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The Ubyssey Jan 8, 2013

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Array BLOTTO BLOCK PARTY A UBYSSEY WRITER STARES INTO THE ABYSS SO LONG KATIC
GORDON'S LAST COLUMN PRICY PONDEROSA STUDENT RESIDENCE LIKELY OVER BUDGET // Page 2
WHAT'S ON i    THIS WEEK, MAY^
TUESDAY
INTERACTIVE INNOVATIONS
2-3 P.M. @ MUSIC BUILDING
This concertfeatures new "responsive
work" from exciting artists. It's also free,
which is obviously what we all want. Cellist
and dancers will be provided.
SATURDAY   ' 13
WINTER MARKET
10 A.M.-2 P.M. @ N AT BAILEY STADIUM
The Bike Co-op will be talking to
people about bikes and biking
around Vancouver. Tune-ups
and info sessions are available by
donation.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
WEDNESDAY'10
UBCUNDIERUN
SECRET EVENT DETAILS TBA
ON FACEBOOK
Thefourth annual UBC Undie
Run is pretty much exactly what
it sounds like. Take off (most of)
your clothes (or don't) and run
around campus. Clothes left on
the "knoll" will be donated, event
organizers say.
ON
THE
COVER
"Yikes! I was terrified. As I went up the daunting crane, I was told that the
camera gear had to stay behind.They ended up using a pully system to
drag all the gear up the crane. If I didn't have some fatih in these guys,
I would have been going insane."..Whata DOOZY! -KaiJacobsonon
shooting aerial photos from atop a crane at the new SUB construction
site.
Video content
Check out our latest video on this
year's AMS Block Party, airing now at
ubyssey.ca/videos/.
'JJthe ubyssey
APRIL8.2013 I VOLUMEXCIVI ISSUEL
Coordinating Editor
Jonny Wakefield
coordinating@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor, Print
Jeff Aschkinasi
3rinteditor@u byssey.ca
Managing Editor, Web
Andrew Bates
webed itor@u byssey.ca
News Editors
Will McDonald*
Laura Rodgers
iews@ubyssey.ca
Senior News Writer
Ming Wong
Tiwong@ u byssey.ca
Culture Editor
Anna Zona
culture@ubyssey.ca
Senior Culture Writer
Rhys Edwards
•edwards@u byssey.ca
Sports + Rec Editor
CJ Pentland
sports@ubyssey.ca
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Justin Fleming
]fleming@u byssey.ca
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
featu res@u byssey.ca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubyssey.ca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubyssey.ca
STAFF
3ryce Warnes, Josh Curran,
Peter Wojnar, Anthony Poon,
veronika Bondarenko, Yara
Van Kessel, Catherine Guan.
Ginny Monaco, Matt Meuse,
Hogan Wong, Rory Gattens,
3randon Chow, Joseph
Ssettuba. Tyler McRobbie,
Sarah Bigarn,StephanieXu.
Natalya Kautz, ColinChia,
-(iin Pringle, Geoff Lister
Business Manager
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fpereira@ubyssey.ca
Ad Sales
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Editorial Office: SUB 24
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Online: ubyssey.ca
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Kai Jacobson
a rt@ ubyssey.ca
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Videographer
Lu Zhang
zhang@ubyssey.ca
Webmaster
Riley Tomasek
webmaster@u byssey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It is
published every Monday anc
Thursday by The Ubyssey Publications Sociely. We are an autonomous, democratically rur
student organization, and al
students are encouraged tc
Darticipate.
Editorials are chosen anc
«ri tten by th e Ubyssey staff. They
aretheexpressedopinionofthe
staff, anddo not necessarily reflect the views of The Ubyssey
Publications Society orthe Uni-
versity of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing in
The Ubyssey is the properly of
The Ubyssey Publications Sociely. Stones, opinions, photographs and artwork containec
nerein cannotbe reproducec
«i thout the expressed, writter
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or typographical errors that
do not lessen the value orthe
mpactofthead.
Michael Hayden is the director of the Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics.
HOGAN WONG PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
Michael Hayden on medicine
at home and abroad
Sarah Bigam
StaffWriter
Michael Hayden's long career has taken him all
over the map, from South Africa to Harvard —
but he's been settled in Vancouver since 1983,
when he shocked his colleagues by moving from
Harvard to what was then a smaller, provincial
Canadian university.
Hayden, director of the Centre for Molecular Medicine and Therapeutics at UBC, has received numerous honours over the years for his work on genetics,
including the prestigious Gairdner Wightman Award,
Canada's highest science award, in 2011.
"It was the first time for many years
that a person from UBC had won that,"
Hayden said in an interview, speaking from Israel, where he is currently
doing research. "I think it reflected the
recognition from my peers across the
country about the impact of the work
we've had on understanding how genes
cause disease and how this leads to new
approaches to therapy."
His research focuses on changes in specific genes
that result in diseases like Huntington's and premature coronary artery disease.
Hayden was the top graduate in medicine from
the University of Cape Town in South Africa in 1975,
and stayed to complete his Ph.D. in genetics. He then
completed a post-doctoral fellowship at Harvard
Medical School. He said he moved to UBC because he
thought it would be a more open place to conduct his
research. He thought he'd stay for a short time — but
he still hasn't left.
In 1986, Hayden pioneered the development of a
predictive genetic test for Huntington's disease, the
first of its kind.
"To our surprise, we learned that in fact people
did quite well, and they did well because they were
already living as if they were going to get [the disease],
but there was tremendous
uncertainty. Now they knew;
they could sort of choose to live
their lives differently and plan
differently and also work to help
develop a cure."
In 2008 Hayden was named
Canada's Health Researcher of
the Year for his work on diabetes and Huntington's disease.
Hayden has identified genes
that are responsible for over
nine disorders, including Tangier disease, congenital insensitiv-
ity to pain and amyotrophic
lateral sclerosis.
Hayden said that he is most
proud of receiving the Gairdner
Award and the Orders of British
Columbia and of Canada, which
he received in 2009 and 2010,
respectively.
"Those three together
represent awards that I'm very
thrilled to be given the privilege of having," he said.
Over the years, Hayden has co-founded three
companies: Neurovir, Xenon Pharmaceuticals and
Aspreva Pharmaceuticals Inc.
Neurovir, which was founded in 1995, used the
herpes virus to treat patients with glioblastoma, a rare
kind of brain cancer. It was sold five years later for
$140 million.
At Xenon Pharmaceuticals, Hayden found the gene
responsible for producing good cholesterol, as well as
an enzyme responsible for obesity.
Aspreva was founded in 2001, to test existing medications as potential treatment for people with rare
diseases. It was sold to the Swiss Galen-
ica Group in 2007 for $915 million.
Hayden has also worked as project
chair of the Masiphumelele Youth Project, a fundraising campaign to build a
centre for at-risk youth in the township
of Masiphumelele, outside Cape Town.
"One quarter of the children [in Masiphumelele] would be getting HIV and
actually a lot of those would be dying
before the age of 20. And when I saw
that, I realized that this was just absolutely unacceptable," Hayden said.
"The life of a child in Africa was of no less value
than the life of a child in Vancouver. We had to do
something about it."
The centre, now called the Kethipula Youth Centre,
opened in 2010. It provides confidential support and
health education for at-risk children and youth. It also
offers recreational and educational services to youths
impacted by HIV/AIDS. Hayden said that since the
centre's opening, there are no children dying from
AIDS in the community of Masiphumelele.
"The people inthe city of Vancouver can be proud
and the people at UBC can be proud, because of
their role in raising the support in allowing this to
happen." tJ
Trouble speaking English? Study hard but find little success?
Studied for years but can't understand English?
"The life of a child
in Africa was of no
less value than the
life of a child in
Vancouver."
Michael Hayden
ALL
!
About
earning
English
'ALL ABOUT LEARNING ENGLISH, Tips,
Tricks and Techniques' by Sandra
Price-Hosie
in English with either Chinese or Korean translation
NOW AVAILABLE
AT THE fr^#* // News
PROVINCIAL ELECTION
ORS WILL MCDONALD + LAURA RODGERS
HOGAN WONG AND KAI JACOBSON PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
NDP advanced education critic Michelle Mungall and B.C. Liberal candidate Andrew Wilkinson, among others, debated university issues at Thursday's forum.
Candidates debate post-secondary policy as election nears
Laura Rodgers
News Editor
Candidates from various B.C.
political parties discussed
post-secondary issues at a debate
Thursday, co-hosted by the SFU
Graduate Students' Society and
the Alliance of B.C. Students.
Moderator and Tyee contributor Katie Hyslop asked a
barrage of policy-heavy questions on topics from funding
to international students to
deferred maintenance.
NDP advanced education critic
Michelle Mungall emphasized
that affordability is her party's
top concern, while B.C. Liberal
candidate Andrew Wilkinson
defended his party's record on
student issues over his time in
office. Richard Hosein, Green
Party candidate for Surrey-Green
Timbers, argued for massive
post-secondary funding increases, and a particular call to build
rapid transit south of the Fraser.
Chad Eros, B.C. Conservative
NEWS BRIEF
General Services Administration Building employees to
be relocated
The General Services Administration Building (GSAB) is in the
process of being emptied, but the
university doesn't have any plans
to fill it.
The building, located at the corner of Wesbrook Mall and University
Boulevard, currently houses the
offices of UBC financial services,
parking services and UBC IT, among
other university employees.
John Metras, managing director
of infrastructure development for
Campus and Community planning,
said the building's occupants wiill
move to Technology Enterprise
Facility buildings within the next
six months.
"GSAB has outdated IT infrastructure and inefficient space
layouts which are making it more
and more difficult forthe units in the
building to operate effectively," said
Metras an emailed statement.
Metras said there is no plan to
move other workers into the GSAB
after its current occupants have left.
"We do not plan to backfill GSAB
with other uses, nor have plans been
developed yet as to how the site will
be used in the long term. Funding
for demolition of GSAB is not yet in
place and there is no current timeline for demolition ofthe building.
At this time, a simple move was
determined to be the most effective
solution," said Metras.Xi
candidate for Chilliwack, encouraged public-private partnerships
at schools to decrease reliance on
tax dollars. And Sal Vetro, leader
ofthe B.C. First Party, brought
forward a plea for student loan
forgiveness if graduates stay and
work in the province.
Mungall again plugged her
party's promise of $100 million
to go toward needs-based grants
to post-secondary students. But
Wilkinson argued that, when
spread out over the roughly
400,000 students inthe province attending universities and
colleges, the grants won't have a
big impact.
Wilkinson argued the Liberals
were putting enough resources
into post-secondary already: $2
billion from the yearly provincial
budget goes into post-secondary,
which is an increase of 44 per cent
since the Liberals took office. But
Mungall pointed out that Wilkinson didn't mention that the B.C.
Liberals plan to cut university and
HOUSING »
Ponderosa funding
delayed due to
budget problems
Will McDonald
News Editor
Budget woes could push back
the construction of new housing
on campus.
A motion to release funding for
construction on the next phase of
the Ponderosa Commons failed at
the Board of Governors due to concerns that it will go over budget.
The Ponderosa Commons will be
a new hub containing student housing, child care facilities, classroom
spaces forthe Faculty of Education,
food services and informal learning
spaces. A presentation on the budget
at last week's Board of Governors meeting said the $80 million
second phase ofthe proposed
$167 million project could come
in up to $2 million over-budget.
John Metras, managing director
of infrastructure development,
said the discrepancy comes from
the switchover from HST, as well
as "space inefficiencies" and the
potential for lower-than-expected
summer occupancy.
"There is a reasonable probability that we're gaining to have some
kind of an increase [in budget],"
said Metras. "I'm hesitant to give a
percentage. I'd say 50-50 on the cost
increase."
Board member Doug Mitchell
took issue with the likelihood Ponderosa could go over budget.
"I would never approve a
college funding by $46 million
over the next two years, according
to the 2013 budget.
Wilkinson defended the Liberals' lifting ofthe tuition freeze
that had been in effect the last
time the NDP was in power. He
said stagnant pre-2001 tuition
levels led to rising class sizes and
deteriorating education quality,
and even said that institutions
should be able to exercise "academic freedom" by setting their
own tuition rates. But he stopped
short of denouncing the two per
cent yearly tuition cap the Liberals currently have in place.
Mungall said the NDP isn't
interested in returning to a
tuition freeze, and said that
keeping the two per cent cap was
a good compromise.
The student society of SFU,
among others, has been heavily involved in arguing that the
current maintenance budget
given by the provincial government to universities and colleges
isn't cutting it, and some structures are in disrepair as a result.
Hyslop asked the panel if they
would raise maintenance funding
to address this concern.
Mungall said maintenance
of public buildings was a key
concern for the NDP, and she
said trade schools in particular
are in need of equipment upgrades. Wilkinson said some
ofthe burden could be lifted if
developers or private companies
involved in building facilities
were also made responsible for
their maintenance.
Few new points were raised
over the course ofthe debate, as
candidates from the two major
parties were careful not to preempt any platform promises. But
overall, a chance to debate some
of the key issues facing universities gave the students in attendance a clear idea of where each
party stands and what might be
in store for post-secondary education after they go to the polls. Xi
The first phase of the Ponderosa Commons
proposal of a project that has a
50-50 chance it will increase,"
said Mitchell.
Board members also expressed
concerns about the high cost ofthe
Ponderosa Commons compared to
other residences on campus. Ponderosa will contain a total of 1,118
beds — 603 in the first phase, to be
completed September 2013, and 515
in the second phase, to be completed September 2015. While Marine
Drive cost $85,600 per student bed,
Ponderosa is projected to come in at
over $120,000 per bed.
While it took six years to earn
back the money loaned to build
Marine Drive, it is expected to take
17 years to pay for the cost of building the Ponderosa Commons.
The time to pay back the money
assumes up to 90 per cent occupancy over the summer. While some
board members questioned how
likely it was that spaces would be
filled, managing director of Student
Housing and Hospitality Services
Andrew Parr said he is confident
there will be demand for the beds.
<AI JACOBSON PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
building will be open in September 2013.
"We have pretty much full
occupancy throughout the year in
the facilities that are 12 months.
In terms ofthe risk of occupancy,
I think it's really quote low.... If we
had all those beds available today,
they would be occupied today,"
said Parr.
Board member Alice Laberge
expressed concern that there
wasn't enough consideration given
to the budget in the first place,
and efficiencies are only now
being considered.
"It seems to me that ifyou can
value engineer it partway through,
why can't you value engineer it at
the beginning?" said Laberge.
However, Metras maintained the
budget was the best possible one
given the location ofthe site and
the goals for the project.
Original plans set construction to start in October 2013,
with occupancy beginning in
September 2015.
The board will reconsider the
project's budget at its next meeting
in June. Xi
LANGARA»
Aboriginal
studies
class holds
demonstration
instead of exam
BRIAN HORSTEAD PHOJWHE VOICE
Langara instructor Justin Wilson photographs his students during the demonstration.
Brian Horstead
The Voice (Langara College)
VANCOUVER (CUP) - While
some students were hitting the
books in preparation for final
exams, Langara aboriginal
studies students were drawing
up banners in preparation for a
demonstration against Bill C-45.
The aboriginal community development course held a
silent demonstration on campus,
hoping that the unorthodox assignment would benefit students
looking for practical experience
organizing community events.
The demonstration was
in response to the Jobs and
Growth Act referred to as Bill
C-45, which opponents say
limits protection of Canada's
protected waterways.
Course instructor Justin
Wilson said the goal of the assignment was to get students to
apply what they learned to cause
social change.
"We can talk about the different approaches that aboriginal
people have taken to community
development, but it's another
thing altogether for them to do
it," Wilson said.
Alara ter Laak, a student in the
course and one of three designated group leaders, said her
classmates enjoyed the grassroots aspect of organizing their
own demonstration.
"They enjoy that they're doing
a practical community development exercise as opposed to just
learning in class," said ter Laak.
Having a group project as the
last assignment was fitting, said
Allysa Paul, another student in
the course.
"Aboriginal communities
are based on working together,
trusting and helping each other,"
said Paul.
Though a protest may seem
more simple to prepare for than
a final exam, Paul said organizing and coordinating roles and
responsibilities for the demonstration was not easy.
"There was definitely some
stipulations in order to receive a
good grade on this project.
Attendance was mandatory,
of course. We also had to do a
lot of background research as
to what [Bill C-45] meant," said
Paul. // Sports + Rec
EDITOR C.J. PENTLAND
YEAR IN REVIEW »
By the numbers: the T-Bird year
C.J. Pentland
Sports + Rec Editor
National championships, national
players of the year and records being
broken: it was yet another stellar
year for UBC Athletics. Here are
some of the impressive numbers that
were recorded during the year by
T-Bird teams, players and coaches.
6 The number of national
championships won this past
year by UBC teams: women's
golf, men's soccer, women's swimming, women's volleyball, women's
cross country and women's
field hockey.
6 The number of Canada West
championships won by UBC
teams: men's soccer, women's
volleyball, women's swimming,
women's field hockey, men's
basketball and women's hockey.
2 The number of individual
national titles won by T-Bird
athletes: Ben Thorne won the
NAIA national race walk championship and Katherine Enns was
named the Canadian University
Rowing Association (CURA)
champion.
3 The number of players who
were named CIS player of
the year: Shanice Marcelle
(women's volleyball), Kelly Aspin-
all (men's swimming) and Savannah King (women's swimming).
5 The number of coaches who
were named national coach
of the year: Craig Pond
(CURA rowing), Marek Jedrzejek
(NAIA women's cross-country), Chris MacDonald (NAIA
women's golf), Stephen Price
(CIS women's swimming) and
Graham Thomas (CIS women's
hockey).
18
The number of national championships won by UBC
women's swimming in their history, the most of any UBC team.
Conor Morgan Jordan Jensen-Whyte celebrate after wining the Canada West championship
once again dominated this past season.
7The number of UBC swimmers — incoming, past and
present — who will be representing Canada at the upcoming
world swimming championships
in Barcelona, Spain: Coleman
Allen, Luke Peddie, Savannah
King, Tera Van Beilen, Tommy
Gossland, Martha McCabe and
Erika Seltenreich-Hodgson.
14
The number of national championships won by UBC
women's field hockey in their
history, the most by any women's
field hockey team.
7
The number of goals
women's field hockey al-
owed in 13 games.
50
The number of goals
women's field hockey scored in
those 13 games.
6The number of consecutive national championships won by
UBC women's volleyball, tied
for the most consecutive titles.
25
The number of consecutive wins to end the women's
volleyball season.
5/
The number of consecutive sets women's volleyball won at
one point during the season.
24
The number of games
<AI JACOBSON PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
In true Thunderbird fashion, UBC teams
that the men's soccer team played
this past year en route to the
national championship.
0
The number of men's
soccer losses.
11
The number of goals
that men's soccer allowed over
24 games.
72
The number of goals that
men's soccer scored over 24 games.
47
The number of career
goals scored by Janine Frazao, the
most of any player in Canada West
women's soccer history.
7The round in which David
Otterman was picked, 245th
overall, of the 2012 Major
League Baseball Draft by the
Milwaukee Brewers.
$141,700
The amount of Otterman's
signing bonus.
2 The number of UBC runners
that represented Canada
at the world cross country
championships in Poland: Luc
Bruchet and Maria Bernard.
Bruchet finished 65th in his
event and Bernard finished 76th
in hers. UBC cross-coutry coach
Marek Jedrzejek was also Canada's coach at the event.
IThe number of games it took
women's hockey to equal
their win total from the
previous season.
23
The number of games
that women's hockey won during
the remainder of the season. The
Thunderbirds finished fifth in
the nation.
9,143
' • J-   J- %_/ The number
of passing yards racked up by
Billy Greene during Canada
West play, the most of any
Thunderbird quarterback.
176
The number of
Canada West championship
won by UBC teams in the program's history.
87
The number of CIS
championships that UBC has
won in the program's history, the
most of any Canadian university.
RECREATION »
Incorporate some exercise into your summer drinking
Justin Fleming
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Feeling like your summer days lack
purpose? All that listless, sunburnt
intoxication getting you down?
Well, when drinking for the sake
of drinking just isn't enough, spice
things up and incorporate some
semi-competitive, pseudo-sports
action into your boozing.
Here are three summer drinking
games that can be played in your
backyard, during your camping trip
or during a trip to the beach. And
while The Ubyssey does endorse
having summer fun, we remind you
to please drink responsibly.
BEERFRIZ/BOOZBEE/
BEERSBEE
Number of players: Two to four.
A popular fair-weather drinking
game, beerfriz is an ideal game
for a day at the beach or the park.
Its estimated time to intoxication
(ETI) is slow and steady, making it
perfect for all-day affairs.
What you need: A frisbee; two
posts around shoulder height
(PVC tubing is ideal at the park;
try using driftwood if you're at
the beach); two empty bottles
or cans to go along with your
own drinks.
How to play: Players are divided into two teams, and the
poles are set up roughly 25 feet
apart (try setting up posts in
knee-deep water if you're at the
beach). The empty bottles or
cans are then placed on top of the
opposing posts. Each team takes
turns throwing the frisbee back
and forth, trying to knock their
opponents' bottle off the post with
the disc.
Players must always have a
beverage in one hand during game.
Players cannot reach in front of the
post to catch the frisbee or otherwise block it from hitting the post.
However, if the frisbee is goingto
miss the post or can, a player must
catch it; if nobody catches it, one
point goes to the opposing team.
If the frisbee hits the post and
causes the can to fall and hit the
ground before it's caught, the
throwing teams gets two points.
However, the frisbee must still be
caught as well, so this is potentially a three-point play. The ultimate
shot, worth four points in total,
is scored when a toss knocks the
bottle off cleanly without hitting
the post at all.
Games are played to 21, and the
winning team must win by two
points. Drinks awarded accordingly for toppled or caught bottles.
BEER-DARTS
Number of players: Two.
What you need: Two chairs; one
dart (the un-weighted, plastic
kind); two players who like each
other.
Beer darts combines the hand-eye
coordination of real darts with
the drunken "put the kids to bed"
kind of danger more commonly
associated with lawn-darts. If it's
played responsibly and ended at
an appropriate time, this game can
leave players inebriated and high
on endorphins. This is an ideal
game for backyards and wooden
decks.
How to play: Players set their
chairs up roughly 10 feet apart,
facing each other. Both players sit
down in the chairs with their legs
about shoulder-width apart, and
then shake up a can of beer and
put it between their legs. Players
should also have a separate, open
drink in hand.
The players then take turns tossing the dart at their opponent's beer.
Any dart-to-can contact, or a "glancing blow" that doesn't result in a
can puncture, is worth one point,
and the defending player must take a
drink. If a player's can is punctured
by the throw, that player slams/shotguns the ruptured beer immediately
as fast as they can. A side puncture
is worth two points and a puncture
on the top of the can is worth three.
Games go up to five points.
NEGLIN,
HAMMERSHLAGEN
Number of players: One to eight.
A type of German Naelspielen (nail
game) that supposedly dates back to
the first Oktoberfest in 1810, Neglin
can be played just about anywhere,
but lends itself to rustic settings
like camp sites and log cabins. The
ETI: moderate to high.
What you need: A wide stump or
round of wood; a finishing hammer; a handful of nails.
How to play: Set the stump on
a table so that it's approximately
waist-high. Players gather around
the stump and each player drives
their nail about a half inch deep
into the wood. One at a time, each
player takes one swing with the
handle of the hammer in an attempt to sink their nail flush.
Players don't have to swing from
one fixed spot; they may maneuver
around the stump to get a better
angle. If a player's nail becomes
too bent, they may use their turn to
swing from the side and attempt to
straighten it. Play continues clockwise around the stump until all
players have sunk their nails. The
last person to sink their nail takes
a drink. Xi
MORE ONLINE
For diagrams on how to play
these ga mes, visit u byssey.
lay   I >
sy.ca MONDAY, APRIL 8,2013    |    FEATURE    |    5
FACES OF
CONSTRUCTION
At times this year, the construction on campus has felt like an obstacle course designed to send
us in circles, make us late to class and force us to traverse muddy paths and puddles. What's more—
many of us will be long gone by the time those concrete frames turn into shiny new buildings.
Through all the inconvenience construction can cause, it's easy to overlook the human face of all the
building on campus: the hundreds of hardworking construction workers who have shown up to UBC
every day of the year, rain or shine, not to take classes but to build structures for all of us to enjoy.
The Ubyssey decided to document these individuals to show the human faces of construction.
The images on this page and on pages six and seven were shot over the course of two days on the
site ofthe new SUB.
PHOTOS BY KAI JACOBSON | ART DIRECTOR
TEXT BY ARNO ROSENFELD I FEATURES EDITOR "*^a«*»,
Iff  II Culture
ANNAZORIA
COMEDY »
EXPLORE»
UBC Improv
takes home
silver
Branching out
CLAIREMELANSON PHOJWHE UBYSSEY
These guys...
Maitrayee Dhaka
StaffWriter
UBC Improv is maintaining
its recent winning streak.
The champions ofthe
Northwest Regional College Improv Tournament recently came
home with a second-place win at
the Chicago Improv Tournament;
they were the first Canadian
team ever to enter the competition against the 15 other North
American regional champions.
Ghazal Azarbad, co-president
of UBC Improv, is savouring
the win.
"The joy and the pride from
the win is incredible, but we're
also humble; it's been so great to
feel so supported and so welcome
in another country. This was
their competition and they were
so welcoming. Coming back with
second place is really great," said
Azarbad. UBC Improv's ability to
deliver a linear story without falling prey to easy punchlines sets
them apart, noted Azarbad.
"We tried to remember the
things that we did in Seattle. The
form was the same, we still did
the linear story where the five
characters on stage remained
the same all night and the story
included them all," she said. "It
was very goal-oriented, focused
and... patient.
"The word patient is something that came up a lot for us
in the competition. The judges
and even the other contestants
described us as patient, with each
other, with the story and with the
crowd. Patience is very rare when
it comes to improv. Improv can be
very jokes-y, very punchy and you
want to get to the punchline, but
we really take our time with it
and I think that's one thing that's
really worked on in the final
round," she said.
The team also garnered a large
support group at the competition.
"People from all over America who were at the competition
have been writing on our page.
It's been received really well,"
she said.
"The more UBC Improv puts
itself out there, the further it's
going to go. It is something that
Vancouver can really take pride
in; the scene is really growing.
It'll be so great if, when people
come to Vancouver, on their list
of things to do would be to see
UBC Improv," said Azarbad.
"One ofthe greatest things
about this trip is how it opened
our eyes to how possible it is to
go out there and make things
happen for us.'"a
Get acquainted with five of our campus' greenest beatuies
Rhys Edwards
Senior Culture Writer
It's springtime again, which means that the
sunlit reverie of boulevards, lawns, gardens
and walkways all over campus beckons to
students weary of dim libraries. The appeal
of such places, however, doesn't just lie in
fresh air and sunshine - they're also the
home of some of Point Grey's oldest living
residents. As you take a break from the
books, why not reflect upon the thousands of
exotic trees at UBC?
You may be surprised to learn that the
more than 8,000 trees on campus are "accessioned" — that is, planted. Point Grey's
indigenous forest was almost completely
clear cut in the early 1910s to make way for
the university, which meant that the first
horticultural and botany professors weren't
just responsible for lecturing; they were
tasked with beautifying the campus.
Through their work, those professors left
an arboreal legacy that, according to the
administration, has since become one ofthe
university's most distinguished assets. A
2009 study conducted by Campus and Community Planning states that UBC's trees help
to reinforce the "commanding position" of
the campus peninsula site. The 2010 Campus
Plan Design Guidelines note that mature
trees on campus are "key resources to be protected," even going so far as to name specific
trees that designers should be wary of.
Indeed, it's difficult not to notice the
towering oaks that line Main Mall or the
Japanese cherry trees that litter the Ponderosa Annex with blossoms. But you can
spot a variety of other exotic species across
campus. Make like a tree and branch out to
the following specimens.
WHAT: DUTCH ELM (ULMUS
X OLLANDICA), TAG NO. 5841
WHERE: SOUTH POCKET GARDEN
BEHIND IRVING K. BARBER
LEARNING CENTRE
The pocket gardens behind 1KB are some
ofthe oldest outdoor spaces on campus.
Unfortunately, they're often ignored by students. They were designed in a Japanese and
English style by Frank E. Buck, UBC's first-
ever landscape architect, in 1926. The canopy
ofthe towering dutch elm provides shade for
students walking along Agricultural Road
and has the largest girth of any planted tree
on campus.
WHAT: WEEPING
ELM (ULMUS GLABRA
CAMPERDOWNII), TAG NO. 5844
WHERE: SOUTH POCKET GARDEN
BEHIND IRVING K. BARBER
LEARNING CENTRE
Just a few feet away from the Dutch elm is
one of its cousins — but looking at the two,
you would never know they're related. This
tree is often referred to as the "upside-down
tree" by students, as its branches resemble
roots. The reason for the unusual shape
comes from its cultivation method: rather
than sprouting from a seed, this tree grows
from a Camperdown elm cutting that's grafted onto the trunk of a Wych elm.
WHAT: LINDEN/BASSWOOD (TILIA
PLATYPHYLLOS), TAG NO. 5945
WHERE: GARDEN AREA BETWEEN
GEOGRAPHY AND MATHEMATICS
BUILDINGS
Although not as grandiose as the other trees
on this list, this basswood is significant for
another reason: it's the very first graduation
class tree, planted in 1919. However, not only
is this tree a venerable senior — it's also a
traveller. From 1915 to 1925, UBC courses
were taught at a temporary location in the
Fairview area several miles east of Point
Grey. This meant that the first several gradu
ation trees had to be brought over and transplanted. Although other graduation trees
around campus have died, this one lives on,
in testament to the spirit of the Great Trek.
WHAT: SESSILE/DURMAST OAK
(QUERCUS PETRAEA), TAG NO. 4815
WHERE: CENTRE OF PONDEROSA
ANNEX
John Davidson, UBC's first botany professor,
planted a "systematic arboretum" on campus in the late 1930s. Featuring temperate
climate species from all over the Earth, the
arboretum serves as an outdoor classroom
for aspiring dendrologists, horticulturalists
and geographers. One of its highlights is this
oak tree; although not a star in the parade
along Main Mall, this is a particularly pristine specimen due to its immense height and
complete lack of disease.
WHAT: GIANT REDWOOD
{SEQUOIADENDRON
GIGANTEUM), TAG NO. 4799
WHERE: BEHIND THE FIRST
NATIONS HOUSE OF LEARNING
Also known as the giant sequoia, redwoods
have a reputation for their colossal size: some
of them reach nearly 100 metres in height.
They only grow naturally on the slopes of the
Sierra Nevada mountains in California, but
luckily, you don't have to travel far to see one
for yourself. The section ofthe arboretum in
which this redwood grows is rarely occupied,
making it a great spot for an idyllic study
break. Xi
<AIJACOBSONPHOTOSffHE UBYSSEY mon:
STUDY DRUGS »
The Adderall
effect
A look into why the road to
excellence often involves
medicated shortcuts
Rhys Edwards
Senior Culture Writer
Ifyou don't use them yourself, chances are you know
someone who does.
For many UBC students,
caffeine just won't cut it. In the
face of intense competition for
awards and graduate programs,
students are turning to cognitive-enhancing drugs such as
Adderall and Ritalin to increase
their mental concentration during study sessions. These drugs
are normally prescribed to treat
symptoms of attention-deficit
hyperactivity disorder — but
that doesn't stop non-diagnosed
students from using them. According to an article published
in January by The Point, UBC's
online varsity magazine, as well
as a CTV News report published
in February, these drugs are
readily available for purchase
on websites such as Craigslist or
through illicit sellers who visit
libraries on campus.
Several studies published in
scientific journals also show
that Adderall, a methampheta-
mine-based stimulant, is the
most popular study drug among
university students. But many
users may not realize how dangerous it is.
"There's a lot of risk to using
the drug, whether or not it is actually required for you," said Dr.
Patricia Mirwaldt, the director of
UBC Student Health Services.
"There are concerns about
things that are serious, like a
heart attack or an arrhythmia,
which is a change in the rhythm
ofthe heart, [which] are certainly possibilities with this drug."
In addition to cardiovascular
problems, the use of study drugs
may lead to decreased appetite,
1IL8.2013   |   CULTURE   I   9
You can get sidetracked, because Adderall
helps you concentrate and focus, but you
can end up focusing on something that isn't
relevant to what you're trying to do.
Molly Mew, 4th year anthropology, on her peer's experience
with the study drug
insomnia and dependency. Even
if a user manages to avoid these
problems, the drug may still
backfire in ways one might not
expect.
Molly Mew, a fourth-year
anthropology student, was
friends with an arts student who
used Adderall to study in their
first year.
"This article I read a couple
of years ago said the same thing
that he did: that you can get
sidetracked, because Adderall
helps you concentrate and focus,
but you can end up focusing on
something that isn't relevant to
what you're trying to do," said
Mew. "So for instance, if he got
sidetracked for a minute and
went on Facebook or Reddit, he
could get stuck on that and end
up spending a couple of hours on
it, because he would get focused
on the wrong thing.
"Or, more likely, he said that
he would go back the next day
and read his paper, and he'd
got the word count in, he'd got
his page limit met, but it was 12
pages of something that didn't
necessarily relate to the topic he
intended to write about."
Despite the risks, an increasing number of students are
still willing to use stimulants
to get ahead. Exact statistics
about study drug use at UBC
are unknown; Health Services
commissioned an Omsbud study
in February, the results of which
are currently being evaluated.
But a study published last December by the Canadian Medical
Association Journal found that
up to 11 per cent of Canadian university students may be taking
Adderall for non-medicinal purposes, while a 2011 article in the
Journal of Psychopharmacology
stated that up to eight per cent
of undergraduate students in
the U.S. have used prescription
stimulants illegally. The Point
also cited anecdotal reports that
the use of Adderall was particularly prominent among pre-med
students at UBC, where competition to score well on MCAT
exams is fierce.
The use of study drugs isn't
actually illegal, but their increasing popularity on campus has
compounded a variety of issues.
In addition to their questionable
efficacy, many professionals and
students wonder if study drugs
give an unfair advantage to students who do decide to use them.
"I've taken Adderall before,"
said Brad Schwede, a marketing
student at UBC. "It definitely
helps me study. I feel guilty
about taking it because I'm not
prescribed it, but if it helps me
study, I'll do whatever I can."
Although study drugs present
a multitude of physiological and
<IMPRINGLEILLUSTRATIONfTHE UBYSSEY
ethical problems, UBC's administration still has no official policy
regarding their use — and they
aren't alone in that regard.
"I'm not aware of any university in North America that has an
official stance," said Mirwaldt.
"I have looked at a few places, to
look and see what they were doing. It is something that is coming into discussion.... I wouldn't
be surprised if eventually we
started having official policies on
it. But it certainly isn't something
that I'm aware of anywhere, that
there are actually policies that
exist already."
Soon enough, the administration will have to address the
impact of study drugs on students — and when they do, they'll
face the challenge of defining
what exactly it means to pursue
"academic excellence" in today's
medicated world. tJ
GONZO»
The second best
Blok Party ever
Bryce Warnes
StaffWriter
Let me tell you about my personal experience on Block Party Day, so that history will
remember what was the second best Block
Party ever (the best was when Bob Marley
came back to life and made everyone believe
inG-d).
It was another super cloudy/rainy normal
afternoon in UBC (joke about Vancouver
rain go here). I walked out ofthe old SUB and
looked at Macdonald's Field.
On the stage some indie rockers were playing indie pop music.
Next to the stage, a two-storey inflatable
choad with the Molson logo on its side just sat
there, looking gross. The space in front ofthe
stage was filled with zero people.
I started putting alcohol in my body. Everyone else was doing the same, looking at each
other with shining eyes, pushing drinks into
their mouths. We were all underground inthe
old SUB, hiding in a room where students go
to feel awful. Eventually, I had to leave.
On the way to the convenience store for
tobacco I met a man with pectorals who fed
me yellow chemical powder from a bag. My
body became warm and languid.
Outside, back at the SUB, great fun was
being had. The young people were finished
their classes. They were ready to fill their
bodies with poison and press them against
other bodies, to loudly say "haha" many times,
to "have fun" and "just be in the moment."
Indie rock band was replaced by DJ man
playing whump-whump sounds. The line
outside the blue wire livestock fence surrounding Macdonald's Field got huge, became
an oblong refugee camp stretching to Gage
Projects. There was an overall sense of waiting forever for something underwhelming.
Grown-ups in uniforms walked
around, eyeballing young bodies, taser
fingers twitching.
Because I was The Media I had special
advance-reservation tickets. I went to a secret
entrance in the fence, happy to be Special, and
not one ofThe People waiting in line.
Once inside Block Party, I stood in the rain
and listened to whump-whump music. Then
I went into the Molson VIP Section with
my VIP pass. The Molson VIP Section was
reserved exclusively for student politicians,
former student politicians, future student
politicians, friends and family of student politicians, and people who had "slipped through
the cracks" (me).
The Molson VIP Section included 80 per
cent of Block Party's covered area and 90 per
We can certainly say a fun time was had by all.
cent of its dry places to sit, being used by 20
people.
Friendly ladies gave me free Molson
products. I stood under the covered area with
my ice-cold Molson products and thought,
I am The Media. The Molson products
went into my body and I thought, I am The
Fucking Media.
Outside, in Normal Person area, virile
youngbodies shouted deep-chestedly at
everyone while other youngbodies went
"haha" and leaned on each other.
Kendrick "K'Naan" Lamar went on the
stage and sang about freedom and being yourself. He did not rap about Swimming Pools
GEOFF LISTER PHOTOfTHE UBYSSEY
(Drank).
I went up to a metal trough and stood
next to other boys and peed in the trough.
Some rain fell on my privates and I thought,
"Haha."
Whump-whump, went the music.
All the Molson products were inthe pee
trough now. Looking at the line for beer "tix"
I thought, "Nope." I left through an opening
in the blue livestock fence.
Outside the SUB, guys were being led
away in handcuffs. Inside the SUB, paramedics were setting up a gurney near the
women's washroom.
It was the second best Block Party ever. Xi II Opinions
LAST WORDS
FARTING SHOTS AND SNAP JUDGMENTS ON TODAY'S ISSUES
X^^^^^L^:
WHAT WILL A CHANGE
IN GOVERNMENT
MEAN FOR UBC'S NEXT
PRESIDENT?
As you probably gleaned from our
last issue, UBC President Stephen
Toope announced last week that
he will be resigning his post early,
in summer 2014. The UBC Board
of Governors has already kicked
off the search for a successor, but
there's one big hiccup coming
down the pipeline.
Come May, it seems very likely
that a new party will be in power
in Victoria. That will have big implications for UBC, both in terms
of funding and governance. We'll
focus on the latter.
In a blog post, Board of Governors faculty representative Nas-
sif Ghoussoub ruminated on the
prospect of an entirely new board
appointing a new president.
UBC's board — the body in
charge ofthe university's big-picture financial decisions — is made
up of both elected and appointed
members. Inthe post, Ghoussoub
worries that the new government
will axe the appointed membership and replace it with a new
slate of governors.
Such patronage appointments
are bound to happen whenever
a government changes. But it's
the timing that's got Ghoussoub
worried. Inthe worst case scenario, a completely "green" board
will guide the selection process
— a board that has only a cursory
understanding ofthe issues facing
the university.
There's some truth in this. A
lot ofthe current board has been
around for ages, and has deep,
committee-level knowledge of
UBC finance and governance. A
new slate of appointees would
still be learning the ropes just as
they need to make one ofthe most
important decisions the university has faced since 2006, when
Toope was first appointed.
It's possible that the new board
will be quick studies, able to balance the new workload and make
informed decisions on behalf of
the university. Or, as Ghoussoub
expects, they'll look to those
who have been around longer for
guidance: the members elected by
students, staff and faculty.
Maybe the political turmoil
will make the oligarchic process
of picking a new president just a
little more democratic.
SHAME ON THE FREE
PRESS MUZZLERS AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF
WINDSOR
This year, we've seen a number
of instances of student unions
tryingto strong-arm their student papers. We saw press-muzzling of various stripes at McGill
and the University of Western
Ontario, and now we're seeing it
at the University of Windsor.
The University of Windsor
Students' Alliance has ordered
its paper, the Lance, to stop
publishing print editions after
budget losses. The paper, which
has one print issue left in the year,
disclosed that it was $24,000 in
the red at the end of February.
However, it claims it will only lose
$7,000 by the time that March
and April advertising revenue
is counted.
[Budget cuts are] a
constant danger for
student papers that
are not independent
from their student
union.
RE: UWindsor's SU cutting
funding to the lance
Money issues aside, this is not
a mutually agreed-upon decision based on budget realities.
The Lance was not contacted
or consulted about the issue
before the stop-publishing order,
which it predicts will reduce its
budget to a third of its current
size. The meeting ofthe student
union was conducted in secret.
So why would you cut a paper
based on its February finances in
April without talking to anyone
on staff? They can't make their
April advertising targets if they
can't publish.
This is a constant danger for
papers not independent from
their student union. The Ubyssey
has not been a part ofthe AMS
since 1995. Advertising revenues
remain volatile, and like many
services provided by student
ifc3}DoEs rH's
6^Y E\/Ew Go
DAVID MARINO ILLUSTRATION /THE UBYSSEY
unions, some campus papers may
need financial assistance. For
example, Windsor's student pub
was allowed to rack up $1 million
in debt before it was shuttered.
But the relationship can be more
tense when the people in charge
ofthe student union are the same
people the paper tries to hold
to account.
That leads us to conclude that
this is an attempt at censorship,
plain and simple. The Lance's last
print issue detailed a number of
allegations of election irregularities, including last-minute disqualifications and online voting
problems.
If there are issues about
money, they need to be dealt
with accordingly, in an open and
accountable way.
The relationship between a
non-independent paper and its
student union always leaves the
paper with no power to protect itself from the people most
aggrieved by their work. We call
on the University of Windsor
Students' Alliance to reverse its
decision and work with the Lance
to resolve its budget issues out in
the open.
A CONSIDERED
ANALYSIS OF
UBC SHITTING
EXPERIENCES
I'm sure all of us have had a
shitty moment at UBC. Some
of us have talked about those
moments online.
But when we start talking
about actual, literal excrement,
fewer of us have described that
sort of moment.
Except for 39 of us, apparently.
That's how many people have
described an act of on-campus
bowel-emptying for UBC Shitting
Experiences, a Facebook page
that, well, does what it says on
the tin.
Is this a parody of
super-hyper-connected
cyber-millenial oversharing? Is
it a puerile gross-out joke that's
gone on far too long? Is it, on
some level, an earnest attempt to
find something in common (after
all, everybody poops)? We're not
really sure. But reading it is disgusting, unpleasant and somehow
satisfying. Which is appropriate.
You know. tJ
What real 'school
spirit' looks like
A columnist reflects on three
years of telling it like it is
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KATICHISMS
by Gordon Katie
This is my final Ubyssey column. I
have been a regular in the opinion
pages for nearly three years, and a
weekly columnist for the past year.
Going forward, you will likely see
the occasional op-ed, but I will
not have the time to contribute a
regular column.
I have written about some of
the most important issues facing
UBC. However, I have a somewhat
trivial gripe to leave you with: I
hate school spirit.
To you, it may seem like innocent fun. To me, it is a pernicious
force bent on the destruction of all
that is good. If I were president of
UBC, I would outlaw pep rallies,
lip dubs, and Harlem shakes. Any
student found painting "UBC"
on their forehead or wearing a
blue wig would face immediate
expulsion. Furthermore, I would
recall all university-branded paraphernalia, and strictly forbid the
utterance of "a place of mind."
A loud pep rally is a sort of
collective psychosis, akin to
Pentecostal worshipers speaking
in tongues. In truth, what we call
"school spirit" is not really school
spirit; it is merely groupthink and
irrational jingoism.
O.K., perhaps my hyperbole is
a bit tongue-in-cheek. I would,
begrudgingly, respect the right
to free speech and free assembly.
However, I have always been
troubled by the culture of conformity that school spirit helps to
create. For example, Imagine Day
speeches rouse students to frenzy
through banal Tony Robbins-es-
que tripe, punctuated by spastic
outbursts of "YOU ARE U-B-C!"
I cannot think of an introduction
to UBC that is more antithetical to
the critical spirit that a university
is meant to cultivate.
To quote the late historian
Howard Zinn, "dissent is the
highest form of patriotism." In
that sense, my weekly column has
exemplified school spirit. From
time to time, people have accused
me of being too critical or not
appreciative enough. These people
fail to understand that criticism is
a public service; if The Ubyssey was
full of masturbatory puff pieces, it
would be of no value.
In my first column I wrote that
the AMS was "concerned more
with self-aggrandizement and
vindictive political squabbles"
than "the issues facing ordinary
students," but this was frustration,
f | b«* CO
government
not cynicism. As I later argued,
"we should not be resigned to what
we are, but motivated by what we
could become."
Perhaps my most-read column
was one in which I argued that
men need to take responsibility for sexualized violence. As
I wrote, "in our society, violent
masculinity is the cultural norm."
A Reddit "men's rights" group
jumped all over it, accusing me of
being "self-hating." However, they
failed to realize that being critical
of masculinity is not the same as
hating men; instead, it is a way to
liberate men from "the burden of
conforming to oppressive cultural
standards."
Many of my columns have
pointed out hypocrisies, like when
I accused Vancouver of "elitism
and faux-progressivism," argued
that UBC compromised its environmental leadership by making
a "Faustian bargain" with the
oil and gas industry or observed
that students are hard to mobilize
because their ideals are "inert and
lifeless." However, I only leveled
these critiques because I wished
to inspire us to live up to those
noble ideals.
I once rhetorically asked if
"exam season is just another name
for overwhelming stress and debilitating anxiety." But when I was
criticizing UBC for its hyper-competitive exam culture, inaction on
mental health issues and rampant
abuse of study drugs, this was not
about skewering the university.
My criticisms were motivated by a
fear that more and more students
would "end up being unhappy,
unhealthy and overwhelmed in
years that are meant to be the best
of their lives." Student well-being
is now a major concern for student
and university leadership, and I
would like to think that my writing played some small role.
Mindlessly chanting "U-B-C,
U-B-C," is not really school spirit;
it is useless, easy and requires no
sacrifice. On the other hand, my
column has demanded painstaking research, carefully crafted
arguments and real personal and
political risks. You may disagree
with many of my conclusions, but
this is certain: I have demonstrated a profound commitment to this
school, an investment in its values,
a faith in its ability to reform and a
belief in its potential.
If you also believe in this school,
I would urge you to join in the
critical dialogue about its future.
You could start by volunteering for
The Ubyssey. What better way to
show school spirit? ta II Scene
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GEOFF LISTER.CARTER BRUNDAGE PHOTOSfTHE UBYSSEY MONDAY, APRIL 8,2013    |    GAMES    |   11
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3UZZLE COURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USEDWITH PERMISSION.
1-Staying power
5-Seed vessel
8- Simple rhyme scheme
12-For (cheap)
14- Sat on the back of a horse
15-Uh-uh
16-Spokes
17-Shoppe adjective
18-Tribute
19- Space between two objects
21-Soft subdued color
23-Cask wood
24-Actress Alicia
25-Contains
26-Winged child
30- Hagar the Horrible's dog
32- External
33-Approved
37- Dash
38-Folded food
39-Yes ?
40-Cowardly
42- Rock
43-Gaze intently
44- Perceived to be
45-Mischievous fairy
48-Holiday start
49-Not'neath
50-Home on the range
52-Annoy
57-Mex. miss
58-OneoftheSimpsons
60-Snap course
61-Appearance
62-And others, briefly
63-High-fives
64-French 101 verb
65-Put on
66-Gnarl
DOWN
1- Hog fat
2-Actor Morales
3-Deities
4-Bad mood
5-Tent stick
6-Like land 3, e.g.
7-Well statistic
8-Aardvark'sprey
9-Voting compartment
10-Cop	
11-Ringing instruments
13-Nonbelieverin Islam
14-Music genre
20-Apprehend
22- River in central Switzerland
24-Harass
26-Like some dorms
27- Hawaiian native dance
28-Greek letters
29-Leases
30-Plinth
31-Govt, security
33-Training group
34-1982 Disney film
35-Sicilian resort
36-Evil is as evil .
38- Made a basketball boo-boo
41-To (perfectly)
42-Sequence
44-Sun. delivery
45- "Who's there?" response
46-Reason for a raise
47-Tire (out)
49-Unwritten
51-Window piece
52-This outrage!
53-Confer
54-Slippery eel
55-Word processing error
56- Compass direction
59-FigureskaterMidori
ONLY ONE ISSUE LEFT!
This is literally your last chance to cross off "Write
for The Ubyssey" from the 94 things to do before
you graduate list (this year, that is). Journalism!
medecme,
n choix
avenir
Etudier a I'Universite
d 'Ottawa
un programme
francophone de
medecine
unenvironnement
bilingue
un programme
innovateur oil la
technologiefait
partie integrante de
la formation
des places reservees
pour les etudiants de
I'Atlantique, de I'Ouest
etdesTerritoires
un appui financier pour
retourner faire certains
stages pratiques
chez-vous
B
It
K francophone
>]     medecine
A I'Universite d'Ottawa, le
Consortium national de formation
en sante fCNFS] contribue a offrir
un acces accru a des programmes
d etudes dans le dornaine de la
sante, aux francophones issus des
collectivites en situation minoritaire.
MAM
@ Consortium national
™ de formation en sante
Volet Universite d'Ottawa
TTTIT
Ce projet a ete rendu possible grace a une
contribution finonciere de Sante Canada
u Ottawa
Faculte de medecine
Faculty of Medicine
www.cnfs.ca
www.medecine.uOttawa.ca
Keep your eyes peeled for announcements of our new editorial board in our next issue.
TheUbyssey | Electing new editors since 1918
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CONCERT Axis Ad for Ubyssey
Size: 6" x 6" - 1/4 Page Vertical
File Name: CON23012_Axis_Ad_Ubyssey_QPV_Mar28.indd
Mar. 28/2013/suikiHD/lngrid
CONCERT
Insertion Date: April 4, 2013
Due: April 2, 2013-Noon

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