UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 28, 1983

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128413.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128413.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128413-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128413-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128413-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128413-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128413-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128413-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128413-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128413.ris

Full Text

Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 32
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 28,1983
228-2301
Surviving cultural genocide
North American Indians
resist assimilation
into white society
By BRIAN JONES
The whites were always trying
to make the Indians give up their
life and live like white men — go
to farming, work hard and do as
they did — and the Indians did
not know how to do that, and
did not want to anyway...If
the Indians had tried to make the
whites live like them, the whites
would have resisted, and it was
the same way with many Indians.
Wamditanka (Big Eagle)
of the Santee Sioux
Since Wamditanka spoke
those words more than 100 years
ago white people have almost
destroyed native Indian culture.
Indians have been stripped of
their religion, customs and way
of life as ethnocentrism and
greed for land continue the white
war against the Indians.
But like Wamditanka, many
Indian people are still resisting
the erosion of their culture. John
Trudell, also a Santee Sioux, has
been active in defending indigenous peoples' rights for
many years. He was national
chair of the American Indian
Movement from 1973 to 1979.
Whites believe the war against
Indians ended in the last century, says Trudell. "But in reality
the war has been going on every
day. It went from cavalary to
government program manipulation to alcoholism to racist
education."
Trudell is a very intense person, and does not hesitate to talk
about the problems every Indian
generation since Wamditanka
has had to face.
"The whole racial, political
and economic system (of white
society) debases and degrades
us," says Trudell. Governments
want to control Indians and do
not care about Indian rights or
uniqueness, he says.
"Government policy is to
destroy us as a people. They give
it respectable terminology, call
us citizens, but when we look at
the citizens, what rights do the
citizens have? When you get
right down to real things citizens
don't have very many rights."
Most Indian people still do
not trust white society, or feel
comfortable in it, says Trudell.
"The vast majority tolerate it,
because you have to." But this
tacit acceptance is a result of
white society's coercion and
violence, Trudell says.
"All the nonviolent white
people in this society will allow
their police forces to do violent
things, as long as it is given
respectable terminology and
called law and order."
Social pressures to conform
TRUDELL...defending indigenous peoples' rights.
are also put on Indians. "If we
don't run out and embrace the
things that the whites put there
(economic and political systems),
and thank them for coming to
save us, then we are ostracised,"
says Trudell.
The desire to civilize Indians
implies they are inferior and
should strive to be like whites,
Trudell says.
This attitude of whites toward
Indians is several hundred years
old, and has become so entrenched that it is equateable to
genocide, he says. "A genocidal
policy attempts to destroy your
culture, attempts to destroy your
history, attempts to destroy your
story as a people."
White society is dominated by
men who want to control both
money and people, and in their
greed they are destroying the
earth's environment, says
Trudell. In this atmosphere Indian culture manages to survive,
while whites still talk of "civilizing the Indian," he says.
Indians value their traditional
ceremonies and way of life, and
their religion is essential to their
culture, he says. This creates
conflict with the dominant white
society.
"We have a spiritual way of
viewing the world, so society
doesn't really recognize our connection to religion or life," says
Trudell.
"If everything doesn't fit into
the Christianized concept of
God, if the society that we come
from isn't based upon a capitalist
or communist structure, people
don't give it any validity, people
don't recognize it as being a
rightful way to live for the people that have that way."
The failure of white society to
understand the importance of
the natural environment to Indian culture has weakened that
way of life, says Trudell. The Indian people have no need for
white ways, and the imposition
of white culture imposes values
that are alien to their traditional
experience.
"The natural world has a right
to live. It provides us with our
life," says Trudell. "It isn't
government or economics. The
Canadian government, the
American government, capitalism, communism — they do not
provide us with the means for
our life. They seize control of
the resorces and their distribution. So our loyalties should be
to the earth and not to any man-
made political system that does
not recognize us as beings."
The experience of indigenous
people in modern white society is
testament to Trudell's words.
"All it (industry) does is take. It
takes from the earth. It takes our
lives away from us. It takes the
fruits of our labor away from us.
It takes our respect," he says.
"They don't know how to live
with the earth. They only live on
it, not with it."
Indians resist assimilation
because it invariably means conforming to white ways on white
terms. Indians themselves have
little say in this process.
"White society says to us that
we should assimilate, and we say
no, maybe we shouldn't
assimilate. Let's define assimilation. Before I'm going to agree
to it I want to know what it
means. So far what I've seen is
not good for us as people," says
Trudell.
Indigenous peoples' rejection
of assimilation is not a call for
isolation, it is a wish for the
freedom to choose their own
lifestyles. It is a rejection of
assimilation as defined by whites.
"Assimilation is cultures living together without
discriminating' against each
other and exploiting each
other," says Trudell. "Then
people would just naturally do
what they want to do in a more
respectful way.
"That means to me that the
indigenous nations should be left
alone — the laws, treaties and
agreements that were made
should be honored,"he says.
"And the assimilation will go its
own natural way. Maybe some
people will move into each
other's society. Maybe some
people will remain apart. But
what is wrong with that?"
But the necessary toleration is
lacking, and the resulting racism
drains Indian peoples' energy
and spirit, Trudell says.
These impositions of white society reach Indains on reservations as well as those in cities.
Corporations are encroaching
on the remaining Indian lands
and exploiting them for their
natural resources. There is high
unemployment, and many Indians end up destitute in cities
because there is no where else to
go, says Trudell.
"Life is hard on the reserves
— there is alcoholism, drug
abuse, political racism,
economic racism, police racism
and legal racism," he says.
"There are boarding schools,
there are people snatching your
kids away from you, there are
crimes committed against you
and no justice for it. That is life
on the reserves, and that has
been life on the reserves all the
time since they made the reserves
and put us there.
"And yet white people say
that Indians are lazy, worthless
and don't have any initiative.
They're not dealing with reality.
Corporations are coming in and
stealing our economic base."
Since they first came to North
! America, the whites' hunger for
land has devastated Indian
livelihood as well as culture. But
native culture is strong and will
outlive the corrupt white society,
says Trudell.
"What white society has, isn't
really power," he says. "The
reality is that they are very exploitative, greedy and violent,
but that is not power. Power has
an ability to heal. Exploitation,
greed and violence never heal.
Never have, never will. Power is
natural. Power is something all
of us carry inside of us. Power is
not necessarily a gun. Or all the
money in the world. That is
violence and greed."
Trudell recognizes that white
society will continue to harm Indian culture, although whites
will never eradicate it. Their way
of life will survive, he says, but
the hardship will go on.
"Our losses aren't finished
yet. Our suffering isn't done.
There is more to come." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 28,1983
Aerosmith performance lacklustre'
By JACK TIELEMAN
Billed as the show to keep rock
alive and well in '83, Aerosmith may
have put rock on its death bed. The
band appeared in Vancouver for the
first time in four years, this time
with new lead and rhythm
guitarists. But the wait wasn't
worth it for ten thousand people
who attended the Friday concert.
The show began with lead singer
Steven Tyler screaming his way into
Back in the Saddle. The show went
downhill from there. Obvious mix-
ups in songs, off-key guitars and a
poor sound system contributed to
the poor performance.
Guitars dominated the show as
Tyler pranced around with
streamers in his jump suit, and the
drummer pelted the audience with
drum sticks.
The highlight of the concert was
Joey Kramers' drum solo during
which he attacked the drums like an
animal.
One drum was broken by the
third song but Kramer continued to
pummel the rest of the drums. After
a relentless beating, he threw his
sticks into the crowd and continued
the assault with his bare hands and
his head.
One fan was hauled off stage by
four guards and received several
well placed kicks from one of the
guitarists.
It is hard to understand how a
band with the reputation of
Aerosmith was content to put on
such a lacklustre and short performance. The band's new members,
lead guitarist Jimmy Crespo and
rhythm guitarist Rick Bufaye, may
have contributed to the poor show.
The opening act was The Pat
Travers Band, who were definitely
better than Aerosmith, but still
nothing special. Travers proved a
guitar master beyond a doubt,
powering his way through his
abilities on I'd Rather See You
Dead and Boom Boom Out Go The
Lights. Travers played for almost as
long as Aerosmith, but with a
crisper and clearer sound.
WESTERN
MBA
School of Business Administration
Tne University of Western Ontario
London, Ontario, Canada N6A 3K7
Professor E.F. Peter Newson,
Chairman, MBA Program,
will Host a Discussion
of the Western MBA Program
DATE: February 3, 1983
TIME: 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.
PLACE: Baysnore Hotel
ROOM NUMBER: Please check at the front desk
ADDRESS: 1601 West Georgia St., Vancouver, B.C.
Anyone Interested in Discussing
The Western MBA Program is
Invited to Attend.
Notice of A.M.S. Executive Election
Evening Polls: Tues, Jan. 25 4:30-7:30 p.m.
Totem Park — Common Block
Place Vanier — Common Block
Walter H. Gage — Common Block
Dav Polls:
Wed., Jan. 26 to Fri., Jan. 2810:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
S.U.B. Hebb Theatre
Law Computer Science
C.E.M.E. Sedgewick Library
Scarfe Woodward Library
Angus War Memorial Gym
Buchanan Home Economics
MacMillan
Poll locations and times are subject to the availability of poll clerks
Ballot:
A.M.S. PRESIDENT
Hetman, Mitchell
Low, Douglas R.
A.M.S. VICE-PRESIDENT
Comesotti, Renee
Oliver, Rick
A.M.S. DIRECTOR OF
ADMINISTRATION
A.M.S. COORDINATOR OF
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Pelling, Greg                               Armstrong, Bruce
Pinkney, Allan                                  Hebert, Lisa
A.M.S.    DIRECTOR    OF
FINANCE
Hollis, James
STUDENTS REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S. CARDS TO VOTE
An Invitation
To Submit Nominations For The
$75,000 Ernest C. Manning
Awards
The Ernest C. Manning Awards Foundation is seeking nominations
for its $75,000 1983 Award.
The Foundation is a national, privately funded non-profit organization, formed to
encourage, nurture and reward innovation by Canadian people.
A Selection Committee will choose a person who has shown outstanding talent in
conceiving and developing a new concept, process or product of potential widespread
benefit to Canada. Of special interest are nominations from the fields of biological
sciences (life); the physical sciences and engineering; the social sciences;
business,- labour; law; and government and public policy.
The deadline for nominations for the 1983 Award is March 31, 1983.
For further information, or to acquire a Nomination Form, please write to:
Mr. George E. Dunlap, Executive Director,
Ernest C. Manning Awards Foundation,
#2300, 639 - Fifth Avenue S.W., Calgary, Alberta T2P 0M9 Friday, January 28,1963
THE    U BYS S EY
Page 3
Gandhi 'frustrating' look at martyr
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Richard Attenborough's Gandhi
is a frustrating screen epic, and no
more than a restrained visual
realization of a History 12 student's
conception of world events. The
film is reverent and respectful
towards the central figure, and it
has many emotional moments. But
as competent as Attenborough is,
he doesn't have a distinctive style.
Gandhi looks like a film which was
made collectively, with bits and
pieces linked together in
chronological order.
Gandhi
Starring Ben Kingsley
Directed by Richard Attenborough
Opening today at the Vogue
In its scope and length, Gandhi is
reminiscent of David Lean's and
Fred Zinneman's films — without
the grandeur. Beginning at the
turn of the century in South Africa
and ending just after Gandhi's
assassination in 1948, Attenborough's film spans over 50 years
in its three hour and 20 minute running time. The roots of Gandhi's
philosophical development lie in
England and South Africa,
although the film completely
neglects his days in London with the
Vegetarian society.
Travelling in a first-class compartment reserved for whites, a
young lawyer named Mohandas K.
Gandhi (Ben Kingsley) is thrown
off the train. Sitting on a deserted,
sandy platform, he observes an
Asian family turning away from
him. Later, when he arrives at
mines where Indian and other immigrants are working, Gandhi
defies the authorities by encouraging the burning of identification
passes and advocating protests and
strikes; his knowledge of the law
becomes an important tool against
the system.
The mine owner who tells Gandhi
"I warned you," gets a curt reply
from the lawyer whose idealism
cannot be shattered: "We warned
each other." It is an impressive moment — one which could have
characterized the tone of the film,
tion of oblique references to the two
world wars, Attenborough has trapped the world of Gandhi in an
enclosed capsule.
Everything in Gandhi is laid out,
easy to digest; it must seem like a
great film to those who like their
narratives pre-processed. Gandhi
embodies some of the worst aspects
of period pieces like Chariots of
Fire; it has an unfuriating snugness
about the past. There is seldom a
moment in which the British
generals and viscounts are real
characters; and neither are the Indian leaders like Nehru, and Jinan,
who splits India with his demands
for a separate Moslem state,
Pakistan.
In his account of Gandhi's film
history over 20 years, In Search of
Gandhi, Attenborough says that independent India's first prime
minister Nehru, told him:
"Whatever you do, don't deify
Gandhi. Don't make him
sacrosanct and place him on a
pedestal." Depsite his best intentions, the film Gandhi has done just
that.
Gandhi embodies what is already
known about this figure; it captures
what high school students learn
about Gandhi in their history
classes. But after more that three
hours of a sometimes ponderous
narrative and beautiful
cinematography, we still don't have
any real insight into the man who
impressed Einstein and disgusted
Churchill.
Large chunks of Gandhi's life are
left out of the narrative, the most
significant of these being Gandhi's
relationship with his wife and family. The film doesn't even mention
that one of Gandhi's sons, Harilal,
left his father and converted to the
Moslem faith.
There is an ironic undercurrent
built in Gandhi's life story that Attenborough avoids — Gandhi's
disillusionment. Although India
achieved independence — as did
Pakistan, resulting in a divided subcontinent — Gandhi's principle of
non-violence as a way of life were
not realized in his own country.
KINGSLEY, BERGEN . .
but doesn't. Gandhi returns to India at the start of World War I,
after he wins a temporary victory
for the "coloreds" in South Africa.
Attenborough's film isn't about
the conflict between ideas and practicalities, or even about India's
quest for independence. It is about
a now-martyred figure's role in the
struggle for independence. But Attenborough, who has some inkling
of Gandhi's historical implications,
never offers a world perspective on
Indian  affairs.   With the  excep-
. discovering  Life's joys
When fighting breaks out between
Hindus and Moslems immediately
after independence, words of comfort about student peace marches
mean little. "It will not be
enough," he says.
Later, when Life magazine
photographer Margaret Bourke-
White (Candice Bergen) asks
Mirabehn, the English admiral's
daughter who has come to India,
about the reason for Gandhi's
sadness, she says: "He offered the
world a way out of madness. He
doesn't see it. Neither does the
KINGSLEY
the price of protest in South Africa
world." And earlier, when an Indian leader advocates revenge, Gandhi says, "An eye for an eye did
nothing but make the world blind."
There is an implication to Gandhi's food fasts to bring his nation
to peace that Attenborough does
not address. In effect, Gandhi holds
his   nation   hostage   —   and   in
Kingsley's eyes, you can see he
realizes that the measure is
manipulative but perhaps
necessary; it is a desperate measure.
Kingsley doesn't depart from Attenborough's restrained approach
— but his facial gestures seem to
capture and communicate truths
about which Attenborough has only
vague ideas. There is a great power
in Kingsley's eyes. His whole performance is concentrated in the upper part of his face. Kingsley
escapes from Gandhi relatively unmarked, but other actors are less
lucky. Some of the performances
suffer because Attenborough gives
them silly reaction shots. (No actor
needs the burden of being treated
like a marionette.)
Fowles explores creations rebellion
By MARK ATTISHA
Imagine that you could shape
plasticine into your perfect creation
and make it come alive. What
would you do? What if it refused to
cooperate?' -
Mantissa
By John Fowles
Collins
196 pages, $16.95
Mantissa, John Fowles' latest
novel, explores this possibility.
Fowles depicts with somewhat confusing yet amusing surrealism,
an author's escapades in a novel
that back-fires.
The author, Miles Green, is an
amnesiac under the medical attention of a female neurologist. She insists on a new therapy for amnesia
which requires sex with the woman
on top. He self-righteously resists
this perverted ruse.
Freudian symbols abound, and
just when Miles thinks he can
become dominant the plot
disintegrates. Appalled with the
chauvinistic storyline, his heroine
attacks his work.
A craftfully layered diatribe ensues in which Miles' defiant creation confronts him.
But is she really his creation? She
claims she is the female archetype,
the woman created by male poets,
writers and other artists. She
represents all women, eternally
misunderstood by men.
Miles Green is no exception. In
Mantissa, one of the nine Greek
muses, he is her son Thamyris.
(More Freudian symbols.)
Erato converts to misandry, rejecting the mythology men have
constructed for her. She is determined to knock Miles into shape.
But she is his character in his story,
after all.
Miles is at first unaffected; his
motives remain overtly sexual and
male-dominant. The rest of Man
tissa is a battle of wits and guile.
Although Miles is the writer, Erato
is often directing. It is not clear
whether Miles or Erato wins in the
end.
Mantissa examines man-made
feminine archetypes in relation to
modern reality. Erato says sarcastically, "I'm supposed to be a
twentieth-centry woman, Miles. By
definition I'm in despair."
The novel is also an amusing look
at storytelling. It examines the
situation authors find themselves in
when plot and character don't
blend, and points out an author's
tendancy to become obsessed with
their own creation.
While the results may not please
all, one cannot help but be inspired
by this bold enterprise.
Looking for Mr. Chanbar
By LISA MORRY
As reflected in the opening rendition of Rock Around the Clock
with Chinese lyrics, Chan is missing
a colorful whodunnit about the
cultural fabric of Chinese life in
America. However, a look out for
the political comment under the
neat detective story.
Chan is missing was shot in San
Francisco's Chinatown district with
an entirely Asian-American cast, an
excellent script, and a verv low
($22,000) budget.
Chan is Missing
Directed by Wayne Wang
Opening today at the Ridge
Although it is in black and white,
the film more than makes up for its
low budget by taking advantage of
the considerable talents of Wayne
Wang who co-wrote, produced,
directed Chan, and the realistic acting — especially that of Wood
Moy as Joe.
Joe and his nephew Steve are
searching for Chan, a partner in
their taxi cab business who apparently disappeared after a
mysterious car accident. The pair
meets various characters who each
have their own view of the local
politics and Mr. Chan's
whereabouts.
Chan's wife and daughter seem
relatively unconcerned about him.
Chan's sponsor Mr. Lee, is not surprised about his disappearance.
Others view Chan as a genius for his
role in developing a Chinese word-
processor.
The people at the senior citizens'
centre Chan frequents describe him
as a jolly old man — nicknamed Hi
Ho for the cookies he always carries
in his pocket. The cook at Chan's
favorite restaurant sports a Sumauri
night fever T-shirt, exclaims "Won
Ton soup? Not Now," and sings
Fry Me to the Moon as he stir fries.
A very vivid movie, Chan is Missing has offbeat characters, and
clues as twisted and misleading as
any Agatha Christie invented. Missing pictures, appearing money,
newspaper clipping, a gun under the
seat of Chan's taxi, a mysterious
other woman, and a myriad of
other things make up this ingenious
film.
Though the movie tends to drag a
bit, it is a humorous, revealing view
of the cultural politics in Chinese —
American life.
Chan becomes everyman. At the
end of the film, Joe holds up a picture of himself and Chan, but Chan
is in the shadows and he cannot be
seen clearly. Joe does not remember
who Chan is, or what he looks like.
Chan is lost without an identity. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 28,1983
i'/W *
Vancouver
UBG Gantpas
Pizza
yvmei
Steak & Pizza -  Lasagna
Spare Ribs       Ravioli
Chicken  - Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Hours Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m. - 2:00 a.m.
Fri   11:30 a.m. - 3:00 a.m.
Sal. 4:00 p.m. - 3:00 am
Sun. 4:00 p.m. -  1:00 a.m.
2136 Western Parkway
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon Fri. 11:30-9:00 p.m
^^^  CLOSED SATURDAYS     ,
aVMi   Sundays and Holidays     A
.^cw^       4:00 pm. 9:00 p.m.
2142 Western Parkway
'; UBC Village *
Vancouver's #1
New Wave Club
1275 Seymour St.
•
'CABARET J
AT THE CENTURY        •
PLAZA TRAVELODGE      *
1015 Burrard St., Van. Phona 687-0575      T
JAN. 28
FEB. 5
WEKbIA] iDragonfly
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-l a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fast delivery!
228-9513
4610 West 10th Ave.
LADIES FREE
Mon.-Thurs. Open Nitely
8 p.m.-2 a.m.
Burrard & Comox
687-0575
HilZM
for a task of the
LMMleBast
1190 Robson St.
688-1725
"Licensed"
HOLY COW
WHAT A DEAL!
prime
RIB
z
at
o/Sllinis
SOUP 8c BREAD
PRIME RIB U
,  A     RICE 8t VEGETABLE   'jtsu^,
^        $4.95
(at the back ot the Village)    \\
("/R
W
/—
VM
^ <M
LUNCH
SPECIALS
GYROS
Spicy ground beef in pita bread,
with tomatoes, tsansiki . . $2.75
PASTA
Dishes complete with soup or salad
$3.95
OUR BANQUET ROOM for up to 70 people:
Anniversaries—Receptions—Birthdays. Phone us today.
: FOR LUNCH AND DINNER. Romios offers fine Green Cuisine and a
touch of the Mediterranean, in the heart of Kitsilano.
2272 W. 4th AVE. 736-2118
after Classes ...
Jan. 31-Feb.5TONY & THE
SPIDER      VANTONES
"Depression new low prices in effect now."
Op.i Moi. - Sat. 7 p.m. - 2 a.m.
932 Granville Mall      687-6418
Jan. 31-Feb. 5
H. B. CONCEPT &
Monday
BO DERRICK WET 10
VANCOUVER 86
Fri. & Sat.
SCKOL BOZ^a*
Tuesday
CFUN SHOWCASE
LOCAL BANDS
t          ^_                      Wednesday
mm\Wt^^M
&^^      THE GONG SHOW
JBmi
f                     LADIES NIGHT
'                      3 Male Dancers
7 to 10 p.m.
Two Clubs In One!
315 E BROADWAY
(FREE Parking at Kingsgatel      879-4651
687-5566 684-2944
1136 W.Georgia St.
Is Rock and Roll
JAN. 31-
FEB. 5
ATTACK
Open 8:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.
Mon.-Sat.
Nightly from 8 p.m.-10 p.m.
M.T.V.   live   from   N.Y.   on
Canada's largest 25 ft. Screen
Presentation House Theatre
333 Chesterfield, North Vancouver
The
WOOLGATHERER
by William Mastrosimone
with
| Terry David Mulligan & Jill Daum|
"A wish is just a detour..."
Tuesday • Thursday: 8:30 pm
Friday & Saturday: 7 & 9:30 pm
Sunday 2 fori: 3:00 pm
Tickets: $5.50, $6.50
For reservations call: 986-1351
The ultimate in sight and sound.
Now, re-recorded in new digital sterea
FMPSIA
NOW PLAYING AT THE STANLEY THEATRE
Check your local listings for details.	 Friday, January 28,1983
THE    U BYS S EY
Page 5
SPORTS
Strong Bears may maul 'Birds
By HARRY HERTSCHEG
This weekend UBC Thunderbirds
men's hockey team hosts the most
improved team in the tough and
highly competitive Canada West
Conference — Alberta Golden
Bears.
Alberta is coming off a weekend
split with Saskatchewan Huskies.
The Golden Bears' 4-2 victory on
Friday gave coach Clare Drake his
500th collegiate career coaching victory — the first Canadian coach to
do so. The Huskies won Saturday's
game 6-3.
At UBC last weekend, a spirited
Jim Allison scored three goals, including the winner with less than
five minutes remaining, to spark the
'Birds to an entertaining 4-3 victory
Friday over Calgary Dinosaurs.
Darcy Alexander added UBC's
other goal.
On Saturday, Grant Harris and
Drew Hunt scored for the 'Birds in
a 6-2 loss.
This weekend should prove to be
an even tougher match-up. "Alberta has good, fast skaters," coach
Jack Moores said. "They don't
mind the hard hitting. They can
dish it out as well as receive it.
"It's going to be very difficult for
us to beat them unless we keep the
goals-against down. We've got to
get some good, solid goaltending."
Netminder Ian McEachern will probably get the nod tonight, while
Moores is considering playing third-
stringer Pierre Grenier in Saturday
night's game.
Another key factor will be
penalities. "I try to tell the guys not
to take penalties," Moores said.
"Some of them are very selfish
penalties. I'm a little upset about
those. Alberta has an amazingly
strong team and part of that is their
power play. We have to stay out of
that penalty box. It's as simple as
that." Defensemen Rick Amann
and Darcy Alexander were the two
EUS Presents
LAST CHANCE DANCE
Featuring '83 BAND
FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 8 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
Tickets $3 at AMS Box Office
All proceeds donated to Variety Club Telethon
"A SNAPPX
STYLISH
THRILLER.''
- Kathleen Carroll, New York Daily News
'STING IS
stunning:'
udtth Crist, WOR-TV
'SUBTLE,
colorful
and riveting:'
Brimstone
-Rex Reed, New york Post
EVENINGS-7:30, 9:30
No Matinees
DENMAN PLACE
Copyrights 1982 United Artists Corporaiion   Ail rignts 'eservad \
United Artists Classics I
Presented in Dolby Stereo 11
Warning—Occasional nudity^^^^^^
& sex. B.C. Director. /  WUI'fjljy j
*»»»*»»»»»»
»*»***»*
mmi
DZZZZZE
PARAMOUNT PICTURES
FAMOUS PLAYERS
and THE UBYSSEY
present a
Fantasia
giveaway
•  FREE DOUBLE PASSES <
•  FREE 3-RECORD ALBUMS
•  FREE POSTERS •
To be eligible to win a choice of these items, you must answer the
following question:
• When was Fantasia made, and which other Walt Disney
film was released the same year?
The answers appear elsewhere in this issue, and are not unduly §
hidden. Find them, circle them, and bring the circled answers to
Room 241K. Contest items available only till they last.
Ubyssey staff members. Alma Mater Society employees, student
council and SAC members and employees of College Printers are in-
elligible.
***»•»**»*»»».»».»»,.,.
main culprits last weekend. "In
order for Amann and Alexander
to play well, they have to be
physical and emotional," Moores
said. "That's just their type."
Both Friday and Saturday nights'
games start at 8 o'clock at the
Thunderbird Arena. Tonight's
game will be broadcast live on
CITR-UBC Radio (FM 101.9, cable
100.1).
CANADA WEST CONFERENCE
Taam                                    W     I     F A P
Albarta OoMan Baara              10     4   N 40 20
Saakatchawan Huaklaa          10     4   M SO 20
Calgary Dlnoaaura                   t     t   40 67 10
UBCThundarMrda                    3   11   47 78 6
CORKY'S
Now
Open Mondays
Come in and meet Joanne
HAIRCUT 9900
Spray wet & blow dry
STYLE *12.00
BEARD TRIM  *3.00
SENIORS «00
2106 West 16th
at Arbutus
FREE STYLE
For the price of Our
$9.00 HAIRCUT
Incl. wash, conditioning, cut and blow dry
Till Feb. 28, 1983
For appointment call
734-2343
*vliW'
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
DUTHIFS
ANNUAL
BOOK SALE
January 31st
to
February 5th
20% OFF ALL
BOOKS AT ALL
OUR STORES
ROBSON ST.
PAPERBACKS
10TH AVE.
ARBUTUS
684-4496
681-8713
224-7012
738-1833
VIDEO    CENTRE
2809 W. 16th Avenue, Vancouver
corner of MacDonald & W. 16th
14851 - 108th Ave., Surrey, B.C. Tel.: 585-7200
20285 - 56th Ave., Langley, B.C. Tel.: 530-2700
107 - 32988 S. Fraser Way, Abbotsford, B.C. Tel.: 853-4533
15148 North Bluff Road, White Rock, B.C. Tel.: 536-4777
562G Clarke Road. Coquitlam, B.C. Tel.: 939-4511
MOVIES
WEEKDAY SPECIAL: Monday - Thursday
2 MOVIES FOR 1 ($5.00)
WEEKEND SPECIAL: Rent Movies on Saturday,
Sunday FREE
NEW MOVIES EVERY WEEK
Movies Inside Marked * Any 2 for $5.00
MACHINES
MONDAY - THURSDAY
$5.00 PER DAY
FRIDAY, SATURDAY, SUNDAY
$8.00 PER DAY
We also accept Reservations
A MOVIE CLUB YOU'LL LOVE TO JOIN
NO DEPOSIT
STORE HOURS: 10:30 - 9:30 Monday to Friday
10:30 - 8:00 Saturday, 12 noon - 6 p.m. Sunday
RENTAL RETURN TIMES: Mon. - Fri. 7 p.m.; Sat. 4:30 p.m.
734-6822
For The Very Best In Entertainment
»********»»*»» Page 6
THE   U BYSSEY
Friday, January 28,1983
"/ told you not to order the rack of lamb.
'•af%  TF»'C2*'
',J\n»"",iay,iiii»iiyiiii)ii t.
'Get porn out of bookstore'
An open letter to John
Hedgecock, UBC Bookstore
manager:
We are opposed to the sale of
pornography (Penthouse, Playboy)
in the UBC Bookstore, and are
writing to encourage you to remove
it from your shelves permanently.
The sale of this material at regular
stores (pharmacies, corner
groceries, and bookstores) legit-
mizes the attitudes and beliefs promoted by these magazines.
These attitudes are: 1) that
women are objects whose sole function in life is to gratify men sexually; 2) that to be sexually aroused,
women must be dominated by men,
and 3) that women enjoy being the
victims of sexual violence and
abuse. Any Penthouse reader can
attest to the accuracy of these
statements.
The Bookstore, in particular,
should not be selling this material.
You do not, to our knowledge, sell
material which depicts the abuse
and humiliation of East Indians,
Chinese, or Jews, although this
material is available for distribution. The same judgement and
responsibility should be exercised in
ordering material which depicts the
dehumanization of women.
You have the privilege of a
monopoly. We feel that you have a
responsibility to use better judgement in choosing material. We want
pornography out of the Bookstore.
AMS women's committee
'Story, edit incorrect,
and Fred literate' - gear
Your editorial of Jan. 21 (End of
Joke), which pertained to the Psi
Upsilon fraternity, was not only
factually incorrect (the story on the
last page of the issue bears this out),
but also made references to an
organization called the Klu Klux
Klan. In fact, it's Ku, not Klu, as
the name originates from the Greek
word for circle, kyklos.
Also, in a story about the congress of Canadian engineering
students in Vancouver which appeared in the issue of Jan. 7 (a story
in which I was rather selectively
quoted), the reporter noted that
some of the delegates might wish to
pick up "momentos" from UBC. I
didn't see any momentos missing,
although some "mementos" may
have disappeared.
Why does an Engineer have to
correct your English? I am reminded of your Christmas editorial, in
which you, in your benevolence,
wished that "literacy" would come
to FRED. Would I be out of line in
trotting out the old cliche that
charity begins at home?
Rob Swiniarski
metallurgy 4
Idiot box
The most excitement on standard TV is the short two minute
programs interspersed with the shows listed in the Leisure section
of Friday's Sun.
They're like drugs — highly entertaining with little personal effort.
Fine. No thinking required here. Just listen to the music and the
convincing voices.
Like the Easy-off Mildew Eater ad. Foam turns into giant Pacmen
(Pacthings) that run around bathroom tiles eating mildew.
This may seem unbelievable but there are houses in Acadia
Camp at UBC with so much mildew that one squirt of Easy-off
would cause the entire house to vanish.
Like the B.C. government adverts featured during the evening
news.
The B.C. economy has never looked better with the B.C. Place
Stadium nearing completion in Vancouver's glorious sunshine.
You know the ads. Weather announcer Fred Latremouille interviews B.C. politicians who do a fair job at not appearing to be
reading from cue cards. Spontaneity. Effective. Convincing.
Except Premier Bennett. He comes off looking like he's stoned
on mushrooms or fine B.C. home grown.
When-the-economy-improves-we-will-all-get,-jobs.  Get-your-
education-now.
That's still the B.C. spirit — still propaganda.
Don't think. It all makes sense that way.
Don't think. "Drift gently into mental illness."
The English Beat, a musical group, is responsible for the last
quote. You won't see them on TV.
THE UBYSSEY
January 28, 1983
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k,
Editorial phone 228-2301/06. Advertising 228-3977/78.
Chris Wong threw back his leonine head, curled his lips and exposed his greying dentures. It
is a far far nobblier thing I do now than I have ever did before' be bellowed. Alone in the
fourth row of the empty stalls Shaffin Sheriff buried his head in his hands and wept gently.
The assistant director, Muriel Driasssma was made of sterner stuff. "We must try and act a
bit, Chris darling 'she purred' that's what actors do." Meanwhile Craig Brookks, Peter Berlin
and Neil Lucente came high kicking onto the stage in unison. As one they turned and beamed
in the direction of Brian Jones at the lighting desk. They would make the very prettiest chorus
line in town. It has been a brilliant idea on the part of Monte Stewart and Sarah Cox in wardrobe to have them naked. Harry Hertscheg and the mysterious Stephen, meanwhile, were
practising their fight scene. Already poor Harry had had both legs cut off by his opponent's
flashing blade. 'So much for my walk on part' he quipped. 'It'll be alright on the night'
Stephen replied.
In the corner Lisa Morry and Patti Flather were coming to terms with the Bard's imortal lines.
That Arnold Hedstrom was some playwright. 'Once more unto the beach dear friends' said
Patti. To be or to be' replied Lisa. 'Out out, to the White Spot.' 'Alas poor Yorick, I knew his
Horatio' 'What news on the endowment lands' 'A daffodil by any other name would smell
so.' 'Get thee to Vanier Desdemanal and so on and so on.
Come home, Denny, Wolfe misses you
There is a relatively obscure Tom Wolfe
quote that sticks in my mind. It goes
something like this: "Anytime you see a
columnist trying to squeeze material out
of his house, articles, books, or the television set you 've got a starving soul on your
hands . . . you should send him a
basket."
This, then, is my basket, going out to
one of our beloved local columnists.
Dear Denny:
Remember a day not too long ago when
reporters and columnists like yourself
avoided hobnobbing with high society and
couldn't tell a tennis racquet from a frying
pan?
Remember how writers, with sweat
pouring down their bare chests, just
beamed with pride when they dug in with
their pens and hit those strong, deep verbal volleys?
Those were pretty good days, weren't
they?
Those columnists would sit by their
typewriters out back, in the shade, cooling
off. They'd pound back a couple of beers
while copyboys kept bringing out platters
of salami and raw vegetables and hot peppers and Greek olives.
They wryly wrote about the problems
of the little guy and the less fortunate, and
oh, the ink that was given to sad stories of
people going broke paying huge sums of
money to keep rich folks happy. But the
typing was so exhilarating and the early
evenings were so sparkling that the writers
felt good and they felt lucky.
DANNY BOY
There was one other thing. In those
days there were a few times when I almost
regretted being a non-writer. You columnists made writing look good. It was
something about the way you worked the
prose around, to make yourselves the
stars of the writing game and how comfortably proud you all seemed back then,
about the unpretentious way you bustled
around your offices. The bunch of you
seemed admirably ordinary then, writers
to be envied.
What I'm trying to do here may seem
pretty damned silly: me, a nobody writer,
trying to give someone writing advice, and
in a newspaper, to boot. But you've
always been solicitous about decent,
humanistic writing, right? So stay with us.
Take us back, Denny. To that golden
age of column writing. To hell with the
hotels and the yachts in Greece and the
Rolls Corniches and all the good life that
gurgles down the sycophant drain. Think
about the social malcontents who live in
bungalows and drive Vegas and vacation
in Port Alberni. Think about what you
did in that Come Home Eleni column and
judge yourself on that.
Your prose stood there in front of us
and your cried like the buddy of a
lovesick, teenaged boy. You weren't crying about civil injustice or human
malevolence. You were playing out a
ridiculous cupid fantasy. You humiliated
us by abusing a well-respected public platform.
I imagine that a few of your friends
knew you were going to do it, and begged
you not to. These guys say that you, Denny, are one-half genius and one-half little
boy. They wanted to protect the little boy
in you and they must have advised you not
to talk about Nelson's marriage problems
in public, but you insisted on doing it.
It was so astonishingly open and emotionless that a lot of people who read it
were embarrassed.
It's a pretty cynical age we're living in,
Denny. People don't seem to care
anymore about the quiche-eating habits of
arrogant highrollers. At least if they do,
they don't expect their favorite columnists
to be delivering their messages. Not when
they've come to appreciate hard-hitting,
Mike Royko-like columns. But Denny,
you said your piece and stripped your
emotions naked. You made us the only
readers in this tough city's history who
ever got a pathetic column written all over
the bottom of page three.
*
Maybe Greek readers are tougher, but a
lot of Canadian readers suffer harder and
more openly than they ought to when the
wheels fall off their literary lives.
I have no idea what caused the latest
problem between you and your ability to
write an effective column, but no question, it is substantial and maybe it hurt
you beyond repair. Only you can decide
that. But, Denny, you are falling apart
and it isn't nice to see.
Some believable readers around town
are convinced that if you can pull yourself
together, rewire the burned-out circuits
between your mind and your emotions,
you could bail yourself out of the depths
of abysmal writing in six months. You
must have colleagues who are eager to
help you. But you can't write five words
in the shape you're in now. You need
help; not from editors or copywriters or
admen. You need us, your readers, and
another chance.
Denny, I hate writing this patronizing
slop and a lot of people are going to hate
reading it. But I hope you read it.
Forget the tennis, I'd really like to see
some decent writing again, soon.
Don Privett
unclassified Friday, January 28,1983
THE    U BYSSEY
Page 7
Frat answers pit charges
around qutcMy. to the length of ate man-
(Mi   It   W£S   4MMfMfMMr*    HOtfOfS)*   wSaf
LOST
Gold Ladies Watch
Great Sentimental Value
Near Anth./Soc. Bldg. Jan. 20
REWARD
Bertha 321-0589
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515
Although loathe to fan the flames
of controversy, we feel we must
answer the serious allegations
printed in this tabloid.
We first take issue with the
headline, 'Shameless' Pledges
Shock appears to be a quotation of
one of the people interviewed. Both
those interviewed in their official
capacities in the fraternity offered
sincere apologies, a fact which was
only mentioned in passing in the article.
Further flaws in the article include misattribution of quotes and
outright fabrication where the
reporter's notes were obviously
lacking. We feel it is unfair that we
Mooners
off-cue
On Wednesday, our Math 101
class was interrupted by a very
strange group of people wearing
royal blue. They gave us a song,
then, horror of horrors, they
mooned us. Rumor has it that they
came from a building far, far away
(not far enough), which they shared
with equally strange people.
Now, I do not know what we did
to offend these people, or maybe
they were being friendly. However,
I will give them a passing grade.
They had some dropping their pants
on cue, some were a bit more eager
than other, and one woman did not
drop them at all.
Jim Davies
science 1
Truthful
falsities
As director of truth for the Ochre
Blorg Free Indigenous People's
Collective Vanguard Liberation
Democratic Army, I must protest
your uncalled for insinuations
regarding the recently terminated
elections.
Your blatant attempt at insidious
election rigging will not be forgotten. Right now elite elements of the
Blorg Liberation United Strike
Team Emergency Regiment are
preparing to release our dread
Folicular Defoliant in your news
room. Retract or suffer.
Bed McNib
be judged by the public on the basic
of such a poorly written article.
As for the editorial, it is a clear
attempt to make the fraternity guilty by association: the Ku Klux Klan,
necrophiliacs, chainsaw murderers
and rapists. It is a well honoured
doctrine in criminal law that
without a guilty mind there can be
no culpability for the act. We
categorically deny any racist or sexist intent behind the act. The act
was not planned nor condoned by
the fraternity as it happened, but
was a spontaneous gesture arising
out of intoxication and an overripe
imagination. We certainly deny that
; abuse or domination of any human
being, symbolic or otherwise, forms
any part of fraternity life.
We applaud Alma Mater Society
president Dave Frank's decision to
let this incident die a natural death.
There is no point in conducting a
witchhunt. As to the grass roots
movement to convince the AMS to
take action against us, or alternatively against the individuals involved, the ombudsperson correctly
points out that Psi Upsilon is independent of the AMS and there is
no possibility of the individuals being identified.
Personally, we believe in the ideal
feminist movement is trying to attain. However, people should be
careful to distinguish between real
danger and unthinking misconduct.
No cause can promote itself by attacking paper tigers.
David Jeffreys
lanBalrd
and the rest of
Psi Upsilon fraternity.
OMOM tHIAIWi
VOGUE
70IVIIVI   SIX-TRAI-K [OCX" 5TPHOI
(mature)
GANDHIl
.•• granuu*     ^n. ,„s... ,2:oo«:oo8:oo: "The movie of the year.
*.«t>Y. Sunday. 4:008:00 -Rex Reed,NEW YORK POST
00 3-54 34
  SBC Tt  TODAYSHOIT    /^^-^~,    . w „.    -i
"MAGNIFICENT!" SOPHIE^
-aaCHQICE
. Meryl Stirep Kevin KlineX
OfJEON
881  GRANVILLE
682-7468
Warning: Soma vary
coaraa language and sug-
gaativa   scene*.    —B.C.
CMATWtO
DUSTIN HOFFMAN JESSICA LANGE TERIGARR <TVw**ci.t»!
WS(mmmmW^m\\ BSaraaTaSaSaSaSl Coronet 2:00 4:30    lUUlMv
CORONET      I      dlJNb
SSI  GRANVIllE
685-6828
7:10 9:40; Warning:   Occasional   very |
DUNBAR at 30th     Dunbar7:30 9:40 coar»a   language.    -B.C.
plm Sat.-Sun.   Director.
2:00
Warning: Some gory violence, swear-
Grad disgusted
fAMXUIttO     ln9 am* coar*6 l*nfluage; occasional
Michael Nesmith presents
CORONET
nudity. —B.C. Director.
At 2:00 4:00 6:00 8:00 10:00
$568G5R6«8Ll1      starringBEUNDABAUER  PETERC0Y0TE   L.Q.JONES   FREDWARD
With reference to the student
members (pledges) of the Psi Upsilon fraternity, and their symbolic
oral and vaginal rape of a black
woman in the Pit, I wish to register
my criticism and feelings of disgust
for their actions.
This comes at a time when I am
being made aware through posters
and media of the Mardis Gras
events being sponsored by fraternities, including Psi Upsilon, and
intentions to contribute donations
to charity (CFMI children's fund).
It is ironic that this very same
group, while supporting a worthy
cause is participating in behaviours
which are violent against women in
general and third world women in
particular.
I suggest that if the scenario was
altered — whereby a group of intoxicated young women arrived on
the Pit scene and proceeded to
dance and assault and mutilate a
naked white (or third world) male
mannequin — not only would they
be stopped by observers, but strong
disciplinary measures would be
taken. It is for this reason, in the
spirit of equal standards for both
men and women, that I suggest the
following. Those responsible:
• should publicly apologize for
their actions through a letter to The
Ubyssey or some similar format;
• should be expelled from this
director of truth   university   until   such   time   as
O.B.F.I.P.C.U.L.D.A.   members of this community are
guaranteed that recurrence of
similar actions will never happen;
and,
• Should be directly accountable
and those members of the Psi Upsilon fraternity and Pit crowd who
condoned the action by their own
inaction, read material readily
available through Vancouver Rape
Relief (at 872-8212) or Vancouver
Men Against Rape (at 437-0767)
about violence against women, men
and sexist violence, and racism.
Carol Nielsen
graduate studies
BEST PICTURE • BEST DIRECTOR
LOS ANGELES FILM CRITICS 7QIVIIVI r^SSSUri
DARk
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
Jl Warning:   Occasionel
J coarse lenguage. —B.C.
Director. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL I
At 7:15 9:30 plus Sat.-Sun. 2:00
Another World, Another Time...
Varsity 7:30 9:30: Broadway 7:00 9:00 (SSSSa^
VARSITY     [bROAdwAV
T*»2
from
3 to4
CAKE & COFFEE " $2.50
(per person)
MUFFIN & COFFEE * $1.25
(per person)
*or tea of course!
Warning
-~ frighten
724-3730 70 7 W. BROADWAY young   child
4375   W. 10th 874-1927 -B.C. Director.
Warning: Some violence.
Iran.    ^^™^^
I   .a^^MMSaaaasaatsftiaaV
|Lfc\    B\   scenes.-B.C. Director.    S^^l^J^V- - 1^,  Ww^^
/"     Starring LEIGH and LYNETTE HARRIS
DROAdwAV
70 7 W. BROADWAY
874-1927
CCtMPUt)
J&Z/?. .v,a
VARSITY1
224-3730
4375  W. 10th
Richard III
SUNDAY ONLY AT 2 P.M.
FOLK NIGHT
UBC GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 8:30 p.m.
Students $3.50 - Public $5.50
Advance Tickets: Grad Centre 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. (228-3203)
 or AMS Tickets Office in SUB
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
GAY f LESBIAN
WEEK 1983
MONDAY, JANUARY 31
Pot Luck Luncheon, 12:30 p.m. Buchanan
Penthouse
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1
Worship Service, 8:30 a.m. Student Union
Building 212
Recital By Gay and Lesbian Music Students,
8:00 p.m.. Recital Hall, Music Building
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 2
Mineral Water Challenge Cup and Boat
Races, 12:30 p.m.. Student Union Building
South Concourse
Symposium: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) presented
by the Gay/Lesbian Health Science Professional Association, 7:00 p.m., Woodward-
IRC4
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3
TRACK TWO — Film on the protest over
the Toronto Bath Raids, 12:30 p.m., 7:00
p.m., 9:00 p.m. Woodward-IRC 2. Admission: $2 AMS cardholders, $3 others. Co-
sponsored by the Gay Rights Union.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4
Public Lecture: Sexual Preference. Dr.
Martin Weinberg, former Senior Research
Sociologist at the Kinsey Institute, co-author
of Homosexualities and Sexual
Preference, 12:30 p.m., Student Union
Building Auditorium.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 5
Pre-Valentine "Great Expectations" Dance,
9:00 p.m., Faculty Club. Admission: $3
AMS cardholders, $4 others. Page 8
THE    U BYS S EY
Friday, January 28,1983
OLD FORT BREWING CO. — producers of Yukon Gold, Iron Horse Malt Liquor
and Pacific Gold bring the best to you each week.
Bowling A Fast Moving Sport!
at the
AMS
GAMES
ROOM £•
Downstairs  <<!
Student
Union
Building
J^M£j
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Any groups or leagues interested in making advanced
bookings, please call the Games Room—228-3692
The A.M.S. Games Room invites you to come and visit
their newly renovated facilities.
This Coupon entitles you or your group to
HALF PRICE BOWLING
From February 1-February 28, 1983
Open: Monday to Saturday — 8:00 a.m.-12:45 a.m.
Sunday: 10:00 a.m.-11:30 p.m.
THE NEW WORLD OF
Fauunnj Cmlar and Praduear
GENE RODDEHBEBBY
AMEMCA S FAVORITE LIVE SCIRNCI FICTION PROGRAM
A nnlntarr Cmkmi w«h Iht (.Bow STAR TUX   Rbspr Rm!    Tht timy> AvwrJ«*M| or«Ml
Rfel for STAR TRER   The Cip   Mrra| (cRkt HwMrr and ■ ipKal Krraiiti of dw NASA film
Sncnmrac    Hot from Ccm RodrjMbmy .tout Ifct futan of STAR TRER Ak Ccw ItMnbmy
jmt ow. q*Hb«M .bout STAR TREK Rmmd n«T mon wrpnici
Pw Mr Al"'
SUN. MARCH 6th   1.30pm & 7.30pm
WAR MEMORIAL GYM.  UBC
ATAfANCE TICKETS. $5 AMS STUDENTS
$6 GENERAL
AJVILABLE AT VTC/CBO OUTLETS, WOOCVwARd!
-EATON'S, COMC SHOP, AMS BOX OFFICE
FOR INFORMATION PLEASE PHONE 687 4444
PRODUCED BY A.M.S.  CONCERTS
BREAK THOSE
ACADEMIC CHAINS
Come to the PIT
Saturdays, Noon to 6
Feb. 6: "VIDEO CHALLENGE"
Asteroids, Donkey Kong Jr., Frogger, Eliminator
Feb. 13: "PINBALL MADNESS"
Black Hole, Sharpshooter, Buck Rogers
Feb. 20: "FOOSBALL FUN TOURNEY"
ALL MACHINES ON FREE PLAY
PRIZES, SURPRISES
FOR HIGH SCORES, LOW SCORES
& MYSTERY SCORES
FOR SINGLES, TEAMS, COUPLES.
SEE YOU THERE'!!
CUR presents
starring
BuDdY s^LfISH       + HERALD N<*
& the  saviors
? & ft      C ^
FRI. FEB. 4 THUNDERBIRD ICE ARENA
sKatetrne:7^30 showtime.800 no minors please
adv. tix $5ams S6gen. (skate rental not included)
available at ams box office
produced by ams concerts
AMS BOX OFFICE &
CONFECTIONARY
NOW OPEN SATURDAYS 11-4
NOW A VTC OUTLET
You can obtain tickets for:
Concerts,   Plays,    Opera,   Sporting
Events,    Symphonies,    Commodore
Events
Jan
27-Feb.5
Jan. 27
Jan. 28
Jan. 29
Jan. 29
. Feb.4
. Feb.4
Feb.18
AMS Clubs
Guys & Dolls	
Club Francais	
First Year Dance	
Farmer's Frolic  	
Newman Club Winter Ball	
Grad Students Folknight	
Crystal Ball	
Casual Wave Experience	
AMS Concerts
Rock-A-Billy Ice Fallies
AMS Special Events:
New World of Star Trek with Gene Roddenberry,
March 6
Other
Lorita Leung Dancers — A Chinese Dance
Spectacular, Feb. 20
Keg Valentine Party
Fe,b. 11
Feburary Bus Passes
Jan. 24-Feb. 7
Cigarettes-$10.59/carton selected brands through
Feb. 15; Black Twizzlers 3/10c while supplies lest. Friday, January 28,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Frozen funding faces thaw
By NEIL LUCENTE
Student groups are beginning to
organize against the provincial
government's anticipated freeze on
university funding.
The freeze will actually mean a
decrease because the current inflation rate for B.C. will not be taken
into consideration, a board of
governors member said Thursday.
Retrenchment will be inevitable if
UBC receives the same level of
funds for next year as it did in
1982-83, said student board of
governors representative Dave
Dale. Retrenchment will seriously
affect student accessibility and certain faculty departments, he added.
"There's a growing sentiment
that one department be solely
eliminated. In the past, the cuts
were easily made while there was
some fat left in other
departments," said Dale.
Dale suggested university administrations prepare arguments to
present to government officials.
The whole education system including community colleges,
elementary and high schools and
the three B.C. universities must
organize a lobby group, he added.
As a last ditch measure, Dale said
universities should improve their
public image.
"The public should be informed
that cuts in university funding are
ultimately unfavorable for the
public. It's cheaper to educate a
person than to support him or her
on welfare," said Dale.
The Canadian Federation of
Students will coordinate action
among student associations from
UBC, University of Victoria, Simon
Fraser University and community
colleges, said Donna Morgan, chair
of CFS pacific region. CFS will present briefs to government officials
which will emphasize the universities' contribution to B.C.'s
economy.
"The current economic policies
will stamp out any long term
growth in B.C. The government
should include education among its
top priorities," said Morgan.
A lobby group from UBC, SFU,
and UVic will be organized within
the next three weeks to discuss the
zero per cent increase, said Dave
Frank, AMS president and newly
elected student board representative. He said he is unsure of the
course of action the lobby group
will adopt.
Meanwhile UBC's administration
and deans are trying to cope with a
$700,000 budget shortfall. They
have only two and a half months to
save the money.
Women's groups
protest pay porn
—arnold hadstrom photo
AGGIE SWINGERS partake in aggie week ritual pentathalon. Participants also drank a beer, swallowed a
goldfish, jumped through tire, and carried bale of hay. Week of unusual behavior ends Saturday with the infamous farmers frolic in the armouries. UBC will now have to wait two weeks to see similar antics when it is
Engineering week. And what about science week starting Monday — need we say more?
OTTAWA (CUP) — A coalition
of women's groups is advocating a
consumer boycott against companies involved in producing softcore pornography for pay-TV and a
withdrawal of First Choice's license
if it carries out plans to show
Playboy features.
The Canadian Coalition Against
Media Pornography was created in
response to First Choice's recent
announcement it would feature
"adult entertainment" bought
from Playboy Enterprises on its
pay-TV services that go on air Feb.
1.
With only five days planning,
more than 1,100 women and men
were organized to rally against First
Choice's plans in 19 Canadian
cities.
The largest demonstration was on
Parliament Hill, where more than
400 people cheered as speakers called for the federal government to
revoke First Choice's license.
Lynn Macdonald, NDP justice
critic, (Broadview-Greenwood),
promised   to   demand   that   the
'Be sfrong and resist' urges accused
By SARAH COX
Five people charged with
sabotage greeted each other with
hugs and smiles in a packed Vancouver courtroom Wednesday.
Outside the small room, court
sheriffs turned away 75 people.
Plainclothes police listened to
conversations in the waiting crowd
and officials thoroughly searched
people entering the provincial courtroom.
The five people arrested on Jan.
20 face IS charges each, including
the bombing of a B.C. Hydro
substation on Vancouver Island and
firebombing three Red Hot Video
pornography outlets in the Lower
Mainland.
Their legs were shackled during
the 12 minute hearing but they waved cheerfully to the crowd.
"Be strong and resist always,"
shouted defendant Ann Hansen in
the courtroom.
Hansen, 29, was arrested along
with Brent Taylor, 26, Gerald Hannah, 26, Douglas Stewart, 25, and
Juliet Belmas, 20.
The hearing was postponed until
Feb. 21 to allow defence lawyers
time to obtain information about
the charges from the Crown.
Judge Brian Bastin also ordered a
ban on publication of evidence.
"We know very little about the
case," said defence lawyer Judy
Gedye. "We're getting our information from the news media."
Defence lawyer Don  Muldoon
said lawyers could only talk to their
defendants through monitored
telephone conversations during the
two days they spent in Vancouver
police cells.
"It was impossible for them to
consult us or to receive visitors," he
said.
The five were taken to Okalla and
Lakeside prisons on Saturday after
lawyers requested they be moved
from police cells where they were
subjected to intense interrogation.
Gedye said Metropolitan Toronto police flew to Vancouver to question the five about the Oct. 14 Litton Systems bombing.
"There was a lot of yelling and
badgering," she said. "They (the
police) were getting pretty heavy."
Muldoon said police are giving
information to news media and attempting to try the arrested in the
press.
"I'm offended by the way police
are handling the case," he said.
"The police have done a great deal
of damage to the rights of these individuals to ensure that they have a
fair trial."
UVic professor investigated
VICTORIA (CUP) — Concurrent with accusations that a University of Victoria professor has been
sexually harassing students, the
UVic administration has finally set
up a committee to examine sexual
grievance procedures.
In early December anonymous
leaflets   distributed   on   campus
warned female students that
economics professor Ezra Mishan
allegedly used his UVic office "to
interview women for the purpose of
using them as models in his home."
The leaflet said the modelling
"may consist of obscene and
degrading poses and may in fact be
of danger to the women involved."
Reagan would be proud
(RNR/CUP) — A Bulgarian exile living in Italy is doing his part to bring
down the Soviet economy.
The man, who calls himself Boris, writes a letter every week to a Soviet
dissident and insures it for $400. Since the Soviets never deliver letters to
dissidents, Italian postal authorities reimburse Boris, then send the bill to
Moscow, which must pay up or be kicked out of the International Postal
Union.
Boris says he makes $20,000 a year writing the letters. If everyone used
his trick, he says, the Soviet economy would collapse.
UVic student Wendy Warren told
the Martlet student newspaper she
went for an interview in Mishan's
office. "Mishan said he liked to
handle his models to a degree and it
would be better if I enjoyed it,"
Warren said. "One of the last
things he said to me before I left
was 'well you brazen little hussy, I'll
see you in a few days.' "
Warren said she decided not to
model for Mishan.
Neither Mishan nor UVic administrators will comment on the
charges. Mishan was out of town
when the leaflets were distributed.
Meanwhile the UVic administration finally took action on a year-
old proposal to examine sexual
grievance procedures. A committee
composed of students, staff, faculty
and administrators will make
recommendations for dealing with
sexual harassment complaints on
campus.
government revoke First Choice's
license, and said a demonstration
should be organized at the Canadian Radio-Television and
Telecommunications Commission
(CRTC) offices in Hull if no action
were taken. More than 200 people
demonstrated outside the Montreal
CRTC offices Jan. 18.
Communications minister Francis Fox said the government would
not have licensed First Choice had it
known its plans to show Playboy
bunnies, but said the CRTC will
have to rule on the matter.
Several other MPs spoke in support of the demonstration, including Flora Macdonald (PC,
Kingston).
"Maybe in the past I haven't
been as aware of this as I should,"
Macdonald said. She added she has
recently been shown samples of
hard-core pornography and "it
can't come soon enough or bften
enough that women speak out
against exploitation ... If pay-TV
needs this kind of exploitation of
women to survive, who needs pay-
TV?"
Maude Barlow, director of Ottawa's Office of Equal Opportunity
for Women, read a statement calling for the government to revoke
First Choice's license, to regulate
against sexual stereotyping, to
toughen anti-pornography laws and
to enforce existing ones.
Pat Masters from Ottawa's
Women Against Pornography called for consumer boycotts against
companies involved in First Choice
or the Playboy shows. These include Eaton's, Manufacturer's Life
Insurance, and the Royal Bank's
Royfund Equity. Many of the protests elsewhere were at Eaton's
stores.
Sally Chaster, a protest
organizer, talked to more than 100
people in Regina about the censorship issue.
"Some people are claiming that
we are trying to censor what individuals watch," she said. "The
truth is that we have federal and
provincial human rights legislation
as well as federal criminal legislation behind us.
"We can't read or write material
that ridicules or demeans the handicapped or racial minorities, and
rightfully so. Yet through pornography women are demeaned and
degraded simply for being women
... we aren't imposing censorship, we are demanding that the
laws that are suppose to protect
women be enforced."
According to Barlow, it is important to block soft-core pornography
now from pay-TV to prevent it
from being replaced by hard-core,
explicitly violent pornography in a
few years. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
YilOSlC
David Ravan: rock, to Jan. 29, The Savoy.'
Annie Roaa and The ThrHlers: rhythm and!
bluea, to Jan. 29. Town Pump.
Straight Face: from Hicktoria, Jan. 31 to
Feb. 2, Town Pump.
Mow: rock aock hop, get out your bob-
byaox, Jan. 28, Soft Rock Cafe.
Buck McKane: rock, Jan. 29, Soft Rock
Cafe.
Blm: toke to folk, Jan. 30, Soft Rock Cafe.
Cathy Fink: bluegrass, Jan. 31, Soft Rock
Cafe.
Raxzmajazz: dixieland. Hot Jazz Club.
Shakki Pyramlda: Scottish rockabilly, Jan.
28, Commodore, VTC/CBO.
Two Compoaara and a Choraographar:
new music, Jan. 28, 8 p.m., SFU Theatre,
ticket* $1 students.
French Letters: local rising rock stars, Jan.
29, Commodore, VTC/CBO.
Purcetl String Quartet: music of Mozart,
Jan. 30, 8 p.m., Arts Club Granville Island,
tickets «.
Levon   Helm/Rick   Danko:   the   Band
revisited, Jan. 31, Commodore, VTC/CBO.
Carl Parklna/Harold Nix: a rock legend (and
I don't mean igneous), Feb. 1, Commodore,
VTC/CBO.
Buddy Setflah/Herald Nix: rockabilly ice
follies, Feb. 4, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird ice
arena, AMS ticket centre.
MOEV/M-40/lmagas   In   Vogue/3-D:
modem music showcase, Feb.' 4, Commodore
Ballroom, tickets $6.96.
Isabella Chapula/Ekllan Silverman: recital
with flute and piano, Feb. 2, noon, recital hall.
Moee   Allison:   downhome   blues,   city
cynicism, and funky jazz, what a mix, to Jan.
29, Landmark Jazz bar.
Bim: UBC grad centre ballroom. Feb. 4, 8:30
p.m. Students $3.50. General *5.60.
Reflactiona On Crooked Walking: Singing
and dancing and caring (wishful thinking),
Arts Club Granville Island. Tuae.-Fri. 8 p.m.;
Wed. 6 p.m.; Sat. 6:30 and 9:30 p.m.; Sun.
2:30 p.m. to Feb. S.
Betrayal: Harold Pinter's love triangle. Arts
Club Seymour. Mon.-Fri. 8:30 p.m.; Sat. 6:30
and 9:30 p.m.; Thurs. 5:30 p.m.
Mass  Appeal:  a  witty  comedy  starring
William  Hutt,  Queen  Elizabeth  Playhouse,
Mon.-Sat. 8 p.m.; Sat. 2:30 p.m.
Hossana: by Michel Tremblay - the struggles
of a homosexual couple,  Firehall Theatre,
Mon.-Sat. 8 p.m.
Tha  Woolgatherer:   starring  the  smooth
talker himself, T.D. Mulligan, Presentation
House, Tues.-Thurs. 8:30 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 7
and 9:30 p.m.; Sun. 3 p.m.
Home: Crossroads Theatre production which
is a marvellous combination of "tall tale,
home-spun humour,  hot jazz, and talking
blues," Waterfront Theatre, doses Jan. 30.
Half price till close of show.
Tha Boys In Tha Band: the Genesis players,
Waterfront Theatre, opens Feb. 5. 929-2476
for more information.
Guys and Dotla: Mussoc is back again with
another   block   buster   production.   Old
Auditorium, to Feb. S, 8 p.m., tickets AMS
box office. NO nudity involved I
«
HpVU6
Pacific Cinematheque (NFB Theatre. 11K
West Georgia) Jan. 28: Tha Wage* of
Fear, 7 p.m.; Sorcerer, 9:30 p.m. Jan. 29-30:
Laving Couples. 7:30 p.m.; Doktor (Has,
9:30 p.m. Feb. 1: Burden of Draame, 7:30
p.m. Feb. 3-4: They Live By Night, 7:30
p.m.; Thlevee Like Ue, 9:30 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus) Jan.
28-Feb. 3: Chan is Mlaalng, 7:30 and 9:15
p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial) Jan. 28-30: Chariots Of Fire, 7:30 p.m.,
QaHlpoli. 9:45. Jan. 31-Feb. 1: Bad Timing/Sensual Ohmalon. 7:30 p.m.; Union
City, 9:45 p.m. Feb. 2-3: Gate Of Hall, 7:30
p.m.; Raahomon, 9:10 p.m.
Savoy Theatre (3321 Main at 8th) Jan. 28-30:
Mephisto, 7:30 p.m.; My Dinner With Andre, 10 p.m. Jan. 31-Feb. 1: Reds, 7:30 p.m.
Feb. 2-3: Annie Hall, 7:30p.m.; Manhattan.
9:16 p.m.
Bxiukih
Meienle Fleischer: a solo exhibition with
two-dimensional air-brush sculptural paintings, Temple Gallery, 4426 West 10th, opens
Feb. 4.
Cy Twombly: exhibition of works by this artist influenced by early Mediterranean civilizations, Vancouver Art Gallery, 1146 West
Georgia, closes Jan. 30.
TODAY
SPEAKEA8Y
Open everyday to answer questions, Qrve info
about the campus, 9:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m., SUB
main floor.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Gym nits, everyone welcome to join the tun,
6:30-8:30 p.m., Oebome gym A.
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY
Bake Rale, 11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.. SUB concourse.
Second annual revolutionary bzzr bath, 7:30
p.m. - midnight, SUB 212.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Gym night, 8:30 -11:30 p.m., Oebome gym A.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Party, membera and irteir guests ere ell
welcome, 8 p.m.. Garden room, graduate centra.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Executive election*, at day, all over campus.
FIRST VEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
Dance, 8 p.m. - midnight, SUB pertyroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation hour, noon. International Houee
main lounge.
NEWMAN CLUB
Soup lunch, e gourmet experience, noon, St.
Merit's kitchen.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Ken Hancock, from Toronto'! Cruise Missile
Conversion Project, speaks on Stopping the
Cruise, noon, SUB 206.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Beer garden and free movie: Easy Rider, 4-7
p.m., SUB 216.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Vs. league leading Alberta Golden Bears in a
Canada West league game, 8 p.m. Thunderbird
erene.
CANADA WEST VOLLEYBALL
Tournament featuring six conference teems.
UBC men end women end ere each ranked fifth
in the country, 4 end 8:30 p.m. Men; 1:45 p.m.
end 6:15 p.m. Women; Peace gym.
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING AND DIVING
Women's meet with the University of Montana.
UBC wal host tha Canada Want Chsmpionshipa
Feb. 17-18, 7 p.m.. Aquatic centre.
THUNDERBIRD SKIING
Northwest coleglete ski conference meet on
Grouee mountain. SFU and other school* win
compete, croea country In morning. 10 a.m.,
Grouee mountain.
SATURDAY
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Party: latest in dieco, pop, weve music, snecka
end soft drinks. 7:30 p.m.  -  1  a.m.,  SUB
207/209.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Gym day — badminton, 2:30 - 4:30 p.m.,
Osborne gym B.
NEWMAN CLUB
Annuel winter bel dinner followed by dance,
6-12 p.m., SUB partyroom. Tickets avaitebie at
the AMS ticket office »15; S13.E0 members. S3
dance only.
MARDI GRAS
Dance featuring the French Letters, em proceeds
to CFMI orphans fund, 8 p.m.. Commodore
besroom.
BRIDGE CLUB
Bridge tournament, 6 p.m., SUB 212.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh, plus
The Ugly DuckHng. 3 p.m., SUB auditorium
•1.60. Bght fibre) for S5.
CITR HOCKEY BROADCAST
Radio broadcast of Thunderbirds va. Alberta
Golden Beers. Canada Weet league geme on 102
FM et 7:60 p.m.. Game et Thunderbird erene, 8
p.m.
CANADA WEST VOLLEYBALL
Tournament featuring six conference teams.
UBC men end women ere ranked number five in
the country. Women play at 9:15 a.m., 1:46
p.m.. and 6:15 p.m. Men at 11:30 a.m., 4 p.m.
and 8:30 p.m. Peace gym.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Vs. Pegasus, 2 p.m., Wolfeon field.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Junior varsity women vs. Portland General Electric, 2 p.m., Oebome gym A.
THUNDERBIRD ROWING CREW
Fund raising row-e-thon to rsiss money to buy
equipment. To pledge money per kilometer
prione Vancouver Rowing Club at 687-3400, 9
a.m. - 6 p.m. Felee creak off Gnrwtte Island
Market.
SUNDAY
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Ride, non-members welcome, 9 a.m., between
SUB and aquatic cantra.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Tense, 2:30 - 5:30 p.m.. Armouries, court 1 and
4.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practise, 10 p.m.. Aquatic centre. AH new interested people welcome.
INTRAMURALS
Tobogganing and hot tones, Seymour Prov.
perk. Organttational meeting Jan. 27, Peace
gym 211.
SAILING CLUB
Placing, all skM levels. 9 s.m., Jericho.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Fun gospel praias, worship and teaching, 7 p.m.,
SUB 211.
THUNDERBIRD SKIING
Last day of three day Northwest Coaagiete ski
meet. Today, the dual slalom, 10 a.m., Grouse
mountain.
MONDAY
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Meeting, noon, SUB 216.
NOON CLUB
Meeting to diecuas changing noon to noon and
noon to 12:30 p.m., noon, SUB 266.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Pot luck luncheon, noon, Buch. penthouse.
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Stephen Rogers, minister of environment end
minister Responsible for B.C. Piece, noon, SUB
119.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Open meeting, guest speaker Carol Gray of
Nurses for Life, noon, SUB 125.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Slide presentation: Peru with Dominique Levieil,
8 p.m.. International Houee Gate 4.
English language evening, 7:30 p.m.. International House gats 4.
SPEAKEASY
Legal heselea? Speasy now? Speekessy now hee
a drop-off box for lew students' legal advice
clinic, eH week. Speakeasy.
TUESDAY
EMPLOYMENT SEMINAR
Find out how to get a job In these tough
economic times. To register phone 228-3313.
Friday, January 28,1983
Thie free eeminar is organized by the Census
Employment Centre end the Student Affairs
Committee, 6-7 p.m., Cecil Green perk.
CAMPU8 PRO-LIFE
Open meeting: Guest speaker is Betty Green
from Vancouver Right to Ufe on the Meaning of
Pro-life, noon, SUB 126. •
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Geologic history of reefs, 3:30 p.m., Geo. Sci.
330A. Noel James, Memorial University speaks.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Worship service, non-denominational, 8:30
a.m., SUB 212.
Recital — gey end lesbian music students, 8
p.m. Music bueding recltel hell.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal clinic, noon - 2 p.m. SUB 111.
CU80 UBC
Development education aeries — a weekly series
' exploring Intemationsl development issues. Using Technology — Traneplsnting High-tech or
Encouraging Local Ingenuity, 7:30 p.m. Interna-
tionel Houee upper lounge.
PRACTICAL WRITING LECTURE 8ERIES
Ekmineting jargon with Robert L. Katz, Arthur
Anderson end Co., noon. Computer Science
201.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
David Harris, the teem physician of the Vancouver Canucks will speak on sports medicine,
noon, IRC 1.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Open meeting, 11:30a.m. - 12:30 p.m., Lutheran
Cempus centre conference room.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting end slide show, noon, Chem.
160.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romance language evening 7:30 p.m., International Houee gate 4.
CAMPUS PRO-UFE
Open meeting: Guest speaker Bev Buses from
Richmond Mother end Unborn Child Care on
pro-life, noon, SUB 126.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, noon, SUB.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Mineral water cheaenge and boat races, noon,
SUB south concourse. Symposium on Acquired
Immune Deficiency Syndrome presented by the
Gay and Lesbian Health Science Professional
Assoc., 7 p.m., IRC 4.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Special free dinner for irrtemstionsl students.
Also introducing Charles Does, Imernerionaty
known evangelist, 6 p.m., Asian Centre.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Film aeries: A Look et Rural India - Habitat:
Pakistan; This is Bengledesh: Indie: Population
600 million, 8 p.m., Irtternettonel Houee Gets 4.
THURSDAY
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
General meeting, all present end prospective
members   invited,   election   of   new   voting
members, noon, Buch. B224.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everyone welcome to open
discussion on the Bshs'i faith, 1-2:30 p.m., SUB
212A.
.ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
General  meeting.   Ken  Hall from Weetweter
Reaeerch  wet  be  apeoking  on  Fraser  River
Ecology end Msnsgement, noon, Angus 226.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Bryan Palmer, SFU History dept., speaks on
Cold War, Politics, end Disarmament, noon.
Computer Science 200.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Starrtrrrttech evening, 7:30 p.m., Imernationai
House gate 4.
INSTITUTE OF A8IAN RESEARCH
Fflm:  Voice of Hunger,  noon,  Asian centre
euditorium.
CAMPUS PRO-UFE
Special guest spssksr Jos Borowski, former
cebinet minister from Manitoba, speaks on Life
and Abortion, noon, SUB ballroom.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Track two — film of the Toronto bath raids and
protest demonetratione. »2. AMS, S3 others,
noon, 7 p.m., 9 p.m., IRC 2.
ZOOLOGY CLUB
Bake sale, great tweets for great price* noon
-2:30 p.m., SUB main foyer.
CYCLING CLUB
Slide preeentetion of a cycling trip in New
Zealand, noon, Buch. A102.
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Healing service — come and bring any afflicted.
Charles Doss international speeker present, 7:30
p.m., Scarfe 100. Dose spooks on Life end Faith,
12 p.m., SUB 211.
FOURTH YEAR DIETETICS
Preparing a homeetyie meal, 4:30 - 7 p.m., Sub-
wsy.
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCE
Tectonic Accretion end Cordaieren Mountetn
Building, noon, Geo. Sci. 330A. J.  Monger
speaks.
CITR FM 102
Cable 100
No. 1 Album thie week:
Siouxsie   and   the   Banshees   —   A   Kiss   in   the
Dreamhouse.
DISCORDER
A guide to CITR.
A complete listing of CITR's programming as well
ea record reviews, band interviews end upcoming
concerts in the city and on campus.
Available Feb. 1.
The UBC musical theatre
society's presentation of Guys and Dolls
premiered last night in the Old
Auditorium.
It runs through Feb. 5, excepting
Sundays, at 8 p.m. Tickets are $3.50
students, children, old age pensioners,
$5.50 adults. Phone 228-5656 or
228-6902 for more info.
Contrary to rumor, the show is not in
the nude, raw, etc. That was all a cheap
publicity stunt by those wonderful kids
from Mussoc, that has partly backfired.
Drip and dry.
Yes folks, if s time once again to drip
for the Red Cross.
The spring clinic will be held all next
week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in SUB
207/209.
The clinic is sponsored by the
Forestry Undergraduate Society, who
are hoping they can get 2,500 pints from
the 30,000 people out here.
Ten cases of beer are offered for the
greatest percentage turnout. Have you
ever given blood and gone drinking — it
is a most unusual and high-flying experience? Then dry out.
So you say you want a revolution?
The Newiy Dogmatic Party, also
known as the New Democratic party, is
pleased to announce their second annual revolutionary bzzr bash tonight in
SUB 212.
Monarchist, Tories (if they aren't all in
Winnipeg stabbing Joe in the back).
Grits and the apolitical are also invited.
You will undoubtedly be able to here
live radio coverage from Winnipeg of
Joe saying "Et tu Peter?"
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c.
Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deedline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5.
5 — Coming Events
30 — Jobs
86 — Typing
INCREDIBLY INTERESTING 1 month
adventure' to a town 7000 ft. in the
Himalayas of India. Departs May '83. Fantastic climbing areal Complete coat, including airfare, only $19891 Info: JoePHaar,
CC, Trent University, Peterboro, Ont.
706-743-4391.
11 — For Sale — Private
SHEEPSKIN COATS and jackets, men,
women, children, very fashionable. From
$170. Phone 732-0906 after 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: Mercedes '67 2S0S A1 mech.
AC, PB., PS., Some rust. Good price for
quick sale. Graham 684-9024.
JOBS: Develop your own recession proof
business, on a part-time basis. Small
registration fee is only investment required,
which includes training materials. Phone
Jean or Gayle eves., weekends 277-4802.
BICYCLE ASSEMBLY mechanic needed
for full and part-time positions. Experience
preferred but would consider training a
motivated student with good mechanical
aptitude. Apply to Manager, West Point
Cycles Ltd. 224-3536.
36 - Lost
15 — Found
SHAME ON YOU, Pinocchio (1940), for
running away. Undo Waft is very angry
with you. Buy large box of kleenex
before you come back home.
LOST:
Gold Ladies Watch. Near
Anth./Soc. Bldg. Jan. 20.
REWARD. Great Sentimental Value. Bertha. 321-0589.
66 — Scandals
20 — Housing
WANTED: Person to share Kits apartment
with 2 quiet students. Available Feb. 1.
$234 incl. util. 738-3661.
HOUSING: Furnished 1 bdrm.
basement suite with private entrance.
Suitable for 2 students. Prefer non-smoker.
No pets. Dunbar area. Feb. 1 $400/includes
utilities 733-1504.
WANTED: Female student (non-
smoker) to share two bedroom basement
suite in Kits area with same. $197.50/mo.
incl. utilities. 731-0760.
GET YOUR UBYSSEY Valentine
today. $1.75 per 3 lines. SUB 266, 9-4 Pin-
nochio has got his already. Deadline Feb. 9.
70 — Services
25 — Instruction
LEARN TO SAIL: Beginners
Course or Basic Coastal Cruising. 30 ft.
cruiser/ racer. Hands on experience.
Registering NOW Feb. Mar. Apr., classes.
Don't be left on the beach. C.Y.A. Certificate 734-1675 after 7. Sailcraft Ltd.
CLASSICAL GUITAR lessons. Reasonable rates. 732-7133. Beginners welcome.
GMAT. LSAT. MCAT Preparation. Call National Testing Centre 738-4618.
EDGAR CAYCE
type deep trance readings.
Any question in the world.
Booking now for DON
DAUGHTRY'S February visit to
Vancouver. Call Pat Wood,
228-9865.
NEW TO AREA. Adina Typing
Service. Student discounts. 4326 West
10th. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER. Special student rates. 5670
Yew (Kerrisdale). Phone 266-6814.
PETER'S TYPING. 731-9752.
FAST, experienced typist, $1.00/
page introductory, rag. $1.25, Neil
733-4634.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: reasonable
rates. Caroline, 967-0888.
ENGLISH M.A. ex-grammar instructor will proofread, correct or just type
essays, etc. Call 734-2430.
TYPIST WANTED: to work at
home. Type from tapes. Approx. 120 pages
per week. Might lead to 200 pages @$1. per
page or negotiable. Please send resume to
Mr. Schwendenmann, 310 - 1233 W. 11th
Ave., Van. B.C.
TYPEWRITING: Minimal notice required.
UBC location. 24 hour phone in 224-6618.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, tectums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9867.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, Resumes, Reports,
Correspondence, Days, Evenings,
Weekends.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 an
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
FRANCINE'S TYPING SERVICES: Theses,
papers, etc. — reasonable rates. Please inquire 732-3647.
90 - Wanted
DAYCARE: Canada Goose, Co-op,
UBC has vacancy for child IK to 3 yrs.
228-5403, eve. 224-2584.
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Students $6.50 with I.D. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
NEED EXCELLENT DAYCARE? Applica-
tions welcome Unit 2 UBC. 5603 Yalta PI.,
18 mon.-36 mon. Call 224-3828 or visit.
WANTED: GHOST WRITER: To complete
book dealing with psychic subject. Split
profrts 50/50. Details 681-3703 ask for
Grant. English proficiency demanded.
PARKING sought for long term storage.
Indoor/outdoor. Anywhere in Vancouver.
Graham 684-9024. Leave message.
WANTED: Tall women to play
on Netball team. Great exercise and fun.
520-3582. Friday, January 28,1983
THE    U BYSS EY
Page 11
B.C. grants may be eliminated
VICTORIA (CUP) - B.C. student aid recipients may find their
non-repayable grants replaced by
loans next year.
A provincial all-loan student aid
plan is one of the options being considered by the B.C. Social Credit
government, education minister Bill
Vander Zalm said following a two
day council of Ministers of Education of Canada meeting this week.
Vander Zalm said unless the
federal government acts quickly to
increase its committment to student
aid, B.C. will have to find a way to
deal on its own with the increasing
Keynes zeroes
in says MIT prof
By PAT MACLEOD
Last year, as Reagan's marketplace magic began to fade and
dwindle into oblivion, 500 people
flocked to hear a prominent
American economics predict the
outcome of the Reagan and Mit-
terand experiments.
On Tuesday and Wednesday,
dozens crammed the aisles of
Buchanan 106 to hear another
economist, this one from the
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, unveil his solution to
the "worldwide economic
showdown."
"Everywhere in the world has a
zero rate of economic growth" said
management and economics professor Lester Thurow, citing declining rates of industrial productivity
in Britain, West Germany, Japan
and the U.S.
Zero economic growth existed for
1200 years in feudal times but
nothing in our economy is based on
the assumption of long periods of
no growth, Thurow said.
Investment in private plant
equipment, "the fuel that keeps the
capitalist economy going" is down
in every industrial country and the
American social security system
runs out of money next June, he
said.
The chances that "some diplomat
somewhere" is working on a debtors cartel among developing nations is an "absolute certainty,"
Thurow said.
Pretending to be the President of
Mexico's advisor, Thurow said
"The gringos have ripped us off for
250 years, now let's take 'em for
$85 billion." Thirty-five nations are
not paying interest on the principle
of their loans, he said.
Blaming the economics profess-
Wages raised
Six and five is coming to the
rescue of UBC student workers.
Compensation stabilization commissioner Ed Peck has approved
6.05 per cent and 5.34 per cent increases for the next two years for
406 UBC student employees.
The students work up to 10 hours
per week in various university areas
— mostly in the library.
The settlement is less than the
7.93 and 5.22 per cent increases
full-time Association of University
and College Employees received in
November.
Students get the AUCE base rate
increase.
GRAD'S
Phone    now   for   complimentary portrait sitting.
RESUME PHOTOS
| AS LOW AS 75c
IN COLOUR.
lifimagraplT
Shidins 1H.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
financial needs of student applicants.
An all-loan program would be
more expensive to adminster than
the B.C. student aid plan which
supplements the federal loans with
grants, he said.
But switching to strictly loans will
make more money available next
year for needy students, Vander
Zalm added.
At the Victoria conference, B.C.
education officials revealed significant tuition fee increases may be
coming. But student aid was the
principal topic of discussion.
ions lack of consensus as playing a
role in the current malaise, Thurow
argued for a "coordinated reflation" between Japan, France,
West Germany and the U.S.
Everyone is waiting for an
American recovery and it is unlikely
to come. Even a little recovery in
housing and construction would
most likely be overwhelmed by imports. "The world is too integrated
to practice Keynesianism on a national basis," he said, explaining
the failure of president Mitterand
of France's policy of fiscal
stimulants.
But Thurow insisted Keynesian-
sim can "restart the engines" of the
world economy.
"We know we can stop the recession. What we don't know is how to
run our economy at full employment with no inflation."
As part of the "coordinated
reflation," Thurow argued for
lower interest rates, and an exchange rate system similar to the
European "snake" — the agreement among western European nations to maintain fixed exchange
rates. The fluctuation in major currencies since exchange rates became
flexible in 1971 has "made international investment impossible," he
said.
To cure inflation while maintaining full employment, Thurow suggested banning all indexing of
wages and social security. To control expectational wage increases,
Thurow praised the Japanese
system of national simultaneous
negotiations where all contracts run
out in March, and the bonus system
in which a portion of workers'
wages is held back and paid every
six months.
"People are more willing to see a
reduction in their bonuses than
their wage rates."
Thurow warned of the dangers of
protectionism and a worldwide
trade war similar to that of the '30s
if nothing is done to stimulate
growth.
Comparing the world economy to
a piece of equipment in Siberia that
must remain running all winter
long, Thurow said "Once the whole
world is shut down, it's very hard to
get it started again."
—ernold heaeirom photo
SUB STROLLERS walk merrily along, not knowing their picture was
being taken. Winter walkers were pleased to know of snow and cold
weather on the prairies and in central Canada. "Let those easterners
freeze," unidentified person said.
Secretary of State Serge Joyal,
the minister responsible for the
Canada student loan program, met
with provincial education ministers
before the conference. An expected
announcement by Joyal concerning
loans never materialized.
Joyal indicated to the CMEC last
fall the federal government was
considering a national bursary plan
financed by the removal of student
education tax deductions to replace
the existing federal student loans.
CMEC chair and Ontario education minister Betty Stephenson
would not release details of the
minister's discussion with Joyal,
but it appears that the $1,800
federal student loan ceiling will be
raised by $1,000.
Stephenson announced the
CMEC will be investigating the
feasibility of holding a Canada wide
education week to raise public support for education.
She called the October CMEC
conference on issues in post-
secondary education "productive
and useful." Stephenson added the
council will look at sponsoring
similar conferences in the future.
Student and faculty reps had
walked out in protest during the
keynote speaker's address at the
conference.
Law school hopes dimmed
VICTORIA (CUP) — A power
outage at the University of Victoria
in December dimmed the hopes of
60 potential law school students.
About 30 minutes before the Law
School Admission Test (LSAT)
scheduled in the Clearihue building
on   campus.   The   buildings   and
f
Gears 'on bold
VICTORIA (CUP) — University
of Victoria president Howard Petch
is sitting by his phone waiting for
the provincial government to endorse a UVic engineering school
proposal.
With UVic dean-elect Glen
Bruton's Jan. 31 deadline approaching, the decision must come
soon. "I wish they would call and
say yes or no," complained Petch.
Universities minister Pat McGeer
is sitting by his phone, waiting for
Petch to call. The government is
waiting for an announcement from
UVic, said McGeer.
"We understand that UVic is
looking at the figures and available
resources to put together an
engineering package before the
dean's deadline," McGeer said.
He said the government is committing $500,000 for the first year
operating costs, half the money
UVic's minimum program needs.
Petch said there was no way UVic
could go ahead with the school with
only $500,000.
grounds staff cut power for repairs
and forced the exam's cancellation.
"I , thought the LSAT was
scheduled for the Begbie building. I
only found out it was the Clearihue
Saturday morning, as my daughter
left to' write it," said buildings
director James Helme.
"I just thought, 'oh my heavens.* "
LSAT regulations prevent room
or time changes so candidates, including one student who travelled
from the Yukon for the exam, will
have to wait until February for the
next exam.
Students were shocked by the
power outage.
"I just want to kill someoi.e,"
said Sheila Sommers.
Many law schools, including
UBC's have deadlines which are
well before February's examination
date.
Heat pipes rot
A lack of funds is preventing
Physical Plant from replacing rotting heating pipes all over campus.
Physical Plant is currently replacing the pipes to Buchanan. One site
worker said Thursday the work
would probably pay for itself within
a year because new fixtures would
prevent heat loss. The work should
be completed within a few days.
The lack of funds will limit
physical plant to working on only
vital areas.
TAX REFUNDS NOW!
^n
BENTAX
85% of calculated
refund includes
tax preparation.
BENTAX DISCOUNT CENTRE
Beneficial Income Tax Service
1854 W. 4th Ave.
736-0441
UBC MU90L THOITB€ SOCICTY
KCTOITS
JdNUdRV 27 - f CBRUdRV 5
UBC OLD AUDITORIUM
CURTAIN 8PM
TICKGT9: STUDCMT K3.50
OTHCRi   T5.50
AM9 BOX OffIC€ OR PHONC
QQ8-5656      228-690Q
The
Price
is Right
hair design ltd.
36X1 te^t*Ji>u.T-4&
733 303/
(J'atv£/£Zyr / \mes ■* / A^^Y CJLi
riue/
i£vrvs... as-**..&**...&**.- linns THE    U BYS S EY
Friday, January 28,1983
SHARP
TEAC
JBL
EPI
THIEL
+ch
MAXELL
Sports Bag
CAR STEREO
/1LPINE
STEREO
PORTABLES
AIWA
CZfeAIC
T617 (41 * 189.96
T621 (1) * 114.96
T634 (1) $ 219.96
T689 (1) * 249.96
S280 (1) * 199.96
MITSUBISHI
RX2   (1 Only)  $ 299.96
RX691    (1 Only)  * 254.96
79EM    (1 Only)  $ 262.60
723   (lOnly)  $ 178.20
752   (lOnly)  $ 210.00
TELEVISIONS
TPR990
lOnly  $399.95
CSJ1    (3 Only)  * 229.96
CSM1    (40nly)  * 259.96
HSF1    (lOnly)  * 189.96
HSP1    (20nly)  * 149.96
HSPOI2X   (2 Only)  ♦ 219.95
TPM10   (1 Only)   * 139.96
TPR140   dOnly)  *   79.96
CS350   (20nly)  $ 239.95
CS880   (1 Only)  * 459.96
TPR906   (1 Only)  » 229.96
pioixieeR
SK31    (1 Only)  * 249.95
SK100   (1 Only)  $ 139.96
SK300   (1 Only)  * 159.95
SK660   (1 Only)  $ 229.95
SK900   (1 Only)  * 599.96
PPI
PC4001    (30nly)  ♦   79.95
PC4005   (20nlyl  $   79.95
PC4008   (120nly)  ♦   89.95
PC4009   (40nly)  $   94.96
PQR7900   dOnly)  74.95
PQR9100   (40nly)  » 179.95
PQR9600   dOnly)  ♦ 129.96
PS2000   (4 Only)  *   39.95
PSeOOO   (9 Only)  ♦   64.46
PST2700   (1 Only)  * 189.95
COLOUR TV   339
(3 ONLY)
CI»T»!
GAMES
Mitsubishi 1971 20" colour (3) * 799
Mitsubishi 1982 20" colour (1) $ 999
RCA 14" remote  (2) $499
RCA 14" colour (4) * 339
RCA20"colour (3) * 449
RCA20" remote .- (6) $ 599
RCA big screen (1) $1999
26" remote/built-in
converter  * 699
Zenith big acreen	
RC/1
STEREO
£SANYO
C7   (1 Only)  » 389.96
M2563   (2 Only)  *   89.96
M5000   (1 Only)  » 129.96
M6400   (3 Only)  *   89.96
M7750   (2 Only)  $ 239.96
M9901    (2 Only)  $   99.95
M9903   13 Only)  * 129.95
M9936   (2 Only!  $199.95
M9962   12 Only)  * 249.95
MG4   (1 Only)   * 249.96
MG12   (1 Only)   $   69.96
MG30   dOnly)   » 129.95
MG32   (1 Only)   *   99.96
MX720   (2 Only)   * 399.96
SLIM4   (2 Only)  *   49.96
TRC5400   (20nly)  *   94.45
Silver
ST536   (1 Only)  * 129.95
TELEFUNKEN
CC9000   (20nly)  * 429.95
CF100   (20nly)  * 149.95
CP105   (40nly)  »   89.96
CR8200   (2 Only)  * 249.95
SPEAKERS
Bose
501 III   (1 Pair Only)  » 749.96 pr.
601II     1 Pair Only)  $1049.95 pr.
901IVEQ   11 pair Only) ... $1499.95 pr.
70C    (4 Pairs Only)  » 149.96 pr.
100   (1 PairOnly)  » 199.96 pr.
140C    (1 Pair Only)  • 299.96 pr.
500   (2PairsOnly)  » 779.96 pr.
VIDEO
RECORDERS
VFT650
6 hour, 14-day programming,
remote control
(3 Only)   (
RCA 1983 portable VCR (4) $ 899
RCA VFT170 convertible VCR . .(2) $ 999
Magnavox 8308,8 hour (181 * 647
Magnavox 1983 portable VCR . .d) * 999
Magnavox Stereo & Dolby 12) $1299
Mitsubishi HS310 check
and compare  (2) $ 799
Sanyo video recorder  $ 499
ODYSSEY2
THE KEYBOARD IS THE KEY
Computer Video Game System   $ 109.95
Leisure Vision Computer
Video Game System  $   89.95
Complete stock of Leisure Vision games
in our Software Dept.
Atari  $ 194.96
While Stock Lasts
VIDEO
ACCESSORIES
Wireless Remote for 1982 RCA/Sylvanla/
Panasonic Video Recorder .. $   49.95
Philips TV Converter  $ 114.96
TV Stand  $   27.96
Video Lights   $   69.96
STEREO
CASSETTE
DECKS
TEAC.
STEREO
RECEIVERS
C3X   (1 Only)  » 679.95
V40   (2 Only)  $ 179.96
V5RX   (30nlyl   $ 298.96
V90   (1 Only)  $ 399.96
AIWA
SDL22   (1 Only)  $ 249.96
ADL30   (1 Only)  $ 339.95
ADM800   (1 Only)  $ 799.96
PIONCECER
CT3   d Only)   $ 169.95
CT4   (20nly)  $ 199.95
CT5   d Only)  $ 249.96
CT6R    (1 Onlyl  $ 309.95
CT7R    (20nly)  $ 379.95
CT8R    (1 Only)  $ 549.95
CT9R    (1 Only)  $ 679.96
RD10   dOnly)  $   89.96
D28   (20nly)  $ 169.95
SHARP
RT100   (20nly)  $ 134.96
RT5050   (1 Only)  $ 329.96
MITSUBISHI
$199*
DAR440   (20nly) ■ W»4f
DAR20   (30nly)   $349.95
DAR25   (1 Only)   $ 479.96
Nikko
NR320   (6 Only)  $ 179.96
PIONEER
SX4   (20nly)  $ 219.96
SX5   (1 Only)  $ 299.95
SX6   d Only)  $ 399.95
SX7   dOnly)  $ 479.95
SX8   (1 Only)  $ 779.96
SX3S00   (1 Only)  $ 209.95
SX3600   (5 Only)  $ 249.96
SX3700   (7 Only)  $ 299.95
SX380O   (40nly)  $ 399.96
SXD5000   (1 Only)  $ 549.96
SXD7000    (1 Only)    $ 679.96
R6   (2 Only)
* 689.95
TELEFUNKEN    TELEFUNKEN
TC250   (20nly)  $ 149.96
TC450   (20nly)  $ 279.46
L19 (1 Pair Only)  $ 379.96 pr.
L40 (1 Pair Only)  $ 549.95 pr.
L60 (1 PairOnly)  $ 729.95 pr.
L46 (1 PairOnly)  $ 479.96 pr.
L86 11 PairOnly)  $ 679.96 pr.
L96 11 Pair Only)  $1049.96 pr.
Merak
M5 13 Pairs Only)  $ 249.96 pr.
Ml (2 Pairs Only)  $ 299.96 pr.
M2 (1 PairOnly)  * 399.96 pr.
M3 11 PairOnly)  $ 599.96pr.
NS160   (2 Pairs Only) .... $ 184.95 pr.
NS244   (1 PairOnly)  $ 179.98 pr.
Thlel
02   (7 Pairs Only)  $ 299.96 pr.
03A   (2 Pairs Only)  $1149.96 pr.
04   (3 Pairs Only)  $ 599.95 pr.
amps a
PRE AMPS
Telefunken CP1    (3 Only)  $ 119.96
Telefunken CP20   (1 Only).... $ 329.95
Threshold M1    (1 Only)  $ 189.96
Threshold NS10   (2 Only) $ 849.95
Threshold SL10   (2 Only) * 899.96
Yamaha C4   (2 Onlyl $549.96
Yamaha C6   (1 Only) $299.96
Yamaha C50   d Only) » 499.95
TC660S dOnly).
CC20-B (2 Only).
CC20-S    (2 Only).
$ 379.25
$ 569.96
$ 569.95
K350
K950
(2 Only)
(1 Only)
$ 169.96
$499.96
amps a
POWER AMPS
AIWASAA30   (1 Only)  $ 149.95
Mitsubishi DAU520   (1 Only).. $ 179.96
Pioneer A5   (1 Only)  $ 259.96
Pioneer A6   d Only)  $ 379.96
PioneerA7   (20nly)   $ 449.95
Pioneer AS   d Only)  $ 699.96
Pioneer A9   (1 Only)  $ 799.96
Pioneer AX50   (1 Only)  $ 389.96
Pioneer SR303   (1 Only)  $ 179.96
TelefunkenTA250   (4Only)...$ 119.95
Telefunken TA750   (2 Only)... $ 629.96
Yamaha A460   (1 Only)   $ 239.95
Yamaha A106O   (2 Only)   $999.96
Yamaha M50   (1 Only)  $ 629.95
AiwaSAP30   (2Only)  $ 195.95
AiwaSAP50   (1 Only)  $219.96
Crown D150A   (1 Only)  $ 679.96
SAE310   dOnly)  $349.96
SAEPA10   (20nly)   $ 379.95
Telefunken CM1   (3 Only) .... $ 119.95
Aiwa SAC30   d Only)   $ 139.96
Aiwa SACS)   (2 Only)   $ 149.96
Crown SL1    (2 Only)  $499.96
SAEP10   (2Only)  $429.96
HR5600   (5 Only)  $ 759.95 |
O YAMAHA
R300   (3 Only)  $ 249.95 I
R500   d Only)  $ 329.95 |
R700   (1 Only)  $ 449.95
R1000   d Only)  $ 849.96
R2000   (20nlyl  $ 999.95
KR1000   (1 Only)  $ 699.95
CR840   (1 Onlyl  $ 449.95
REEL-TO-REEL
TEAC.
X3R   (1 Only)  $ 649.96
X7R    (20nly)  $ 849.95
X1000RBL    dOnfy)   $1499.96
Accessories
Dynacharger 240 with 4
AA batteries  $   27.46
Maxell UDXLII C-90
Cassettes  5 for $18.99
Many headphones, cartridges, equalizers and
microphones on sale.
Many other Demo's
offered at
RED TAG PRICESI
e  Manufacturer's warranties apply •  No telephone I
orders/quotes please • All [
sales final.
Beceuee of our low pricing    we    heve    been I
requested to no quote or I
print  prices  thet  could I
leed to ell out price were. [
Main Centre: 556 Seymour St. 687-5837
Car Centre: 2696 E. Hastings St. 254-1601
AIWA

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128413/manifest

Comment

Related Items