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The Ubyssey Jan 17, 1967

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Array We're
coming
Vol. XLVIII, No. 36
THE UBYSSEY
to take
us away
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY  17,  1967
if «\ '*
w
224-3916
LADIES TAKE OVER as men crawl under the blankets. New cleaning
girls in Totem Park are causing a furor by encroaching on a once-upon-
a-time all  male job.   Joe student  cares  not  with   large  sheet.
Schwarz misses point'
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Ass't News Editor
The Canadian Union of Students
report on health and psychiatric services by UBC's Dr. Conrad Schwarz
can be viewed with mixed emotions.
Dr. Schwarz did a valuable service
in crystallizing, in a national report,
what many of us have been thinking
for a long time concerning the growing
impersonality of the modern university.
The increasing class size, the narrowing specializations of faculty, their
overloaded schedules, all widen the communication gap between students and
professors.
The student, attempting to develop
as an individual but frustrated and
sterilized by the enveloping institutional mass, demonstrates not against
the university leaders, but TO them,
as human beings, to pay more attention
to the effect the establishment they
are developing is having on its members.
The realization of the waste of
human resources of the growing "turn
on, tune in, drop out" generation hanging on the fringes and siphoning off
part of the cream of the developing
intellectuals, and the hope that this
fringe can be offered a better alternative.
The emotional problems of the university student are intensely focused
on by the hyper-time-conscious individual until it can be reasoned out,
dampened by experience, or until it
drives the individual onto an escapist
tangent where only extensive personal
involvement or violence will bring him
back.
The average student is indeed struggling through a murky vale, developing his religious, political, social, and
sexual views on life, and often in desperate need of help.
But reading through Dr. Schwarz's
probably well - meaning attempts at
solution, one is struck with cold- horror.
The attempt to "encourage the
optimal conditions for physical and
mental well-being on the campus so
that students will be able to pursue
their academic and maturational tasks
with the least possible interference
from extraneous factors" is obviously
a vitally important and neglected area.
But anyone vaguely familiar with
Paul Goodman's "Growing Up Absurd"
society has to view with varying
degrees of paranoia the likely structure
of this psychological institutionalization.
Just as Dr. Schwarz declares war
on the growing departmentalization
and impersonality of the modern university he is proposing yet another
department to more ghettoize and
standardize the university process.
What the students need is some real
ideals which will work towards bringing the Great Society more into relation with basic human individualism.
And they need impetus from the
academic community who should be in
Turn to page 11 —
'impetus'
Sick students
lack facilities
The rapidly increasing Canadian
university enrolment and resulting impersonality of student - professor relationships is leaving a void which must
be filled by increased health and
psychiatric facilities on campuses.
This is the conclusion of a report
released Friday on university healthy
and psychiatric services, prepared for
the Canadian Union of Students by Dr.
Conrad J. Schwarz, consultant psychiatrist for the student health service
at UBC.
In a survey of 49 campuses conducted during the spring and summer
of 1966, Dr. Schwarz found only one
university (Dalhousie) whose health
services approach the ratio of one
physician and one nurse per 1,000 students recommended by the American
College Health Association.
• • •
The survey showed 38 of the 49
universities have some sort of health
services (28 out of 30 for campuses of
more than 1,000 population) and only
22 of 40 have a psychiatrist available,
for varying periods of time.
"Increasing class size and sharper
refinement of areas of specialization by
faculty members have led to a widening of the gap between faculty and
students, Dr. Schwarz's report said.
"In addition, as faculty members
develop narrower fields of interest,
they become less able to communicate
with each other and consequently
there are fewer people available to
give students a broad overview of any
subject.
• • •
Faculty members are often concerned about their lack of rapport with
students, but "are fully aware that if
they begin to give individual attention
to each student their already heavily-
overloaded schedules will become unbearable."
The students, says Dr. Schwarz,
are in the midst of a search for a
personal identity, and are exploring
areas such as their religious, political,
social, and sexual views of life.
"Since learning the course content
does not seem to be all that is involved
in going to university, the student
should at times feel a need to check
up on what his teachers think about
life in general," he said.
"The student does not necessarily
have to accept the faculty member's
ideas but even in the process of disagreeing, he helps to define his own
attitudes."
• • •
As faculty members become less
and less available for this kind of
interaction, the student turns to other
ways of dealing with this aspect of his
development.
The student may go and talk with a
dean, clergyman, or residence don, go
to the counselling office for an aptitude
test, or try LSD.
"He may develop more severe
physical or psychological symptoms
and take himself to the health service
and perhaps to a psychiatrist.
Dr. Schwarz cited figures from a
1963 Canadian Union of Students survey as showing that approximately 55
per cent of students at one time had
felt a desire to seek advice regarding
emotional or psychological problems.
Students questioned listed their three
•'   -'  "■   ■   -   >-  •■   <■'■■■   .  y   ■■ v  .■  .* v v *  y i' v v v * v v v v v v v v t v
DR. CONRAD SCHWARZ
. . . psychiatric void
serious problems as (1) despondency
and depression, (2) lack of self-confidence, and (3) relations with the
opposite sex.
"On an average about 60 per cent
of those who answered the above question affirmatively actually went to
someone for advice. The usual person
consulted was a friend, but about one-
fifth had gone to a professional person
(physician, psychiatrist, counsellor, religious advisor, or faculty member.)
Dr. Schwarz reports that faculty
members in general do not want to
get involved in solving the personal
problems of students—not that they are
unconcerned or unwilling, but "most
of them realistically feel they do not
have the necessary professional training to offer personal counselling."
The purpose of a student health
service is to encourage the optimal
conditions for physical and mental well-
being on the campus so that students
will be able to pursue their academic
and maturational tasks with the least
possible interference from extraneous
factors.
"This purpose can only be adequately achieved by a three-pronged attack
of treatment, prevention, and research"
The physchiatric service, ideally
functioning as an integral part of the
health service, should be involved in
the same way.
• • •
The primary function is to make
medical facilities available to the sick
student as quickly as possible, requiring a 24-hour service with a physician
and/or nurse being at least on call for
emergencies.
The psychiatric service would also
provide 24-hour coverage for emergencies.
"Facilities should be provided for
adequate individual assessment, including psychological testing when indicated.
Turn to page 2 —
'preventative plan' Page 2
TH.      UBYSSEY
Tuesday. January 17, 1967
President's name forgotten 'Preventative plan a must'
Alma Mater Society made a final decision Monday to forget
about making a nomination for UBC's next president.
"The purpose of a student nomination is to offer the name
of some serious candidate who might foe omitted, but since 40
names have been submitted to the Board of Governors, we
might as well not worry about it," said AMS president Peter
Braund.
Deterrents  study approved
Council agreed to approve in principle a proposed study of
sociological deterrents to higher education in B.C.
Student Stephen Beckow will survey high school students
and their reasons for attending or not attending university.
CUS fees pose problem
Council moved to postpone discussion of the proposed 5
cents per capita raise in the Canadian Union of Students fee.
Treasurer Lome Hudson said he needed more time to consider
the $800 request.
"It's a straight priority issue," Hudson said. "We've got to
put UBC before CUS in some cases."
The proposed raise has been postponed several times.
Notre dame 'not public
Council agreed to ask Notre Dame University to delete its
name from the joint brief to be presented to the provincial
legislature Jan. 27, on the grounds that Notre Dame is a private
university and cannot ask for the same aid to education as B.C.'s
three public universities.
Notre Dame is asked to state its case separately to the
legislature.
IN THE EAR
Springy belly
By IAN CAMERON
Once again spring is approaching, and a young
man's fancy turns to love, a
married woman's thoughts
turn to her unmarried
friends. And, if you are an
eligible male, you start getting  invitations  for  dinner.
This is an insidious proposition, because the average
bachelor will sell his soul
for a decent meal. This is
fortunate, because that's
exactly what he's expected
to do. When you are invited,
you will be informed that
there will also be a young
lady there. This young lady
is always described in glowing terms. For the benefit
of all bachelor types, I wish
to present a small translation of a few common
phrases. What the hostess
says is in quotes, what she
means is in parentheses.
"She attractive." (She's
stupid). "She very attractive." (She's very stupid.)
She has a nice personality."
(She's a dog). "She's a wonderful c o n v e r sationalist."
(She never shuts up). "She's
iiinterested in all sorts of
things." (She expects you to
do all the talking).
"What does she look like?
Well, she's slim." (She's
skinny). "She's pleasant
looking." (She's fat). "She's
not too short." (She's 5' 11").
"She not too tall." (A runt).
"Her hair is beautiful." (Unfortunately, the rest of her
comes with it). "She has
wonderful eyes." (Tinted contact lenses, one of which
will fall into her soup, causing a massive panic).
"What does she do? She's
a private secretary." (Steno
pool). "She's an elementary
teacher." (Her vocabulary
consists   of  one  syllable
words, and she says things
like 'How do we like our
soup?) She's not doing anything right now." (She's a
divorcee with two kids).
"Why did we phone you?
Well, you have such a lot
in common." ('You both have
two arms and legs). "You're
in economics, and she's interested in it." (She likes to
spend money).
"You both like sports."
(You ski, she once went to
a football game). "She's interested in philosophy, and
we know you are too." (She
took honors philosophy, you
once read one Russell's essays). "You're both interested in literature." (You're a
librarian, she reads the funny papers every week). "We
know you're interested in
cars, and so is she." (She
has a '52 Pontiac that needs
a ring job).
However, the picture is
not all black. There are some
tip-offs that work in the
opposite direction. "She's an
old friend of Bob's, who just
got into town." (Bob is the
husband, the girl is a doll,
and the wife wants to get
her married pdq.) "We're
not having anything fancy."
(With this date, you wouldn't notice if it was pheasant
under glass.) "She's an airline stewardess, a model, a
radio station hostess." (Get
your suit pressed.)
So there you are. With
this to guide you, you should
be able to have many
pleasant meals, none of
which will give you heart-
bum or cost a dime. Just
one last thing. Arrange to
have someone phone you
about two hours after you get
there. This gives you a
chance to say your granny
is ill and is calling for you
if the hostess crossed you up
by reading this column too.
From page 1
"Infirmary facilities should be available
to the psychiatric service for well-supervised management of patients with mild
and moderate degrees of anxiety and depression."
Preventative aspects of the health and
psychiatric service program may include
advice on precautions which might be taken
to minimize athletic injuries, comment on
food standards and residence standards, and
advice in laboratory work involving the use
of noxious chemicals.
"The preventative aspects of campus psychiatry are equal in importance to the primary treatment aspects."
The service can "interpret to the university administration in a meaningful way
how the university atmosphere may be
made less emotionally stressful to students.
"Administration and faculty members
can be educated to recognize early signs of
disturbance in students and to assess
whether these signs be of significant magnitude to require psychiatric referral.
"If only downtown physicians are used
by the students for problems, the university
itself receives very little in the way of
feed-back of general health principles in
relation to the total university atmosphere.
"A psychiatric service co-operating in research with other departments of the university such as medicine, psychology, sociology, education, and counselling, can contribute a great deal of studies such as motivations for learning, teaching techniques,
small group work, and from such studies
the university as a whole can obtain considerable benefit."
Dr. Schwarz's survey consisted of a five-
part questionnaire sent to student representatives on each of 49 campuses, requesting details on the extent of facilities offered,
and general characteristics of the university, to fit the information into context.
All 49 universities replied, offering some
indication of the universal concern about
health on Canadian campuses.
The report covered two general areas,
health services and psychiatric  service.
The health services report was broken
down into five areas: staffing, infirmary
facilities, student utilization, physical facilities and financing.
Some campuses have full 24-hour coverage, some only nurse or physician on call.
Nineteen campuses of the 49 provide beds
on campus for treatment of students with
minor ailments.
The psychiatric services report centered
on staffing and student utilization.
On the campuses with psychiatrists available, the ratio per 1,000 students ranged
from .01 to .52.
Psychologists, available on six campuses,
ranged in ratio per 1,000 students from .01
to  .95.
"A psychiatric service should consist of
a team of professional people under the
leadership of a psychiatrist.
"It would appear that about five per cent
of the student population will need to use
the facilities of a psychiatric service directly, and will require an average interview
time of six hours.
"Each member of the team should spend
about half his time in individual treatment
of students and the other half in liaison
activities, so the required ratio of team
members per 1,000 students works out at
.5."
Big  occurrence
in  Brock office
POINT GREY (UNS) —
The Ubyssey staff will meet
today at noon in the Brock
Hall office to hear each
other vent spleen and find
The Way.
KMC presents
The Carpetbaggers
Thurs.. Jan. 19, 12:30, 3:30 8:00 p.m.
Auditorium
SPRING CLASSES
now forming at
THE
ADRIENNE CAMERON
SCHOOL OF MODELLING
COURSES INCLUDE:
• Personal Development (Makeup, Visual Poise, Fashion Coordination, Wardrobe and
Grooming, Hair Styling, Figure
Co-ordination and Diet, Speech
and Diction, and Social Etiquette).
• Professional Modelling
• Creative Acting
9 Isometrics
• Fashion Design & Illustration
• Private Tuition Available
Phone NOW for an Appointment
and  a   Complimentary  Analysis!
THE
ADRIENNE
CAMERON
SCHOOL OF MODELLING
1386 BURRARD ST. 688-1301
But stops right outside
free parking at rear
THE SCIENCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
of the University of British Columbia
requests the pleasure of the company of
 ^..&y«tfe	
at the sealing of a Time Capsule
North of the Cairn on the Main Mall
on Wednesday, January 18th, 1967
at 12:30 p.m.
a new production by Playhouse
Theatre Company,
Tickets on sale at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St., MU 3-3255;
all Eaton's Stores (charge them); and Town & Country Home Furnishings
in Kerrisdale and Richmond.
STUDENT   SPECIAL:
HALF-PRICE   FOR  ALL  EVENING
PERFORMANCES.
$1.00 FOR SATURDAY MATINEE Tuesday, January 17, 1967
JJvl   Slack,   plaausL
Page 3
INSTRUCTIONS GIVEN
SUS invents mated radar
Here are the confidential
instructions for the operation
and maintenance of the
AN-2X2Q, radar set.
The two components, receiver and a transmitter, are
each mounted on their own
bipod. The receiver is located
in a handsomely-finished cabinet which is equipped with
two main tuning dials, a coast
button, and a resonant cavity
type of receiving wave guide.
The transmitter consists of
a less handsomely-finished cabinet of more practical construction; the most pro-feature of
which is the radiating mono-
pole antenna located at the
lower end of the chassis.
The antenna is fed through
5 mm. wave guides from twin
transmitting tubes operating
in the push-pull mode.
The equipment may be operated while mounted on the
bipods when time is insufficient to prepare a more suit-
a b 1 e installation. Optimum
performance should not, however, be expected under these
circumstances.
The bipods function most
satisfactorily when laid extended on the ground, or they
may be folded.
There is an almost unlimited
variety of suitable positions
for practical installation.
In nearly all orientations, it
will be found that the receiver
bipod, which is widely adjustable, can be interlocked with
some portion of the transmitter chassis, and so provide a
firm support for the equipment.
The site of installation is
important, and the equipment
should not ibe bedded down on
a surface that is too springy.
Excessive resiliency of the
foundation for the group may
cause spurious oscillations
which will interrupt the Pulse
Repetition Frequency and may
even cause premature transmission to take place.
To prepare the equipment
for operation, it is advisable
for the operator to manipulate
the two main tuning dials of
the receiver continuously
while the receiver is warming
up. If the receiver emits a low
moan, excellent operation is
assured.
In optimum operation, the
Pulse Repetition Frequency
varies gradually, commencing
at a. low rate, increasing slowly, then decreasing again, the
whole cycle being repeated
several times during one operation. During this time, if the
receiver is operating properly,
the resonant cavity will become highly receptive to the
transmitted frequency.
In rare cases a receiver is
found, due to the negligence
of the maintenance crew,
which retains the utterly useless protective shutter put in
when {the component was
made.
This would, however, be destroyed by the first main bang.
Very few receivers will be
found that have not had this
modification carried out.
A common mistake on the
part of the inexperienced operator is to start transmission
at too high a Pulse Repetition
Frequency.
Entirely apart from the
strain which is imposed on
the mechanism, this type of
transmission is inadvisable as
it invariably results in premature operation.
In proper operation, the
cyclically-varying Pulse Repetition Frequency will gradually rise to a tremendous peak,
pulse of approximately ten
megawatts is given off and the
radiant receiver becomes virtually incandescent.
The equipment must now go
off the air for a short period
of maintenance. The operator
should pay careful attention to
the receiver making certain
that all capacitors discharge
slowly and the equipment is
gradually brought back to a
quiescent state.
Trouble, whenever it occurs,
will always be caused by the
transmitter.
Remember: after the first
trial run, except during monthly overhauls, nothing ever goes
wrong with the receiver.
ON BLACK AND BLUE
Prof airs views
(Ed. note: Most students are unware of faculty opinions of
the Black and Blue Review. The following article was written
by a prof who prefers to remain anonymous.)
Nobody wishes to deny the student the right to say
anything he chooses.
But whether there is necessarily any value in what he
says is another matter. If an
analysis, however valid statistically, is made df the'opinions
of a group of people, one ob-
Dear Gertrude
Dear Gertrude:
Eighteen years ago, my
mother — then a prostitute —
deserted me at a well-known
white slave market in New
Orleans. I have been through
hell on earth until two years
ago when I befriended a
wealthy, elderly matron who
insisted in leaving me $200,-
000 as well as her family
jewels. Now I'm looking for
some clue as to my identity or
for any relatives that may still
be living. Can you help me in
this search?
Lost.
Dear Lost:
My baby!! Come home!
•     •     •
Dear Gertrude:
A couple of months while
on campus, I was accosted by
a funny-looking man in a dirty
"T shirt and torn kilt. He ran
up, grabbed my bottom and
yelled, "yummy!" then ran
away. I'd like to find out more
about this idiot.
Curious.
Dear Curious:
The  person
who   grabbed
you wasn't a man. If you're
really interested in finding out
more about this person, you
can reach me at my private
number, CA 4-4338.
•      •      •
Dear Gertrude:
Every day for the past six
months my wife has been going out in the morning to a
job that I know nothing about.
She leaves me to wash the
dirty dishes, clean the house
and look after our five kids.
Is there some way I can force
her to quit the job and have
her take her proper place in
the kitchen?
An Angry Husband.
Dear Angry Husband:
Listen, swine, if I hadn't
taken that job, we'd all be in
poor house, since you're too
fat and lazy to get one yourself.
And what's more, if you
don't like doing dishes, you
know what you can do with
them!
Just you wait till I get home
you lazy, good-for-nothing
slob!
tains information about the
OPINIONS, seldom about the
SUBJECT of their opinions.
For example, the opinion that
work is not popular is not evidence that it is undesirable.
On the other hand, if the professor cannot be heard, or his
immediate argument cannot be
understood, or his keys jingle
too loudly, the student has
more than a right to complain
He has a duty. And he has only
himself to blame if he neglects
it.
If your professor has one
mind and you have another,
it is hardly surprising that you
will disagree with his methods.
When you made your criticisms last year, did you give
any thought to this?
Where are the results of
Jast year's questionnaire? Can
over 200 double sided sheets
of opinion on a single course
be distilled into a few sentences? Hardly! Such information can only be presented in
any useful way by serious
statistical methods. Therefore,
let us see class size, sample
size, and the means of all the
scores, not just the answer
concerning popularity.
If the Black and Blue is
merely a record of arbitrary
opinion, well and good. But it
is then little better than frivolous. If it pretends to bring
about imnrovement, let its
standards be those which will
be accepable everywhere.
A mature judgment presented in a sound manner will
compel attention; an undergraduate frolic is at best mischievous.
—laurie nichols photo
HONEST TO GOD, at first I couldn't believe it, but it was
this long and this big around.
Science sponsors
top lecture series
The Science Undergraduate Society, in co-operation
with the Faculty of Science, has initiated a science lecture
series.
The series will consist of
lectures by prominent men in
various fields of science.
The aim of the series is to
give the undergraduate the
opportunity to meet well-
known and respected men who
are in the foregrounds of their
fields.
It is hoped this will stimulate greater interest in science
as a whole, by making students more aware of the recent advances.
The guest lecturers this term
are Dr. J. T. Wilson, geophysi-
cist, director of the Institute
for Earth Studies at the University of Toronto; Dr. G. P.
Kuiper, astrophysicist, director of the Lunar and Planetary
Laboratry at the University of
Tucson; and Dr. I. M. Lerner,
geneticist, professor at the University of California at Berkeley.
The intial lecture in the
series will be presented by Dr.
Wilson Jan. 26 at noon in the
Hebb Theatre.
He will discuss two current
revolutions in earth science.
This will involve comparison  of the  earth with  other
planets and the moon, and
some new ideas on the subject
of continental drift.
Everyone is welcome to these
lectures; there is no charge.
Space study
starts here
With the construction of the
$20 million Queen Elizabeth II
observatory on Mount Kobau,
in the B.C. interior, Canada
will emerge as a leader in the
field of astronomy.
This is part of an extensive
project which will also see the
construction of a research centre on the UBC campus and the
establishment of a separate department of Astronomy under
the faculty of Science.
At present it is part of the
UBC Institute of Earth Sciences
and the Department of Geophysics.
The first phase of the project
will be the construction of a
$1 million optical shop which
will grind the 150-inch mirror
for the telescope, which will be
the second largest in the world. Page 4
JhsL  Blade  plaqusL
Tuesday, January 17, 1967
"OKAY, IT'S AGREED.   We'll  charge  ten  cents admission and we'll open right away before
this line-up goes away.   A lot of these people look\ like they need  our facilities."
SUS jokes and
broads
on sex,
Well Hung
There was a young maiden
named Nellie
Whose breasts could be joggled like jelly;
They could be tied in a knot
or reach you-know-what
Or even swat flies on her belly.
Wrung Dry
There was a young laundress
' named  Singer;
Whose   bust   was   a   round,
pink  humdinger.
But flat, black and blue
It emerged into view
The day it got caught in the
wringer.
Jail Bait Sold
Employment — Classified.
The fishing tackle dealer was
introducing the co-ed to her
duties for the summer:
"By the way," he said, "have
you ever had any experience
with trout flies?"
The co-ed looked thoughtful.
"Can't say I have" she replied, "reckon they're about
the only ones I've never opened."
Bottled Bond?
When 007 picked up a "social disease" in Cairo and passed it on to Lady Fotheringham
Price-Chapman,   she   then   be-
limericks
and booze
I came   known
I Carrier".
as   '1A   Bonded
Stick Out Necks
Sexy co-ed to the tattoo artist: "Can you tatoo' a cat on
my knee'"
Tattoo Artist: "We're having
a sale on giraffes this week."
Why Eat Out?
Definition of a glutton: a
man who can have chicken
for breakfast, chicken for
lunch, chicken for dinner, and
yet go to bed with a breast
in one hand, a bone in the
other, and still want another
piece.
Better Sweater
There  was   a young   lady
named Etta
Who   fancied   herself   in   a
sweater;
Three reason she had:
To keep warm was not bad,
But   the other   two   reasons
were better.
Underpriveleged
Sciencettes
The SUS women's rep gave
the following speech to the
women of the SUS at a recent
general meeting:
We must have what the men
have; it may not be much, but
we mean to have it.
If we cannot get it without
friction, we will have to get
it with friction. We refuse to
be poked in the gallery any
longer,   we    insist   on    being
placed on the floor of the
house.
We are willing to look up
to the men, but we don't want
to be forced or held down
without making a few motions
of our own.
We want to hold up our ends
and show the men our possibilities when ever anything
arises that will fill our expectations. Nothing that comes
up can be too hard for us.
How often have our efforts
to push forward our ends been
met with the cry of "down
with the petticoats"?
Now I say "Up with the petticoats, down with the pants."
Then shall we see things in
their true light.
So long as we women are
split the way we are now, the
men will always be on top.
SUS teams
to re-enter
intermurals
The SUS is back in intermural sports.
It has entered teams in almost every sport played this
year, playing against clubs,'
frats and other faculties.
Intermurals are free (you pay
for them through AMS fees
anyway), and they give players
the opportunity to learn new
sports and lose excess weight.
This term you still have time
to sign up for badminton, rugby,
tennis, golf, wrestling, and
track.
To encourage participation in
these sports for Science, a block
letter system has been implemented (block 'S' of course).
To gain one of these blocks,
students need 10 points, 20
points for a large block. Two
points are awarded just for participation in any sport.
There is no limit to the number of sports a student may
participate in. If the team or
individual 'places' in competition, more points are awarded.
These points are accumulated
through your years in Science.
Points are also given for
those who help organize the
teams.
No large blocks have been
awarded since the system, started, less than a year ago, however eight small blocks have
been awarded.
'Last week a criticism was
received.
Dennis was teaching an Art-
sie how to play golf, but was
met with disapproval of his
teaching methods and the game
itself.
Part of the Artsie's letter
appears below.
"I went to see Dennis and
asked him if he would teach
me how to play."
Dennis said, "Sure, you've
got balls, haven't you?" I said,
"Yes, but on cold mornings
they're kinda hard to find." He
said, "Bring them to the clubhouse tomorrow and we'll tee
off."
. "Not for me," I said, "you
can tee off there if you want
but I'll go behind the barn
some." I asked, "Do you play
sitting down? I always thought
you stood up and walked
around." "You do," he said,
"you're standing up when you
put your ball on the tee.'
He asked, "You've got a
bag?" "Yes." "Well, can't you
open the bag and take one out?"
I said, "I suppose I could but
the hell if I'm going to."
He asked if I had a zipper on
my bag and I told him I was
the old-fashioned type.
Then he asked if I knew how
to hold my club. I told him that
I usually held it in two fingers
and he said that wasn't right.
That you take it in both hands
and then I knew he didn't know
what he was talking about. He
said I should bend over and he
would show me how to do it
right.
"Then," he said, "you hit the
ball with your club and it will
soar." Well, I can imagine that.
Then he said, "When you're on
the green ..." I asked what
the green was and was told
that's where the hole is.
"Alright then, take your putter ..." I asked what a putter
was and he hold me it was the
smallest club made, so I said,
"That's what I got." So he told
me that I put the ball in the
hole with my putter. I said,
"You mean I put my putter in
the hole?" "No, stupid, the hole
isn't big enough for both the
ball and the putter."
He went on to say that after
I do the hole on the first green
I go on to the next 17. Well
on'e enough for me anyday.
Physics
society
informal
Poetic SUS women
clobber nurses 16-2
A beautiful and wondrous sight blessed the Winter
Sports Center yesterday. It was the pure poetry of graceful
gliding forms and flashing skates (shut-up and keep reading) of the Science Women's hockey team.
The SUS Women completely clobbered the nurses in
the second annual Science-Nursing hockey game that
Science always wins.
The action was hot and heavy and for a while it seemed
as though the Band-aid Pushers had the edge, but with the
backing of many weeks of strenuous practice our girls came
through with a 16-2 victory over the hard-charging nurses.
For the last few years, SUS
has had in its midst one of
the largest and most active
clubs on campus—UBC Physics Society.
Phys-Soc provides an informal atmosphere for discussion of physics, girls, and related subjects.
Among the facilities offered
are study space, physics and
chem lab cook-books, a ten-
cent pop machine, and a bunch
of fourth-year students willing
to do first-year problems.
There is also a well-stocked
library containing over 150
reference texts which may be
borrowed overnight, several
hundred grad calendars, old
exams in almost every Science
course and in some other useful courses such as Horticulture 318.
The present membership of
110 enjoy Thursday noon talks
on subjects of interest in physics, films in Hebb Theatre
every Wednesday noon, tours
of research labs, discussion
groups  and field trips.
The fees are $1.00 plus 50
cents for the Journal.
The Journal is published annually and contains articles on
physics by students and profs,
for example "Some Freudian
Aspects of Plasma Nomenclature", by Dr. Curzon.
The club is open to all interested persons; just walk
into the operations base in
Hennings 307 with $1.50 in
your nose. Tuesday, January  17,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Bandy bandies revolt
When is a revolution not a revolution?
When it is a counter revolution.
This was one of the major points raised
by Alex Bandy Friday in his discussion of
the Hungarian Revolt of 1956.
In a speech attended by 50 Internationalists, Bandy discussed Hungarian history
pointing out its feudal background and its
fascist government prior to world war two.
Following the war the Marxist government attempted to bring the nation from its
feudal state directly into a socialist state
thus bypassing the traditional liberal bourgeois state.
This failed and the bourgeois way of
thinking developed as a natural development
from the feudal state.
Thus the revolt of 1956 was pushed by
people who believed in capitalism and individual enterprise at the expense of the good of
the community, he said.
Bandy pointed out there was a very small
Hungarian Communist Party which lacked
sufficient popular support to develop a successful socialist revolution.
Bandy went on to examine the Cuban
revolution headed by Fidel Castro. He visited
Cuba in the summer of 1966.
He recounted the interest of the people
T. POLE
. .. out in cold
No room in shed
for rotting pole
U1BC is doing its best to stop the rot in
its totem poles.
Vancouver sculptor Peter Ochs recently
claimed a prize pole from Kispoix, B.C. was
rotting at UBC's Totem Park.
Wilson Duff, professor of anthropology,
says the pole is well taken care of under
existing conditions.
With the lack of finances, Duff said he
could only get the pole out of the ground
and wrap it in plastic.
He claimed there was no room in the
totem-pole shed. The pole is still in the
ground at Totem Park.
in discussing the speeches of Castro in Ha-
vanna cafes.
Bandy likened this lack of action to those
Canadians who are aware of injustices and
contradictions in their social, economic and
politcial system but who only continue to
talk.
To wait for objective conditions to materialize which will force the individual to
act, Bandy labelled "Waiting for the
Fascists."
Bandy was born in what is present day
East Germany and lived most of his youth
in Hungary.
He left the country following the revolution.
He is now a Canadian citizen and political
science student at Simon Fraser.
New arts program
proposed by head
of undergraduates
Arts Undergraduate Society president
George Roberts has announced a new arts
action program.
The program, drafted Friday, calls for
establishment of:
Departmental arts student-faculty academic committees to review old courses and
establish new ones.
Faculty-council student-faculty academic
committees to work for the general improvement of study conditions for arts students.
Student committees to supplement university employment services by searching
out employment opportunities for arts students.
Tutoring and counselling by senior graduate students.
Position of arts ombudsman — a senior
student to help arts students with problems.
Roberts said he will call an arts general
meeting during education action week for
faculty debate and a vote of confidence.
"I want to push this through with or without council support," he said.
Roberts said council's accusations in The
Ubyssey Thursday were "pure garbage."
"Until the play-pen politicians stop bitching and come up with some ideas of their
own," he said, "I refuse to become upset by
their uninformed criticism."
AUS council accused Roberts of irresponsibility and inaction. They said locker rentals
have not been collected, audits have not been
handed in, and money is missing from desk
drawers.
He said the secretary has the key to the
office, and any missing money disappeared
during former president Wise's reign.
UWO ok's dorms
LONDON (CUP) — The University of
Western Ontario's board of governors recently gave its preliminary approval to the proposed 1,600-bed student housing complex.
The five-building complex will by next
August house 1,200 single students and 400
married couples, doubling present on-campus
accommodation.
The buildings will be focused around central facilities such as a main recreation room
designed to hold a maximum of 800 persons
and a single, cafeteria with room for 480.
— powell hargrave photo
GLINTING CHROME, and black rubber cram motorcycle
shed at north end of C-lot. Students who brave weather
on cycles get to park closer to campus.
PROFESSORS   ELEVATED
Two retired UBC professors have been elevated to the status
of professor emeritus.
Dr. James Mather and John Gibbard were honored by
the senate after one year of retirement.
Mather was head of UBC's department of public health
from 1952 and assistant dean of medicine from 1960 until his
retirement. He becomes professor emeritus of public health.
Gibbard taught at B.C. schools before joining UBC's faculty
of education in 1955. He becomes associate professor emeritus
of education.
Push-button system
keeps profs alerted
Anonymous chats with the prof, anyone ?
Through an electronic system introduced at Simon Fraser
Academy, students can now keep their anonymity when indicating they have not grasped a professional point.
The system, first in Western Canada, calls for multi-
position switches on the arm of each seat in lecture theatres.
Students turn the switch to one Of five positions in response
to multiple choice questions or to indicate their progress in
solving a problem.
Electronic signals are relayed to five corresponding meters
on a small console in front of the lecturer so that he receives
immediately an exact percentage reading of student response.
Dr. Brian Pate, head of the Simon Fraser chemistry
department, said the electronic system is a "positive" learning
process.
"It is the answer to the problem of involving all students
in a large lecture theatre. The individual student may be
reluctant to raise his hand to ask a question because he is
afraid of exposing himself to ridicule," he said.
"The system works two ways because it also enables the
lecturer to pace his material according to the speed of the class
and indicates to him whether students are mastering his
material," said Pate.
Asked if UBC had any such project planned, an information office spokesman said: "Nothing it up for consideration, at
least it hasn't come up in the senate."
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TAKE VOU TO CAMP. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout tho university
by the Alma Mater Society of the UKyersity of B.C. Editorial opinion!
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorised
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Pag*
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press Trophies for general
excellence and editorial cartoons.
JANUARY 17, 1967
We march . ..
January 27, 1967—1,000 students march on Victoria
in an attempt to insert support for education into the
Social Credit mind.
Education minister Les Peterson will talk with a
student delegation and receive an agglomeration of
briefs. Everybody will hear some long speeches and
then everybody will go home.
Meanwhile, the fedeTal government has rechannelled
federal tax money to the provinces instead of paying its
usual per capita education grant.
In accord with the British North America act,
the federal government will say nothing about how this
money is to be spent—it is completely and absolutely
up to the provinces. Of course, Pearson has suggested
it he spent on education and pointed out that is Ottawa's
intent.
The prime minister thinks B.C.'s share of the automatic no-strings kickback is $27 million.
Pretend you're Les Peterson next Friday. You're
aware of $27 million that ought to go to education, and
with the normal provincial grants and the university's
own funds the total will be $66 million—just what the
universities need in 1967-68.
You also know you control absolutely $27 million
of that money, and here comes a horde of students to
try to persuade you to spend it on universities. But
you'd rather drink beer or play golf on Friday afternoon.
And you know that most students are barely 19—
they don't vote, and even if they did would not vote
in a block. By next election time, they won't be students
any more. So there's no political pressure on you from
them, and you happen to be a man of great political
acumen.
They will vote in the next election and it would be
nice to leave them with a nice taste. So talk with them,
hear the student view, send a nice note acknowledging
the brief, and forget  it.
So has gone the past course of student brief!- and
marches and more briefs. So has gone the university's
own submissions, and so goes both the federal government and the AUCC's speeches on education spending.
Which means you can't educate a provincial government with briefs alone.
...in weed patch
Now examine the course of the student politician.
He knows nothing will happen until the student community is educated to the needs of the university and
made politically aware enough to act on those needs.
That's you, bubla, the politically unaware and uneducated mass Peter Braund likes to talk of.
But Peter Braund and all the rest of the student
government thinkers stop thinking when they're asked
what politicizing the student mass means. It's a nebulous goal nicely in line with fashionable new left-think,
as are lots of briefs to every government agency in
sight. It's a bit of new leftism designed to make everybody feel good while doing nothing to make the student
politicos think they know where they are going while
the wander in verbal weed patches.
Probably they cannot face the result of politicizing
a mass of people. Historically, it's called revolution —
although it can be subverted to a quiet revolution.
But an aware horde, a horde that knows why its
education facilities are starving for lack of funds and
where the funds that could be tapped are, cannot stop
at briefs and orderly marches. It cannot continue to
play a game in which it holds no cards and Les Peterson
holds them all.
It may be irresponsible, but the kind of power
students can use ranges from Berkeley-type uprisings
to simple sit-ins to general strikes to warfare in the
streets and mob rule.
If Peter Braund and his AMS had done their thinking, and had faced the inevitable conclusions, they
would not now embark on a march which will have as
little effect as January 27 to the legislature.
UBC's student leaders have not taken their fashionable new left-think to it's logical end, and they do not
know what the final result will be — if what they are
trying to do now succeeds.
^
Pavement artists
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
'Unsatisfactory
Editor The Ubyssey:
I found Mr. Mate's "column
of resignation" disturbingly
unsatisfactory. "Personal reasons" cannot be argued, but
his attack on his own work,
and on The Ubyssey as a vehicle for any improvement
thereof is a horse of a different color. Hypocrisy lies not
in disseminating trivia, but in
condemning that work of
others which was unimproved
by his own.
• •       •
Perhaps the most troubling
aspect of his stand is an apparent denial of the relevance
of Humor, and of its association with Truth. Was Samuel Clemens' work made socially and morally irrelevant
by its suit of Daughter? It is
truly unfortunate if he could
not appreciate how much
essence was transmitted
through the silliness of your
creations.
The horror in Viet Nam is a
true horror, but it is a
materialistic one. The tales of
the ^strength of spirit, the
courage and devotion which
Vietnamese show (when they
really care, as in a matter of
a family member's health),
shows that this war has not
broken their minds nor destroyed their joy in living—
and neither should it destroy his.
• •       •
If I were a Vietnamese
peasant, it would not make
me feel a mite better to know
tha 8,000 miles away, a person (or persons) is living a
life of self-inflicted anguish
on behalf of my own distress.
Indeed, I should feel worse,
having an added responsibility with which I have no
means of coping. You are suffering, Mr. Mate, from the
American disease of overin-
volvement: the feelings of an
unbearable responsibility for
that which you cannot meaningfully influence. You don't
even have the excuse of being an American, and even
for Americans it is foolish—
they cannot stop this war any
more than yourself.
Only Lyndon Johnson or a
large majority  can stop  the n* I
war (and this IS the  truth). BICyCieS
Be informed. Be aware. Be Editor The Ubyssey:
open. Be communicative. In response to Mr. Leo Tos-
Do not sacrifice to Mr. John- canelli's letter of January 12,
son your sense of Humor and 1967 I should like to indicate
your creativity, as an artist of that the AMS is considering
Humor, for this is far more an investment in a number of
than is his due. community bicycles.  In fact,
•      00 provision  could be  made in
Although   your   complaints tne   Outing  Headquarters   in
about The Ubyssey are largely tne   Student   Union   Building
valid, we still have here a bet- for their rental and storage,
ter paper than, say, the Berke- We  could  also  arrange   uni-
ley Barb, in spite of the latter's cycles and tricycles for those
more    meaningful    material, possessing   superior   balance
The reason is The Ubyssey's and  maturity.     Applications
higher level of sanity as man- for *he Bicycle Committee are
ifested in its healthier sense eagerly invited,
of humor.  That is  the only LORNE  HUDSON,
thing about The Ubyssey that Student Union
must not be changed. As for Building Chairman,
substance of material,  it has Wffi^^^ms^^^^^^^KUHMMl
been   hardly   overwhelming, editor: John Kelsey
but   it   is   unconsciOUSable   Of Managing       - . Richard Blair
you to declare  that there has News             Caret Wilson
been none. (An obvious exam- Citv  Danny stoffman
pie    is    Peter    Light's    article phot<>      Powell Hargrave
Jan    7 ) Page Friday      Claudia Gwinn
My    own    letter    does    not Focu$      Rosemary Hyman
show any marked display of Sport*       -   Sue Gransby
my own sense of humor, and *»'* New» M Kni'
this I attribute to my talent A$$'tCity - -  Tom Morris
being poorer than yours. Cup       Bert Hill
000 All   staffers   —   reporters,   sports
writers,    Page    Friday,    cartoonists,
We   do   no   Choose   Our   tal- everybody — important  staff meet-
.      _. , , ing noon  today in Ubyssey office.
entS. If you are to make your In-depth    analysts    were    Norman
mn«_r impnnini-fnl   r-nntriVintinn Gidney,   newcomer  Don  Stanley,   Bo
most meanmgiui contriDution Hanserii Boni L-e, counciioons Kris
to Life and play most square- Emmott and Val Zuker,  Dave Cur-
, ... . sons,      Murray      McMillan,       Terry
ly With your conscience,  you Black,   Charlotte  Haire  and  the  re-
should  not  reject any talent «0j£S££uiUn ZlVh"Skme     from
because   you   think   it   not   as Powell Hargrave, Kurt Hilger, Den-
...        , ._.    ,       , ,   , nis Gans and Al Harvey.
Significant  as  it  should be. Ross   Evans,   Mike   Jessen,   Tony
__„,„ _»*«»,_. Hodge, Pio Uran, Marg Fairweather,
ETHAN   A.   SCARL, Bev     Feather     and     Jim     Maddin
Portland. Oregon. spv^otpearty Prlday.
Maple Leaves
'ftt U>i<J<*xr>
youve 9ot<v
point "there Adam Tuesday, January 17,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
CAMPUS QUESTS
Freedom of mind, stomach and soul
Students across Canada and
the United States had riots,
drugs and food on their
minds over Christmas.
In Ottawa, the Canadian
Union of Students learned
when not to crack a joke.
A recently - released CUS
program facetiously suggests
university students riot this
month in their campaign to
attain power at the top.
The document, which suggests "an ideal January program" for university students' councils to follow, includes the following statement: "Follow-up the board
(of governor's) reply, or lack
of reply, with another letter,
an article, sit-in or riot, depending on the mood of your
campus."
The proposal was not meant
to be taken seriously, CUS
president Doug Ward pointed
out to The Toronto Globe and
Mail which picked up the
story in all seriousness.
The Globe received a program from the University of
Western Ontario administration which is undergoing controversial changes in university government.
Western's students' administrative union also sent CUS
a letter complaining about
the use of the word riot.
"There's absolutely no implication that we should call
riots," Ward  said.
"I'm amazed at the paranoia
of any administration that
we would want to incite a riot.
A riot isn't possible."
Ward said the "real bombshell" contained in the program outline was not the humorous part, but its call for
what he termed "open decision making" in the university community.
However, CUS will strike
the word riot from its vocabulary—unless it is meant to
be taken seriously.
Boycott
American students, following the lead set by their Canadian counterparts at the University of Montreal last fall,
have been boycotting cafeterias in protest of increased
food prices.
Students at Hunter College
in New York City succeeded
in getting across - the - board
price reductions after a three-
day boycott.
The administration agreed
to subsidize any financial loss
the cafeteria might incur.
Cafeteria directors at San
Francisco State College faced
a two-front battle when students protested a 15 per cent
increase in food prices and
cafeteria employees demanded an hourly wage increase.
The   employees   got   their
raise. The students succeeded
in getting a 10 per cent price
cut after a nine-day boycott.
The students, who want another 10 per cent reduction
are eating at the cafeteria
again. Meanwhile, the cafeteria mangement is conducting a study of prices, student
attitudes, and possibilities for
change.
Probe LSD
LSD once more made headlines, both in Ottawa and in
Chicago.
The federal government is
investigating the export of
records into Canada by Dr.
Timothy Leary — "the high
priest of LSD" — and the
legality of advertisements for
the records appearing in Canadian university newspapers.
Margaret Rideout, parliamentary secretary to health
and welfare minister Allan
MacEachen, said during a
House of Commons adjournment debate that sale of the
records is being "looked
into."
Mrs. Rideout was replying
to a question raised by Social
Credit MP Howard Johnston.
Johnston said he had seen the
record advertised in The
Sheaf, University of Saskatchewan's student newspaper.
BRAUND ON BRAUND:
Our duty is to lead
By BONI LEE
The Alma Mater Society's Peter Braund
likes to describe himself as a left wing liberal,  and a traditionalist.
Some   of  his   other   contradictions:
President Peter Braund has some "pretty
definite ideas" about the B.C. Assembly of
Students.
"It is one of the most significant student
movements in Canada," said Braund.
"But what we're fighting for is in the
interests of ourselves. The Union des Etudiants Nationale de Quebec is relating their
problem to society at large — working in
slum  areas, for instance.
"This is the sort of thing I would hope
the assembly would look into," he said.
"But I think BCAS has a hell of a realistic program."
On student council, he commented:
"Since we are the elected representatives,
our duty is to politically lead."
A secondary role is to administrate efficiently, said Braund.
"But too many people rationalize political leadership to administrative duties,"
he emphasized.
On the role of the politician:
"To perceive a crisis and solve the problem before it gets too late."
On free tuition:
"A realistic progressive step. Students
would have to be academically qualified."
On out-of-town equalization grants:
"This   is  highest  priority."
On  parental  financial   aid:
"I disagree with the principle. I think
a student should try to make it on his own."
On politics:
"I'm along a left wing liberal line—small
T left and big 'L' liberal. There are a lot
of people  like myself who  might  as  well
be NDP but for various reasons are not."
On student journalism:
"The role of a university newspaper is
a  critical role.
"A good newspaper has a philosophy of
trying to polarize political opinion, of mobilizing student movement on any issue and
in the long run."
On The Ubyssey:
"The Ubyssey is one of the best university
papers I have read, although there are few
good ones in Canada.
"I have been very disappointed in the
attention given to relevant issues such as
democracy in the university community.
The Ubyssey should get comments from administration, faculty and students, get opinions."
On the AMS:
"On every major issue student government has provided leadership. In many
cases it hasn't been effective, in many cases
it  has."
On Viet Nam:
"I think every student should be worried
about the war in Viet Nam. Too many
people rationalize, use home affairs as an
excuse for non-involvement.
"You have to have your mind open and
start thinking about other people and other
problems."
On LSD and phychedelic drugs:
"These students taking drugs should be
made aware of the physical problems as
well as the legal problem.
"If there was more literature on drugs,
a lot of students now taking drugs would
not be."
On campus morality:
"It's strictly between two individuals.
I do not favor public displays; I'm all for a
little privacy.
"Rather than fight the morality, we've
got to look at it and decide the pros and
cons. I'm sort of a traditionalist person,
myself."
Records could be bought by
sending $3 to a New York
address, he said.
The advertisement has also
appeared in The Ubyssey and
the Gazette from the University of Western Ontario.
A student League for Spiritual Discovery (LSD) has applied for campus recognition
at Roosevelt University in
Chicago.
But dean of students
George Watson says he has
postponed making an official
decision until he obtains legal
advice on the matter.
Watson said his "preliminary judgment" would be to
deny recognition because the
group   "is  organized   for   an
illegal purpose and therefore
cannot be recognized as a
Rooselvelt student group".
The group, an off-shoot of
former Harvard psychologist
Timothy Leary's new psychedelic "religion", is dedicated
to the use of the controversial
drug, LSD.
The organization differs
from other religions in that
it doesn't "turn sacrement in
sacrilege," founder Bill
Moore, a Roosevelt graduate
student said.
"We use the word religion
because the experimental aspects of our movement can't
be well-fitted under any other
name—we're not political activists, we're not athletes,
we're not addicts."
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• Receive the current club magazine which lists over 400 latest best sellers at extra special prices -
up to 45% off   list, e.g. $5.20 LPs for $2.86.
• Every record brand new, first quality, factory fresh—or guaranteed  fully returnable! Tapes available
Record Club of Canada,
62 Richmond Street West,
Toronto 1, Ontario.
CLIP AND MAIL
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Send me my FREE SCHWANN CATALOGUE, your CLUB MAGAZINE, ORDER FORM and complete
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17, 1967
Reds close RC schools
WARSAW (UNS) — The Polish government has taken
action to close six Roman Catholic seminaries here.
The move arises from a long-standing feud between the
Roman Catholic Church and the communist government of
the country.
Since 1963, the government has requested more and more
control of the subject material in Catholic schools, including
inspection of seminary premises, inspection of textbooks, and
overseeing of teaching procedures.
The closings were ordered when Catholic officials refused
entry to the seminaries of inspectors who intended to take part
in conducting student examinations.
Cardinal Stefan Wyszynski, leader of Poland's 30 million
Catholics, ordered the resistance.
No reason was given by the government for singling out
six institutions of 44, as well as a university and a theological
academy.
Hong Kong students meet
HONG KONG (UNS)—Sixty students, representatives of
Hong Kong's 19 universities and colleges, met here Dec. 26 to
29, to discuss the role structure, and functions of a student
union.
The seminar was opened by a Malaysian delegate, Mohammed Kamar.
"The universities are not only expected to work for the
cultural and intellectual development and enrichment of
the communities, but also for the economic, political and technological advancement of the societies of which they are a
part," he said.
The seminar resolved to improve the welfare of students
in Hong Kong, and help establish student unions where none
exist at present.
Yugos fire youth chiefs
BELGRADE (UNS)—The central committee of the Yugoslav Union of Youth has dismissed its secretariat for what
it termed careerism and bureaucratism.
YUY said the secretariat has not been quick enough in
bringing its activities in line with present national policy which
emphasizes economic reform and democratization within the
entire country.
The Yugoslav Union of Students is contemplating a similar
action, stating that the YUS heirarchy has lost all contact with
its members.
Zagreb University's Studentski List charged the YUS
heirarchy has lost all contact with its members.
One saving-grace for the secretariat may be the policy
of democratization, which emphasized controversy and shake-
up as a cure for the youths' present apathy towards their
, organizations.
Arrests start mass riots
TUNIS (UNS) — A disagreement between two students and
a bus driver kindled a several-hour riot at the University of
Tunis here Dec. 15.
The riots, starting with the arrest of two UT students,
ended in more than 100 arrests.
The students, predominantly members of an anti-socialist
group, were released from police cutsody but nine were hastily
inducted into the Tunisian army following their release.
The General Union of Tunisian Students condemned the
students for making an issue out of an 'insignificant' event.
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INTERVIEWS WILL BE HELD
MONDAY, JANUARY 23, 1967 AT U.B.C.
Interested applicants are asked to contact the U.B.C.
Placement Office for appointments or
If unavailable for interview contact Mr. J. W. Stollery.
Cordilleran Exploration Corporation. 400-837 West
Hastings St., Vancouver 1, B.C. Phone 685-0167.
Career Opportunities
BEAVER
■ We are Canada's largest retailer of building materials and
related products.
■ Our 285 retail outlets service six provinces, from
Quebec to British Columbia.
■ Beaver is a Canadian Company, in its sixtieth year of business.
Most graduates are seeking important work, personalized training, the
opportunity to contribute to the growth of an enterprise, advancement
based on ability and suitable recognition, both financial and personal.
We offer all this and the opportunity to become part of a
progressive management team.
The stimulus of marketing a constantly-changing product mix in
a highly competitive industry will appeal particularly to
graduating students in
Business Administration Q
Commerce Q
Arts Q
The Beaver Representative
will visit your campus
°n Jan.  23 and 24 Tuesday, January 17, 1967
THE      UBYSS-EY
Page 7
— kurt hilger photo
SYMBOLICALLY MOVING LEFT off  Point Grey,  solitary tug tugs  barge  past  log   booms
representing booming B.C. industry.   Logs are owned by lumber barons who  also help
run   UBC  via   board   of  governors.
Employees  union certified
The University Employees' Union, Local
116, has been certified by the Labor Relations Board as bargaining agent for the
UBC bookstore employees.
Bob Black, president of Local 116, announced Friday the local intends to enter
Art work needed
Canadian universities' centennial program begins in Calgary with an art and
photography exhibition.
Information about photo and other art
contributions can be obtained from the fine
arts office in the Lasserre building.
Photo exhibits should be in by Feb. 13
and art by Jan. 23.
into collective bargaining for the employees
at an early date.
"We will ask those directly concerned to
tell us what improvements they want in
wages and conditions and we will bargain
on that basis. In the main, salaries are so
low now that there is lots of room for improvement," he stated.
Charges of undue interference laid by
the union against the UBC director of personnel and the bookstore manager have been
withdrawn.
Bookstore Manager John Hunter said he
did not oppose the certification of Local 116
as bargaining agent but thought the action
would make little difference.
The local is also lodging a grievance on
behalf of lower mall residence janitors who
are to be replaced by maids by June, 1967.
Survivors
can seek
fortune
Successful Christmas exam
survivors can start fortune-
hunting for 1967.
Nominations are now being
accepted for the $1,500 Sherwood Lett Memorial Scholarship.
To be eligible, a candidate
must have attended UBC for
at least two winter sessions
rank academically in the top
quarter of his year and faculty, and give assurance he will
continue his next year of studies at UBC.
The winner will be selected
from nominations submitted by
students council, the executive
of a grad students' association,
the executive of an undergraduate society, or a faculty member.
The final date for submitting nominations to student affairs Dean Walter Gage is Feb.
28,  1967.
A complete file on each nominee should be sent to Gage.
Protest prices
PANGO PANGO (Staff)—
Three hairy green blorgs
and one purple puce blorg
immolated themselves in
front of the U.S. embassy
here recently.
Observers for the Home
Office said the four were
apparently protesting rising
gasoline prices.
CARPET BAGGERS
THURSDAY      •       JANUARY 19      •      AUDITORIUM
12:30 • 3:30 • 8:00 P.M.
ALL THESE  METALS
ARE AVAILABLE  AT
GRASSIES ON  SEYMOUR
Designed to any special requirement whether it be
watches — rings or exquisite table pieces. Come in
and ask for it by name.
STUDENT PREFERENTIAL DISCOUNTS ACKNOWLEDGED
Marks show arts
in second class
Exam statistics prove that arts professors tend to mark
in the 65-80 per cent bracket more than science professors.
The results of last year's finals, released for the first time
by the faculties of arts and sciences, show that both faculties
had a similar percentage of students who attained second class
averages, 32.6 per cent in science compared with 33 per cent in
arts.
There is a greater difference in the number of first class
marks, 8.4 per cent in science and 4.4 per cent in arts.
Marking harder in arts seemed to result in a lower failure
rate as 10 per cent failed in arts as opposed to 12.1 per cent in
science.
A breakdown in years shows the failure rate among first
year students to be the same, 17.1 per cent in arts and 17 per
cent in science.
Second and third year science had a higher failure rate,
14.1 per cent and 9.8 respectively with 10.6 and 5.2 per cent in
arts. Arts' failures in fourth year were 3.5 per cent while science
failures dropped to 1.5 per cent.
Education results showed a lopsided percentage of second
class marks compared to first class marks.
No one in first-year elementary education received first
class standing, .7 per cent in second year, 1.3 per cent in third
increasing to 6.7 per cent in fifth year. Total average for elementary education was 1.1 per cent.
Forty per cent in elementary education received second
class marks.
Figures were taken from the exam results of 4,500 artsmen,
3,000 science students and 2,800 in education.
WRONG SEX HOCKEY
The nurses should have known they couldn't fool the
referee.
They took a 2-1 beating from the science girls in an ice
hockey game played yesterday noon in the Thunderbird Arena.
The nurses were aided by a member of the opposite sex, but
a goal scored by him was disqualified. Women's Rep. Robin
Russel and Science Queen Brenda Bryan flashed along to
score.
566 SEYMOUR . . . 685-2271
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Promotion is from within the company, and is
based on individual performance.
If you are graduating in the faculty of Commerce,
Arts or Science.
If you possess leadership ability and self-confidence.
If you possess imagination, ambition, and an
interest in people.
If you are able and willing to accept periodic
expense-paid transfers.
Consider a career with Zeller's Limited, a growing
Canadian Retail Company with over 100 stores in
more than 70 cities. Success in the Training Programme leads to Store Management or to other
executive positions.
Starting salary will be commensurate with your
qualifications and experience. Employee benefits
include, Pension Plan, Group Life and Health
Insurance, Profit Sharing, and Summer and Winter
Vacations.
Visit the Placement Office to learn more about
the career opportunities with Zeller's, and to
arrange an interview with a company representative who will be on campus on:
\
« 1
i i
TUESDAY,
JAN. 24
.     <>\A*.>Wrt4WA Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17, 1967
Huskies hurt Birds'
ice hockey start
By ROSS EVANS
The UBC ice hockey Thunderbirds made their debut in the
current WCIAA season last weekend against the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies, and suffered two defeats.
On Friday night, before 652 spectators, the Huskies whipped
the Birds 9-3. The fast-foreaking U of S squad took advantage
of two defensive lapses by the Birds, and held a 2-0 lead after
four minutes of play. The Thunderbirds' defence never did
settle down to steady hockey, and the Huskies built up a lead,
and showed a form which left no doubt as to the outcome.
The line of Kozac, Wass, and Josephson contributed most
of the damage for the Huskies, the latter two each scoring
two goals, and Kozac adding a goal and three assists. Wayne
Statham, a stand-out rearguard, also scored two, and singles
went to Chiasson and Hobday. Al McClean netted two and
Miles Desharnais the third for the Birds.
The Birds had several good scoring opportunities, especially in the second period when they were within two goals of
the Huskies, but the steady goaltendinrv of Jim Shaw, and poor
shooting by the Birds, kept them off the score-sheet. McClean,
Desharnais, McGladery, and Richurds turned in the best games
for the Birds.
Saturday's match provided the 520 fans with more to
cheer about, as it was a fast and closely-fought affair which
saw the Huskies score in the final minute to win 4-3. The
rejuvenated Birds led 3-2 after 2 periods, stormed out in the
third and fired 18 shots at Shaw, but could not put one behind
the hot netminder.
As indication of the play the Huskies had only 9 shots
on Russ Kirk in that period, but made them count.. Bill
Sveison and Wally Kozak scored two apiece for the Huskies,
Kozak's second a cannon-like shot from 40 feet which won
the game.
Al McClean was the big gun once again for the Birds,
scoring two and helping with the spadework to set up Dave
Chamber's goal.
Coach Bob Hindmarch was pleased with his team's performance in Saturday's game, and felt that "they carried the
play to the Huskies, and did not commit the mental errors
that they did on Friday night. I'm confident that we'll do no
worse than split the double-header when we play them in
Saskatchewan." Hindmarch also had praise for Wayne Hunter,
who missed Friday's game, but checked and skated tenaciously,
and'set the pace for his team-mates on Saturday, Orchids also
to Tom Koretchuck. who "kept them honest out there."
This week the University of Alberta Golden Bears come
to UBC for games on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, as a
part of the Hamber Cup Series.
For Thursday's noon-time game, special free buses, for
those who fancy the speed and excitement of inter-collegiate
hockey, will depart for the Winter Sports' Centre from Brock
Hall—and return.    Gametime is 12:45 p.m.
Friday the action begins at 8:30 p.m., and Saturday at
2:30 p.m. Admission is 50 cents for students and $1 for adults.
The Friday night game is followed by a free dance with a
live band.
Brian Harper, on Montreal's prospective list leads the
Bears with eight goals. He is the brother of Montreal's Terry
Harper and was Conference All-Star last year. Other top men
are Mel Stelmenchuk, on Detroit's list, Daryl Le Blanc, on
San Francisco's list, and Gordon Jones, another aiming for
Detroit. The Birds will also be watching out for Del Billings
and Dale Ripple.
Chartered Accountants'
CAREER
BRIEFING
SESSION
18 January 1967
12:30 to 1:30-Chemistry Bldg.
Room 250
Members of the Institute of Chartered Accountants
of B.C. will speak to 1967 graduates in all faculties
and answer questions about a career in chartered
accountancy.
Free coffee will be served
Let's
Go
Skiing!
• Erbacher and
Gresvig Skis
• E.C.L, Tyrol and La
Dolomite Boots
• E.C.L, Tyrolia and
Solomon Allais
harness
• Junior ski sets
• Sweaters and Sox • After Ski Boots and Slippers
• Toques, Parkas, Hoods and Hats • Goggles and Glasses
COMPLETE SKI SETS AT $29.95      -      REPAIRS AND INSTALLATIONS
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
10th AVE. at ALMA ROAD
224-5040
SPACE AVAILABLE
in our January EFFECTIVE READING classes.  Here is
your opportunity to at feast TRIPLE your reading speed.
OPENINGS IN THE FOLLOWING CUSSES:
DOWNTOWN VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
WEDNESDAY-JANUARY 18th—6:30 P.M.
UNIVERSITY HILL SECONDARY SCHOOL—2896 ACADIA
THURSDAY-JANUARY 19th—6:30 P.K
Phone us for information or come in at
above-noted locations and times.
READING DYNAMICS OF BC LTD
MAIN OFFICE: 549 HOWE STREET  VANCOUVER 1 BC
SUITE 210 685-2374
*.*%«   «r'jT-»;*■_«_-»'J Tuesday, January 17, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
One point from two wins
By MIKE JESSEN
The UBC basketball Birds almost came
out of Alberta with two wins this weekend
but had to settle for one.
On Friday night the University of Calgary Dinosaurs defeated the UBC team 73-72.
Coach Peter Mullins said of the game, "There
with none closer. With a score this close
it's the bounce of the ball that determines
the outcome." The team missed two shots
near the end of the game.
Ian Dixon led the scorers with 18 points.
Phil Langley had 16. The Birds rebounded
very well.
The tall Dinosaurs were held very effec-
Molsons' match
Vancouver Molsons have once more successfully defended their title as champions
of the annual UBC Thunderette basketball
tournament.
Molsons walked over Victoria College
70-39 on Friday evening and on Saturday,
scraped by Mt. Pleasant Legion 48-46.
In the final game of the tournament
Molsons staved off a determined UBC onslaught to eke out a 42-38 victory.
Pauline Gensick, UBC, and Darlene
Currie, Molsons, shared the scoring lead with
10 points each.
In earlier games the Thunderettes worked
their way to the final by defeating Prince
George and Victoria Rawlings. In the first
game Janet Douglas led UBC with 16 points
and Johnna Pederson had 15.
Mt. Pleasant trounced Rawlings 53-45 to
take third place in the tournament.
Central Washington State College, a new
entry in the tournament, was victorious in
the consolation final against Simon Fraser
Academy although they were not used to
men's rules.
Kathy Benedetto, a player on the American national team, won the free throw contest with 19 out of 20 baskets, and was
second highest scorer for the tournament
with 49 points in three games.
Mary Coutts, of Victoria Rawlings, and
a member of the Canadian team, led the individual scoring race with 56 points in three
games.
R. F. Osborne, head of UBC's School of
Physical Education, presented the winner's
trophy to the Vancouver Molsons.
tively by the UBC zone press.
Langley was hurt in the first game so
on Saturday afternoon Mullins had to change
the lineup. Dixon was shifted to guard and
Dave Rice took up his forward position.
The Birds won this game 62-58.
The Birds now have a record of two
wins and two losses irt WCIAA play. The
team is hustling and running well and stands
as good a chance as any other team in the
conference according to coach Mullins.
TEN FOR JV HOOPSTERS
The UBC basketball JV's won two games
over the weekend to run their win streak
to ten straight.
On Friday night the team, led by Keith
Margetson and Sam Vandermeulen, each
with ten points, scored a 78-65 win over the
CYO Saints.
Saturday night they defeated SFA 53-48.
Vandermeulen was the leading scorer with
15 points.    Dave Marshall had 12 points.
The two wins kept the JV's atop the
Inter City Junior Men's League with 24
points.
Rugby on in rain
Even with rain descending relentlessly,
the UBC rugby teams opened the second
half of their season in fine style.
Jan. 7 found four UBC teams on the
rugby fields.
The Thunderbirds lost a close match 8-5
to Maralomas 1st team. The Braves, in
revenge, walked over Maralomas 2nd team
6-0. Tomahawks played to a 6-0 win over
Trojans 3rd team, and Totems tied a strong
Ex-Brit side 3-0.
Jan. 12 the Birds and Braves visited
Western Washington State in Bellingham.
The results proved UBC stronger as the
Birds recorded a 9-0 win while the Braves
came up with a 23-0 victory.
Last Saturday, players of the Thunderbirds and Braves played for positions on the
UBC team that will meet the touring Australian Wallabies.
The Frosh teams, meanwhile, put on one
extremely good showing and one a little less
spectacular. A combined 1st team were vi-
torious over the until now undefeated Trojans 2nd team. Trojans 2nds are the undis:
puted leaders of second division rugby in
Vancouver. The Frosh 2nd team was
humiliated by St. George's 14-0.
Vikings fall for first UBC victory
By JIM MADDIN
The UBC swim team travelled to the home
of the Western Washington State College
Vikings on the weekend to swim a dual
swim  meet.
With their two loss no win record the
Birds were looking for their first victory
of the season and they got it, defeating the
Vikings by a score of 61-43.
After losing the first relay by less than a
second the Birds came on strong to take
seven first places in the next twelve events.
Paced by a two-win performance from
Jim Maddin, the Birds also got wins from
their manager, Gary Baker, Phil Winch and
Bill Gillespie. Winch and Gillespie both
added more points for their second place
efforts.
Other members of the team who travelled
to the meet were Mark Lemieux, Keith
McDonald, Frank Dorchester, Martin McLaren, Dave Brihe, Gorden Auld, Bill Storey,
Dave Goodman and team captain, Rack
Mansell.
Diving honours were taken for the Birds
by Norm Deleenheer who won a narrow
victory over his teammate Don Panton.
Thus the Birds have set a good note for
their next meet, this weekend, against Central Washington State College at the Percy
Norman Memorial Pool.
Soccer Birds cinch a berth
The UBC Soccer Thunderbirds beat the
New Westminster Royals last Saturday, 2-1,
in a muddy game that featured a last minute
winning goal.
The scoring for the Birds started when
Kirby Carter received a header from Jim
Berry and drilled the ball in.
The game remained a 1-1 tie until the
last minute of play when again Jim Berry
passed the ball into the goal area, this time
to Keith Brookes, who beat the goalie for
the winning goal.
Coach Joe Johnson said he was pleased
with the entire team's playing.
The Birds' win increased the point gap
between the fourth place Birds and the fifth
place Royals. The league standings now
are: Victoria in. first place with 22 points,
Columbus in second place with 21, followed
by North Shore with llj> and the Birds in
fourth place with 15 points.
This, as it stands gives the Birds a playoff berth, but they have no easy games
ahead.
This Sunday the Birds play Columbus
at Callister Park.
— powell hargrave photo
GETTING A HOLD on his University of Puget Sound opponent, UBC wrestler Ken Kerluke wins this bout over
Jim Meyerhoff by a decision.
Wrestlers wrangle Wash.
The UBC Thunderbird wrestling team put up a spirited
fight against the University of Puget Sound Saturday, but
was unable to overcome the 10 point advantage lost through
forfeits.
Puget Sound won 21-13.
Winners for UBC were Ron Turner at 145 lbs. by a
fall, Greg Greiner at 177 lbs. by a fall, and Chuck Tasaka
and Ken Kerluke by decisions.
The outstanding wrestler for UBC was Ron Turner.
On Friday UBC will wrestle Western Washington State
at the Women's gym. Western Washington is one of the top
American wrestling schools in the North West.
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SPECIAL
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presents
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EX GREEN BERET
HERO IN VIETNAM
"The
Whole
Thing Was
A Lie'
TODAY
Auditorium       -       12:30       -       35c Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17, 1967
'Little mag' launched
Forum, a tabloid featuring criticism, reviews, and commentary from around the
world, will begin publication at UBC in
February.
Plans for the publication were announced
Monday by sometime - student Greydon
Moore.
He explained Forum would be a vehicle
of communication.
"It will act as an alternative to much
that is presently offered and will emphasize
content rather than academic or literary
style," Moore said.
It will be from 30 to 40 pages and will
allow space for art work and illustrations.
Moore said the organizing force behind
the publication is a group of young artists
and  writers.
They plan to communicate with other
individuals in other countries.
"If a friend writes to us and we think
others would benefit from it, we will publish the article or poem," Moore said.
"This way we hope to have people from
all over the world participate in a system of
communications.
"We will send Forum anywhere that
people request. In this way it will be a
wider medium than most papers today."
Moore said they would begin with 3,000
copies at 50 cents per copy.
"There are many young writers and
artists who have enormous potential but
haven't had the chance to publish. We will
give them that chance."
"But .hese aren't the only ones. We
will print anything of value," Moore said.
"Our idea is to tell people what a thing
is and not what our reaction is to it. We
don't necessarily want opinions. We want
to tell people about things."
Moore said the magazine would be free
from all dogma.
"If it heads any direction politically it
will not be intentional."
"The first issue will feature poetry and
art work. There will be a feature on young
poets in the second, issue. The third issue
will be the first communication issue.
"We will also concentrate on poets plus
their illustrations, whereas magazines have
previously focused on poets and poetry,"
Moore said.
"We are not after the hippy crowd, as
it may sound, but if they are interested we
welcome them," he said.
Forum will appear in the first week in
February.
Gordon Selman,     who
wrote a history of trie
UBC extension department as his
M A thesis,
has been appointed i t s
new director.
Selman was
formerly executive assistant to John
Macdonald.
Livermore named
Head of UBC's new Hispanic and Italian
Studies department is Professor Harold V.
Liveiinore.
A British born expert in Spanish language
and history, Livermore, 52, is currently on
leave of absence from UBC. He is studying
Latin American literature as a Canadian
Council senior fellow.
ONE NIGHT TOO MANY
PALO ALTO, Calif. (CUPI)—Stanford University residence
students have decided to delay paying rent until Jan. 17, the
final deadline for such payments.
The students, who had originally called for an indefinite
'rent deal', modified their tactics on the advice of two women's
groups demanding off-campus living privileges for co-eds.
The groups—the Women's Strike for Equal Rights and the
Off-Campus Committee—are protesting university policy which
requires all women to live on campus while attending university.
The policy, termed "clearly discriminatory", is "an abrogation of fundamental liberties on the basis of sex alone," the
women say.
The policy also creates an "inequity" among women, they
claim. Stanford allows women all-night sign-outs six days a
week, requiring co-eds to return to the dormitories at 2:30 a.m.
only one night a week.
The women say this allows wealthier co-eds to live off-
campus, in effect, by renting both a dormitory room and an
apartment, while the other women have to live in the dorms.
Concert tickets available
Secretary Gayle Gaskell announced that 150 tickets to hear
Ludwig Olshansky, concert pianist, in early February, had been
donated to UBC by Alfred Blundell. The tickets are available
free at the AMS office on a first come, first served basis.
Von Thadden to speak
Adolph Von Thadden, vice-president of the neo-nazi
National Democratic Party of West Germany, is coming to
UBC Jan. 31.
"The purpose of his coming is for students to see if there
is any danger of the resurgence of fascism in Germany," said
special events chairman Brian Plummer.
Plummer said the Canadian Jewish Congress threatened to
demonstrate if the German was allowed in Canada.
"On the national scale there might be an uproar," he
said.
"Unless it's declared illegal, Von Thadden will come to
UBC—and even then we might do it in the name of free
speech."
' Special events hopes to offset the expenses by selling
exclusive radio and television rights to the press conference
scheduled for after Von Thadden's speech.
Summer jobs
go better
with Europe
Do you want to spend your
summer in Europe this year?
The American Student Information Service, with headquarters in the Grand Duchy
of Luxembourg, is now accepting applications from university students for temporary
summer work in Europe.
ASIS has job openings in
such categories as hotel work,
factory work, child care, camp
counselling and farm work.
ASIS places students in 15
European countries including
Germany, France, Great Britain, Spain and Switzerland.
Wages range up to $400 a
month for the highest paying
jobs in West Germany.
Travel to and from Europe
can be arranged by the student, or the ASIS will arrange travel at a reduced cost.
Interested students should
write to Dept. 1, American
Student Information Service,
22 Avenue de la Liberte, Luxembourg City, Grand Duchy of
Luxembourg. Students should
send $2 with each enquiry to
cover the cost of the material
and handling.
Pepsi generation
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Unimpressed observers in this
island capital studying the annual Confederation Day festivities of the smooth puce blorgs
reported the blorgs ate fricasseed Things and drank
large quantities of coca-cola.
"Things go better with coke,"
they said.
Up in the air
over Europe?
Ask about your AMS Charter Flight.
It's the cheapest way to Europe. There and
back for $395, and you travel with friends.
Almost everybody wants to go to Europe, but how
about that air fare! It's pretty exorbitant.
That's why there's an AMS Charter Flight. The logic
of it all is very simple. If you gang up on an airline,
you can charter a plane and get to wherever you want
to go for about half the Tegular fare.
Non-stop to London
Most people want to go to Europe, so we've reserved
a DC-8 jet to take 180 university people to London
and back this summer. With that many people, the
total reiturn fare is a down to earth $395.
Take off May 11
Our flight leaves Vancouver May 11. and jets nonstop to London. From there, explore Europe your way
. . . you'll have 14 frisky weeks. And with the money
you've saved on air fare, you'll be able to afford it.
All we ask is that you make it back to the London
airport in time to catch the August 25 trip home.
Once aboard, you'll relax over a hot meal and friendly
service.
See us soon
We hope you'll agree that this flight has got to be a
good deal. It's open to all students and faculty members and their families. We ask only one thing . . .
come see us now before all the seats are taken.
For more information, see Bryan Davis or any of the
girls in the AMS Office, South Brock. Just ask about
an application form for the Charter Flight to Europe.
It's a down to earth way to get up in the air over
Europe. If it's inconvenient to find Brock, drop this
coupon in the neairest mailbox.
To; Bryan Davis '
Charter Flight to Europe '
AMS Office, South Brock )
University of British Columbia ■
I'm intrigued. Please send me an application form   '
for the charter flight to Europe. •
I
Name    ■
Address .	
i
    i
.-.-....-.. _.._.--_.._.-.-..--..- j Tuesday, January 17, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
CONSERVE, PRESERVE"
Man rapped for destruction
Dean of graduate studies, Ian McTaggart-
Cowan has condemned man for the annihilation of 107 species of wildlife.
In a Saturday
speech to the
Vancouver Institute, in UBC's
Buchanan build-
ig, the dean said
man is still primitive in his approach to his
environment.
"Man is now
the   master   and
on   the   road   to
large-scale environmental    mani-
IAN McTAGGART-COWAN pulation,"   he
. . . man primitive      said.
"But as master, he has a fearful responsibility to conserve and preserve."
He cited the use of pesticides such as
DDT for the elimination of some wildlife
species.
He said these poisons have  a pyramid
effect. When they are used, excesses work
their way into water systems, where they
are consumed by plankton, then fish and
finally by larger animals feeding on these
sea creatures.
It is in these larger animals that the
harmful effects are most felt.
One of the most-effected species is the
bald eagle.
"These eagles eat the fish loaded with
DDT, and examination of eagle eggs which
have failed to hatch reveals the eggs are
saturated."
DDT fallout is distributed in much the
same way as radioactive fallout, he said.
He suggested a system of wilderness
areas, which would conserve wildlife. There
would be close, medium, low and wilderness
densities, according to each area's expected
attraction for visitors.
"The close density area would be for
people who like other people no further
away than two arms' lengths, while the
wilderness area would be for those who
aren't interested in seeing a fellow human
being," he concluded.
Education bastion dies
The pillar of the Education Faculty has
collapsed.
Gordon Howland, commissionaire of the
new education building since it opened in
1961, died of a heart attack on Sunday. He
was 58.
Education Dean Neville Scarfe said:
"Gordon was the pillar of the education
faculty, supporting students and faculty alike
through his friendliness, helpfulness, and
common sense good advice."
Howland was employed by the B.C. public
works department while the new education
was being built, and when control of the
building passed into the hands of the education faculty he became commissionaire.
His official duties were to direct visitors
and care for equipment but, said assistant to
the dean, Mrs. Eileen Nesbitt, "he really did
more for the students and staff than can be
believed.
"He did a tremendous amount for the
students, he was a very warm person, most
of what he did for the students cannot be
paid for."
Services will be held in the Mount Pleasant Chapel, Kingsway at 11th Ave., Wednesday at 1 p.m.
IMPETUS
from page 2
more of a position to conduct
meaningful analysis.
They do not want to be
rationalized to the existing system, which is what Dr. Schwarz's increased health services
will do.
Conscious or not, one of the
major causes of the current
growing student disaffection
with the modern university is
this integration of university
functions into the production of
- parts for an industrial society
many feel is based on false and
inhuman values.
Scholars such as Dr. Schwarz,
in proposing these increased
services integrated with the
university, are furthering the
processes of academic research
and attempting to bring some
order to the chaos of some students' lives, but do not possess
the overview needed to really
solve these problems.
Dr. Schwarz's report will undoubtedly be received with
praise by the authorities and
programs based upon his findings developed.
These programs will undoubtedly be successful, but in what
way? In creating another department of the educational system dedicated to subduing the
sensitive, inquiring student
back into the norms of the university, set up for and futher-
ing the aims of technology.
It is frightening in that it
will work, to a degree as yet
unknown.
But it is no solution to the
basic problem.
NEW/WAN CENTRE PRESENTS
hn inn
REGAL BALLROOM - GEORGIA HOTEL
Friday,  January 20,   8:30-1:30
$5.00- per couple for members - $6.00 for non-members
Tickets at A.M.S. or Newman Centre
(dress format)
Graduating Students
Interested In
A Financial Career
should have an interview with
The Royal Trust
representatives on campus
January 26th & 27th
Appointments made at the Placement Office
The Royal tat
COMPANY
Canada's Leading Trust  Company
VANCOUVER, B.C.
CAMPUS BARBER DEMONSTRATES radical but sure dandruff cure on Peter Armstrong, law 2, who ordered head
shaved to gain $20 bet from friend. Armstrong is
smiling because he hasn't yet looked in mirror.
BACK-TO-THE-
B00KS EYEWEAR
Better vision can mean better marks! Start the new
year right with a visit to
your eye physician. Even if
your prescription is unchanged, a fashionable
new frame can do wonders
for the disposition.
HdbQpfkol
seven
locations
in Greater
V-tncouver
'Where quality is first—
and price is a pleasant surprise!"
\
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
t JS *. _r_ / jt i Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 17,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Ex-beret bubbles forth
SPECIAL EVENTS
"The whole thing was a lie"—ex-green
beret Donald Duncan, today, noon, auditorium. Admission 35 cents. Coming Thursday, acid rock in Brock.
ARCHITECTURAL US
Films: Romance of Transportation, Expo
Preview, Great Toy Robbery, and Celebration, today, noon, Lasserre 102.
SUS
Prof-student coffee party, today, noon,
Brock. Time capsule- interment, Wednesday, noon, cairn on main mall.
ECONOMICS SOC
Professors Will, Munro, Shearer and McGuigan discuss economics and nationalism,
today, noon, Ang. 213.
UBC RADIO
Executive meeting today, noon, office.
IH AND UN
Mexican exchange students will show a
film and slides today, noon, Bu. 202.
COMPUTER CLUB
Discussion of time sharing today, noon,
chem. 250.
AQUA SOC
Meeting today, noon, Bu. 216 to discuss
mid-term break dive.
AAC
"What's happening in China?" A discussion with Prof. Paul Ivory, Rene Goldman,
Clive Ar    >y, and Jack East, tonight, 8:30,
the Advance Mattress Coffeehouse.
MUSSOC
Those interested in making posters for
How to Succeed, sign up in club room above
auditorium.
ARTS US
Persons interested in helping the new
arts undergrad society, please put name and
Iron pit studied
The Canada Council has awarded a $6,000
grant to UBC assistant history professor
Barrie M. Morrison to further his study of
iron deposits in India's Ganges Valley.
Morrison plans to test the present theory
which contends the growth of agriculture
and urban areas in the area are a result of
its rich iron deposits.
The region is presently the site of India's
largest steel developments, with a history
of iron production dating to the first mil-
lenium B.C.
phone number on the blackboard in Brock
ext. 359.
ARTS US
Lockers in Buchanan or east mall annex
not paid for by Jan. 20 will be confiscated.
Payment may be made in Brock ext. 359
daily between 12:30 and 2:30.
CIASP
Application forms for summer work in
Mexico, at St. Marks college or Brock ext.
350.    Deadline Thursday.
PHRATERES
Meeting, Wednesday, noon, Bu. 104.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP
Kathryn Helm discusses government
training program, Wednesday, noon, Bu. 225.
UN CLUB
Discussion with Charlie Boylan and
Gabor Mate on student demonstrations and
the international scene, Wednesday, noon,
upper lounge IH.
PRE MED
Films Wednesday, noon, Wes. 201.
NOON HOUR CONCERTS
Randolph Hokanson,  pianist,  plays  the
Stravinsky Piano sonata and serenade in A,
Wednesday, Bu. 106.
ACE
H. B. McLean of the McLean Method of
writing speaks Wednesday, noon, Ed. 204.
Admission one bar of soap or ten cents.
GEOPHYSICS
Dr. R. I. Wilcott discusses the Bouger
Gravity map of S.W. B.C., Wednesday, 3:30,
Henn. 301.
SPECIAL LECTURE
Dr.   Peter   Brock   discusses   the   Polish
Identity, Wednesday, noon, Bu. 100.
BRIDGE-CHESS CLUB
Meeting Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., Brock TV
lounge.
DESERET CLUB
Film  on  smoking  hazards,   Wednesday,
noon, Bu. 102.
ONTOLOGY
Michael Cecil on the single person, Wednesday, noon, Bu. 223.
IR-COM LAW CLUB
■" nel discussion on injunctions in labor
dis_     ;s, Thursday, noon, Ang. 110.
UBCSCC
Thursday noon rally leaves top of C-lot
at 12:30. City map helpful, but not needed.
PSYCH SOC
Those interested in forming a psych soc,
meet Thursday, noon, Ang. 207.
STUDENT VOLUNTEERS
Coffee party Thursday, noon, school of
social work.
Reg.
Science
Week
Science Jacket  $19.98
Science Sweaters  16.95
Sweater Crests  2.60      2.1
Chem Crests  1.25       .'
Math Crests 1.98      l.<
Science Week
AT THE
College Shop
BROCK       EXTENSION
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
SENTIMENTAL REASONS
prompt me to offer reward for
white clothhat lost at Famrer's
Frolic.   Phone   RE   1-3480,   Laurie.
FOUND: BLACK TAILLESS CAT
on campus Saturday. Phone Jill
224-6106.
BLACK LEATHER GLOVES
left in MA 100 Friday 8:30 a.m.
to 9:30 a.m. Finder please call
327-5139   and   ask   for   Brian.
FOUND: UBC JACKET, SIZE 42,
Tn place of mine, 42T, three
months   ago.    Bruce    922-3497.
FOUND: KEY SET IN BROWN
leather case. Bu. 320. Phone
Mary   after   6   p.m.   224-0102.
REWARD FOR RETURN OF
Jade and silver ring lost In Library washroom Thursday. Phone
WA   2-8318.
Coming Dances
12A
NEWMAN BALL, REGAL BALL-
room, Georgia Hotel, Friday, Jan.
20, 8:30 p.m. $6.00/couple ($5.00 for
members). Tickets at A.M.S. or
Newman   Centre.   Dress   formal.
MARDI GRAS CHARITY BALL,
Show Mart. Tickets on sale now
at   AMS   office.   $5.00   per   couple.
THE PAINTED SHIP SAILS!
William Tell & The Marksmen
Make It! and the Afterthought
is   a   GAS!
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
SPREAD YOUR TALENT TO THE
masses. Enter Mardi Gras comic
cartoon contest. Judged by Len
Norris.   Deadline   Jan.   23.
ANYONE WITNESSING ACCI-
dent in Acadia parking lot Jan.
5th please phone Frank Green
224-9833.   Leave    Phone    No.
t-'ENDER      JAZZMASTER      $290.00.
736-0776   after   6.
YOU CAN EARN BIG MONEY
by being a local representative
for the Record Club of Canada.
(See our display adv. in this
issue.) Inquire today to: Record
Club of Canada, 62 Richmond
St.  West,   Toronto.
S.U.S. APOLOGIZES FOR CAN-
cellation of last Thursday's
Brave New World Mixer due to
conflict   with   Aggie   Week.
HOW TO SUCCEED IN Business. Tickets on sale Wednesday.
Students 75c. Feb. 6th, 7th,
matinee   9th.
Scandals
39A
HATE TO STAND IN LINEUPS
for books? At Chu Hai College In
Hong Kong there are no books
to lineup for. Share with WUS
in   Feb.
CARPET BAGGERS LOVE YOU.
Jan. 19, Thurs. 12:30, 3:30, 8:00
p.m.   Auditorium. KMC
IF YOU'RE OVER THE AGE OP
consent, come to the Painted Ship
at the Afterthought. Fri. at 8:30.
2114 W.   4th.
DAVID   C—I   KNOW ABOUT   YOU
and   Jill   M.—Greg  R.
SEWING • ALTERATIONS    40
Transportation
14
DRIVER NEEDED ONE DAY A
week for carpool, vicinity 49th
and Granville. Phone 261-4429
evenings.	
WISH TO FORM CAR POOL
f'om vicinity 35th and Arbutus.
Phone  Reynolds.   266-0879.
RIDE WANTED WITH CAR
pool. Vicinity Broadway and
Granville.    Phone    Rick,    738-7345.
Wanted
15
WANTED TO BUY. OLD ELEC-
tric toy trains, the older the better. American Flyer, Lionel Horn-
by,  etc.  Phone 261-1838 eves.
WANTED: ACCOUNTING TEXT-
book. Intermediate Financial Accounting. Meigs Johnson. Brian,
874-4744.
MARRIED STUDENT PHOTOG-
rapher requires a figure model.
Phone   682-40'31   after  6  p.m.
16
Travel Opportunities
FEMALE STUDENT WISHES TO
find other girl travelling to Europe this summer. Phone Dot,
224-9945.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1954 STUDABAKER COMMANDER
V-8, excellent condition, new tires.
$225 or best offer, phone 278-2377
after 6 p.m.	
1957     PONTIAC SW     V-8     NEW
shocks,     tires, battery.     recond.
motor,      clean throughout,      $595,
phone  228-8144.
Miscellaneous 34
JANUARY CLEARANCE. THE
Campus Shoppe, 5732 University
Blvd. (in the Village) 228-8110
"Where  prices  are  always  right."
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville St. 263-4530
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL DO
essays   and   thesis  at   home.   Mrs.
Hay,   3963   Bond   St.,   Burnaby   1.
433-6565   after  6:00  p.m.	
EXPERIENCED    TYPIST    AVAIL-
able     for    home    typing.    Please
phone   277-5640.
EXPERT   TYPING
876-5959.
MY   HOME.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF
Essays and Theses. Reasonable
rates. I.B.M. executive typewriter.
Telephone:   263-4023.	
EXPERT TYPING. FAST. REAS-
onable. Experienced In term papers,   essays.   Phone   786-0538.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
STUDENT WANTED: RECORD
librarian for UBC radio. Typing
and general knowledge of records
helpful. South Brock basement.
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
ENGLISH, FRENCH AND History lessons given by B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S.   736-6923.
SPANISH      TUTORING       AND
translation.   731-1280.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
•65 MODEL FENDER BASSMAN
Amp. Special heavy-duty speaker
system. New condition. Student
must sell. Phone Pete eves., 224-
5958.
1  PR.  MEN'S  TYROL SKI BOOTS.
Size  8%.   $25.   Ph.   AM 1-5619.
RENTALS  ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ONE SLEEPING ROOM WITH
small room adjacent—males only.
MU  4-6736 or 224-0956.	
CAMPUS     ALLISON     RD.     ROOM
for girl. Kitchen priv.  228-8695.
ROOM    TO    RENT    CONVENIENT
to U.B.C.  bus.  Single or to share.
Kitchen    privileges    possible.    CA
4-5905.
Room & Board
82
EXCELLENT ROOM AND BOARD.
Phi Delta House; convenient location; congenial atmosphere. Jim
Gaudin,   CA  4-9073,   5:30-7:00.
ROOM AND BOARD. $40 MONTH
plus light babysitting. One block
from   gates.    224-0146.   Girl   only.
PRIVATE ROOM, BATHROOM,
kitchen, private entrance, near
gates. Dbl. bed, etc. Warm. 224-
6857.	
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS.
Good food and comfortable accommodation. Phone 224-9662 after 5
p.m.	
PRIVATE ROOM AND BOARD
for quiet male student. -4595 West
6th.  Phone 224-4866.	
BOARD AND ROOM AVAILABLE
as of Feb. 3 at PSI Upsilon. Phone
Ross   Little,   224-9665.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
MARDI  GRAS  GOES  COMIC.   JAN.
27-28.
CARPET BAGGERS FOR RENT.
Jan. 19, Thurs. 12:30, 3:30, 8:00
p.m.   Auditorium. KMC
COME TO THE SCIENCE PEP
meet this Thursday in Hebb
Theatre. A whole noon of entertainment by The Painted Ship
and other performers. Admission
only 25c.
GIRL WANTED IMMEDIATELY
to share modern apartment and
costs at Dunbar & 16th. Phone
Myrna,   224-6397   after   5   p.m.
Unfurn. Houses   ftApis.
84
STUDENT   WANTED    TO SHARE
suite     near     University. George
Cornish,    HE    4-0122    or 681-8730
after   6:00   p.m.
BUY  -  SELL  -  RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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