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The Ubyssey Mar 17, 1978

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Array 10,000 join Ont. march
Canadian University Press
Ten thousand chanting, shouting students marched on the
Ontario legislature Thursday as part of a series of protests
against education cutbacks and unemployment in three
provinces.
Students from more than a dozen Ontario colleges and
universities gathered at the University of Toronto and marched
to the legislature at Queen's Park shouting, "they say cutback,
we say fight back,'' and' 'cut Bill (premier Davis), not back.''
At Queen's Park, students heard messages of support from
faculty and support staff associations, from student organization
in the Atlantic provinces, the Prairies, B.C. and from the
National Union of Students in Ottawa. The rally had been endorsed by the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty
Associations and by the Ontario Federation of Students.	
Just before the demonstration    front 0f the legislature and jam-
THE UBYSSEY
t
Vol. LX, No. 63
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 17, 1978
228-2301
started, occupations at two institution!? ended so that students
could attend the rally. The occupations at Guelph University
and Ryerson Polytechnical Institute pressed for cancellation of
classes so that all students, staff
and faculty could attend the rally.
A similar occupation at the
University of Toronto ended the
day before, when students said
they had won their most important
goal — publicity for the rally.
Occupations at Trent University
and Carleton University last week
were successful in closing those
institutions for the day of the rally.
Members of both opposition
parties and a representative of the
Ontario Federation of Labor spoke
to the students and were well
received.
But both Davis and Harry
Parrott, minister of colleges and
universities, refused to speak to
the demonstration.
And in Winnipeg, 1,000 people
demonstrated against unemployment and provincial government
policies at the opening of the
Manitoba   legislature   Thursday.
Carrying placards with slogans
like "unemployment won't solve
deficit" and "unemployment won't
bring revenue," they paraded in
Coffee bar
referendum
fails to pass
In a burst of apathy, UBC
students failed to give the Alma
Mater Society enough votes to
reach a quorum for the referendum on the proposed SUB coffeehouse, held on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday.
The AMS needed 3,510 votes but
managed to get only 2,745 ballots,
including four spoiled ones. The
responses they did get showed that
1,735 students favored the proposal
to spend $20,000 on the new f acility,
against 1,006 dissenters.
The proposal also needed a two-
thirds majority but received only
62 per cent in favor.
med its entrance.
Manitoba's new Conservative
government has been laying off
government and crown corporation workers saying it must
reduce the government's deficit.
The demonstration was
organized by the Manitoba
Federation of Labor and joined by
the Manitoba Government Employees Association, the Unemployed University Graduates
Association, members of the
University of Manitoba Faculty
Association, Students, Metis, Indians and unemployed.
In Saskatoon, 400 demonstrating
students greeted Saskatchewan
premier Alan Blakeney when he
emerged from a guest lecture in
the arts building at the University
of Saskatchewan here Thursday.
The students demanded more
government funding for the
university to eliminate need for a
nine per cent tuition fee increase
announced by the university's
board of governors March 9.
Demonstrators also protested
increasing unemployment. "Well,
my children have been able to get
jobs," said Blakeney. "You'll be
out of a job soon," shouted a voice
from the back of the crowd.
Five thousand Alberta students
demonstrated their opposition to
tuition increases and inadequate
government funding of education
during a rally in Edmonton
Wednesday.
They chanted, "we won't pay
more for less" and gathered on the
steps of the Alberta legislature to
demand that the government
loosen the public purse strings to
ease the financial pressure that
has led to tuition increases of 10 per
cent and cutbacks in services
which have eroded the quality of
education.
But a debate on the floor of the
legislature immediately following
the protest showed that the cries
fell on deaf ears.
Alberta premier Peter Lougheed
indicated during the two and one-
half hour debate on funding that
the province's universities may get
more government support for
utility costs, but that is as far as
extra support is likely to go.
—craig heale photo
UBYSSEY REPORTER HEATHER CONN finds UBC can be difficult for a handicapped person. Conn spent
Thursday touring campus in a wheelchair as part of Handicapped Awareness Week. Curbs and a lack of
wheelchair ramps and elevators make normally simple, everyday trips around the university an arduous
odyssey (see story below).
Wheelchair tour hits barriers
By HEATHER CONN
After spending several hours
confined to a wheelchair on the
UBC campus, one can readily
appreciate the countless inconveniences, hidden obstacles
and time-consuming journeys that
face handicapped students.
Most students are totally
oblivious to the every day
problems that face handicapped
students. For someone confined to
a wheelchair, the simple task of
going to classes becomes a constant battle against curbs, a
struggle in manoeuverability and
You thought Stan was weird
Vowing to fight for the underdog and uphold Christian
values, Bible-thumping Vancouver alderwoman Bernice
Gerard has announced she will
run for election as chancellor of
Simon Fraser University.
"If I won this election it would
be a victory for the underdog,"
GERARD.. .
God on her side?
Gerard said in an interview
Thursday. "Usually it's a rich
person who gets these things."
Gerard, a Pentecostal pastor
who led her flock on a march
against nudity on Wreck Beach
last summer, said she is running
for the position to provide a link
between SFU and the "ordinary
people."
She said she does not believe
her image as a hard-line upholder
of traditional Christian morality
would clash with the university's
image as haven for free thinking
and even radicalism.
"My profile is highly Christian
— I believe in a lot of old-
fashioned things like the Ten
Commandments.
"But I'm very much for
academic freedom and the
pursuit of truth because that is
part of Christianity. I really
strongly believe in a strong, open
university with participation by
all members of the community."
An orphan who was shuffled
around foster homes during her
youth, Gerard is running against
current SFU board of governors
and senate member Paul Cote.
When asked what she thought
of her opponent, Gerard confessed she did not know who she
is running against.
"I am running in a gesture of
good spirit," she said. "I'm not
going to hold my breath but I'm a
serious candidate."
Gerard admitted her
knowledge of education issues is
limited, but said her experience
as a school teacher and Simon
Fraser campus chaplain would
help her in the job.
"I don't have a bunch of issues
like Stan Persky," she said.
Persky was defeated in his bid for
the UBC chancellorship last
month by industrialist J. V.
Clyne.
an endless search for ramps to
make entry into buildings easier.
For handicapped people at UBC,
student life is not an easy one.
Many public areas on campus
are totally inaccessible to people in
wheelchairs. SUB is nearly impossible.
Only one ramp exists at the north
side of SUB so handicapped
students must often go all the way
around to enter the building. The
north cement path is steep and
bumpy, making the wheelchair
hard to control.
The Pit is a place few people in
wheelchairs could venture into
without considerable help. No
ramp leads into the Pit from
outside SUB, and one is forced to
ask passers-by to be carried down
the stairs in order to get inside.
The SUB auditorium is next to
impossible for students in
wheelchairs to enter.
Once inside SUB, the only means
of getting to other floors is by
elevator. When the elevator doors
open on the second floor, one encounters a service area used by
janitors.
Newcomers confined to a
wheelchair would find it difficult to
find their way out of the area
without some help.
And although there is a ramp
leading onto East Mall from the
west side of SUB, travelling up the
hills to Main Mall is a steep and
tough trip. The entire route is
uphill and without someone to push
the wheelchair, it's a lot of work to
make forward progress.
Even a normal trip to the library
becomes a long and difficult ordeal
for a student in a wheelchair.
The route leading from Main
Library to Sedgewick is extremely
steep and quite dangerous for
someone who must control the
speed of a wheelchair. The ground
is bumpy and makes motion highly
uncomfortable.
Sedgewick library is also a
difficult place.
A wheelchair is too wide to fit
through the turnstiles and one
must enter the library through the
only way available — the
mergency exit gate. The handicapped student must reach over
the gate and press a bar on the
other side of the door; a difficult
task in itself.
But Sedgewick does have one
place which is easily accessible to
the physically handicapped — its
washrooms. They are spacious and
the facilities are well-equipped to
meet the needs of students confined to wheelchairs.
The only way out of Sedgewick
for the handicapped is the east
entrance facing Main, Main
Library. Going back up the extremely steep hill is time-
consuming and often handicapped
students are not given adequate
time between classes to move from
one building to the next.
Buchanan has only one ramp to
enable students in wheelchairs to
enter the building. Although it has
four floors, Buchanan has no
elevator to allow handicapped
people to reach their classes
easily.
Within Buchanan itself, lecture
halls are cluttered with chairs and
tables and there is not much room
to manoeuvre a wheelchair. Since
one is unable to move down the
aisle   stairs   into   a   seat,   it   is
Seepage 3: STAIRS Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, Marth  17, 1978
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N Friday, March  17, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
'Banks on anti-union campaign'
By GLEN SCHAEFER
Chartered banks are using every
means possible, including scare
tactics and monetary rewards, to
stop the drive for bank employee
unionization, an organizer for the
Service, Office and Retail Workers
Union of Canada charged Thursday.
Gail Borster told students in SUB
205 that banks are rewarding
employees at branches that stay
out of the union with extra vacation
time and other bonuses.
Emplojrees   at   branches   that
have been certified are being held
up in lengthy contract
negotiations, she said.
And the banks are also actively
working against attempts to
organize their workers by holding
monthly meetings in some branches to scare the staff away from
unions, said Borster. At these
meetings the employees are advised to tell the bank about any
union approaches.
Another obstacle in SORWUC's
drive for bank worker certification
is the actions of other unions at
tempting to organize bank
workers. The United Steelworkers
Union has signed up bank employees in Saskatchewan, she said
and the Canadian Labor Congress
has attacked SORWUC directly by
offering membership to bank
employees currently certified by
SORWUC.
Borster said SORWUC members
are suspicious of the CLC. "When
the bank workers first tried to get
certification, they went to all the
established unions. The workers
were told that certification for
bank workers was impossible."
"SORWUC was the only union
that tried."
SORWUC was formed in the mid-
seventies as an independent
Canadian union for working
women in poorly paid and
traditionally   non-unionized  jobs.
Borster said that originally, the
Canadian Labor Relations Board
maintained that bank workers had
to get union certification on a
national level. This policy barred
bank employees from certification,
because no union or group of
employees was capable of
organizing the workers on a
national level, she said.
But in June, 1977 the CLRB
announced that a branch of a bank
was an appropriate Dargaining
unit. This made union certification
a much easier job and encouraged
the established unions to take part
in bank employee certification, she
said.
Borster expressed fears that the
combined efforts of the chartered
banks and the large unions would
cause the end of SORWUC.
Compared to big unions she called
SORWUC a "do-it-yourself" union.
"No one gets appointed to any
positions in the union. Decisions in
the individual bargaining units are
made solely by the employees
concerned."
"I hope they don't find a way to
stop us."
UCBC aid report
'not adequate'
nond o'brien photo
LOST PADDLER LOOKS for way out of turbulent waters of UBC's Empire Pool after taking wrong turn off
Spanish Banks. Stan Woods had to warily avoid kayak traps placed in pool by irate swimsuit types who were
blasted out of water for duration of kayak races. Naturally event was a big splash.
By MARCUS GEE
Student board of governors
member Paul Sandhu Thursday
criticized a Universities Council
committee student aid report,
saying it would do nothing to increase accessability to post-
secondary education.
"I think the UCBC is kidding
itself if it thinks this report would
improve accessibility. The report
doesn't get to the heart of the
matter."
But Byron Hender, UBC director
of student awards and one of the
authors of the report, said the
Alma Mater Society has ignored
the report and overlooked its good
points.
"I am a bit disappointed that the
students haven't said 'boo' about
this report. If we don't get behind
the report we are likely to see it
gather dust on the shelf."
The report, prepared by an ad-
hoc committee of the Universities
Council, was written to assess
"more specifically how the funds
available through the B.C. Student
Assistance Program might be used
to eliminate financial barriers" to
getting a university or college
education.
'Science ignores students' requests'
By CHRIS ELENIAK
Science students' requests for a
lounge and permanent office have
been consistently ignored by the
science faculty, science undergraduate: society members said
Thursday.
"We have been trying to get a
lounge for two years now, but have
met consistent refusal," said Hugh
Welch, past president of the
science undergraduate society.
"Last year we did not try to do
anything publicly. However we
now feel we should bring this issue
out in the open," said Welch.
Ace Ducey
hired on as
chief flack
The UBC administration announced Thursday it has found a
new director for Information
Services to replace former director
Arnie Myers, who resigned last
September for personal reasons.
Brant Ducey, who starts at UBC
March 28, was formerly director of
public relations for Canadian
National Railways in Montreal and
worked in CNR's public relations
department for 17 years.
Ducey, is married, has three
children and holds a master's
degree in journalism from the
University of Oregon.
"Basically we are sick of being
diplomatic. We haven't had any
response from this approach," said
Brian Knight, SUS vice-president.
"Dean Vokoff has waffled the
issue for over a year now. For the
past three weeks I've been chasing
around after the deans and I can't
afford to any longer because of
exams," he said.
Knight said department head
approval is necessary for SUS to
get any space in science faculty
buildings, but the heads have
refused to meet SUS representatives.
"At a meeting Vokoff asked six
other department heads if they
would meet with me. They
refused," Knight said.
"This is unfortunate as I am also
the elected representative for
science students and I feel that I
am not being treated properly.
They will not talk to me in person."
Chemistry department head
Charles McDowell said the issue
was mainly a question of finding
available space.
"There is lack of space in the
departments. There is not lack of
sympathy," he said.
"They (SUS) wanted a lounge
centrally on campus, however the
departments are terribly short of
space. The society used to have a
room but they had to close it up
because of the awful mess that was
made," McDowell added.
"I suggest that the SUS should go
to the administration in getting
space," he said.
As well, SUS may not even have
an office next year, according to
Alma Mater Society president
Bruce Armstrong.
"An executive (faculty) member
intimated that we might not even
get an office. We find this very
disturbing. It is a very serious
matter," he said. The present SUS
office is in the Auditorium Annex.
"This whole area is grad student
offices. They (Math) can just
decide not to give us an office if the
Math Department has more grad
students next year," said Welch.
And Knight said its location caused
problems.
"I can't see the Math department giving it (the office) back to
us. We made too much noise. I can
see it being too annoying for the
grad students," said Knight.
The anti-calendar being
published by SUS may be another
reason for the Math department
not wanting to give them the office
back, he said.
SUS has also been unsuccessful
in obtaining vending machines or
lockers in science buildings, said
Armstrong.
"We have also met refusal on
other issues such as vending
machines and lockers. We were
told that the vending machines
would encourage pests," he said.
"The faculty is not willing to
support us in attempting to get a
fair deal," he said.
"The issue (of the lounge) has
been riding a long time. We feel
that we have given them sufficient
time to respond."
It recommends supplementary
grants to needy full-time students
and grants to part-time graduate
students, as well as special aid to
correct regional inequalities.
Sandhu said that although the
report is generally "a step in the
right direction," the recommendations that deal with criteria for
assessing a student's financial
independence and for assessing
what a parental contribution
should be are retrogressive.
The report recommends that dependent students who can prove
financial need should be given
some supplementary grant
assistance.
But Sandhu said the report fails
to deal with the current unfair
practice of assessing dependence
on the basis of the student's status
before he begins post-secondary
education.
He said that if the report is accepted a student entering the first
year of university can still be
judged on his degree of dependence
in Grade 12.
Hender defended the dependence
criteria recommended in the
report, saying they would be
rationalized by tying the dependence criteria to the student's real
financial strength.
Hender also defended the report
against Sandhu's charge that it
would be unfair to tie the size of a
parental contribution to the
parent's net assets, as the report
recommends.
Sandhu said the net asset rule
would cut out parents who have
their money tied up in non-liquid
assets.
"You are going to put parents in
the position of having to sell their
house to send their kids to school."
Hender, however, said the net
asset criteria would tie the
parental contribution closer to the
family's true financial strength.
He said as an example that a
farmer with $1 million in land but
no steady income is more capable
of sending his son or daughter to
university than an executive with a
$20,000 salary and a variety of
expenses to meet.
Stairs stop wheelchairs
From page 1
Ever considered how much effort it entails to open
a door?
Door sills in UBC's buildings are a serious problem
for students in wheelchairs. Often handicapped
students must enter a building backward after
pushing their wheelchairs up and over the stubborn
door sills.
For most people, these small problems seem insignificant, but such inconveniences only add to
excess travel time for students in wheelchairs.
Although students in wheelchairs can do most
things other students can, travelling across campus
takes substantially more time and effort.
Most entries to buildings are highly inconvenient
for students in wheelchairs and to avoid curbs,
handicapped people must often take the long way
around. Most of the main buildings have ramps but
they are far more inaccessible than stairwells and
are often hidden from view.
In Angus, the ramp inside is extremely difficult to
find and the physically handicapped must often ask
for directions.
But some positive action has been taken to improve
the conditions of the physically handicapped on
campus.
After complaints by two handicapped students, the
physical plant installed a ramp at the auditorium
annex, which previously had only stairs. Page 4
THE       U BYSSEY
Friday, March 17, 1978
Fell obstacles
Precipitous stairways, hard-to-open doors, cramped
washrooms and all too few ramps — this is the reality for
UBC's handicapped students on campus and around the city.
This concrete discrimination against people confined to
wheelchairs is an error of omission — caused by the architects
and builders not thinking of the handicapped when designing
buildings or something as prosaic as sidewalks. As our
reporter Heather Conn found Thursday, the problem is
serious out at UBC, something Easter Seals won't correct, but
remodeling jobs on existing buildings and careful planning of
future buildings will correct.
The UBC administration, which like so many institutions
in the past ignored the problems buildings can present to the
handicapped, is now making efforts to make life more
pleasant for wheelchair-bound students and others.
It will have to squeeze lots of money out of a stingy
provincial government — not an easy task these days — but
we hope that a comprehensive program of building
improvements can be completed as soon as possible. It's easy
to forget this problem when we have our full physical
capabilities, but a ride in a wheelchair, as Conn learned, can
be very persuasive.
Bye bye, Bernice
The news that Bernice Gerard is running for chancellor of
Simon Fraser University can only be called a Godsend—for
UBC.
The farther Gerard, a former alleged UBC chaplain,
fundamentalist preacher and Vancouver Alderwoman, takes
her right-wing ministerings away from here, the better.
Perhaps this campaign will keep her away from fighting
nudity on Wreck Beach. Should she try to eliminate nudity in
the beaches below SFU, she will have a tough time when she
encounters the rifle range located between SFU and Burrard
Inlet.
Letters
We're all labelled
I was walking by the Main
Library last week and I noticed
there was a tarp covering the clock
tower. Written on the tarp was
"Women's Weak."
Noting the phallic connotations
of the design, I took it to be a
sarcastic and somewhat
aggressive objection to Women's
Week. The supersubtley of t h e
display almost slipped my attention but it did cause me to
reflect on my first year here at
UBC.
It is wonderful that such openness and such an atmosphere of
mutual respect and interest exists
here. How I chuckled recently at
The Pole's witty racial slur on
Orientals and how great it is to see
posters in my residence proclaiming that it is "honger season"
in the library.
This is the only place I have been
where people can disdain others
simply by sex, race or faculty, with
no prejudice to their characters.
The labelling of people is helpful
also. Knowing that a red jacket
clothes a narrowminded sexist is
really comforting. The realization
that agriculture students are.
impudent because of their lack of
success at the chariot races is
really informative.
The piece of mind brought by the
Unsolved
It's all very well for a senate
committee to absolve the board of
governors election results, but the
problem still isn't solved. The only
person who has benefitted from
this is Basil Peters, who was put
over the top when more than 250
votes were cast for him at the
fraudulent engineering poll, while
fewer than 30 votes were cast for
anybody else.
If he were truly concerned with
maintaining an honest image on
campus, as he has often stated, he
would resign now and immediately
enter his name in an interim
election.
Larry Green
arts 4
assurance that my faculty, sex or
race will mold my personality is
extremely comforting. I'm also
relieved that individualistic
thought and distinction is no longer
necessary in the eyes of the student
(gee, if I were an engineer I
would've voted for Basil Peters
too!).
In summary, I'd like to say that I
think it's great that people can
mock, put down and oppress others
with such a wide choice, and think
they are witty and fun-loving
people at the same time. That UBC
has many facets is a reflection of
the hardworking students who go
here.
To some of them I owe thanks for
the introduction to alienation, big
city style. To some of them I
acknowledge their help in shaping
my opinions about people,
especially those who helped with
jocks, hongers, women's libbers,
gears, aggies and artsies.
Thank God I'm jus' a white bo'.
Mitchell Hong
Joke defenders miss wider issues
In defending racial jokes, Bill
Kolida and Barry Lam neglect a
wider issue. They claim (March
14) that racial jokes are "intended
to release racial tension and
competitive pressures" between
races, and they point to their
mixed-ethnic upbringing in which
"we didn't care what we called
each other . . . because the offensive nature of ethnic slurs has
worn itself out."
A glance at these two statements
reveals a contradiction in attitudes: However healthy their
upbringing was, it is obvious that
racial tensions do exist in the here
and now (a fact which they
recognize in the first statement
quoted).
Two distinct social situations are
implicit in their letter. One refers
to kids of varied racial
backgrounds growing up in Canada
learning more or less equally how
to be Canadians; the other involves
more recent immigrants and
visitors to Canada. It is one thing to
have a set of mutually derogatory
"in jokes" within a group of people
who grew up together, and it is
another thing to publish racial
jokes in the faces of newcomers
who, not having benefited from
Kolida and Lam's east-end upbringing, are justifiably offended
by what they read.
How about a little tact?
Jim Schoening
arts 4
Joke rekindles protests
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 17, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Chris Gainor
"Whip it out," yelled Les Poophead to a startled Pee-Peeface Gee. "Piss
on the crowd," Craig Crap and David Defecation. Edmond O'Shit let loose
a grand yellow arc all over an ecstatic Fecesface Ford. Bill Turdman
dropped his guitar and spit blood on Heather Haemorrhoid and Steve
Suppository while Gray Piles put safety pins through the buttocks of
Ptnch-a-loaf Promislow and Stoolnose Strong flogged "dead meat liberally
over Nicholas Peed and Gunk Edwards. Glen Shitter pogoed on top of the
drooling mouth of Bum-waste Bough, who was entangled with the
outhouse shaped body of Paisley Pisshead. Urine Huey fell over' his drum
kit and slashed his face to ribbons on the broken beer bottle of Doo-doo
Read. Dave Diarrhea tatooed a sunflower seed shaped anus on Mike
Puding's naughty bits while Piss Gainor took a leak into a plugged-in amp
and short circuited his entire plumbjng system. The scene was typical for a
gig by that repulsive punk crock band Used—to-Pee. But through the
raunchy flatulence and noisy taating rang the phone. Snotface Eleniak
answered it and fell to the floor laughing and belching. "But get this — his
name is Joey Shithead!" Everyone broke up. What a today name for a
punker.
A
To Bill Kolida and Barry Lam:
I question seriously your
judgements (March 14) as to what
some people insist as jokes.
It makes no difference what kind
of Samaritan intention the
anonymous editor has (even this is
doubtful), the fact remains that
few people, if any, are amused.
Supposing the intention of this joke
is good (?), then this editor is
actually trying to denounce racism
through ironic satires and sarcasm
(some call it insults).
I ponder; if one-method does not
work, is it intelligent to insist using
the same method over and over?
Obviously this kind of joke — no
matter what it means to do — only
serves to rekindle protests. If
calling us Chinks once hurts, will
calling us Chinks a thousand times
make us feel any better?
If you recognize that "of course
this will not work with all people,"
then why don't you encourage
something that works better, such
as braving racism fact-to-face?
Instead, you objected to objections.
The objectors did not instigate
anything — they are merely
criticizing what has happened.
It is perhaps true that ethnic
slurs have come out of the streets
and perhaps have even worn out
there, but should one foster such an
uprise in an institute where one is
supposed to learn about the cures
to this type of thinking? The
university should be the breeding
ground to change this type of
negative and ignorant attitude that
damages the national unity more
than anything else. Remember, we
do not have to accept or practise
what is being practised, east or
west.
Finally, thank you Totem Park
housing committee for doing
justice; I sincerely hope that in
future you will circulate The Pole
throughout this campus so that we
may be further aware of condemning evidences.
Allan Li
Not funny
With their suggestion "to allow
offensive gestures to pass as
outlets of tension," Bill Kolida and
Barry Lam would have justified
Nazism and the Jewish Holocaust
as Germany letting off steam for
national tensions brought on by the
Depression.
The lynching of blacks in the
American South was just some
farmhands taking it easy after a
hard day's work.
Boys, racism can never be
funny.
Anne Yee
science 2 Friday, March  17, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
By STEPHEN ST. MICHAEL
Last fall a great deal of excitement was generated in international political and human rights
circles over Jakarta's projected
release of some of Indonesia's
many Tapols — a contraction of
'tahanan politik' or political
prisoner.
Since the abortive communist
coup of 1965, which resulted in the
systematic roundup and incarceration of elements "sympathetic to communist revolution
in Indonesia, the presence of vast
numbers of untried political
prisoners has persistently
threatened to scuttle the Suharto
regime's attempts to improve Indonesia's international status.
With the implementation of what
Jakarta has chosen to call 'operasi
sakti' — operation supernatural
power, the right-wing government
has made its greatest attempt yet
to deal with this sensitive issue.
Trick
Its prescribed aim is to release
and resettle all but a handful of the
country's 31,461 political prisoners.
Kopkamtib (The Command for the
Restoration of Security and Order)
chief of staff Admiral Sudomo,
unveiled the program initially in
December, 1976 outlining a phased
release of 28,390 "B" category
prisoners.
The scheduled release of 10,000
prisoners last December was the
first of three phases that would see
all 28,000 released before 1980,
leaving only 1,925 "A" category
and 1,146 "X" and "Y" category
prisoners in jails throughout Indonesia.
Careful consideration should
however be made before we accept
and wholeheartedly endorse this
program prima facie. In the first
place Annesty International cites
Indonesia's Tapol population at
between 55,000 and 100,000,
ctradicting those figures put
forward by the Indonesian
government.
There are growing fears from
various quarters that the government is simply planning a
bookkeeping trick with its
detainees, setting them free one
day only to have them return the
next for 'voluntary participation'
in resettlement programs to less
desnely populated areas of the
archipelago.
Conditions
Before a prisoner is to be
released, however, he must first
meet five conditions. They are as
follows: the government must be
satisfied that it has succeeded in
readjusting the mental condition of
the detainee, the prisoner must
have demonstrated his acceptance
of the guiding 'Pancasila' principles upon which Indonesian
society is predicated, and the
prisoner's family must be willing
to receive the individual.
This may not seem a major block
to returning these persons to
society, but in many cases the
families are reticent to
acknowledge any links with jailed
family members because of the
traumatic events that followed the
abortive coup.
And the former neighbors of the
detainee must be willing to receive
him or her back. This too has been
a major holdup to the reintegration
of these individuals as a result of
the past programs of the government to foster hate and suspicion of
these elements. Also, there must
be a job waiting for the detainee on
his release.
Apart from these stringent
requirements, many of those who
are released will never in fact see
freedom. By transmigrating those
prisoners from Java to other parts
of the nation, the Jakarta government has created a poorly concealed   program   aimed   at   the
Stephen St. Michael, arts 4, is a
member of Amnesty UBC. Perspectives is open to all members of
the UBC community.
Isolated colony
holds Indonesia's
political prisoners
f7*jZ Philippines
"-'.«=»
Jakarta
Moluccas
INDONESIA . .. prisoners taken to Bum, far away from Java
removal of ex-prisoners from the
mainstream of Indonesian life.
In doing so, the government has
achieved the permanent removal
of "potentially agitative" elements
from Java — the nexus of Indonesian political, social and
cultural life; and the creation of
what can only be construed as
permanent prison islands, of which
Buru is the most notorious
example.
Lying 1,400 miles to the east of
Jakarta in the Moluccas, Buru
island has been the recipient of
some 11,600 Javanese political
prisoners over the last eight years.
Unsubstantiated stories of
brutality and hardship had
sporadically slipped through the
veil of secrecy that customarily
surrounded the penal colonies.
In an unprecedented move in
mid-December, the Jakarta
government opened the island to a
five-day tour by Indonesian and
foreign journalists.
Buru's inmates consist of some
of Indonesia's most renowned
poets, academics, journalists, film
directors  and intellectuals.
Here, detainees are forced to eke
out a subsistence level existence
through rice cultivation and
supplemental activities such as toy
making and the sale of duck eggs.
They told of systematic beatings
and maltreatment by prison officials, particularly in the early
days of the camp's establishment.
By and large, the conditions of
life in the camp are reasonably
good as prisons go. But the hardships of Buru are not the tangible
scars and disease that with care
may be removed, but are the
traumas of complete isolation from
the land and people one loves.
Pramoedya Ananta Toer,
probably Indonesia's greatest
living novelist, remarked that "we
are longing for Java . . . only about
20 or 30 people would stay if we
were all given a choice."
The prisoners' isolation is both
physical and psychological  in
nature. The infertile Sungai
Waiapu plain on the eastern end of
the island is the only habitable
region of the island, the other half
being dominated by disease-ridden
swamps and jungles. The waters
surrounding Buru are shark infested, completing the isolation of
the "migrants."
Despite the conditions of hardship, only about 50 detainees have
attempted to escape from Buru.
The largest breakout (and the only
one acknowledged by the
authorities) occurred in 1973 when
48 men escaped from the Unit 2
camp. Twenty-one were recaptured after a three-month roundup
campaign, 21 have perished in the
jungle or attempting to swim to
nearby islands.
The prisoners of the camps
related that harsh treatment now,
as in 1973, was the prime
motivating force for the desperate
attempts to reach freedom. But the
isolation of the penal island goes
far beyond mere physical
alienation. There is one television
for the 10,000 islanders.
Needless to say, few ever get to
watch it. Those that are near
enough to have access to the TV
see it turned off before the world
news. As such, few prisoners had
heard of the fall of Saigon or the
death of Mao Tse-tung. Prisoners
are not allowed newspapers,
magazines or books, except for
some religious tracts. Radios are
forbidden.
Mistake
The journalists witnessed the
cumulative effects of inflexible
rules and bureaucratic ineptitude
in the form of what, for lack of a
better phrase, may be called
broken spirit. It is not uncommon
for a prisoner to be told that he is to
be released, only to be told that it
was all a mistake — after he has
disposed of his possessions.
An interesting paradox surfaced
during the tour; while western
journalists were dismayed at the
mental state of the prisoners,
Indonesian journalists criticized
the imposition of western notions of
justice and morality upon the
Indonesian context, and
rationalized the situation, arguing
that political detention was still
very much a necessity.
The Jakarta government made
much of its release of some 1,500
prisoners from Buru in mid-
December. However it is still a fact
that 85 per cent of those released
were from camps elsewhere.
Though we should welcome the
recent release of 10,000 prisoners
from jails and camps throughout
Indonesia, we must view with
caution recent trends that threaten
to establish a permanent prison
island at Buru; its ramifications
suggest the institutionalization and
social acceptance of the notion of
internment for those individuals
less than sympathetic to the
policies of the government.
THINKING OF TEACHING?
The University of Victoria is offering a Secondary
Internship Teacher  Education Programme in 1978-79.
ELIGIBILITY
Candidates must have an acceptable undergraduate degree from a
recognized University, have the necessary subject preparation in
two approved teaching areas for secondary schools, be prepared
to intern in Alberni, Nanaimo, Courtenay or Campbell River
Districts, and show evidence of commitment and skill in working
with young people. Applications are encouraged from individuals
with life experiences in addition to their formal education.
PROGRAMME
Academically admissible candidates will be interviewed by
University and participating School District personnel in early
May. Selected candidates will then attend a week's orientation in
their school district in late May, attend UVic for July and August
course work, train in their school district from September, 1978
to April, 1979, and complete their academic work on UVic
campus during May/June, 1979. Successful candidates are then
recommended for a Teaching Certificate.
FINANCIAL AID
Interns will be eligible for existing student aid as administered by
the University's Financial Aid Office. Some financial assistance in
the summer months is anticipated. In addition school districts
will provide a stipend to Interns during their 8-month residency.
TO APPLY
For detailed information and application forms, phone 477-6911
ext. 6636 or write immediately to:
The Co-Ordinator, Secondary Internship Programme,
Faculty of Education, University of Victoria,
P.O. Box 1700, Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y2
Applications post-marked after midnight MARCH 31, 1978 will
not be accepted.
SCARBORO FOREIGN MISSION SOCIETY
The life of a Scarboro Missionary is based on
the conviction that the value of each individual
person surpasses the most sophisticated technical
accomplishments. We are convinced that only in
Christ does the mystery of man take on light.
We invite you to share in our
mission as a Priest or Lay Person.
Please send me more information.
Name	
Address^
Age	
.F.ducation.
UBC
Mail to:  Formation-Education Department
Scarboro Missions,
2685 Kingston Rd., Scarboro,.Ont. M1M 1M4 Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday.- March  17,  1978
'Tween classes
TODAY
AMNESTY UBC
Election meeting, all members must
attend, noon, SUB 212A.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's committee meeting, noon,
SUB 130.
CSA
Chinese   painting   class,   5:30   p.m.,
SUB 125.
BAH IA CLUB
Informal   talk   on   the Bahai  faith
noon, SUB 115.
GSA
GSA    folk    night,     no    admission
charge,    everyone    welcome,    free
coffee, bar facilities, 8 p.m., garden
room, Graduate Student Centre.
SUNDAY
SPORTS CAR CLUB
T'Bird car rally in the lower Fraser
Valley, 95 per cent paved roads,
8:30 a.m.. Airport Hyatt Hotel.
MONDAY
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
Want  team  managers for   1978-79,
Hot
flashes
Anyone want to
waif for Godot?
Are you still waiting for Godot
after everyone else has left the
theatre?Does endgame mean the
final moves of chess to you?
Maybe it's because you don't
know anything about the theatre
of the absurd. Drama critic Martin
Esslin will speak on the subject
Saturday at 8:15 p.m. in IRC 2.
Ecological law
When you bite into that juicy,
luscious B.C. apple in your lunch,
ever wonder if you'll wake up the
next morning deathly ill from
pesticides that some chemical
farmer may have used on his
crop?
The Vancouver People's Law
School is sponsoring a free course
on Environmental Law consisting
of three sessions on Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the Kitsilano
branch library. Pre-register at
734-1126.
Huge selection of Mens and Womens
Original FRYE boots and casuals
516 W.Hastings    770 Granville
BLENHEIM
IMPORTS
SERVICE
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
REASONABLE RATES
FACTORY TRAINED
MECHANICS
3299 W. 4th Ave., Van.
738-0910
applications    due   today,    4    p.m.,
room 208, War Memorial gym.
SRA UNEMPLOYMENT C'TEE
Meeting,  everyone  welcome, noon,
SUB 212A.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Linda Light: Powerlessness and
power in the feminist movement,
7:30 p.m., Mildred Brock lounge.
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
Dona Sturmanis — poetry reading,
noon, Mildred Brock lounge.
TUESDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
Volleyball,   5:30 p.m.,  TWSC  Gym
B.
HAMSOC
General   meeting, noon, room 358,
Brock Hall Annex.
Big or Small Jobs
ALSO GARAGES
BASEMENTS
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Committee    meeting,    noon,    SUB
130.
PSYCH STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Psychology party for profs, students
and friends, 5 to 10 p.m., SUB 212.
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
General   meeting,   4:30   p.m.,   SUB
260.
UBC CONTEMPORARY
DANCE CLUB
Regeneration    dance    performance,
7:30      p.m.,       Museum      of
Anthropology.
WEDNESDAY
UBC NDP
NDP leader Dave Barrett speaking,
noon, SUB auditorium.
PURIM AT HILLEL HOUSE
SUPPER AND
MEGILLEH READING
BRING GRAGERS
AND HAMENTASCHEN
Wednesday, 22 March,
5:30-8:00 p.m.
'78
TORONTO
SUMMER
FLIGHTS
ONE WAY
VANCOUVER/TORONTO
May 7
TORONTO/VANCOUVER
May 7
VANCOUVER/TORONTO
August 29
TORONTO/VANCOUVER
August 29
RETURN  TRIP
VANCOUVER/TORONTO/VANCOUVER
May 7-August 29
TORONTO/VANCOUVER/TORONTO
May 7-Airgust 29
C.U.T.S
B.C. Government Registration Number 233-2
$125.00*
$125.00*
$125.00*
$125.00*
$229.00*
$229.00*
* plus $8.00 tax
CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES
TRAVEL SERVICE LIMITED
Student Union Building, Room 100P,
Phone (604) 224-0111
WHY WAIT TILL FALL
JOIN NOW
Women's Athletic Association Has Openings For
MANAGERS
For The 1978-1979 Season
BADMINTON
BASKETBALL
BOWLING
CURLING
FENCING
FIELD HOCKEY
GOLF
GYMNASTICS
ICE HOCKEY
ROWING
SAILING
SKIING
SOCCER
SQUASH
SWIMMING & DIVING
TENNIS
TRACK & FIELD
VOLLEYBALL
Also needed MEMBER-AT-LARGE W.A.A.
Apply to room 208 for further information. Deadline:
Monday March 20, 1978 at 4:00 p.m.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 SEYMOUR ST.
688-2481
688-5333
(24 hrs)
O 9 9 ? » ? ?
SUMMER STORAGE
PROBLEMS
Cheer up — we will store everything
from a suitcase to a houseful of
furniture — at a low monthly cost.
Rent your own private locker — you
keep the key. Easy 7-day a week
access.
RESERVE YOUR LOCKER NOW
(Palletized storage also available)
DOWNTOWN U-LOK STORAGE
864 Cambie Street, Downtown Vancouver, V6B 2P6
LTD.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
j \
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c,
Commercial ^- 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Boom 241, S.U.B., UBQ, Van., B.C. V6tlW§.
5 — Coming Events
FREE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE Lecture Prof. Martin Esslin, former head
of drama for the BBC in Britain who
now teaches at Stanford University,
speaks on "The Theatre of the Absurd" *at 8:15 p.m. in Lecture Hall
No. 2 of the Woodward IRC on Saturday (March 18). He's regarded as
one of the world's leading theatre
critics and is the author of a book
with the same title as his lecture.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
'76 HONDA WAGON, very clean, $3,300.
669-3213 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Dealer
No.   D00526A.
ORGANICALLY grown Okanagan fruit
and vegetables. Wholesale prices to
bulk. Free Delivery. 738-8838.
11 — For Sale — Private
FOR SALE — 1976 Yamaha 500 ec
8500 miles, like new. Phone after 7
p.m.   434-4009. 	
40 — Messages
20 — Housing
TO   SHARE   2   BDRM.   furnished  bsmt.
suite,   available   May   1.   $150   month
each.  14th and Crown. 228-0691, Brian.
ENGLISH MAJORS! Don't you think
your professors will want you to see
"Islands in the Stream?" Subfilms'
weekend   presentation.
HAPPY    BIRTHDAY    P.B.    Love    and
kisses, B.L. (Soon to be B.B.)
65 — Scandals
85 — Typing
PROFESSIONAL TYPING on IBM Selectric. Thesis, essay, etc. Kits area.
Standard rates. Phone Lynda, 732-
0047.
TYPING ESSAYS, THESIS from legible
copy. Fast, efficient service. Rngltsh,
French, Spanish.  324-9414.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
669-8479.
FAST, accurate typist will do typing at
home. Standard rates. Please phone
anytime, 263-0286.
30 — Jobs
TRAVEL
THE MAGIC TRIANGLE
VANCOUVER-WHITEHORSE
-YELLOWKNIFE
Guys & Gals
Field Workers and Jr. Executive
management training and
experience, in marketing and
promotion.
Above average to
HIGH INCOME
WIN $1,000. SCHOLARSHIPS
$1,000. PRODUCT PRIZES
WIN: A NEW HONDA CIVIC
734-4044 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Part time work available
during the year.
Student Summer Work	
THE TYNEHEAD Zoological Society
will be hiring students in biology,
agriculture, engineering, and education this summer to help with planning a wild animal park in Surrey.
For more information and applications see us on Tuesday, 21 March,
Room  166 MacMillan  at  12:30  p.m.
35 - Lost
LOST — One Eterna watch with engraving on the back. Sentimental value. Large reward. Phone 2244066,
ask for Chris.
A LADIES gold 'Jubilee' watch on Tuesday, 14th. Please return. Great sentimental   value.   Reward.   733-3877.
TYPING DONE. My home. Reas. rates.
IBM Selectric typewriter. Peggy,, 225-
9797.	
TYPING — 75c per page, IBM Selectric
term papers, etc Dunbar-Kita area.
Phone  Ingrid, 22*^481.
ELECTRIC TYPING: Fast efficient
work on Thesis and errays; 90c each
double   spaced  page.   873k)051.
TYPING FAST AND ACCURATE. 75c.
Ann  738-1518.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
TAYLOR BAY LODGE, Gabriola Island.
Enjoy comfortable accomodations,
good food — good vibes. Weekend
Special: $33 for two includes overnight stay, dinner Saturday, Sunday
breakfast. For reservations please
call  247-92U.
=ir=ir=Jr=ir=i[=Jr=nr=Jr=Jf=Jr=i|
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM
ddglirdcindrd^JidrfjSli: Visions of wilderness and apocalypse
Poems by third-year arts student Stephen Palubiski are featured on
this week's Page Friday Creative Arts page on PF 3.
Various activities which took place on campus during Women's Week
are reviewed on PF 5. We look at singer-musician Ferron, the cooperative publication Makara and the rape film, Not a Pretty Picture.
Djuna Barnes, an author contemporary with Eliot and Joyce, is
profiled on PF 2, as is male actress Charles Pierce.
On the music scene, last weekend's punk concert at the Japanese hall
is reviewed on PF 4, Randy Hansen's tribute to Jimi Hendrix is
reviewed on PF 8, and saxophonist Fraser MacPherson is reviewed on
PF 6.
The National Lampoon comedy show That's Not Funny, That's Sick is
reviewed on PF 7.
Vista appears on PF 9.
Cover illustration by Albrecht Durer. biography
/
Public slow to recognize Djuna Barnes
By CAROL READ
Djuna Barnes has been the lost writer of
what Gertrude Stein called the Lost
Generation. Among the expatriate artists
who gathered in Paris during the 1920s and
1930s, Barnes was well known and influential. She was published in The Little
Review and was a friend of Ezra Pound,
William Carlos Williams, James Joyce, T. S.
Eliot, Robert McAlmon and Gertrude Stein.
Today Barnes is seldom read; she is excluded from anthologies and her literary
contributions are often ignored by
academics.
Perhaps Barnes' problem is her self-
created image of a non-commercial artist,
which can be misinterpreted to mean
somebody who is esoteric and unreadable.
She refuses to give information about
herself, as she believes that an artist's work
should stand on its own. She even says that
artists should only show their best work to
the public, and that an artist should create
for him or herself, without others in mind.
Bjarnes' ideas about literature are a
result of her unusual upbringing. She was
born on June 12, 1892, near Cornwall-on-
Hudson, a small town in upstate New York.
By 19th century rural American standards,
her family was eccentric: her father, Wald
DJUNA BARNES . .. unrecognized talent
Barnes, desired freedom from society, and
her grandmother, Zadel Barnes, was an
early feminist. Along with Wald Barnes'
British wife, Elizabeth Chappell, the family
moved to a 105-acre farm on Long Island,
where they were almost self-sufficient.
Because the Barnes thought public
schools were inadequate, Djuna was
educated at home by her grandmother. The
family was talented, so Djuna learned how
to play the banjo, violin and French horn,
and developed her painting and writing
skills.
At the age of 20, Barnes left home for New
York City, where she studied at the Pratt
Institute and the Art Students League. She
got a job as a newspaper reporter and
illustrator and began to be published in
small periodicals. She also became an actress and playwright; during the 1919-20
Provincetown Players season, her play,
Three From the Earth, appeared with the
premiere of Eugene O'Neill's The Dreamy
Kid.
By 1920, Barnes had established herself as
an independent writer. She wrote columns
and articles and painted newspaper
illustrations to support herself in her
Greenwich Village apartment, while she
worked on creative writing during her free
time. By 1923 her short stories were being
accepted by small periodicals, and two
years later her collection of Imagist poems,
The Book of Repulsive Women, was printed
by an obscure firm (as these poems have
little appeal). Three of her plays — Kurzy of
the Sea, Three From the Earth, and Irish
Triangle — were produced by the Province-
town Players and judged as too difficult by
critics and audiences.
However, the main artistic life was in
Paris, not the U.S. Barnes got a job interviewing famous people in Europe for
McCall's so that she could support herself,
and she left the States.
Her most rapid artistic growth occurred
during her years in Europe (mostly spent in
Paris). She became influenced by T. S.
Eliot, Joyce, Lawrence, Proust, and the
Elizabethans and Jacobians.
During the '20s, she wrote A Book, The
Dove (a play), Ryder, Ladies' Almanack,
and A Night Among the Horses. Vagaries
Malicieux (1922) has the most interest now,
as it is full of delightful sketches of pre-
Second World War Paris. Joyce is described
as a "quiet man. . . with the back head of an
African idol, long and flat" who dislikes art
talk and loves discussing Greek mythology;
he makes the Greeks.'naughty boys,' and
leaves them shaking hands, across the gulf,
with Rabelais."
Standing far above Barnes' other works is
her masterpiece and only attempt at a
"popular" novel, Nightwood. It was written
in 1933 and published in 1936 by Faber and
Faber. T. S. Eliot, the editor, wrote in his
preface that "what I would leave the reader
prepared to find is the great achievement of
a style, the beauty of phrasing, the
brilliance of wit and characterization, and a
quality of horror and doom very nearly
related to that of Elizabethan tragedy."
Nightwood differs from Barnes' earlier
works not only in beauty of language and
imagination, but in form. Barnes usually
wrote in a concise style and let her form be
her plot. Nightwood is like the house of one
of its characters, "giddy with plush and
whorled designs in gold . . . peopled with
Roman fragments."
It is surreal because it describes the life of
the night and dreams; instead of following a
normal time sequence, it depicts its
characters as figures in a dream.
The main figures are Nora, Dr. Matthew
O'Conner, and Robin Vote. Nora is in love
with Robin; Dr. O'Conner wishes he were a
woman. Robin wanders blindly between the
central characters as a catalyst who affects
others but is herself lost, without a sexual
identity.
She is introduced in the novel as an unconscious figure lying on a bed, her legs
"spread as in a dance, the thick lacquered
pumps looking too lively for the arrested
step." She is surrounded by potted palms
and caged birds; her body exhales a perfume the quality of "earth-flesh, fungi,
which smell of captured dampness." By the
end of the novel, she has so lost her identity
that she is neither person nor beast; she is
caught in a frieze between Nora and a dog
she tried to become.
Dr. O'Conner acts as the philosopher and
healer who is unable to stop the pain of his
and Nora's anguish. In Nightwood's most
famous chapter, Watchman, What of the
Night? he describes nightlife and dreams in
highly poetic language. While he recognizes
that life is painful and death is the only
relief, he advocates a heightened living, or
life in death. This is Barnes' message: we
should live as fully as we can.
Twenty years later, Barnes wrote her
second masterpiece, The Antiphon. Edwin
Muir wrote that "The Antiphon is one of the
greatest things that have been written in our
time, and that it would be a disaster if it
were never to be known."
The play, written in blank verse, portrays
a family gathering in Burley Hall, England
during the Second World War. By the end of
the play, the mother, Augusta, has completely changed costumes and identities
with Miranda, her daughter, who is an aging
actress.
Unfortunately, The Antiphon does not
have any popular appeal. It is obscure and
difficult to understand, like much of Barnes'
writings. Barnes seems to offer brilliant and
enjoyable writing only on the condition that
the reader makes an effort to understand.
Despite Barnes' difficulty at times,
Barnes is valuable for several reasons. She
was a great influence on the surreal school
of writing in the 1930s, and she pioneered a
new type of novel with Nightwood. Such
diverse writers as Anais Nin and Dylan
Thomas have been strongly influenced by
her. (Readers of Nightwood will recognize
Thomas-like use of language and images).
She is proof that Thomas did not invent his
unique style of writing.
Barnes also serves as a model of an independent woman writer. Women in the
past have had much less opportunity to
create than men have, and they suffer from
a lack of female models. Barnes is priceless
as an example to women writers.
Barnes is also priceless as an example of
how the public treats artists. Until recently,
she had been forgotten. Because she was
ignored by critics for so long, Barnes has
become a recluse who will not give any
personal information, if she decides to grant
an interview at all. Her attitude to the public
is understandable, but it hinders her acceptance as an important writer.
With the renewed interest in the writers of
the 1920s and 1930s and Anais Nin, hopefully
Barnes will be recognized for her true value.
Otherwise, the public will continue to be
deprived of a brilliant contribution to
literature.
Female impersonator throws balls into bawdy act
By DAVID MORTON
Adrian was dressed in a long sparkling
purple evening gown. Her hair was tinted a
slight purple, her face was heavily
powdered and rouged, and jewelry cascaded
around her neck like a silver niagara.
She was waiting for a Mr. Charles Pierce
to appear from his dressing room at the
Cave Theatre Restaurant. Pierce had just
performed a set of female impersonations to
a large appreciative audience, and Adrian
was one of many people now waiting to
shower him with compliments as soon as he
appeared.
Hearing a man introduce himself as a reporter from a local university newspaper to
the backstage manager, Adrian approached
him and inquired if he had heard of the
Coronation Drag Ball coming up at the
Commodore Ballroom in a few weeks time.
"Your paper should send along a reporter," she said. "I'm running for Empress.
But you understand that I am a man."
Female impersonation and the drag
community have for years been associated
with the weird fringes of society. The idea of
men dressing up as women has for many
represented one of the further extremes of
perversity. "If transvestites exist," the
attitude goes, "they belong in the closet."
But the recent success of the Canadian
move, Outrageous, has thrown a new light
on these so-called fringes. By directly
confronting audiences with the gay and drag
community the film erodes away their preconceptions and enables them to see this
part of society as a real, healthy group of
people who are different only because of the
different problems they must confront.
As Adrian said, "You can call me
anything you like — a drag queen, a fag,
anything. Just as long as you realize I'm not
sick in the head."
But Charles Pierce, who has been in the
business of female impersonation for 23
years now and who recently finished an
engagement at the  Cave,   believes   that
Outrageous was in a sense damaging to the
gays and drags.
"For people who have never seen this side
of entertainment, because they thought it
was sick, I suppose the movie did some
good," says Pierce. "But I can't imagine
anyone who hasn't seen a female impersonator anyways."
Pierce said the movie showed only the
sleazy side of the drag nightclubs and
completely avoided the fact that there were
any class acts in the business. Many female
impersonators who have made names for
themselves in the business play at only the
best nightclubs.
Pierce said he was also upset at the movie
because the script used many of his own
lines and costume ideas. One such line was
the Mae West joke, when she walks into the
nightclub full of men. She coos in her famous
bedroom voice, "I feel like a million,
tonight. I'll take 'em on two at a time."
Pierce said he was also offered the part of
Robin but turned it down because he felt that
CHARLES PIERCE ... as Bette Davis, one of his many roles
Craig Russell deserved some attention as an
impersonator. The part also demanded
someone younger than Pierce's 50-odd
years.
Pierce is now trying to dissociate himself
from the label of "female impersonator."
"As of this engagement," he said, "I will
no longer be introduced as a male actress, a
female impersonator, or a standup
comedienne. From now it's going to be:
'Appearing Tonight! Bette Midler, Mae
West, Carol Charming. . .' and that sort of
thing."
A female impersonator, claims Pierce, is
a second-class act that imitates the image of
woman in a very limited manner. They do
not impersonate people like Mae West or
Bette Davis, rather they present only a
certain type of woman. Pierce even considers various women as female impersonators for similar reasons.
Pierce considers his talent as one of impersonation — without the adjective of
female in front. "I am a human being, and
an entertainer," he says. "I do not put on
drag shows."
Pierce's show certainly does have class. It
is a well integrated presentation of
numerous woman personalities ranging
from actresses to wives of famous
politicians. He even threw in an impersonation of Jack Benny in one set.
While Pierce does not have the broad
voice range that Craig Russell displayed in
Outrageous, he capitalizes on quick one-
liners which characterize his women with
great accuracy.
Most of the jokes are bawdy in orientation
which emulate the iron-witted, larger-than-
life presences of the characters. The jokes
are not direct quotations from their movies
or public appearances. Pierce accompanies
his dialogue with mannerisms peculiar to
each personality to overcome the
limitations of his relatively static voice.
Of the many people Pierce portrayed, the
funniest by far was a battle of words bet-
See PF 3: PIERCE
Page Friday, 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, March  17,  1978 -,- >*
r
-Z\     Xs   «,
ft
creative arts
Poems for the modern wilderness
By STEPHEN PALUBISKI
Stephen Palubiski is in Arts 3 at UBC.
Page Friday's Creative Arts page publishes
submissions by UBC students in the areas of
poetry, short fiction, drama, graphic arts
and photography.
POEM WITHOUT PLOT
In a white house
high on an isolated hill
two old and wise men
contemplate their situation.
One claims he is the centre of the universe
that all things are known in him.
The other claims he knows nothing.
Breathless a third man enters
and wonders aloud at the coincidence
of three men
in a house
on a hill.
FEBRUARY DUSK
A peach sun low
in a hyacinth sky
casts a rose to the mountain peaks
dusts the valleys in violet
and with a silent sigh
swoons in the arms of the emerald sea.
* * * *
Illustration by Turer
BOUND
I plunged a knife
in a raging river
and watched the wounded water bleed.
Overhead blue birds swooned
giddy in the tightened air.
About me the trees whispered.
That night I dreamt I was clairvoyant
could fly
and create color.
But today I am a hunted man
haunted by fears
of high places and peacocks.
It leaves my mind so confused.
That water would bleed seems unreal
and birds and trees have their own fiction.
So now I wince and wonder —
"Do I remember this happening
or only sense it could?"
ANTI-MAN
Any day now I fear I'll take
to a life of wanton
wicked crime.
With unfounded hate
I'll murder my mother
gorge on her guts
and swill it down
with her still warm blood.
I'll steal and waste
the starving mans food,
implant a plague that has no cure
and rape some innocent child.
With savage grace
I'll reorder reality
rekindle chaos
until with animal eyes
a cringing world will
wail in fear and doubt.
And no I won't fear Hell
for there I'll be Lucifers lover
and when his back is turned
for his hellish whore
deep will I stab
and steal the crown
to crown this carnal urge.
Oh-h then, sweet reader,
longing will I gaze
towards that too perfect peace
of Heaven high above.
Pierce revives stars
DU TEMPS PERDU
When through those
silver
silent seconds
I am enchanted
and my memory
carries me. . .
I am a child again.
Under whispering maples
and cloudless skies
I wait for tourists
who come to buy ice
cut from the river
last winter.
They are Americans mostly
from pie-in-the-sky cities
with campers
and coolers
and kids with cokes
Canadians too
prepared and practical
but with no sense of the theatrical
like an American in the back blocks
of capacious
Canada.
Yes Americans mostly from Michigan or New York
amused at the "bargain-rate" of such
a large block
("In Deetroyt it'd cast me fahv tarns thaht much")
but we got it for nothing
from a river that by morning
had healed
ready to yield
another icy harvest.
From PF 2
ween Bette Davis and Tallulah Bankhead.
Although the two women never met in real
life, there was always hostility between the
two expressed in the newspapers and radio.
By creating this fictitious confrontation on
stage, Pierce gives a sense of the enormous
strength of personality of these two women.
At the same time the battle rages, there is
an underlying respect for each other's wit.
Pierce began with Tallulah Bankhead
stumbling on stage in her frequent drunken
state.
"Really, dahlings, I'm just pissed to the
tits, I don't know what to do!"
Bette Davis then rolls her frightening eyes
at the audience.
"Why don't you sit on an ice cream cone
Tallulah, and tell us what the flavor is."
Tallulah straightens up and says with as
much down-the-nose arrogance as she can
muster, "Oh, Bette, dahling, I heard you
attracted quite a crowd of vultures when you
were sunbathing in the nude the other day."
"I once had an affair with a buffalo," said
the ice-voiced Bette Davis, "You know,
Tallulah, you could be my daughter."
And on it went.
Pierce has a remarkable talent for
playing off his audience. He frequently
walks to the edge of the stage to talk to
people at their tables. He asks if they are
enjoying the show, requests cigarettes, sips
their drinks and insults the hecklers. He
constantly pokes fun at the audience for
being at a drag show, even though he does
not consider it one.
"Wouldn't Anita Bryant just shit if she
knew we were having so much fun?" he
asks.
It is clear throughout Pierce's performance, the feeling he has for the women he
imitates. While at times he is unfair to them
by portraying them as colder or more obnoxious than they may have been, it is understood that he holds a large reverence for
them.
One part of the show is devoted to Bette
Davis explaining how one is forced to
sacrifice so many things on the rise to fame.
The scene is out of place because it is suddenly serious. It ends even stranger than it
began.
"Suddenly you roll over and there he is
lying beside you. It is only then that you
realize you have forgotten what it is to be a
woman. Close curtain, end of scene," and
the lights go out.
The scene is undercut a few minutes later
after a costume change when Marlene
Dietrich quips, "Never break wind when
you're wearing pantyhose. The bubbles will
go down your legs and blow your shoes off."
An impersonation show with the quality of
Charles Pierce's is enough to change
anyone's impression of female impersonation or drag shows. The Adrians of Vancouver are certainly not sick in the head.
But it also gives a new appreciation of the
women that Pierce chooses to imitate.
Friday, March  17, 1978
THE        UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 muste
Shithead christens awestruck audience
By LES WISEMAN
Well, it had to happen, the
Japanese Hall on Alexander Street
was officially christened as a punk
hangout last Saturday night. In the
grand tradition of Jim Morrison,
Joey Shithead whipped it on out
and sent a rather prolific arc of
urine into the awe-stricken
audience of punk rockers,
diletantes, and thrill-seekers.
The sociological implications of
this act are probably best left to the
crowd in the Brooks Brothers suits.
One notable lesson which can be
gleaned from the actipn is that a)
not even punks like to be pissed on
and b) that even semi-conscious
stoners can move swift as lightning, given the proper stimulus.
Vancouver's answer to CBGB's
is the Japanese Hall, down by the
waterfront, in an area previously
only frequented by the vanilla
extract crowd, it is a sufficiently
degenerate setting for an evening
of punk rock. If you're lucky, the
toilets will overflow, which does
add a nice ambience to the whole
evening.
Saturday night presented five
bands: Wimpy and The Bloated
Cows, Tim Rey and A.V., Victorian
Pork, Joey Shithead and D.O.A.,
and The Chumps.
Tim Rey and A.V. do not fit the
typical image of punk rockers.
Their music is more intricately
structured, with more technical
proficiency displayed both in-
strumentally and vocally than the
other groups. Acoustically, the
Japanese Hall works against any
sort of musical pretensions and
much of Tim Rey's occasionally
witty lyrics were lost in the rafters.
However, in a proper setting this
band displays a great deal of
promise.
Himself a rather clean-cut young
man, Rey told PF that he preferred
the classification new-wave than
punk. Visually, the band centres on
Rey who projects a rather
ephemeral, Bowie-esque stage
presence.
On Sunday, Rey explained to PF
that he is trying to create a music
which will be accessible
specifically for Vancouverites. He
went on to explain that he felt that
the new-wave movement is needed
in Vancouver in order to filter out
what he called "the pretentiousness of Top 40 music."
Rey's own attempt at commercial success, the single Space
Rays, backed with Time Waves, is
an independently produced effort
which can be found in various
record shops around town.
The legendary Victorian Pork
followed. And these guys are
bloody scarey. Forsaking the
musical aspirations of Rey and his
band, Victorian Pork ran through a
set which included material by the
Stooges and the Sex Pistols.
The music, or the facsimile of it,
takes a back seat to the appearance of this outfit. Looking as
if they were on vacation from a
hospital for the terminally
depraved' these guys are really
punks in the ugliest sense of the
word. One member of the band
bears a striking resemblance to the
sickest looney in One Flew Over
the cuckoo's Nest. Perhaps
tuberculin chic is the next big
thing.
And then there was Joey
Shithead, who Tim-Rey calls a real
moral, honest, gentle, intelligent
guy." Regardless, Joey is Vancouver's most official punk rocker
and is a superb showman.
Always the avant-garde fashion
plate, Joey sported a fresh
neandrathal pig-shave, complete
with bald patches, and possibly the
largest feet ever to be seen on any
stage.
Swearing at the audience even
before the show started, Shithead
emanates aggression. D.O.A., his
new band since the disintegration
of The Skulls, is a power trio with
Joey handling the guitar.
Through songs such as My Old
Man's a Bum, Fucked up Baby,
and Waiting to Drink Your
Wretched Blood, Shithead
assaulted the audience with a wall
of power chords. The drone was
relieved only occasionally for such
things as the aforementioned call
of nature, and another instance
when Joey threw down his guitar to
chase after someone who was
throwing eggs at him.
By the time that the Chumps
came on everyone was having a
great time. A few bon-vivants were
throwing empty beer cases and
bottles at the stage, while others
were content to drag their buddies
through the urine and broken glass
in front of it.
The Chumps have only been
together a month and made their
debut as the last band of the
evening. Fronting the band is the
delightful Diane, a young woman
who seems quite willing to sexploit
.-:*»•< •
TIM REY AND THE A.V.'s
herself as long as she can bring the
audience to their collective knees
with her fingernails-dragging-on-a-
blackboard voice. Screeching
through a number of  songs  to
new wave music rocks out at the Japanese hall,
which the main lyrics seemed to be    Smith version of Gloria for which
either "fuck you" or "fuck off" she    the word travesty would seem an
almost emptied the place single-    apt description. The Chumps do
handedly. show  promise,   but   as   paint-
The set ended with the Patti See pF g. SHITHEAD
Page Friday, 4
Friday, March  17,  1978 women's week
Ferron's songs speak to the heart
By BRUCE BAUGH
Ferron's music is genuine and intense, the
spontaneous expression of the deep
emotions she grapples with and communicates in her songs. The effect is that the
listener is galvanized into responding. It is
impossible to really listen to Ferron without
being; moved.
Last Wednesday during Women's Week a
small crrowd gathered at noon in the SUB
art gallery to hear Ferron sing and play
guitar, accompanied by Keith Maillard,
electric bass and Steve Nikleza on electric
guitar. Those who heard her were lucky.
Talent such as hers is far to seek.
The music of Ferron's songs relies on the
same simple forms found in folk music and
at times her songs sound like those of Joni
Mitchell or Bob Dylan. But the resemblance
is not due to the influence of any artist or
form of music on Ferron, for she is a
completely self-taught musician. The
similarity comes only from the music's
simplicity and directness.
Ferron, who has lived in Vancouver for
most of her life, began playing music when
she found a guitar in a basement at age 11.
When she was 22 she found out she was
playing chords. She had discovered them
without knowing what they were. Similarly,
she discovered other musical forms that
have surprised the trained musicians who
back her up in their sophistication.
The music serves as a framework for the
lyrics. As Ferron says, the songs are poetry
set to music. They often deal with personal
encounters and relationships, and the
audience responds to the feelings revealed.
Ferron gets a feeling first, and then puts it
into words and music, often in the middle of
the night. She started playing music simply
as a release for her feelings. "I played
because I felt a lot of pain in my body and in
my life," Ferron says, "and the guitar took
that away, which is why a lot of the songs
end up in minor chords."
The songs which Ferron performed come
from her first two albums, Ferron and
Ferron Backed Up, the first which has
Ferron alone and the second on which she is
accompanied by electric bass and guitar.
In concert, Ferron plays the songs from
her first album without electric backup. She
is not redoing the old songs because people
familiar with them expect to hear them
played the same way as on the record and
get upset when they're done differently.
People feel betrayed. Which is one reason
that Ferron keeps on writing, because new
material gives her the freedom to do what
she wants with her music.
Ferron has found a following, playing at
the Full Circle Coffee House and benefits for
gays, feminists, women and children and
the NDP. Her first album, which she
produced herself on her own record label
both to preserve her artistic integrity and
because no one else offered her anything,
has sold 800 copies. The sound engineering
was donated by a friend, as was the cover
art.
She says that her music is political, but
didn't start out that way. "People turn the
songs around that for me weren't political to
stress a point," she says. "I tell the truth for
me." It just happens, she adds, that
feminists have the same anger or hurt as
she does, but she didn't set out intentionally
to reach that audience.
On the other hand, she recognizes that
there is a political element in all music. "If a
musician doesn't think it's political," she
says, "then they are really putting a lot of
junk in people's minds."
One of her more overtly political songs,
Bellybowl, carries with it the following
indictment:
Oh we are such a stylish class
devoid of spirit wailing
we've not used leaves to wipe our ass
tomorrow we'll go sailing.
Ferron is concerned with preserving her
artistic integrity and with reaching a wider
audience. She hopes that she will be able to
avoid compromising, as she feels she may
have done by going electric, but feels the
need to grow musically and reach more of
an audience, two reasons for the switch
from acoustic music. She is still telling her
own story.
She refrains from doing other people's
songs because on the one hand she feels she
can't do justice to them and on the other she
can't relate to most of them past the first
couple of lines. (She does perform Dylan's
One Too Many Mornings and Fleetwood
Mac's Landslide.)
While her own music is mostly in the folk
idiom, she sometimes goes into different
musical areas. Willow Tree is a bluesy
number with a heavy backbeat and a funky
electric guitar line. Another number
featured a Native Indian drum rhythm in
the instrumental backing while the vocals
overlaid a cross-rhythm in iambic metre.
The voice itself is strong and often
plaintive. She didn't set out to be a performer, but only to express herself through
music, and as a performer she feels
vulnerable. She plays in safe situations so
she can be what she wants to be. (A gig at
Whistler where she was asked to "boogie"
has put her off playing unfamiliar places,
understandably.)
She speaks to her audience in hopes that
some of her audience will respond. She says
she started to sing so she wouldn't get
lonely. There is a give and take between her
and the audience.
The total effect of Ferron's music and
stage presence is a bit overwhelming,
especially compared to the faceless music of
the past years. She sings from the heart and
touches the feelings of others in doing so.
Ferron says, "It took me two years to
believe that people liked the music." After
hearing her sing and perform, it's hard to
imagine how anyone with a heart and mind
could not like it.
Her first album is available at Ariel Books
on 4th Ave., and the Women's Bookstore on
Richards St.
Makara's staff discovers new magazine success
By ERIC PROMISLOW
Vancouver is not known as a good place to
publish a successful magazine. There are a
few local monthlies on where to eat in town
or about the rodeos up in the Caribou, but
nothing that could sell in Toronto.
However, a group of women may be
changing all that with Makara, "the
Canadian magazine by women for people."
Schendler says. The name itself has attracted much attention. It means, "what's
happening?" in Hebrew, while in Finland, a
makara is a sausage.
The $150,000 LEAP grant ended in
December, 1976. The magazine reduced its
frequency from bi-monthly to quarterly in
order to do more advertising work. "The
magazine business in Canada is not one of
your more lucrative businesses," Schen-
dlinger says.
However, the staff members want to be as
autonomous as possible. They are selective
in what kind of pamphlets they'll print for
other groups, and have a very stringent ad
policy for the magazine.
The readers are as highly principled as
the publishers, Schendlinger explains.
Makara has refused to print material they
find offensive, due to either content or
origin. There is also no cigarette or liquor
advertising, a policy which has cost the
magazine much potential revenue.
MAKARA
This year they plan to concentrate on
women's lives, which will entail more than
publishing journals. Even a shopping list
can be interesting when placed in the proper
context, Nora Randall says.
The next issue will be featuring articles on
daycare centres, the status of women in
Cuba, and a woman who has survived being
committed to Riverview 18 separate times.
There will also be a feature on Diamond Lil
and the second instalment of the Feminist
Communist Popcorn Conspiracy. Yes, the
feminist movement does have a sense of
humor.
Coolidge confronts rape
MAKARA ... mythical beast
Published in the depths of Vancouver's
east end, Makara is one of a small coterie of
Canadian co-operative magazines that is
trying to be self-sufficient, apparently
successfully.
The co-operative consists of nine women
who publish Makara as the flagship of their
design company. Although the magazine is
the company's main concern, the advertising work they do for other groups
keeps the magazine, which operates at a
high loss, on the newsstands.
Nora Randall and Mary Schendlinger
revealed Makara's origins to a small but
interested gathering in the Women's Office
during the recent women's week.
Several artists, all unemployed mothers,
joined together to^orm a small typesetting
company in January, 1973. They were
funded through the Local Employment
Assistance Program.
They started talking about publishing
their own magazine when they got tired of
using their creative talent for only other
people's advertising work.
The first issue hit the stands in December,
1975. It was going to be called the Ladies'
Home Radical, but one of the staff members
discovered a picture of a composite female
animal in a book of medieval mythology.
The animal was called a makara, and the
group adopted the name as its namesake to
"reflect its  composite,  diverse nature,"
MAGAZINE
collective effort
Schendlinger finds working on a co-op
magazine a very fulfilling experience. "You
sacrifice traditional office efficiency ... but
it's really worth it." Almost all decisions are
made by consensus at the weekly meetings,
and as no woman does one set job all the
time, things can get confusing. However, the
co-operative factor makes the staff a tighter
unit and closer to each other.
Despite this communal nature, they
consider Makara to be a composite product
with something to interest anyone. It has a
fair amount of fiction and poetry, as well as
interviews, photo essays, political articles
and topical features. Freelancers do most of
the writing, as the staff members are more
interested • in the visual aspects of the
magazine.
By GRAY KYLES
There have been several films produced
over the past few years which are concerned
with various aspects of rape.
Most of these films have dealt with
various modes of self-defence (often contradictory) or have provided information on
what a woman should do once she has been
raped.
Last week Martha Coolidge's feature Not
A Pretty Picture was shown in SUB as part
of Women's Week. It too is a film about rape
but it approaches the subject in a manner
different from most.
Coolidge was raped when she was 16 years
old and the film is her recreation of that
event 12 years later. By making it she hoped
to finally resolve some of the anguish she
has experienced.
The film opens at a high school concert in
1962 in which Martha is the star performer
singing folk songs about lying down with her
lover. Certain members of her audience
take this to mean that she'll "go all the way"
and one of them arranges to go out with her.
A few weeks later she goes out with one of
the older boys in the school, another couple,
and the school goof. Although they are
supposedly going to a party they end up at
an empty apartment belonging to
somebody's brother. The goof gets sick, and
the other couple begin to make out leaving
Martha and her date alone.
The rape that follows is not a particularly
violent one but it is the kind of sexual offence
which is probably most; prevalent. Martha is
made to feel that her life is in danger and
that if she doesn't give in to her date he will
kill her.
What Coolidge shows us is the complete
helplessness she felt at the time of the rape.
She didn't know where she was, she had no
means of escape and she was trapped with a
potentially violent young man. Her only
hope was to submit to him (although she did
fight for as long as she could) and hope that
she would escape with her life.
The most horrifying aspect of the movie
though is what happens to her once the
actual rape is over. Because she went out
voluntarily with the rapist and then went to
the apartment she realizes that she could
never make a rape charge stand in court.
But the thought of charging him hardly even
occurs to her.
She is ashamed of what has happened and
tries to cover it up. At first it appears that
she may be pregnant but when that is
disproved she tries to forget the whole thing.
But she finds that it just won't go away.
Her rapist, proud of his conquest, spreads it
around the school that Martha is an easy
lay. Her girl friends turn on her, calling her
a slut, and the boys treat her with contempt.
Martha is played with dignity and warmth
by Michele Manenti, a young actress who
has also been raped. She conveys the pain
and agony that Martha experiences both
during and after the rape well. In some ways
she is portraying herself just as much as she
is Martha.
Jim Carrington plays the rapist as a nice
guy who can turn violent and dangerous
when he doesn't get what he wants. Both he
and Manenti show promise as actors.
The film cuts back and forth between the
drama and scenes of the director and actors
working out various sequences. This
structure allows Coolidge and her performers to comment directly about what
they are doing.
Carrington states that he finds himself
getting very violent during the rape scenes
and is concerned about how naturally he can
slip into the role.
Carrington states that he finds himself
getting very violent during the rape scenes
and is concerned about how naturally he can
slip into the role.
Coolidge finds that by reliving the experience 12 years later she finally begins to
understand some of her feelings and
reactions to it over the years.
The sad conclusion of Not a Pretty Picture
is that rape is a crime that can never be
forgotten, at least not by the victim.
Coolidge states at the end of the film that she
has never been able to completely trust a
man since she was raped. At the age of 28
she has never had a stable relationship with
anyone.
For Martha Coolidge, and most likely for
many other rape victims, rape is not one
isolated moment of terror. It is an event that
changes its victim forever, a crime that
lives on every day for the rest of her life.
Not a Pretty Picture is an important film
that deserves a much wider distribution
than it has received. If it ever returns to
Vancouver try to see it; it is.worthy of
everyone's attention.
Friday, March  17, 1978
THE        UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 music
MacPherson stands with jazz greats
By STEVE SIMKIN
The frosty tone of Fraser
MacPherson filled the James
Cowan Theatre last Sunday night
as MacPherson's trio launched a
successful concert with Gettin'
Sentimental Over You.
MacPherson's style has often
been compared to that of Zoot
Sims, and on this opening number
his breathy low register, ghosted
notes and behind-the-beat phrasing
were indeed often reminiscent of
Sims. Still, his approach is
anything but derivative. Within his
chosen tradition he is a stylist.
Under MacPherson's direction,
the trio — with Oliver Gannon on
guitar and Wyatt Ruther on bass —
has jelled and gained an easily
identifiable sound and style. Part
of this identity is a result of the
leader's choice of repertoire,
which is fairly constant from
performance to performance.
Rather than inducing stagnation,
however, the constancy has
resulted in increasing awareness
among the players and a greater
depth in the exploration of each
tune.
The program consisted
primarily of standards, as well as a
few less well-known tunes. The
most delightful of these was Louis
(or Lil) Armstrong's Struttin' With
Some Barbecue, which the trio
does with a Latin feel at first, to
good effect. Another Armstrong
classic, Someday You'll Be Sorry,
was much more relaxed than the
original. Treated as a straight-
ahead blues, Goose Pimples
(which was recorded in a very
different style by Bix Beiderbecke
about fifty years ago) included
some of the most adventurous
playing of the night, particularly
by Gannon.
Honeysuckle Rose was kept
lively by a chromatic alteration in
the melody. Highlighting two of the
group's strongest characteristics,
this number was notable for
Freser's high-energy output —
with Gannon's laid-back comping
leaving him plenty of room — and
for Ruther's subtle walking beat,
always just there, nudging the
soloist ever-so-gently onward.
Showing off MacPherson's
romantic subtone, his two ballads
— Body and Soul and
Sophisticated Lady — were
marvels of phrasing and controlled
lyricism.
With Gannon's Freddie Greene-
style strumming, another
Ellington composition, Drop Me
Off In Harlem, saw Fraser get so
far behind the beat that he seemed
To Students Interested in Graduate
Programmes in the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration
Professor MacCrimmon, Director of the
Ph.D. Programme and
Professor Oberg, Director of the
Masters' Programmes
will meet with students interested in
The M.B.A., M.Sc. (Bus.Adm.) or Ph.D. (Bus.Adm.)
on
TUESDAY, MARCH 21 at 12:30 p.m.
IN HENRY ANGUS 323
At that time a short description will be given of the types of
programmes available, the admission requirements, the length of
the programme, possibilities for financial aid, and career
opportunities.
Students from fields other than Commerce are especially invited
to attend.
Starring TIM MclNTIRE • LARAINE NEWMAN
JAY LENO • JOHN LEHNE • CHUCK BERRY • JERRY LEE LEWIS
Screenplay by JOHN KAYE • Story by JOHN KAYE and ART UNSON
Produced by ART LINSON ■ Directed by FLOYD MUTRUX
| Soundtrack Album Available on A&M Records and Tapes j
STARTS FRIDAY
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in danger of falling into the next
song. That kind of presence of
thought is a rare pleasure.
Even during its double-time
section, All The Things You Are
had a delicacy (even fragility) to it
that left the listener breathless for
fear of damaging the filigree that
was being crafted on stage. This
tune included Gannon's outstanding solo of the night. His
mixture of octaves, chords, and
running lines maintained perfectly
the feel established by MacPherson.
On Stardust, Gannon's feature,
he managed to stray from the
expected harmonies without affecting the song's inherent beauty.
His unaccompanied playing the the
verse was especially pretty.
Tangerine led off the second half,
which came together better than
the first, and, in truth, left little
upon which to comment. The next
up-tempo tune, Duke's In A
Melotone, prompted some
aggressive growling from Fraser.
John-Lewis3 tribute to the gypsy
guitarist Django Rinehart, simply
entitled Django, began with a
sensitive Gannon introduction. As
Ruther joined him Jor the
statement of the theme, a strong
empathy became apparent, just as
much between the players as
between their instruments. Strings
have a way of playing off each
other . . . Hence orchestras, I
suppose.
The closing tunes of the two sets
were both flagwavers, which
featured extensive unaccompanied
MacPherson. The man is a
dynamo.
The single most impressive
aspect of Fraser's playing is his
tonal control. Over the course of
the concert his sound was
feminine, masculine, breathy,
growling . . . always perfectly
controlled and always appropriate.
There was, however, on annoying thread that ran through the
performance. The management
insisted on playing with colored
See PF.7: MACPHERSON
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Page Friday, 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, March   17,  1978 comedy
Lampoonitis leaves scar on Vancouver
By GEORGE HUEY
From its rather benign origins as
a campus rag at Harvard
University, trie National Lampoon
has developed into a malignant
communicable disease of epidemic
proportions.
Millions succumb to this dreaded
affliction annually and statistics
bear evidence of the gravity of this
situation.
That's Not Funny, That's Sick
The National Lampoon Players
At the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Sunday, March 12
In its most innocuous form,
Lampoonitis is transmitted by a
black humor magazine which has a
life cycle of approximately one
month. Successful preventive
measures that have been employed
in the past include deliberate
avoidance of neighborhood newsstands, periodic psychiatric
consultation and chronic illiteracy.
However, these measures are
totally ineffective against the more
acute manifestations of this
scourge which threatens the very
life and limb of contemporary
middle class morality. These more
serious forms are now communicable through the media of
vulgar record albums such as the
notorious Lemmings and White
House Tapes., and ribald live
revues which periodically tour the
entire North American continent,
provoking terror wherever they go.
Last Sunday night at the Queen
Elizabeth operating theatre, the
residents of Vancouver were
treated to some sage medical
advice from the National Lampoon
Players in their current revue,
That's Not Funny, That's Sick.
Under the surgical knife of the
Lampoon's incisive humor not a
modicum of conventional morality
remained intact, and the audience
MacPherson
From PF 6
lights during the songs. I suppose
this was an attempt to replace the
mood lost by the high school
auditorium atmosphere of the
theatre, but this music can stand
on its own, and is not aided by
having Fraser turn chartreuse in
the middle of Body and Soul.
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Wendy Goldman, Eleanor Relssa,
Andrew Moses and Roger Bump-
ass — provided more than
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revision of the Hippocratic Oath.
The versatility and expertise of
these dropouts from the Harvard
School of First Aid was evident in
innumerable skits which
proceeded in rapid-fire succession.
The only coping strategy the
audience could resort to under the
barrage of four-letter words, blunt
references to various parts of the
anatomy and biting satirical
sketches was frequent outbreaks of
irrepressible mirth.
The concerted efforts of the staff
at National Lampoon have always
been directed at the wholesale
annihilation of the moral fabric of
society. Yet as perpetrators of the
filth called National Lampoon
humor, they have repeatedly
asserted that it is society and not
their bizarre brand of humor which
is sick. As artists who merely
illuminate and clarify the basic
social issues, their duty is to
present the diagnosis while it is left
to our statesmen, evangelists and
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Friday, March  17, 1978
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 music
P?<
**«£*■£**&
Hansen does no harm to Hendrix axe
By BRUCE BAUGH
What would it be like going
through life as somebody else?
There are actors, who are always
playing other people, and some,
like Carroll O'Connor (Archie
Bunker) become inseparable from
the role. Others try to recreate
someone else's stage persona:
these are the imitators. The most
common are those who imitate
Elvis, and one of them recently had
plastic surgery to carry the
identification over to the physical
level.
Then he sings like Hendrix,
although a little echo effect helps
him out there, but the intonations
and inflections are very close to the
real thing.
But then there's the matter of the
guitar playing, and there Randy
Hansen is truly amazing. He
played Purple Haze, Fire, Manic
Depression and All Along the
Watchtower exactly like Hendrix.
In places he duplicated Hendrix's
playing note for note, and where he
improvised he still sounded like
Hendrix improvising (although he
had a tendency to play fast and
flashy when he was not following in
the sure footsteps of the master).
Even the feedback was right,
and it came in just the right places.
In fact, Hansen's performance of
All Along the Watchtower, though
it followed Hendrix's treatment of
the song on Electric Ladyland and
the live Isle of Wight record, was
better than Hendrix's live version.
HENDRIX
music resurrected
To prove he had not covered
merely one dimension of Hendrix,
Hansen played a stunning rendition of Hendrix's beautiful Little
Wing, moving deftly from the
gentle ballad of the verse to the
intense sadness and power of the
guitar solo.
As if that weren't enough,
Hansen also had all of Hendrix's
stage gimmicks mastered as well.
He played the guitar with his teeth,
took solos using only one hand,
played the guitar between his legs
and behind his back, threw it up in
the air while playing, played while
turning sommersaults and did just
about everything else except play
left-handed. (Unfortunately,
Hansen's right-handedness and
Caucasian ancestry will prevent
him from being exactly like
Hendrix.)
Shithead
From PF 4
remover  rather  than  rock   and
rollers.
It seems that Vancouver's
punk/new-wave scene is gathering
momentum. This Friday, the
Japanese Hall will host The
Monitors and the Shmorgs. Joey
Shithead plans on releasing a new
single in a couple of weeks. Tim
Rey and A.V. are working on a live
album.
And, yes, Virginia, there are a
few people in Vancouver who wear
safety pins through their cheeks.
Page Friday, 8
Super-charged versions of Foxy
Lady, Freedom and, appropriately, I Don't Live Today
(which was complete with feedback and Hansen intoning over the
frenzied cacophony, "There ain't
no life nowhere") kept the excitement level high.
But the climax of the performance was a medley of Can You
See Me with an extended version of
Third Stone From the Sun, which
was a tour-de-force of guitar
playing wizardry and showmanship. Hansen pulled out all the
stops and did everything at once,
wandering into the audience and
playing on top of chairs and tables,
as well as back on the floor.
Extended feedback and
breathtaking guitar solos left the
crowd in amazement. The perfectly adequate Star Spangled
Banner which followed was an
anti-climax.
Hansen was called back for two
encores. The first, Voodoo Chile
(Slight Return) again featured
extended soloing, while the last,
Stone Free, was succinct and to the
point. In all, a feast for Hendrix
fans, who rewarded Hansen with
generous and enthusiastic applause.
Two  complaints,   though.   The
drummer and bass player are not
nearly as good as Hansen, nor do
they come close to Mitch Mitchell
and Noel Redding (both much
better musicians than is generally
acknowledged, as the Experience
records prove).
More seriously, the Zodiac didn't
see fit to put Hansen on stage until
one a.m., and since he was the
advertised attraction that can only
be called a cheap and slimy ploy
for selling more booze to the dance
crowd.
Oh, if Hansen wants to live his
life as Jimi Hendrix, that's fine by
me. Just keep on playin' that
guitar.
„o6^
NOTICE OF
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
THEA KOERNER HOUSE
Graduate Student Centre
THURSDAY, MARCH 23, 1978 at 12:30 p.m.
in the Ballroom at the Centre
NOTICE
The Board of Directors will recommend to the membership
constitutional changes. Details have been sent to all
members and are posted in Thea Koerner House.
NOMINATIONS
NOMINATIONS are now being accepted for three positions
on the Board of Directors of the Graduate Student Centre.
Nomination forms are available at the Centre office, until
Tuesday, March 21, 1978 at 4:30 p.m.
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THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, March  17,  1978 vista
r
By NICHOLAS READ
The city of Victoria will be
showing off its best when the
Victoria Symphony Orchestra,
under the direction of Laslo Gati,
will make its first-ever concert
appearance in the Lower Mainland
at the James Cowan Theatre in
Burnaby's Century Park on March
18. The thirty-six piece orchestra
currently making preparations to
begin a province-wide tour, will
perform a program of popular
classics featuring the Overture to
the Marriage of Figaro and
Haydn's Surprise Symphony.
Concert time is 8 p.m., and student
tickets are available at the door.
Not to be outdone by its neighbors across the Straits, the Vancouver New Music Society will
showcase the talents of four local
artists in an evening of music at
the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, 1895 Venables, on March
19. Performing Sunday's concert at
the Centre will be Vancouver
pianist Robert Silverman, mezzo-
soprano Phyllis Mailling, percussionist Ken Moore and UBC's
own trumpeter Martin Berinbaum.
The concert will begin at 8:30 p.m.,
and student-priced tickets can be
bought at the door.
\ .nu niiM'i stmg'.irt'ss lain-
Mortifee, fresh from a triumphant
appearance at the VECC, will give
an encore performance to that
concert at the Burnaby Art
Gallery, 6344 Gilpin St., on March
19. Jane will present a program
featuring a wide variety of musical
styles beginning at 2:30 p.m.
Admission for the concert is free.
Connoisseurs of jazz will want to
attend the March 19 performance
of the Jeff Ridley Jazz Trio at the
Surrey Arts Centre, 13750-88th
Ave., Surrey. This newly formed
Vancouver group is composed of
Jeff Ridley on six- and 12-string
guitars, Bill Runge on bass,
saxophone and flute, and Albert St.
Albert on percussion. Their concert, which will feature a varied
program of original and classical
jazz compositions, will begin at 3
p.m.
Also for lovers of jazz, the Hot
'.i// Cluh ;*< M.isi KiD<u]ua\, Mill
feature the sounds of four of the
club's most popular attractions in
the week to come. On tap for
tonight will be the Dave Roberts
Jazzband, while tomorrow night's
musical chores will be assumed by
the   Mainland   Jazz   Band.
George C. Scott and Claire
Bloom star in the Franklin J.
Schaffner film adaption of Ernest
Hemingway's Islands in the
Stream, the SUB Film Society's
feature presentation for this
weekend. Showings of the film take
place tonight, tomorrow and
Sunday. •
Finally, if you happen to be a
struggling artist looking for a
gallery to exhibit your work, and if
that work just happens to be in the
medium of fibre, you might want to
contact the North Shore Art
Gallery in Presentation House, 209
West Fourth Street in North
Vancouver. The gallery is looking
for individuals working with fibre
who would like to display their art
in an upcoming exhibition. For
more information telephone Mary
Fox or Gerrie Brooks at 986-1351.
The A.M.S. Gallery in SUB will
be presenting paintings and
drawings by senior students in the
art education faculty from March
20 to 23 inclusive. The show opens
at 8:00 p.m.
Also the tenth annual sale and
exhibition of works by the graphics
students in the faculty of education
will be presented from March 28 to
April 1 inclusive.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1978 SPRING LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Martin Esslin
Martin Esslin has a mastery of the contemporary theatre from the vantage joints
of critic, producer and administrator. He is thought to be the most distinguished
critic of theatre in England today. His former position as head of the drama
department for the BBC makes him a practical man of theatre. His book, The
Theatre of the Absurd, is now a standard work for any study of the contemporary
theatre.
THE THEATRE OF THE ABSURD
Saturday, March 18
In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute lecture )
POLITICS AND THE THEATRE
Tuesday, March 21
In Room 106,  Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
sponsored by
The Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund
An experience in terror and suspense.
Subfilms resurrects
the ghost of Hemingway and presents
Po(omoun[ p,au-es P'e
George C. Scott
A Franklin J. Schaffner Film
"Islands in the Stream"
S.U.B. Aud. Thurs. & Sun. 7:00; Sat. 7:00 & 9:30 75c
Remember! No show Friday night (tonight) this week only!
CLOS€
Nominated for 8 Academy Awards
GNCOUNTCRS
OF TH€ THIRD KINO
SHOWS AT 12,2:20,4:45,7:10,9:4-5
SUNDAYS 2:20,4:45,7:10,9:45
VOGUE
918  GRANVILLE
685-5434
a funny love story. Walter matthau
WUai __ GLENDA JACKSON
riOUSe ART CARNEY
Calls"
SHOWS   at   12:10,1:50,3:45,5:40
7:30,9:35
CORONET 1
851   GRANVILLE
685 6828
<;r\yvyi)>
SHOWS at 12,1:55,3:55,5:55,7:55,10
CHARLTON HESTON
CORONET 2
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
BIG ACTION-DOUBLE BILL
RESTRICTED
'THE VAN"
Warning—some coarse|
-^..-   „^..  „~.. language—occasional
THE   POM  POM  nuditv-BC Director
GIRLS'
VAN 12:25, 3:45, 7, 10:15
POM POM 2:10,5:25,8:48
881   GRANVILLE
682-7468
Friday, March  17,  1978
THE        UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 9 Page 16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  17, 1978
POWER, PERFORMANCE and PRICE
That's what you're shopping for when you're in the market for a stereo. And
Marantz has it all. Every audiophile feature and more has been thoughtfully and
carefully incorporated into these magnificent instruments.
MARANTZ
MODEL 2215B AM/FM STEREO RECEIVER
15   Watts   minimum    RMS   per
Channel at 8 Ohms, from 40 Hz
to   20   kHz,   with   no  more than
0.8%  total   harmonic  distortion.
Phase   Locked   Loop   (PLL)   FM
Multiplex Demodulator
Full    Complementary   Amplifier
Dual       Purpose      AM      Signal
Strength/FM    "Centre   Channel"
Tuning Meter
Tape    Outputs    for    Two    Tape
Decks
Main/Remote Speaker Switching
$199.95
MARANTZ
MODEL 5220 STEREO CASSETTE DECK with DOLBY1
• Built-in   Dolby   Noise  Reduction
System
• 25uS    FM    Dolby    De-emphasis
Network
• Professional 3V2" VU meters
• Ferrite Heads
• DC Servo Motor
• Master Level Control
• Mic/Line Mixing
• 3-Position    Tape    EQ    and   Bias
Selector
*TM Dolby Labs, Inc.
$299.95
MARANTZ
MODEL 5420 STEREO CASSETTE DECK with DOLBY*
$349.95
Built-in   Dolby   Noise  Reduction
System    hich   can   also   be   used
externally
25uS     FM     Dolby    De-emphasis
Network
Active     Mixer     with     4    input
capability
Pan Pots
Master Level Control
Professional 3V2" VU meters
3-Position   Tape    EQ   and   Bias
Selector
Ferrite Heads
DC Servo Motor
Auto Shut-off
Tilt-up Adjustable Stand
*TM Dolby Labs, Inc.
r
MODEL 960
MULTIPLE PLAY
MANUAL
TURNTABLES
Jfti
The number one sellingturn-
table in North America.
Here's why — The motor
used in B-l-C turntables is a
compact 24-pole low-speed
synchronous unit which
turns at only 300 R.P.M. They
are all designed with a particularly effective Belt-Drive
system. This turntable now
complete with top rated
SHURE M91ED cartridge.
SHURE M91 ED CARTRIDGE   @
$174
.95
B-l-C VENTURI
FORMULA 7
Formula 7 speakers constitute a new
"System Monitor" series with performance capabilities and operating facilities on the professional level. Designed to satisfy such quality-ciritical
use as recording and broadcast studios.
SPEAKERS @
SAVE ON   HIGH   QUALITY YAMAHA AUDIO
SPEAKERS, TURNTABLES,  RECEIVERS, TUNERS,
AUDIO'S  UNBEATABLE 5 YEAR PARTS/LABOUR
WARRANTY*
"on most models
33 ■) " ■ - i  r m.
RECEIVERS SALE
CR 45Cs0l.D 9.$rms $24995
cr 600 gov.0 Q^Ims *29995
CR  800  50 + 50 WATTS RMS *399 95
.<■■'•
50 + 50 WATTS RMS	
AMPLIFIERS SALE
CA 400 20+ 20 WATTS RMS *1 89 95
CA 410 25 + 25 WATTS RMS $1 99 95
ca 600 soUo OV3T.,s $23995
C A 61 0 40 + 40 WATTS RMS
CA 800 45 + 45 WATTS RMS
CA 1010 90 + 90 WATTS RMS!  .
'Q--3>',1   ur:
AM/FM TUNERS
CT 41 0   HIGHLY SENSITIVE	
CT  600  2.0UV SENSITIVITY
CT 610  FM BLEND
CT 810  NECATIVE FEEDBACK MPX
CT 1010  .15% DISTORTION
SPEAKERS
NS  625  COMPACT 2-WAY	
NS   645   DELUXE BOOKSHELF	
NS  670 3-WAY - DELUXE WALNUT
NS  690 12" 3-WAY WALNUT	
NS  550  UNBELIEVABLE SOUND ...
NS 570  LARGE FLOOR MONITORS *19995
NS  1000M  BERYLLIUM DRIVERS! $499 95
NS  500  ROCK MONITORS *249 95
TAPEDECKS SALE
TC 800D WEDGE SHAPE  *289 95
TC 800 C L AWARD WINNING DESIGN ^O"'95
$279.95
$329 95
$58995
SALE
$159.95
$19995
$199.95
$239.95
$29995
SALE
$10995
*1399*
$219.95
$249.95
$16995
SALE
$179.95

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