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The Ubyssey Mar 10, 1972

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Array SECOND NEWSLETTER BLASTED
EUS does it again
mgpm
kl
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Vol. UH, No. 60
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 1972        °^^>48     228-2301
—kini mcdonald photo
SIX UGLY MUGS, who have only one thing in common, pose for Ubyssey photographer Kini McDonald. Former Ubyssey editors are:
bottom left, Nate Smith (1970-71); top left, Mike Finlay (1969-70); top right, Al Birnie (1968-69); and bottom right, Leslie Plommer
(1971-72). Past paragons of campus journalism surround newly-elected editorship team, John Andersen (centre left) and Jan O'Brien (centre
right). Some have claimed election was rigged but these doubters were seen late Thursday tumbling from Ladner bell tower. Story, page 3.
Computer timetables in the wind
Students could lose the
privilege of choosing their own
timetables under a plan for
computerized scheduling being
contemplated by the registrar's
office.
The plan is the office's second
attempt at computerized
registration.
In 1970, more than 2,000
students pre-registered under a
computerized plan, and were
forced to register again in
mid-September when their
timetables were planned
incorrectly.
However, the 1970 plan
allowed students to choose their
own section but the new plan,
according to a former student
working at UBC, will not.
' Registrar Jack Parnell refused
to say if the new plan will leave
the choice of sections to students.
But he said he feels the
university should be making
better use of the computer, "and
using it to program students'
courses would be one possible
idea."
Parnall proposes that students
send his office an outline of their
desired courses for the winter
session in June or July. These, he
said, would be fed into the
computer and an "appropriate"
timetable would be spewed forth*.
"We would try and encourage
freshmen to see the campus in
June, and set up special days for
this purpose," he said.
He said the system could be
implemented this year, if planning
is completed by June.
"However, we don't want to
annoy people by forcing them to
cope with an unready situation.
"We do feel it will take the
pains out of registration. This way
most people won't have to run
around during registration week
and get their courses straight,"
Parnall said.
Under this new system there
would also be an opportunity for
students who wished to register in
person during September to do so,
he said.
He said he would welcome
comments from students on the
proposal.
"It doesn't suit my needs at all.
I don't know in June what my
plans will be for the next year,"
commented outgoing Alma Mater
Society internal affairs officer
Michael Robinson.
He said his previous
experiences with the computer
also prejudiced him against the
program.
"Two years ago when I
pre-registered     the     computer
By JOHN TWIGG and CONRAD WINKELMAN
The publication of a second racist newsletter by the
engineering undergraduate society has resulted in the
suspension of classes by a math professor and a
condemnation of the newsletter by administration president
Walter Gage.
The  newsletter   published  Wednesday  contained   a
barrage of racist jokes, some aimed at math prof George
Bluman who on Feb. 22 withdrew
his application to teach in the
engineering faculty because of
racist jokes published in the Feb.
9 newsletter.
Bluman appeared at his 2:30
math 256 class Thursday and told
his 40 students he had a letter for
them, then left.
The letter announced that
Bluman has suspended his classes
until further notice.
At an EUS general meeting
Thursday noon, Dean Gage said
he was "ashamed" of the "sick
humor" in the newsletter and said
there was no excuse for it.
"The perpetration of hate
literature has no place in the
university." an obviously
disturbed Gage told the 300
engineering students.
In a prepared statement, Gage
said later: "I want to make it clear
to all, both as president and as an
individual, that I cannot condone
this kind of ethnic and religious
prejudice on the part of a few
students.
"I take it for granted that I
have the support of the university
community on this stand."
The jokes included: "A little
something for the Jewish
Populace. German Kommandant:
"Prisoners, I have some good news
and some bad news for you. First,
the good news: half of you will be
going to our new Stalag in Paris
and the other half will be going to
our accomadayshuns (sic) in
Berlin. Now the bad news: The
top half of you is going to Paris
and the bottom half to Berlin.
(Split personality?)"
The newsletter began with an
opinion poll of how students felt
about the racism controversy.
The poll began with: "To be truly
just and treat everyone equal we
give you the BLEWMAN ETHNIC
POLE."
Applied science dean* W. D.
Finn also spoke at the general
meeting, saying the faculty
council and the EUS executive
will be meeting to clarify and
detail the faculty's stand.
"You have now started to
irritate and hurt people rather
than amuse them," Finn said in
reference to the faction that put
out the second newsletter.
See page 3: ENGINEERS
botched up my program. I had to
come back and go through the
whole thing again.
"I was not impressed," he said.
He said he would speak to the
registrar under the auspices of the
AMS about the proposal.
"If this program is imposed on
the students this year I'll probably
take action," Robinson added.
'   Svn&S&i'V's&ik*
Nemetz in chancellor race
Mr. Justice Nathan Nemetz is the choice of the
UBC Alumni Association to fill the post of
chancellor of UBC.
But whether or not he is also the choice of the
people is yet to be determined.
Registrar Jack Parnall said Thursday he had
received Nemetz's nomination from the
association's nominating committee.
He said it is the only one he has received to
date.
Current chancellor, Allan McGavin has said he
will not seek re-election to the position.
"Three years is a fairly long time to be
chancellor," he said.
In nominating the B.C. appeal court judge,
association spokesman Barrie Lindsay said he felt
"Nemetz would make an excellent chancellor, a
chancellor who would bring the community and
university closer together."
Nemetz is well-known as a negotiator in
labor-management disputes.
Parnall said unless other nominations are
received by his office before Wednesday, the mail
ballot election scheduled for June 7 will not be
held.
Only UBC alumni and faculty members are
eligible to vote, but students may run for the
three-year post. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  10,  1972
■ «■','
In the classroom
By DENNY SEKUE
The last decade has seen a noticeable change in
the approach of many university professors towards
their students.
Although the change was largely tokenism or a
reluctant recognition that students were no longer
prepared to accept what they did in the past,
nevertheless it is rare that one comes across a
professor having such a blatant disregard for the
wishes of students, such an obvious assumption that
all students are completely ignorant, and such an
inflated opinion of himself, who is so pompous as to
not even attempt to hide qualities and opinions that
most professors try, for the most part desperately,
to disavow.
Harry Adaskin is one such man. Adaskin
teaches Music 326, a music appreciation course for
students not majoring in Music.
The course itself is really quite good. It is to
Adaskin's credit that he is able to make music of all
kinds and periods in history somewhat
comprehensible and in most cases fascinating. And
to Francis Adaskin's credit that she manages to play
the music superbly almost all the time with no
recognition in terms of being allowed to contribute
to the lectures themselves. (In the course of the year
the class has studied the .techniques and
development of classical music from Bach to
Schoenberg.)
However, the 300 or so people who attend the
class could have learned twice as much music by
now or spent half as much time at the course and
learned all that has been learned.
The problem: Adaskin seems to aspire to the
philosophy that it is necessary to spend at least half
the class time either preaching or relating anecdotes
from his own life from which the class will surely
gain enormous amounts of knowledge.
Frustration and anger are the cumulative effects
of hearing constantly, for eight months, lectures to
the tune of, "Now, class, I want you to listen, and
listen well, because what I am about to say is
something that you can only learn from long years
of experience ...", to be followed by the gem of
wisdom that the key to understanding life is to
understand that nothing can ever really be changed;
incessant references to his own personal experiences
that prove him to be patient, kind, dedicated, and
above all wise; frequent lapses into French and
numerous readings of French poetry (in his
impeccable French, self-taught through diligent,
patient study and great self-discipline); and most
obnoxious of all, numerous unprincipled and
unsubstantiated attacks on any political ideas that
suggest social change is desirable ("The French
Revolution didn't do anyone any good." "In Russia,
they do away with composers who use dissonant
notes.")
On Wednesday, Adaskin pulled a trick I had
associated only with overly strict high-school
teachers. He was reading from an essay written by
the composer being studied. Several people in the
room were talking quietly, presumably bored, and
not in any way bothering the rest of the class.
Adaskin stopped reading, marched up to the
back of the theatre and proceeded to record the
names of two people who had been talking. The
class responded, understandably, with shocked
silence.
This kind of bully tactic is representative of a
man who seeks only to repress and dominate a large
number of potentially creative human beings.
If he were not so close to retirement, I would
venture the prediction that Harry Adaskin would be
the university's logical choice for heir to arts dean
Doug Kenny's dictatorship. I am sure that this
article itself would serve as an adequate character
reference.
Adaskin teaches Music 326, in the music
building recital hall, on Monday, Wednesday and
Thursday from 2:30-3:30 p.m. Francis Adaskin
attempts to give beautiful recitals during the same
time period, between interruptions by her husband.
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733-8181
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general meeting of the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre
12:30 p.m. March 16, 1972 at the centre.
Move:
That by-law 12 clause 2 of the constitution of the Thea Koerner House
Graduate Student Centre be amended to read: "two faculty members
appointed by the Graduate Students Association"
That the words "and one for a term of three years," be deleted from
by-law 12 clause 2 subsection (a).
That the words "three years" be replaced by "two years" in by-law 12
clause 2 subsection (b).
That by-law 12 clause 3 of the constitution of the Thea Koerner House
Graduate Student Centre be amended to read: "two persons appointed
annually by the president of the university during the month of but prior
to the annual general meeting of the centre, who shall hold office until the
anniversary of their respective appointment."
That clause 4 be added to by-law 12 of the constitution of the Thea
Koerner House Graduate Student Centre to read: "The president and the
internal affairs officer of the Graduate Students Association, to serve on
the board for the duration of their term as members of the executive of the
Graduate Students Association."
GSA Executive.
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FPR UBC 48 Friday, March  10, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Striking students, workers unite
SHERBROOKE (CUPI-MDQS) - What was once an
internal conflict in the social services department'at the
Universite de Sherbrooke, is on ihe verge of becoming a
common front struggle against the administration by
workers and students.
The social services department was set up by social
services students last Nov. 10 in a bid to obtain an equal
voice in evaluation. They were assisted by several faculty
members and by the local Construction Workers' Union
(Confederation of National Trade Unions) which offered
them moral and financial support. The students had
earlier assisted the union by acting as "animators" during
a strike.
The local union movement is also interested in the
Universite de Sherbrooke because of the struggle of 87
library employees for a union. The university
administration is contesting the accreditation on the
grounds that any such union should include all the
university's maintenance employees.
But the Universite de Sherbrooke allows its
professors to unionize themselves by faculties, and
mechanics working for the university have a separate
union. The students are seriously considering the
formation of a common front with the workers in the
light of the successful struggles at the Universite de
Montreal and the Universite de Quebec at Montreal, last
fall..
As far as students are concerned, the University
council has negated the results of hard-fought negotiations
between students and faculty by denying the students the
right of co-evaluation.
As early as Dec. 13, the social services professors had
recognized the students' demand for equal power in
evaluation. The main point of divergence involved the role
of the department head. The faculty wanted him to have
the power to arbitrate in cases of deadlock while students
wanted him to act as a mediator who would urge
participants in a dispute to arrive at their own settlement.
The students and the department head arrived at a
satisfactory agreement, which was ratified by the student
assembly, Jan. 6 but subsequently faculty members
altered the sense of the agreement. The students
maintained that the faculty's failure to come to an
agreement with them was due to an internal faculty power
struggle.
Meanwhile, on another front, the social services
students were struck with a "coup de matraque" from the
department. Seventy-two of them, or more than 70 per
cent, were failed for not showing up for evaluation. This
action led some students to conclude that "peaceful,
positive creative means lead nowhere except to 72
failures."
On Jan. 12 negotiations were resumed on a serious
basis. A series of 11 marathon meetings produced an
agreement by Jan. 17 after a climate of bonne entente had
been established. Both sides really wanted to arrive at a
settlement.
The council's statement maintained that student
participation in evaluation would mean that a student
would be the judge of his own case.
The students demanded to meet with the university
council. The administration claimed it would be difficult
to bring members together for such a meeting and that the
hearing of a "spontaneous group" would create a
dangerous precedent.
The ministry of education, in a recent reply to
students' requests for intervention, ignored the impasses
in negotiations and refused to intervene in the affairs of
the Universite de Sherbrooke. So at least one university
struggle continues in Quebec, with no end in sight.
Panelists discuss U.S. domination of Canada
GIDEON ROSENBLUTH, DOUGAL MACDONALD, WALTER YOUNG, FRED FERDMAN .
—kini mcdonald photo
at Thursday meeting
Reorienting the Canadian
economy is a question
fundamental to all Canadians,
according to political science head
Walter Young.
Young presented his views
Thursday noon in a debate with
Fred Ferdman of the Canadian
Communist Party
(Marxist-Leninist) on U.S. control
of the economy.
"We must begin to take control
of our economy," Young told 75
students in SUB 207-209.
Ferdman charged that Canada
has been the victim of foreign
domination since it was taken by
the whites from the Indians.
"The U.S. now dominates
Canada politically, culturally and
economically," he said.
Ferdman laid the particular
situation in B.C. on the shoulders
of the Social Credit government.
"In the last 20 years we have
subsidized $2 billion worth of
dams, roads and other
conveniences for the foreign
exploitation of this province," he
said.
"We need a mass-democratic
anti-imperialist revolution," he
concluded.
Engineers outraged at newsletter
From page 1
"The limit of tolerable
behavior has passed and
disciplinary action is seriously,
considered," he said.
A spokesman for the EUS said
the majority of the executive is in
New Brunswick for a convention
and no statements will be made.
He admitted that the group
which put out the Wednesday
edition was different from the
group that put out the Feb. 9
edition, but declined to name them.
The engineering students
appear to be divided into two
groups regarding the racist jokes.
A large number deplore the jokes
while another faction believes that
the newsletter is theirs and thus
responsible to no one.
Bluman, who was not
answering either his office or
home  phone, said on Feb.  22:
"Under Hitler in Germany,
Nazi literature often made jokes
about Jews. It shows an extreme
lack of sensitivity."
EUS president and Alma Mater
Society president-elect Doug
Aldridge defended the first
newsletter by saying "it offended
everyone equally."
But Gage told the Thursday
meeting: "Not playing favorites is
not good enough."
A group of Bluman's math 256
students confronted him after he
handed out his letter and asked
him if he realized his action was
contrary to the Universities Act.
Bluman replied that he knew
his action was contrary to the act.
But he said he wouldn't teach
his class again until the racist
attitude ended, and added that a
water bomb had been thrown at
him as he walked past the civil
engineering building.
One of his students told The
Ubyssey Bluman is "a fine teacher
who cares about students."
"I really resent losing my class
over something as low on my list
of priorities as the EUS
newsletter," said another.
Another engineer, Kim
Stephens, said: "In the four years
that    I've    been   at   UBC   the
attitudes of engineering students
have definitely changed.
"The 'engineers-right-or-wrong'
attitude is no longer acceptable to
a majority of engineers. There is a
growing realization that we can't
justify our traditional insularity.
"Basing his opinions on such
things as the newsletter, how can
an outsider possibly come to any
other conclusion than a belief that
engineers are depraved, sexist,
racist,    reactionary    perverts."
Turkey two win coup in shoo-in
By JAN O'BRIEN and JOHN ANDERSEN
Ubyssey Appointments Editors
PUNGO-PUNGO (UNS) - Members of
the notorious syndicate The Collective today
couped and declared the end of democracy
on this island republic.
"Democracy no more shall reign,"
newly elected Ubyssey editor blorg John
Andersen was heard to proclaim.
"Democracy no more shall reign,"
newly elected Ubyssey editor blorg Jan
O'Brien was heard to proclaim.
"Democracy no more shall reign,"
echoed the masses of the great unwashed.
The coup ended the red turkey tactics
employed by both candidates during the
frenzied pre-coup activities.
"The coup ended the red turkey tactics
of the other candidate," both editor blorgs
were heard to proclaim.
"Personally I think they're both
gobblers," ousted editor Leslie Plommer was
heard to exclaim.
"Personally I think they're both
gobblers," previously ousted editor Nate
Smith was heard to exclaim.
"Gobble, gobble," said former chief
turkey Mike Finlay.
"You can say that again," muttered the
ghost of turkeys past, Al Birnie.
"Gobble, gobble," said former chief
turkey Mike Finlay.
Meanwhile, back at the turkey ranch,
incredibly ugly pung-faced blorgs were
making noises about restoring democracy to
the island rag.
"Back reaction (up against the wall),"
members of The Collective were heard to
proclaim.
"Fascism shall not pass. However, it
may write a supplement."
More developments later.
-.tv'**". Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 10, 1972
Thick skulls
We commend UBC administration
president Walter Gage, applied science dean
W. D. Finn and a large number of
engineering students for their stand against
Wednesday's racist engineering
undergraduate society newsletter.
While we do not believe the
administration has the right to "discipline"
the few people involved in publishing the
newsletter, we do think a principled stand
against ,EUS newsletter racism is long
overdue from all segments of the university
community.
That the venom of a small group of
engineers is now being directly aimed at
math prof George Bluman — the first man to
openly take a firm position against
newsletter "jokes" — only makes the
situation doubly intolerable.
It seems to us that the best course of
action on this matter is one that must come
from engineers themselves.
Those who object to the attitudes
expressed in the newsletter should change
this publication by working on it and thus
making their influence on its contents felt.
In addition, they should be talking to
the people responsible for the most recent
racist newsletters in an effort to get through
their thick skulls once and for all that racism
is not funny.
(And we hope these discussions will not
ignore the fact that sexism and right-wing
extremism are not funny either.)
Like Walter Gage, we assume the
university community supports a stand
against racism.
And we believe this includes the vast
majority of engineers.
Turkeys, No!
Belated congratulations to the 'Birds for
their basketball victory Saturday — without
it, the whole week could well have been
lined up against the wall and shot as an
all-round Bad Thing.
For starters, there were the egregious
potholes — growing bigger and more
numerous every day — in the SUB parking
lot.
Then there were the puddles, all over
the place, seeping through flimsy boots.
Probably a Socred plot.
And then the canned milk in the little
containers doled  out  by food  services to
those who daily attempt to dull the flavor of
cafeteria "coffee."
We hate canned milk. We loathe canned
milk. Especially month-old sour canned
milk. We can't stand it.
And the cracks too. The cracks that
keep getting wider in the walls of SUB, some
of them located in the corner where The
Ubyssey   has   its   offices.
And finally,to top it all off, the election
of two puce turkeys as Ubyssey co-editors.
Birnie, yes. Finlay, yes. Smith, yes.
Plommer, yes.
Turkeys, no.
Letters
Cohn
The following letter was sent
to anthropology-sociology
associate professor Werner Cohn
by the Union of Radical Social
Scientists
Dr. Cohn:
We have approached you on
two occasions to invite your
participation in a public forum on
the Biology and Sociology of
Race. Although commending us
on this worthwhile endeavor, you
consistently refused to take part
in anything more than a small
seminar. As we stated both times,
racism is an issue which
necessitates treatment in an open
and public manner. It cannot be
properly dealt with behind the
closed doors of the Angus
penthouse with only a select few
in attendance.
Particularly because your
published statements in Current
Anthropology (April-June, 1969,
and February, 1971 editions) and
your comments in the classroom
have occurred in a manner which
seriously   limits   contention  and
which are determined at your
convenience, we feel you have a
moral responsibility to the people
and to the science to present your
ideas and defend them in an open
forum.
We sincerely want your
attendance at this public forum in
order to insure that your views
will not be misrepresented. As
you are aware, we have serious
criticisms about the moral and
scientific bases of your work and
we intend to put forward these
criticisms publically with or
without your attendance.
An immediate response is
requested.
Union of Radical
Social Scientists.
Court
Dear Grant:
Your request, through your
letter of Feb. 29 for the LSA
executive to propose 10 names for
students' court has sparked some
controversy here at the law
school. Specifically, the restricted
composition of the court has been
questioned.
THE UBYSSEY
MARCH 10,1972
Published Tuesdays, 1 hursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,    228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
^i
Masses massed around Jan O'Brien and John Andersen who
volunteered to type 'tween classes in turkeyish style. That's where they
belong, muttered Al Birnie who joined Mike Finlay and Nate Smith in a
tap dance behind the door. "Quit pinching, you sexist asshole." Leslie
Plommer belched at Mike Sasges. Kini McDonald claimed she was elected
chief robot by a majority of Berton Woodward, but was quickly
outnumbered by Vaughn Palmer who jumped to Denny Sekue's defence.
Conrad Winkelman set up a waffle faction joined by John Twigg and Mike
Gidora, but Dick Betts ruled them out of order. Kathy Carney complained,
"This is no way to run a capitalist state." and wallowed in Gord Gibson
with Lesley Krueger. Kent Spencer was elected head garbage booster while
Jim Adams was appointed his assistant. Gobble, said Paul Knox to Sandy
Kass.
In light of the recent conduct
of the court in considering the
validity of the AMS election, the
wisdom of having only law
students sit on the court appears,
at best, in doubt. For this reason
and many others, but particularly
because the issues to be decided
by the court affect not only law
students but the entire student
body of this campus, it is the
feeling of the majority of the LSA
executive, and this feeling formed
the consensus of opinion at the
most recent LSA general meeting,
that the members of the court
should not be chosen solely from
the law school but rather should
represent a cross-section of the
student body.
Pursuant to this feeling we
cannot recommend to you more
than the minimum three names
which we understand is required
by the AMS constitution. We
include the name of an alternate,
should one of the named students
be unable to sit on the court at
any particular time. This provision
of the constitution we would even
question for we feel that if we
must have law student
representation on the court, one
out of five would be more than
sufficient.
We realize that it was your
desire to see 10 names proposed
but we have restricted this
number in the hope that the
possibility of cross-campus
membership on the students'
court be considered. In essence,
the majority of the LSA executive
sees no reason why law students
should be considered more
qualified to decide on issues
affecting all students.
What we would like to see is no
more of the ego-tripping, Perry
Mason-type, fiascos conducted
solely by law students, but rather
a rational cross-section of campus
arriving at decisions on the issues.
"Kikes, gooks, niggers, chinks.. . we're
not racist, we offend 'em all equally."
It is not our desire to make the
students' court a microcosm of
the political games played on this
campus, however, we feel in
broadening the membership of
students' court we can go some
distance in arriving at a
decision-making body, free from
the very restrictive legalese
hang-ups that seem to be inherent
in total law student membership.
We would hope that this
question be opened for public
discussion even to the point of
delaying selection of the members
of the students' court until such
time as all interested parties on
campus have had the opportunity
to express their opinions. We
realize that time is limited, for as
you pointed out the membership
of students' court was to be
decided at a meeting of the
incoming and outgoing AMS
council which we understood was
to be held Wednesday, March 8,
1972.
We feel, however, that this
issue is one of sufficient
importance to delay such a
meeting for at least a week in
order that it may be considered
-adequately.
Bill Wilson,
President, L.S.A.
on the AMS discipline committee
(which acts as a preliminary
screening body for the student^
court), I would hope that students
who are interested in serving on
this committee might also forward
their name, etc, by Tuesday.
Courtingly,
Grant D. Burnyeat,
President,
Alma Mater Society.
Women
More
In view of the fact that the
Law Students' Association has
decided that they will not
recommend for student council's
consideration, a full slate of law
students for student court (as was
requested in my letter to L.S.A.
president Bill Wilson), I would
like to request, at this time, that
any students who are interested in
serving on student court submit
their name, address, phone
number, faculty and year, to my
office by Tuesday, March 14th.
As there are also four openings
Women's Week is a fine idea;
the Tuesday issue of The Ubyssey
made interesting, thought-
provoking reading. However, I
find most articles and interviews
on the subject of women are
lacking in one important area.
You speak of women in
politics, sports, and the arts;"
women as teachers and secretaries;
women fighting to overcome the
'traditional' in traditional roles.
But what of women in science?
No, not just female doctors,
which may well merely be a
refinement of woman's service
role, but the pure and theoretical
sciences.
What of women as researchers
and professors in these fields?
Certainly they are few in number.
Their numbers will continue to
decline unless young women in
high schools or as first-year
students are made aware of the
possibilities in science.
I would like to see interviews
with several UBC professors (Dr.
Betty Howard, Physicist; Dr.
Janet Stein, oceanographer; Dr.
Julia Levy, microbiologist, for
example). Their achievements are
remarkable; even more so because
of the prejudices they have faced
in order to attain them. They have
served as inspiration for me.
Perhaps they can do the same for*
others.
Other    interesting   interviews
See page 13: LETTERS 0393672 qfi dj (g&ltoigfetf
The wretched excesses perpetuated by
the Canadian news media during the
Quebec crisis of October 1970 have now
been well-documented. We all remember
the totally1 false "Women and children
next" story which hit the nation's
headlines shortly after the kidnapping of
James Cross, and the non-analytical way
in which newspapers, radio and television
newscasts referred to "terrorists",
"anarchists" and so on.
But as the similar crisis in Ireland, an
ocean away, has deepened during the past
three years, what similar distortions are
we being subjected to without the benefit
of better, if not exactly first-hand,
knowledge of the situation? How many
"Five die in Ulster terror" reports do we
read and uncritically absorb, allowing a
false consciousness of events and
processes to color our perception?
The struggle of the Catholic minority
in Ulster is an anti-colonialist struggle
which resembles in many respects that of
the American black or the Quebecois.
There is now a long overdue book which
helps us to understand both the origins of
the subjugation of Ulster Catholics and
the sequence of events which has led
from civil rights marches in the late
sixties to the carnage and urban guerrilla
warfare of 1972.
That book is Divided Ulster (Penguin,
$1.65), written and revised last year by
Liam de Paor, a history lecturer in Dublin
and the author of several books in Irish
history. "In Northern Ireland," the book
begins, "Catholics are blacks who happen
to have white skins. This is not a truth. It
is an oversimplification and too facile an
analogy. But it is a better
oversimplification than that which sees
the struggle and conflict in Northern
Ireland in terms of religion ... The
Northern Ireland problem is a colonial
problem ..."
Rarely do we think of Ireland in these
terms, as an adjunct of the British empire
in the same way that India and Canada
were. But the fact, as de Paor recounts, is
that while Sir Walter Raleigh was crossing
the Atlantic to colonize Virginia, several
operations of the same kind were being
carried out across the Irish Sea. The
Anglican settlers who worked the Ulster
plantations, together with Scottish
Presbyterians who emigrated from their
native land at the same time, were the
ancestors of today's Ulster Protestants.
From the outset it was clear that the
policy of the British government with
regard to the indigenous Irishmen, who
mK    V  **■■ t      <* .
had been followers of the church of
Rome since the fifth century, was to
separate them from the colonists and
employ them as temporary cheap labor,
when they were not forced to scrape
what meagre living they could out of the
little land that was left to them.
The rule of the British over the entire
island was confirmed in the victory of
William Ill's armies over those of the
deposed British James II in 1689. It took
250 years for the Irish to finally shake off
British control ov§r three-quarters of the
island. The modern history of the Ulster
conflict begins with the division after the
First World War of Ireland into Northern
Ireland,    a    province    of   the   United
Kingdon, and independent Eire.
The apparent division of colonial
societies along religious or ethnic lines
was, of course, a feature of the British
empire. The conflict between Hindus and
Moslems in India and Pakistan is the
classic example of this. But just as the
economic basis of religious independence
in 1948 (and as the economic realities of
the Canada-Quebec relationship have
become clearer too), so in Ulster the
economic disenfranchisement, with
accompanying political impotence, of the
Catholic minority can now be identified
as the root of the problem.
For it was the largely Protestant ruling
class in Ulster which owned the land,
which was the beneficiary of the
industrial revolution. As de Paor shows, it
maintained its supremacy through the
denying of political and administrative
offices to Catholics through
gerrymandering and religious
discrimination in appointments.
At first, during the twenties and
thirties, the reaction to this inequality
often took the form of combined
Protestant and Catholic working-class
action. Since this drove at the raison
d'etre of the state of Ulster,
divide-and-rule tactics were adopted — in
de Paor's words, "the incitement of
sectarian fears was a proven weapon of
division to counteract the dangerous
tendency towards solidarity among the
urban workers."
Similarly, the civil rights movement of
the mid-sixties was initially non-sectarian
agitation which included significant
Protestant factions. But right-wing
Protestant groups, led by the sometimes
open, always tacit support of the police,
tried with a good deal of success to
"categorize the demand for civil rights as
a Catholic agitation, and to attempt to
force the campaign for democracy back
into the sectarian mould."
In the violence of the last three years,
centuries of demagoguery have
culminated in what can only be described
as anti-Catholic pogroms. Yet, as Divided
Ulster emphasizes, Catholic leaders such
as Eamonn McCann and Bernadette
Devlin remain committed not to Catholic
participation in the free-enterprise state
of Ulster but to the establishment of a
socialist state in which Protestant and
Catholic workers alike have power.
De Paor's 1971 revision of his book
came too early to effectively analyze the
leadership position of the Irish
Republican Army in the Ulster struggle.
There is also no discussion of the role of
terrorism and urban guerrilla warfare.
Indeed, the last chapter seems to end in
mid-air, as if the writer had stopped in
the middle of a paragraph to catch a radio
bulletin of the latest development.
Hopefully, there will be a sequel or a
further revision, for de Paor's portrayal of
the political forces at work strips the
dross and emotionalism from other
accounts of the Ulster situation and
makes it much easier to understand the
daily unfolding of events.
—Paul Knox
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 10, 1972 J the News That's
Fit to Print."
Sflrje $etoi Jj#xk Sim*^
THE WEATHER
UuMtM. »K__ r.d.. Udaj;   Trnm.
Mmy raht. dwriiit tetar; frss>l_
VOL.    LXX....N0.   22,948.
NEW   YORK,   MONDAY,   NOVEMBER   22,    1920.
TWO CENTS  i°nS USSftSSBHB35_"
OFFICERS' LODGINGS INVADED IN DUBLIN, FOUR TEEN KILLED;
POLICE FIRE ON CROWD AT ATHLETIC PARK, KILLING TEN;
GOVERNMENT TO SEND TROOP REINFORCEMENTS TO IRELAND
UTHDAHIANS ASK
LEAGUE TOCfflffl.
Fm BY POUND
KoWy ttomNy That They Art
Bring Attack«f by Fifteen
DhMom.
W. D. Vanderlip Seeks Soviet Recognition;
Assails Wilton's Administration as "Idiotic'
Cavrrifhl.  _.•*_>, br Tha Clilctf* Trlbun* On.
-LONDON. Nov. 21.-WtablBftOB D.
VudwUp, r«pre_KDUUr« of m. croup of
Pfttifte CotM capUAllrt* who Juat hu
«c«nl_rad ma Iidiimiim concoMien In E*M>
n abort* from Sovtat HumU, Ull* rm
a r^Mt aunp*l*n I* aurtlnc In tha
United State* to Indue* Con*r*M to ree-
<>■_____.*• Md r*op«n trad* wit* Rua_Ma.
" Pratfdmt Wltaon now la ■ndMvorlng
to talk trada with Rnaala br anfflBaar-
1ns * Boliihavlat aeara In tha Unltad
•Utaa. If ____• suooaeda ta boodwlnklaf
Uw poblle, tt will tw a. moat eotoaaal
aail a flttta* dim** to tba moat
aara  Mr.   Vaa-
tba American  people,
derlip.
" Enclaad haa a thouaandfold mora
rvaaona to'faar oommu&lam; rat aba baa
hat accaptad a trada asraanaot with
Ruaala. Will Concrsaa rafuaa tba trada
of a Ml lion dollara yearly whan oiar Industrie* are dacllnlnc mapaljr bacauaa of
tha (rouftdlcaa ftar of a ravolutMnaTT
•antlmtnt which la non-axlatant?
" The Rad laadara mada an otter to
Mr. Wllaoa fourtaan mon tha a_yo to
withdraw *n propaganda from America
o* a raaumatlon of normal rotations.
It la IncenealTabla that America. abauM
"   ""     &*	
CALI FOR STERN MEASURES
London Press, Indignant
at Outrages, Demands
Vindication of Law.
GOVERNMENT  IS  ATTACKED
Outbreak tht "Culmination of
Murdwfoui WlekediMw" on
DutmtJMtnKUi
Ttn Htm Limerick
DUBLIN, Nov. 21.-Michael Blaka
and JiBMt O'Neill wara ahot and
klllad oar Limerick laat nlvht by
dlarulacd man. wbo bald up tha
motor In which the two wara rldlnc
to their homea from Limerick Junction,
Patrick Blaka. a brother of Michael.
and O'Neill wara MQtilttad by a
co art-martial In July, and It la believed tha attack waa tha outcome of
thla trial.
When the automobile waa (topped.
the attacklnc party demanded If a
man named Blake waa prcaent.
Michael aaeweredSn tha affirmative
and. waa \#ho* dead. CMein at-
bat hi* body waa
ALL SLAIN AT FIXED HOUR
Gangs Shoot Down Court
•   Martial Officials in
Their Homes.
TWO   KILLED   IN   *   HOTEL
Another Shot Down More Hit
Large Reinforcements of Troops for Ireland;
Shooting Begins Again at Night in- Dublin
LONDON, Nov. 22.-Th« D.i.y M.il nys th.t .nuftimnU
■re und«r w.y to send larfe reinforeeme-1* of troops to Ireland and
Uiat the opinion is held in official quarters that the danger of as-
eMaiuUra la spreadis* to England.
Fire broke out in Dublin this evening in various plates, says tha
Dublin correspondent of The Daily Mail. Twelve nurses were among
those arrested today.
DUBLIN, Nov. 21 {Associated Press).—Shooting began again
in the streets just before midnight, and a number of people are
reported killed.   There is much military activity.
Tbe casualties in Croke Park are aemi-officially given as 10
kiltod nd U Injured. 11 seriously. ^*~~^mmmmm~—
By MICHAEL MYERSON
First of three articles
The Guardian
Dating from 1155, when
Pope Adrian IV, an
Englishman, granted Ireland
"an inheritance" to England's
King Henry II, the spirit of
revolution has gripped the Irish
nation.
It was James Joyce who said
history was a nightmare he was
trying to wake from and the
past 800 years have seen much
of Ireland, fully awake, try to
drive that nightmare from its
shores.
On Sept. 1, 1913, Lenin
wrote: "Dublin, the capital of
Ireland — a city of not a highly
industrial type, with a
population of half a million —
the class struggle, which
permeates the whole life of
capitalist society everywhere,
was becoming accentuated to
the point of class war. The
police have positively gone
wild; drunken policemen
assault peaceful workers, break
into houses, torment the aged,
women and children. Hundreds
of workers (over 400) have
been injured and two killed -
such are the casualties of this
war. All prominent leaders of
the workers have been arrested.
People are thrown into prison
for making the most peaceful
speeches. The city is like an
armed camp."
This remarkable description
applies today almost verbatim
- with only a couple of
exceptions — to Belfast.
Ireland's second city and the
scene of sporadic urban
warfare for the past two and a
half years.
In recent years, among
Western capitalist countries,
only the black liberation
movement in the U.S. and the
May-June 1968 events in
France have received the
world-wide attention accorded
the revolutionary movement in
Ireland. But the Irish struggle
bears    few    resemblances   to
given away for as little as a few
cents an acre to Scotsmen
crossing over the St. George's
Channel.
These   Scotsmen   pacifying
the  North were kin to those
The struggle
in Ireland
those of black Americans or
the French workers and
students; the former is a
culmination of eight centuries
of anticolonial struggle,
including armed struggle. As
Britain's first colony, Ireland
was the first country to
develop a national liberation
movement.
Ireland was studied in detail
by Marx and Engels and the
latter began a never-to-be-
completed history of that
country. Lenin watched
Ireland closely and gathered
from its struggle many lessons
for his teachings on the
national question and the right
of nations to self-determination.
Eight centuries ago, in
1169, the English first began
their empire, by invading
Ireland. It may prove one of
history's ironies should Ireland
bring the final sunset to Pax
Britania. By the time James I
took the throne in 1603, a
dozen Irish uprisings had
already been suppressed,
especially in Ulster, the
northeast quarter of Ireland.
Ulstermen were fierce in
fighting the English, but after
defeat they were forced to
move south and their land was
colonizing North America,
particularly in the South, with
guns and bibles. They sided, of
course, with Protestant William
of Orange in his war for the
British crown against Catholic
James II. Catholics forced from
their land rose up to slaughter
the settlers, as their North
American Indian counterparts
did later — with much the same
results.
In 1689, the apprentice
boys of Derry (still referred to
today by the British as
Londonderry) closed the gates
of the city to the Catholics, to
insure Billy's defeat of James
at the Boyne River. By then,
less than 5 per cent of Ireland's
20 million acres were still in
Catholic hands. The Irish were
tenants of English and
Protestant landlords. When
William won, economic
exploitation of the south of
Ireland began in earnest.
Economic motives replaced
religion, as England, by
exporting its industrial
revolution to Ulster only, made
the rest of Ireland poorer and
accentuated the differences
with the North.
Peculiarly, it was in the
North that the first conscious
Irish     republican     movement
began. Outside Belfast, Wolfe
Tone, a Protestant, formed the
United Irishmen, which was
closely associated with the
Freemasons; in fact, many
Masonic lodges served as
revolutionary committees,
under the influence of the
North American and French
revolutions, the United
Irishmen rose against the
crown in 1798, as Wolfe Tone
announced: "We must replace
the names of Catholic,
Protestant and dissenter with
the common name of
Irishman." Not since then,
until recently, has the
possibility arisen for Catholics
and Protestants to fight in
common against British
domination.
English imperialist control
of Ireland had its predictable
results. With an absentee
landlord class in ownership, the
country was reduced to a
one-crop economy. Disaster hit
in 1845-50 with the great
potato famine. Not until 6
million Jews and 20 million
Soviet citizens perished under
Nazi onslaughts did a European
nation suffer as did Ireland in
that period. Ireland had a
population of 8 million when
the famine began; when it was
over, only half that number
remained. One million had
perished and 3 million had
emigrated.
Repression in the homeland
forced the - Fenian (Irish
republican) movement to
organize in secret. In the
campaign against the brutal
treatment of Fenian political
prisoners, the International
Workingmen's Association
played a leading part. Marx's
daughter,    Eleanor    Aveling,
Continued pf 4
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Friday, March 10, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
Thea Koerner House
The Graduate Student Centre
The Annual General Meeting will be held on Thursday, March 16,
1972 at 12:30 p.m. in the Ballroom at the Centre.
All Members are invited to attend.
Where's your HAIR at?
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2244636 - 9 a.m.-5;30 Mon.-Fri.      SUB Lower Floor -
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COST: Between $280.00 and $290.00
Any further reduction in fare will
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To join flight and for information please contact:
Education Extension Programs World Wide International
Centre for Continuing Education Travel Ltd.
University of British Columbia OR    5700 University Boulevard
Vancouver 8, B.C. Vancouver 8, B.C.
Telephone 228-2181, local 220 Telephone 224-4391
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Continued from pf 3
publicized to the world the
conditions under which the
prisoners were forced to live.
At the end of the 19th
century, the Irish Republican
Brotherhood was formed. Its
object: independence through
"physical force" — the term
used in Ireland for armed
struggle.     Simultaneously,
whose industries were financed
from London. The Orange
Order named for William of
Orange, had long been (and
remains today) the dominant
political organization among
reactionary Protestant
Ulstermen.
With the Home Rule threat,
Randolph Churchill, father of
Sir  Winston,   announced that
nine counties of Ulster. British
Tories offered their full
support.
In 1910 James Connolly
returned to Ireland from New
York, where he had organized
the Irish Socialist Federation.
He soon became the general
secretary of the Irish Transport
and General Workers' Union
which    he    had    helped    to
"I suggest we handle this as the Americans would . .. locate the lieutenant in charge and court-martial
him!"
cultural organizations like the
Gaelic League, built to
maintain Irish traditions
against British cultural
imperialism, gave rise to Sinn
Fein, originally a parliamentary
organization for Home Rule.
When, in 1912, Britain's
Liberals got Home Rule passed
by the House of Commons, the
House of Lords, under
Conservative influence,
correctly understood that to
lose Ireland meant the
beginning of dissolution of the
empire. Moreover, Irish Home
Rule spelled defeat for
conservative Ulster Protestants,
"the Orange card is the one to
play." Heeding the call, some
200,000 Ulstermen pledged to
use "all means" to defeat
Home Rule, which to them
meant "Rome Rule." Lord
Randolph, minor poet as well
as politician of similar
dimensions, cried: "Ulster will
fight, Ulster will be right."
Armed gangs of Unionists (the
political party run by the
Orange Order) formed the
Ulster Volunteers to resist
Home Rule by force. Using
smuggled German arms, the
Volunteers attempted to set up
a provisional government in the
organize. Connolly's trade
union movement formed the
Irish Citizens Army to defend
striking workers from police
attacks and to fight for an
independent socialist Irish
Workers' Republic. This was
the first Workers' Army in
Western Europe in the 20th
century.
Meanwhile, the Irish
Republican Brotherhood, in
response to the Ulster
Volunteers, was organizing its
own Irish Volunteers, with
help from the Irish in the
United States. When the First
Continued pf 5
All Graduating Class Members
GRAD CLASS MEETING
TUESDAY, MARCH 14—12:30 NOON
S.U.B. AUDITORIUM
This meeting will be held such that each organization seeking subsidy from the
Grad Class Gift may present their proposals directly to the members of the Grad Class.
A short discussion period will be held after each presentation.
APPLICANTS:     SEDGEWICK LIBRARY     CANADIAN WOMAN E.C.O.
UNIV. DAYCARE URBAN VEHICLE CRANE LIBRARY
LIONEL THOMAS MENTAL PATIENTS ASSN.      SPEAK EASY
Voting will be done by a preferential ballot on
WEDNESDAY, MARCH  15. between   10:00 a.m. and 4.00 p.m.
Nine Balloting Stations will be set up around campus.
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, March  10,  1972 Continued from pf 4
World War broke out,
Unionists in the North rushed
to support the British crown.
Some Sinn Feiners argued that
the Irish Volunteers should
join British forces. Rebuffed,
they attempted to form the
National Volunteers, which
lasted only a bit longer than
the CIA "volunteers" at Playa
Giron a half-century later. The
whole of Connolly's Citizens'
Army and the 12,000 Irish
Volunteers refused to join
Britain, on the premise that,
"We serve neither King nor
Kaiser, but Ireland."
British conscription of the
Irish was never attempted.
Connolly's attitude toward the
imperialist war, like Lenin's,
was unambiguous. Just a few
days after Britain's entrance he
wrote: "Should the working
class of Europe, rather than
slaughter each other for the
benefit of kings and financiers,
proceed tomorrow to erect
barricades all over Europe, to
break up bridges and destroy
the transport service that war
might be abolished, we should
be perfectly justified in
following such a glorious
example and contributing our
aid to the final dethronement
of the vulture classes that rob
and rule the world."
In 1916, the Irish
Republican Brotherhood and
her military organizations, the
Irish Volunteers and Citizens
Army, proclaimed the
founding   of   the   Provisional
Government of the Irish
Republic. As bells tolled,
bringing the faithful to mass
that Easter, thunderous
explosions shook the streets of
Dublin. The Union Jack was
lowered at the post office, the
tricolor Republican flag raised
in its place. The Easter Rising
was on, under the military
leadership of James Connolly.
A week later, the flower of
Republican youth lay dead in
the streets, its leadership
executed by the colonial
troops. After holding superior
British forces at bay for a
week, Connolly was wounded.
Propped up in bed for
court-martial, he was shot
sitting in a chair May 12, 1916.
Continued pf 6
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CHARTER FLIGHTS
ja       RETURN FLIGHTS
[0)1 <1 VANCOUVER - LONDON - VANCOUVER
o'G   J MAY 1-AUG. 25 $250.00
MAY 2-JUNE 26     250.00
d?\ MAY 10-SEPT. 3       250.00
wl MAY 15-AUG. 25    250.00
MAY 28-JULY 14    250.00
ONE-WAY FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER - LONDON
MAY 15 $145.00
SEPT. 7     145.00
SEPT. 11     145.00
EDMONTON - LONDON
MAY 15 $140.00
CALGARY.- LONDON
SEPT. 30 $140.00
STUDENT GUIDE TO EUROPE
NOW ON SALE $1.95
EURAIL AND BRITRAIL PASSES AND "i
INTRA-EUROPEAN FLIGHTS NOW BOOKING       K
AMS Travel Office Room 226 SUB
OPEN - 1:00-4 P.M. Mon.   Thurs. - 1:00 - 3 P.M. Fri.
Phone 228-2980
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
RESIDENTIAL FRENCH LANGUAGE
BURSARY PROGRAM— SUMMER 1972
The Centre for Continuing Education of the University of
British Columbia is offering two residential programs in French
as part of the Secretary of State Summer Language Bursary
Program for Canadian students.
SESSIONS: MAY 22 - JUNE 30
and JULY 10 - AUGUST 18
Bursaries will cover tuition fees, as well as the cost of room and board,
for the duration of the six week program. Students must pay their travel
expenses.
Students who wish to apply for bursaries should write to:
LANGUAGE INSTITUTE
CENTRE for CONTINUING EDUCATION
University of British Columbia Vancouver 8, B.C.
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WEEKDAYS-9 A.M.-9 P.M.     Sat. 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARYl
327-0461
Page Friday. 5
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 10, 1972 TRAVELl
CHARTER
Official representatives for travel to the U.S.S.R.
and Eastern Europe. Arrangements made for attendance  at scientific and educational conferences.
HAGEN'S TRAVEL SERVICE
2996 West Broadway - 736-5651
HAGEN'S
Tit        O
^Jhe (L-xciL
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LIMITED
Granville of Pender Since 1904
300.00
30.00
GIVE A
DAMN
PLEASE. The AMS is desperately looking for students who are concerned
about U.B.C. and what's going on here. Not just concerned enough to sit
and rap about the system. .. but concerned enough to devote some
time . . . and maybe bring about some genuine improvements.
Don't just laugh. Don't pass the buck . . . yet. It may be naive, but we
would like to hope that out of 22,000 students, maybe, just maybe. . .
there is someone . . . willing to help.
We're not looking for special skills. Not even experience. We're looking for
interest and concern.
Phone us and ask questions (228-3967). Or come and talk to someone
(SUB 248). Please.
Our special concern right now is Committee members. . . WAIT! Don't
shudder and throw conniptions. Committees aren't as bad as they sound.
And they are vital.
FOR EXAMPLE:
SPECIAL EVENTS organizes special student events on campus.
Poetry readings, guest speakers, special programmes etc. It's worth a
little of your time and energy, or FROSH ORIENTATION ... if
you were (are) ever lost out here... if you can remember what it
was like to be caught in a storm or a desert (or however it hit
you) .. . then show a little empathy. You can probably help. OPEN
HOUSE is next year. Enough said.
And there are also the following;
Education Committee
Canadian University Service Overseas
Community Visitation Committee
Homecoming Committee
Intramurals Committee
World University Service Committee
(DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS EXTENDED TO MARCH 22nd)
Think about it at least. If Committees leave you cold, there are other ways
to help.
SUB 248—228-3967
If You'll Work For Love,
Not Money
Come and Talk With Us
Continued from pf 5
He remains today Ireland's
most important revolutionary
martyr.
The Easter Rising was the
first revolutionary armed
struggle in Europe since the
Moscow Uprising 11 years
earlier. It is not without
significance that Connolly's
first military writing was an
examination of the Moscow
battle. Nor is it unimportant
that both uprising were
condemned by European
socialists as "putsches" and
defended against that charge
by Lenin. Unfortunately
Connolly did not have access
to Lenin's article on "The
Lessons of the Moscow
Uprising," in which he writes:
"Military tactics depend on the
level of military technique.
This plain truth was dinned
into the ears of Marxists by
Engels. Military technique now
is not the same as it was in the
middle of the 19th century. It
would be folly for crowds to
contend against artillery and
defend barricades with
revolvers."
New tactics were evolved
from the Moscow Uprising:
"The tactics were the tactics of
guerrilla warfare. The
organization which such tactics
demanded is  that  of mobile
and exceedingly small
detachments: 10-, three-or
even two-man detachments."
Lenin warned against "ignoring
the new question of tactics and
organization called forth by
street fighting under the
conditions imposed by modern
military technique." Connolly,
Ireland's greatest Marxist who
always saw the need to
contend for power, subscribed
in his writings and his life's
work to Engels' dictum that
"fighting is to war what cash
payment is to trade."
The crushing of the Easter
Rising of 1916 far from ended
the Irish Republic. As the
Moncada assault on July 26,
1953, on first appearance a
defeat, in fact launched the
victorious Cuban revolution, so
the Easter Rising gave birth to
the political independence of
most of Ireland. By 1918, the
Sinn Fein elected 70 of
Ireland's 107 members of the
British Parliament on a
platform of immediate
independence. Refusing to take
their seats at Westminister, the
Sinn Feiners remained in
Dublin as the national
assembly of an independent
Irish Republic. They set up the
Dail Eireann (Irish Parliament)
with its own courts and its own
army,   the   Irish   Republican
Army (IRA).
For the next three years the
IRA waged full-scale guerilla
war against the British. Because
of the large Irish immigration
to the U.S., the Republic
fostered hopes, quickly dashed,
of recognition from
Washington. The new
revolutionary Soviet
government, itself only
recently in power, became the
first government to recognize
the Irish Republic. In turn, the
Republican Parliament in
Dublin was the first to
recognize the Soviet. For years
the Romanoffs imperial crown
jewels lay in government vaults
in Dublin, security for a loan
given the Soviet Union by the
Irish.
British Prime Minister David
Lloyd George finally imposed a
settlement in 1920 which
recognized the "Irish Free
State", but separated from the
rest of Ireland six of the nine
counties of Ulster, granting
them a pseudo-parliament of
their own in Stormont and
representation at Westminster.
Ulster Protestants did not like
the scheme because it was
Home Rule, but it was better,
they figured, than being ruled
from   Dublin.
(Continued Next Week)
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Special Discount to U.B.C. Students
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Page Friday, 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March  10,  1972 The Enemy by Felix Greene —
Vintage Books.
This is a book about
capitalist imperialism. It
demonstrates that it exists,
shows how it develops, tells us
why it is harmful and suggests
how we can work to eliminate
it. The book attempts to
analyze American imperialism
and succeeds with no sacrifice
in style or lack of immediate
relevance to practical
problems.
Greene chose the United
States as a model of an
imperialist power, not because
he hates America, but because
it is the largest and most
flagrant example of the
excesses of capitalistic
imperialism    in    the    world.
Greene develops his thesis in
a well organized manner that
quickly leads us to the central
problem, that of capitalism in
modern technological society.
The capitalist "growth ethic" is
shown to inevitably lead to the
need for overseas markets and
supplies of raw materials. From
those two simple needs the
whole mess of imperialism
develops.
Greene presents a short
historical development of
imperialism and then plunges
directly into examples of
imperialism in our world. This
is done by the use of case
histories; that of the United
Fruit Company in Guatemala
being an especially good one.
From 1952 to 1954 Guatemala
had a liberal democratic
president who was willing to
implement some much needed
land reforms. Part of these
reforms was the expropriation
of some unused United Fruit
land; it was paid for at the
value set by United Fruit for
taxation purposes. In 1954 a
Guatemalan army colonel
instigated    a    coup    with
American arms, planes and
pilots. One of his first acts in
power was to return United
Fruit's land. Was it an accident
that John Foster Dulles, U.S.
secretary of state at the time,
was   legal   adviser   to   United
''Don't forget, there
are two hundred
million of us in a
world of three
billion. They want
what we've got
- and we're not
going to give it
to them!" - LBJ
Fruit and that the head of the
CIA had been president of
United Fruit? The book is full
of details of this kind that flesh
out the bare theory of
imperialism.
Greene's writing is
fast-paced and exciting. I'd
recommend the book merely
for the liveliness of the writing
(Greene is also a film maker,
which gives him an eye for the
dramatic) but fortunately 4t is
also well documented. Greene
not only tells us what happens,
but also why it happens, and
what should be done - it
doesn't leave you hanging like
so many "documentary"
books.
My criticisms of the book
are minor, they deal with
perhaps three pages of a 380
page book. First, Greene's
reconstruction of twentieth
century    history    is    rather
painful. He's trying to fit all of
the twentieth century into on
Marxist trunk and
unfortunately some of the
arms and legs keep popping out
when he tries to close the lid.
For instance the
Soviet-German non-aggression
pact is completely ignored —
presumably because it would
be awkward to explain in the
space he had available.
Secondly Greene seems unable
to come to terms with
marijuana and what he calls
"casual sexual encounters".
Some of his criticism is valid —
after all, a person whose only
interests are "screwing and
grooving" isn't of much use to
a mass movement, yet I feel
that Greene (who must be in
his fifties) has missed much of
the effect that illicit dope use
and sexual liberation have had
on the development of a
revolutionary consciousness in
America. But these are niggling
criticisms; the book is an
excellent introduction to
American imperialism in 1972.
The Enemy is subtitled
What Every American Should
Know About Imperialism and
it is aimed at an American
readership. So after reading the
last section which urges the
reader to action I though,
"Yup — I sure hope those
Americans get their asses in
gear ...". But wait — before
we let the Americans do it all
for us let's remember that
we're in a doubly unfortunate
position. Sure we're being
exploited by Amerika but at
the same time our own
corporations run an empire in
the Caribbean. Remember too
that our very own Alcan is
helping Portugese racists to
build a dam in Mozambique to
provde power for South Africa.
It's about time we got our asses
in gear.
—Konrad Mauch
50c
SUB Theatre
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
Friday & Saturday
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday-7:00
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
... For Glaum
for that smart look in glasses...
leek to
PtescUption Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
j
on
PIZZARAMA
Mow on the campus "in U.B.C. Village
at £136 Westernparkwau... phone
224-7013
A.M.S.
GENERAL MEETING
MARIJUANA AND BEHAVIOR
A discussion with John Yuille
of the UBC Psychology
Department
Friday, March 10— NOON
Angus 110
INTERNATIONAL FAIR AND DANCE, MARCH 10 & 11
lnternational=Between Nations
Displays and "Goodies"
from:
AFRICA, CARIBBEAN,
CHINA, GERMANY, ITALY,
JAPAN, MALAYSIA-SING.,
PAKISTAN, and SPAIN
Times: Fri. 4 to 10 p.m.
Sat. noon to 5 p.m.
Students — .50c, Faculty — .75c
THURSDAY,
MARCH 16th 12:30
SUNNY DAY: S.U.B. MALL
ORDINARY DAY: GYM
REPORTS (ONLY A FEW)
SPEECHES (NONE)
HARANGUES (USUAL NUMBER)
CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS (ONLY TWO)
AND
A BAND ("SUNSHINE")
4000 Students Needed for a Quorum
Friday, March 10, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 2294692
Friday, March 10, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 8 Friday, March  10, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
Letters
From page 4
would be with women grad
students in the physical and life
sciences. If the professors are
unwilling to speak out, then
surely some grad students would
talk about the problems of
entering an almost totally
male-dominated field.
Science has, in many ways,
shaped the present, and holds
important keys to our future. Are
women to sit placidly by and let
men continue to make most of
the important discoveries that will
be affecting us all? A little
inspiration from the media could
go a long way in changing this.
Brenda Guild,
Zoology 4.
We agree with your comments
and your suggestion is a good one.
All that is required is somebody
to do the sort of articles you have
in mind. If you or any of your
friends want to undertake the
project, feel free to submit the
results for publication.
Now
The publicity recently given to
the Women's Grievance Board
leaves me in some perplexity.
My English 200 instructor is a
woman with a forceful
personality. She often makes
remarks that imply the inferiority
of men, and her selections (when
there is a choice of items for the
reading list, as there is for the
novels) often support the same
notion. I suffer, therefore, from a
continuing attack, and a contempt
that, while it is not personal, does
include me at least by implication.
Tuesday's special issue talks
about not functioning in society
by mere sexual roleplaying, but
by being people. Is it too obvious
to ask that we start now?
Lome I. McKerlich,
Agriculture 3.
Club
In answer to the questions
raised by the unsigned letter in
the Thursday edition of The
Ubyssey:
(1) The AMS does not have an
account at the faculty club (nor
do any members of the executive
or any of the AMS employees,
staff, etc.). Any use of the club is
facilitated by the use of regular
AMS purchase orders which must
be checked by the AMS treasurer,
general manager and office
manager.
(2) The dinner in question was
held at no cost to the Alma Mater
Society.
(3) If you have any further
questions please direct them to
4444 W. 10TH
Xg^       228-8933
•
GENERAL
v-___-r^F,CT,0,V/
NEW*
AND
USED
TEXTS
STUDY
GUIDES ^&
POSTERS
me and/or the AMS treasurer,
David Dick. I would also
appreciate it if you might sign
your letters in the future.
Grant D. Burnyeat,
President,
Alma Mater Society.
Hydro
Besides being generally
dissatisfied with the efficiency of
the city transit system, I have a
very specific complaint to make.
Buses that wait — up to 10
minutes - in the UBC loop
generally leave their motors
running, spewing out unpleasant
exhaust fumes.
I approached two bus drivers
about this. The first who had the
motor on told me that he kept the
motor running in order to keep
the bus warm. I thought that a
rather weak excuse since a bus
would not cool off very much in
five or 10 minutes.
The other driver, who shut off
the motor as soon as he had
pulled into the loop, was both a
bit pleased that I would remark
on this and slightly puzzled since
(to quote him) "we're supposed
to shut it off anyway."
The regulations then seem to
be that while buses are waiting in
any loop, the motor is to be
turned off; very few drivers do
that.
I am asking B.C. Hydro to
enforce that regulation since it is
very annoying to have to breathe
the exhaust fumes of four (or
more) stationary buses.
R.B. Krause,
UBC graduate student
CRAPS!
The 1972 Grad Class Council has chosen CANDID
STUDIOS to be the official Graduation Portrait
Photographers.
You will receive a FREE sitting, proofs and one finished
4x5 color portrait.
Extra 4x5 color $2.95 ea. 5 x 7 $4.95 ea. 8 x 10 $5.95 ea.
or choose a package with savings up to 28%.
CANDID uses only. Ektacolor professional products for best
available quality. Satisfaction guaranteed. Free retakes if you
don't like your first set of proofs.
All gowns except Phd. are available at the studio. White
blouses, suits and ties are also on hand.
^™^ 3343  WEST   BROADWAY
VANCOUVER   8,   B.C. _.
Phone now for your appointment — 732-7446
A.M.S. GENERAL MEETING-MARCH 16-12:30
Constitutional Amendments
I. MOVEMENT OF "NON-CONTROVERSIAL
INTO THE A.M.S. CODE.
WHEREAS the Student Council has recommended that
certain 'procedural sections of the Alma Mater Society
By-Laws be removed and placed into the Alma Mater Society
Code:
Are you in favor of the following sections being removed
from the By-Laws and placed into the Code?
By-Law 4 (2), a section dealing with the appointment of
honorary members of Student Council;
By-Law  4   (4)   (2),   that   is  a   section   dealing with the
appointment of an Honorary President and his/her duties;
By-Law 10 (2) to 10 (7) that is sections dealing with the
procedure for the levying of a fee upon each member of an
undergraduate society;
By-Law 11 (9) and 11 (10), that is sections dealing with
procedure by which the Alma Mater Society Budget shall be
accepted and by which the A.M.S. Treasurer shall deal with
fees levied by Undergraduate Societies upon their members;
By-Law 12 (1) to 12 (3), that is sections dealing with
prohibition of gambling, the drinking of intoxicating liquors
and the approval of advertising and distribution of materials
on campus;
By-Law 14, that is a by-law setting out the procedure for
dealing with subsidiary clubs and organizations;
And all other changes necessarily incidental to the foregoing
amendments.
PARTS OF THE A.M.S. CONSTITUTION
Effect of the change:
Provisions which are presently in the A.M.S. Constitution
can only be changed by a vote of all students by means of a
referendum vote where the minimum vote must be about
4,000 voters. On the other hand, the A.M.S. Code can be
amended by a 2/3 rds vote of the Student Council. It is
proposed that certain "procedural" sections would be better
dealt with in the Code and this change would allow those
sections to be removed from the Constitution and placed in
the Code.
The sections involved in no way affect the basic operation
and organization of the A.M.S. but rather they are procedural
details which should be placed in the A.M.S. Code so that
changes as they become necessary can be made more easily.
A bi-partisan Constitutional Revisions Committee of
Council met to determine what "non-controversial" provisions
could be placed into the Code and their recommendations
were unanimously accepted by the Student Council which
now presents this change for your consideration.
This "housekeeping" change can facilitate a much more
instant response to the changing needs of administrative detail
and you are urged to vote YES for these changes at the
MARCH 16,1972 SPRING GENERAL MEETING.
II. CHANGE IN THE SELECTION OF THE EDITOR OF THE UBYSSEY BY-LAW 4(3)(i)
OF THE A.M.S. CONSTITUTION.
BY-LAW 4 (3) (i) NOW READS:
The Editor-in-Chief of the Ubyssey Editorial Board, who shall be an appointed and not an elected
member of the Council. He shall be appointed by a vote of the Incoming Students' Council before the
end of the spring term on the recommendations of the Editorial Board.
AMENDMENT WOULD REPLACE THAT WITH:
"The Editor-in-chief of the Ubyssey Editorial Board shall have successfully completed his/her first
year or its equivalent. He/she shall be elected in the same manner as the Executive of the Students'
Council."
III. REFERENDUM (NOT A CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE)
In view of the performance of The Ubyssey staff this year, are you in favor of a cut in the present
budget allotment of $36,500? Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March  10,  1972
Hot flashes
Experience
show starts
The Canadian Experience Art
Show will run from Monday to
Saturday in the SUB art gallery.
The gallery will be open from
10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Wednesday and Saturday
and from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Thursday and Friday.
Media course
A seven-week course on Mass
Media, the Individual and Society
will begin Thursday at the Inner
City Board Room, 1895 Venables.
The cost is $14 per student for
the course.
Panelists at the seminars will
discuss subjects like cablevision,
newspapers, radio and technical,
non-technical and social aspects of
communications.
Registration is currently taking    BfGOffli
place at the Centre for Continuing
Education.
country and study in an informal
atmosphere.
For further information,
students can contact Alam
Walworth at Box 1156, Reed
College, Portland, Oregon, 97202.
Informality
A group of students at Reed
College in Portland, Oregon are
setting up a combination summer
school-commune this summer on
the coast of Nova Scotia.
They are looking for 25
students who want to live in the
Breath is life, according to
Guru Janardan Paramahansa, who
claims to live on one hour of sleep
and four cups of tea a day.
He'll be explaining his methods
Tuesday at 8 p.m. in the SUB
auditorium.
Russia
'Tween classes
TODAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Final dinner meeting at El Matador,
3135 W. Broadway at 7 p.m.
GERMAN CLUB
Get together from 4 to 10 p.m. in
international   House   lower   lounge. •
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Discussion on student government:
Co-operation but not Castration to
take place at noon in SUB 111.
FINE ARTS
Stephen Straker of UBC history
department speaks on Duker's Art
and Kepler's Science in Lasserre 104
EDUCATION   COMMITTEE
Ian Adams on Politics of Poverty at
noon in SUB party room.
AUCM
Getaway weekend today, Saturday
and Sunday.. Phone 224-1614.
ENGINEERING INSTITUTE
OF CANADA
Talk and slides by Mordechai
Briemberg, recent visitor to
pre-Nixon China, at noon in Civil
engineering building room 201.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Interesting younger speaker from
Gordon Neighborhood House at
noon in SUB 130.
RADICAL UNION
Meeting at 8 p.m. at 1336 Maple.
Come or else. Refreshments
available.
SATURDAY
HILLEL CLUB
Film, A Tale of Two Cities starring
Ronald Colman at 8:30 in Hillel
House behind Brock. Beer and free
popcorn.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Mission of Church, from 10 a.m. on
at Lutheran Campus Centre.
DANCE CLUB
An educational group tour is
being planned for th|s May by Dr.
Fred Ustina, of the University of
Alberta at Edmonton math
department.
It will leave Montreal May 5
and return May 31.
Cost from Vancouver is $1,130
anf from Montreal is $1,021.
Air Canada in Vancouver has
further details.
Annual     Dance
general    dance,
ballroom.
GERMAN CLUB
Get together in
competetion    and
7    p.m.     in    SUB
nternational House
Hearing
lower  lounge from noon to 5 p.m.
SUNDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Folk   mass,    11   a.m.,   St.   Mark's
Chapel.
MONDAY
EDUCATION SA
J.    S.     Medley    of     B.C.    School
Trustees'   Assn.   speaks,   noon,  Ed.
100.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
General    meeting,    Len    Marchand
speaks, noon, SUB 125.
TUESDAY
TAICHI
Joint   hands   practice,   noon,   SUB
205.
HILLEL CLUB
Bet Cafe: kosher lunch, noon, Hillel
House behind Brock.
WEDNESDAY
DANCE CLUB
General   meeting:   everyone  attend,
noon, SUB party room.
Seattle city council has set
Friday, March 31 as a tentative
date for a public hearing into the
Seattle City Light and Power
Company proposal to build the
Ross Dam, which would flood
eight miles of Skagit Valley.
Details will be announced later.
€risis
Opportunities For Youth jobs
are up for grabs at the Vancouver
Crisis Centre, 3895 Albert Street,
Burnaby.
Applications to work with the
centre this summer can be had by
phoning Alex Blefare at
298-4496.
'De Sica returns to greatness"
-Cue Magazine
'BELONGS IN A CLASS WITH 'BICYCLE THIEF' AND 'SHOESHINE'."
—Liz Smith, Cosmopolitan Magazine
VITTORIO OF SICA'S
the Garden of the Finzi-Continis
Starring Dominique Sanda, Lino Capolicchio, Helmut Berger. Produced by Arthur Cohn and Gianni Hecht. in color, from Cinema 5
Winner Golden Bear Award, First Prize, 1971
Berlin Film Festival
Best Italian Motion Picture of the year, 1971, David of Donatello Award
Varsity
224-3730 V
4375 W. 10th
ENGLISH SUBTITLES
SHOWTIMES: 7:30,9:30
HILLTOP GULF
SERVICE
-  JOE     MIZSAK  -
Tune-Up Specialists For All Makes
Specializing in Repairs to
JAPANESE & EUROPEAN CARS
All Repairs Guaranteed - 4000 Miles or 90 Days
Student Special: 20% Discount off Labor Charges
4305 W. 10 Ave. at Discovery 224-7212
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Compos — 3 linos,  f   day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Cemmorclal - 3 lines,   1   day $1.2$; additional
Bros 30c; 4 days pric* of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and ate payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 «./»., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.V.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
INTERNATIONAL PAIR DANCE
Saturday 9-1, Seranaders Steel
Band & Streetligrht (Rock) Band
$1.50  I.H.	
POLKA PARTY: LAST ONE OF
the year. Friday March 17 IH.
8:00 p.m.  to 1:00 a.m.
Greetings
12
SUSAN ITS NICE JUST BEING
with you. I regret we never met
before.   LOVE  TOMA.
Lost & Found
13
LACE-UP SKI BOOTS WITH RET)
socks. Lost March 4 near 16th
on campus. Phone M. Feller, 224-
9818.
Rides ft Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
 SKI WHISTLER!	
Rent furnished  condominium  opposite Gondola,  224-0657 evea.
FILM EXPERIENCE? COULD BE
worth $1,000. Phone 684-4887 after
5   p.m.
INTERNATIONAL FAIR 4-10 FRI-
day,  noon  to  5  Saturday. I.H.
THRIVING DRESSMAKING AND
alteration business in White Rock
Shopping Centre, sells crochet
items, etc. on consignment. Terrific location, low rent, could
be expanded as boutique or craft
centre.   Mrs.   MacDonald   581-9326.
GESTALT, SENSORY AWARE-
ness — 1 day introductory workshop    —   Individual        Groups.
Psychologist.    One    year    Esalen.
929-3662   mornings.
LOOK    HERE
3    FOR    $1.00
Why pay this much for your
prophylactics? We will mail you
24 Assorted Prophylactics for
only $2.00, by return mail in
plain sealed envelope. Enclose
this ad for additional bonus of
3  prophylactics.
POSTTRADING
BOX  4002      VANCOUVER,   B.C.
Travel Opportunities
16
HONG KONG RETURN FROM
$550 up. Special homeland flights
for Chinese students, families.
Phone  684-8638.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
PERSONS WITH DEFECTIVE
colour vision to participate in an
experiment. Please call at Henry
Angus  12  D  228-2756.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
FOR SALE OR TRADE 64 VW
Window Van. Will accept 65 BUG
or better.  Phone  874-3729.	
  1965  SUNBEAM $225  	
Good running] condition. Very economical ideal for students. 684-
5763  evenings.
1961 AUSTIN CAMBRIDGE GOOD
running condition, city tested.
$275 ONO. Available 30th March.
Phone 224-1539.	
'62 PAIRLANE 500 NEW PAINT,
engine overhauled, very clean.
See and  make offer 943-1364.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Duplicating & Copying
34
Scandals
37
JOB INTERVIEW WORRYING
you?? Sea the experts at Corky's
Men's Hairstyling, 4th & Alma.
731-4717 — then  relax.
Typing
40
ESSAY   TYPING   19th   AND   DUNBAR.   733-5S22.
Typing—Cont.
40
EFFICIENT. ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.   Phone  263-5317.	
TYPING OF ESSAYS ETC 35f.
page.  Phone  224-0385 after  5 p.m.
TYPING DONE — I.B.M. ELEC-
tric — Elite type, essays, term
Papers, Thesis, etc. Stencils and
Mimeograph.   My   home   327-5381.
PROFESSIONAL BILINGUAL
typing, IBM Selectric. Open days
evenings, weekends Phone
Madeleine at 738-3827. Reasonable rates.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
•1
Work Wanted
32
INSTRUCTION ft SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
POT AT POTTER'S CENTRE! 12
week Spring session starts April
3, register early. Luaited enrollment.  GJ' Alfred, 261-4764.
Tutoring Service
63
WORRIED ABOUT EXAMS? THE
UBC Tutoring Center has tutors
in nearly every course. Register
in   SUB   228   12:00-2:00   weekdays.
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
PIONEER 3-MAN TRAIL PACK
tent $50. Black's Icelandic Special
(large) down si. bag $30. As new
Ph.   526-0105   after  6.	
MCB CRESCENT SPECIAL
(men's) Campagnolo gear, Reynold's tubing, brand new $175.
Offers, phone 266-9009.	
ENGLISH DRUM KIT. DOUBLE
side Toms on Ludwig Stand.
Cymbal, pedal, stands. Rod 876-
5406.
RENTALS ft REAL ESTATE
Rooms
II
ROOM, KITCHEN. $60/MO. ON
campus 5745 Agronomy Road, 224-
9549. Live on campus, exams are
coming.
Room ft Board
•a
IT'S NEW—STAY AT THE D.K.E.
House. Large spacious rooms,
semi - private washrooms, full
laundry facilities, color T.V., and
excellent food. 5765 Agronomy Rd.
224-9691.
Furnished Apts.
83
ROOMATE WANTED TO SHARE
2 bedroom furnished apartment
in Kits, for May-Sept, with gay
male. $90/mo„ Box 6572, Station
"G''   Vancouver  8.
Unf. Apts.
84
UNFURNISHED 1-BDRM. UPPER
dupl. Priv. ent. Kits. nr. Alma
Beach. Tennis area Third Ave.
Frig., stove, drapes, carpets,
Cablevis., parking, balcony, heat
incl. Prefer single, no pets. Refs.
rey,   $175.   Call   731-3028.
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. ft Unfurn.       86
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Friday, March 10, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
—garry gruenke photo
WINDSOR DEFENDERS look hopelessly bewildered as Jack Hoy drives easily through them to score two
of his 12 points during last Thursday's game. The'Birds took the game 117-84 and advanced to the finals
and the championship of the CIAU  basketball  season.
New Zealand Bowl here Saturday
UBC Thunderbirds and UVic
Vikings clash Saturday in a game
that decides both the lead in the
Northwest Intercollegiate Rugby
Conference and ownership of the
New Zealand Bowl.
The game is the second
meeting of the season between the
two clubs. Playing for the
Wightman Boot before Christmas,
the 'Birds ran away from a 9-7
half-time score to clobber the
Vikings 38-7.
Intramurals
The awards banquet is to be
held Monday evening at 5 p.m. in
the SUB ballroom. Festivities will
begin with a meal followed by the
trophy presentations. MCing the
event will be Frank Gnup and
Ray Herbert.
This year with the addition of
more events such as bridge,
orienteering and curling, 180
trophies will be awarded. Up for
grabs is the Intramural Athlete of
the Year award, the Unit
Manager of the Year, and the
Walter Gage Cup, awarded to the
top unit.
Women's
Important managers
meeting today at noon in
room 211 of War Memorial
Gym. All managers are asked
to PLEASE attend.
In last season's play, the Boot
went to UBC and the New
Zealand Bowl to Victoria in the
'Birds' only loss of the year.
The Bowl game is one of the
'Birds' big weekends of the
season. Coach Donn Spence
expects to field a healthy first
string side. The Vikings, who
played minus several key players
before Christmas, can be expected
to provide an experienced, hard
working team.
Past Viking strategy has
emphasized a spoiling style of
game, defensive and effective in
the Bowl game last year. Lining up
flat and attacking quickly, they
attempt to force mistakes and
then capitalize.
Added to a strong Viking
attack is fullback Jim Wenman. A
B.C. Rep last year, Wenman
continually adds an extra man to
the three line, as well as
maintaining a strong defence.
The 'Birds' style remains
unchanged. Stressing offence and
open play, UBC usually out-scores
most opponents.
"Victoria's scrum hits
aggressively and attacks well. I
anticipate a hard-fought,
entertaining game," said coach
Spence.
The Braves play Vic seconds at
1:15 p.m., with the 'Birds and the
Vikings clashing in the UBC
stadium at 2:30 p.m.
SO
YOU WANT
TO BE
SKINNIER
AND
SEXIER?
WELL, CALL ON US .
For the Finest in
Ladies Bicycles
and Exercisors.
• 4385 W. 10th Ave.
228-8732
• 4638 E. Hastings St.
291-6071
• 620 E. Broadway
874-8611
• 7007 Kingsway
Burnaby
524-9768
peddler
bicycle centres
J<* r •-' •
i*
*-*
Soccer squad in Victoria
The UBC soccer club journeys
to Victoria Saturday for a game
against Victoria West.
The game is an important one
for both teams as it affects the
league standings.
The next home game for the
'Birds will be Thursday at noon
against    the    University    of
California    at    Thunderbird
Stadium.
In other Pacific Coast Soccer
League action, Pauls take on
Victoria Gorge, and New West
battles the Firefighters in a double
header at Empire Stadium. The
first game is at 1 p.m. with the
second to follow at 3 p.m. Sunday.
MEN'S INTRAMURALS
AWARDS
BANQUET
MONDAY, MARCH 13th
5:00 p.m. SUB BALLROOM
MC's
"FRANK
GNUP''
&
RAY HERBERT'
EDELWEISS HAUS
"SPORTS SPECIALISTS"
WEEKDAYS TILL 9
EDELWEISS HAUS
1230 N. State (Next to Shakey's)
Bellingham, Wash. - 733-3271
MONEY AT PAR
 • ••••*■ Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 10,  1972
Dep't overlooked facts,
psych grad brief finds
By BERTON WOODWARD
The psychology graduate
student association has released a
brief on current departmental
hiring procedures concluding,
"decisions based on such
procedures are, at best,
questionable."
The brief examines the
controversial cases of Drs. Carol
Marx and Michael Humphreys,
each refused renewal of their
teaching contracts last year, and
finds that much evidence which
could have been used by their
senior faculty evaluators was not.
The association recommends
the adoption of "a more objective
procedure of faculty evaluations
for tenure, promotion and
contract renewal, as outlined in
the faculty of arts Guidelines"
and the reconsideration of the
cases of Marx and Humphreys
under that procedure.
The association says its main.
finding in Humphreys' case was
that "no formal student
evaluations were taken in his
courses during his first two
years".
It asserts that although the arts
faculty guidelines were not
published at the time, it is "odd"
that such procedures, which "do
not extend beyond common
sense", were not used.
The 39-page brief notes the
reasons given by senior faculty for
the decisions are primarily
concerned with ineffectiveness of
the two professors' teaching.
In appendices to the main text
the brief reprints laudatory
student evaluations taken in Marx'
psych 206 and 401 classes last
year and mixed but mainly
favorable views of Humphreys'
psych 517 taken informally in
1969-70.
The brief, submitted to psych
student societies and faculty, also
includes letters from several of
Humphreys' colleagues and a
group of his students defending
his teaching competence. A letter
from 22 of Marx' students says, in
part: "We feel she has shown to
be an extremely fine professor."
While no official reasons were
given Marx for her non-renewal,
the brief notes that a second
reason gathered informally from
senior faculty was that she could
not make a long-term
committment to the department.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) -
Blorgs at the university here
groaned mercilessly at the news of
their award-winning newspaper's
editorship "election":
"A moronic half-wit who
sleeps—snoring—on his feet and a
hen-pecking, bearlike misanthrope
who will only drive her drudgy
self to suicide trying to wake him
up. We'll never get our paper."
It says Marx suggested this was
because her place of residence is
officially in Bellingham.
It then points out that Marx
has maintained a separate
residence in Vancouver since
October, 1970 and adds "an
alternate interpretation .. . must
have been intended".
It speculates: "One possible
interpretation would be that Dr.
Marx' academic interests are not
consistent with the long-term
objectives of the clinical program
in the psychology department. If
this is the appropriate
interpretation then another
question arises.
"What are the long-term
objectives of the clinical
program?"
The brief does not attempt to
answer the question.
PGSA spokesman Ron Douglas
Thursday termed the brief "mild
and conservative."
He said the association plans to
meet with faculty next week to
discuss the brief and to ask for
faculty support for the re-opening
of the two cases.
Acting department head Edro
Signori would not comment
Thursday on the brief. Asked if he
would attend the planned meeting
he said: "We've had our meeting
(in early February) on the
substance of the brief. That's all I
care to say about it."
IH fair has displays, food
The International House fair begins today with
booths, displays and food from nine foreign
countries.
The fair is open from 4 to 10 p.m. today and
from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday at IH, located
across West Mall from the Grad Student Centre.
Admission for the community and faculty is 75
cents, and for students, 50 cents. The Saturday
dance ending the fair is to run from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Admission is $1.50.
The following areas will be represented at the
fair: Africa, with dramatic pantomimes, poetry,
displays and soul food; Caribbean, with steelband
demonstrations, calypso dancing and food; China,
with slides and photos, painting demonstrations,
craft displays and a movie on acupuncture;
Germany, with a Bavarian garden, food and music;
Italy, with slide shows, games and crafts;
Malaysia-Singapore, with handicraft displays: Japan,
with the tea ceremony and displays; Pakistan, with
slide shows and handicrafts; and Spain, with
music, displays and more food.
In conjunction with the fair, the Canadian
Council of Christians and Jews is holding its final
hearing on briefs submitted by Vancouver ethnic
groups Saturday starting at the Ponderosa cafeteria
at 9:30 a.m. The hearing is open.
•       ■•       '
Lett award 'anachronistic
The Sherwood Lett Memorial
Scholarship is an anachronistic
glorification of the legal system in
British Columbia, Alma Mater
Society grad studies rep Julian
Wake said Thursday.
Wake moved at Wednesday's
council meeting that council not
endorse a nominee for the $1,500
scholarship, given in memory of
former chief justice of the B.C.
supreme court, Sherwood Lett.
Grads protest $ cut
EDMONTON (CUP) - University of Alberta graduate students
have questioned the priorities of the university administration.
In the recent university budget, severe cuts were made to
graduate programs while at the same time the academic staff
association was allowed to ask for salary increases.
At a meeting last week the students decided not to
accept without protest a proposed $482,000 budget cut for the
faculty of graduate studies and research in the coming year. The
cuts are expected to be made in fee remissions and intersession
bursaries.
At the meeting a previous grad motion to accept a $100
reduction in the tuition fee allowance for graduate teaching assistants
and a reduction in graduate travel grants was rescinded.
The grad students also agreed to form a collective bargaining
unit to negotiate a contract with the administration.
The students also voted for the formation of a General Faculties
Council committee to study the new university budget and to report
back "as soon as possible."
His motion failed for lack of a
seconder.
"In view of the record of the
judicial system in this province, in
particular on the Fred Quilt case,
and in view of the fact that
council previously condemned
such actions, I don't think we
should aid in the glorification of a
former chief justice," Wake said.
"The award is given to the
candidate who most typifies the
qualities of Lett and I don't think
a B.C. supreme court justice is a
model which we should encourage
students to imitate.
"The AMS council is one of
the bodies on the campus
endorsing nominations for this
award and one of its candidates is
usually selected," Wake said.
"Therefore it would be a
suitable gesture of contempt if we
refused to nominate a candidate."
The graduate student
association, undergrad societies
and the dean of a faculty can also
make nominations for the award.
Nominations for the
scholarship will be made at next
week's council meeting.
U.B.C. HOME SERVICE
JOHN BARTON
2181 Allison Rd. (in the Village)
224-3939
0 BARTON BUCKS 0
with each Gasoline Purchase
over $1.50 you will receive redeemable coupons
Good for Cash or Merchandise.
50c
SUB Theatre
a SUB FILM SOC presentation
Friday & Saturday
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday - 7:00
CHARTERS 72
If You are Travelling on a Charter
to Britain or Europe Please
Remember to Reserve NOW for
U-DRIVE—HOTEL
ACCOMMODATION
DISCOUNTED RAIL TICKETS
and
Call for your Passport Application
Forms if you do not have
a Passport
No Extra Charge
For COMPLETE Travel
Information and Brochures
Call —
5700 University Boulevard
ON CAMPUS 224-4391
B.C.'s Leading Travel Organization

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