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The Ubyssey Jan 31, 1986

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What is the allure of Miami Vice? Why does actor Eton Johnson need two bodyguards to fend
off groupies when he goes out to eat in Miami?
How has this show overcome its inauspicious start (it languished in the bottom
half of the Neilsen ratings in the first ten
months when it ran head to head with Falcon
Crest on Friday nights) to achieve perennial
top-ten finishes, 15 Emmy nominations and
four Emmy awards? It also captures the highest percentage of male viewers
age 18-54 of any show on the air except Monday Night Football? How has
this programme, in the words of NBC president Brandon Tartikoff,
"redefined the cop-show genre?'
According to Dr. Peter Klovan of
tie University of Alberta's film
studies program, there are four
reasons why Miami Vice is changing
the way television looks and
sounds. These reasons are: a
reworking of the conventions of the
bard-boiled detective genre, a rock
synthesizer score, quick, rock
video-like editing, and an (art deco)
expression mise-en-scene.
"In literature, there exists two
kinds of detectives: the classical
detective and the hard-boiled detective," says Klovan. The former
category includes such vaunted
sleuths as Sherlock Holmes and
Hercule Poirot. In classical detective stories, society is essentially
good with crime being an abnormality committed for purely
criminal motives. The classical
detectives use reason and logic to
defeat evil and the stories are marked by little or no violence. The problems of life are brought down to a
simple clash of good and evil with
good always triumphing.
"The hard-boiled detective genre
includes Sam Spade, Philip
Marlowe, Mike Hammer and now
the Miami vice cops, Sonny
Crockett (Don Johnson)* Micardo
Tubbs (Philip Michael Thomas),
and Lt. Castillo (Edward James
Olmos).
"In the hard-boiled genre, evil is
believed to be intrinsic to the society. Evil, although it must be fought,
will always exist; it can never be
controlled. This genre is fraught
with cynicism and violence.
"Beneath all the glitter and
glamour of Miami is the definitive
setting for the hard-boiled stoiy.
On a weekly basis Crockett and
Tubbs do battle with scumbags,
degenerates, cocaine cowboys, smut
peddlars, crazed youth gangs and
even zombies from Haiti. Also, one
favourite Miami Vice theme is the
good cop turned bad.
"Miami Vice is part of the hard-
boiled detective genre, but it takes it
one step further. The cops don't
just perform their job, they are
their work. Crockett, Tubbs,
Castillo, and the other four detectives on the squad (Switek, Zito,
Gina Callabrese, and Tandy Joplin)
must adopt criminal methods to
survive and to succeed, but they are
in no danger of becoming enl
themselves because they strictly
adhere to an unwritten moral code.
This moral code is based on foar
values: friendship, loyalty, duty,
and honour. In every show, if
they're not acting on these values,
they're discussing them. By following this code, the detectives are able
to salvage their dignity."
Klovan also believes the show
transcends the boundaries of the
hard-boiled genre because the
detectives are very close and loyal to
one another. "The hard-boiled
detective is essentially a loner," he
said, "but Miami Vice has seven
hard-boiled detectives in a sort of
surrogate family with Castillo as the
head. They all will go to extraordinary lengths to help each other
and to help other human beings.
They're knights in shining armor.
Crockett is even dressed in white."
The code these detectives follow
is akin to Bushido, says Klovan,
Bushido was the name given to the
code of honour followed by Japan's
Samurai warriors.
"Bushido — in its strictest interpretation — means 'code of
knighthood'," says Klovan. "The
Samurai lived and died by Bushido.
They were indifferent to pain or
death, loyal only to the overlord.
This is quite similar to the kind of
dedication practised by the seven
detectives in Miami Vice. In every
show, there is always some mystical
reference to Vietnam, Cambodia or
Southeast Asia. Crockett was with
the 1st Air Cavalry in Vietnam and
Castillo worked for "The Com-
jjany" (probably CIA) in Thailand,
Cambodia and Laos.
"Castillo provides a good example of wht Bushido is. In one show,
actually titled 'Bushido', Castillo
finds out that a friend of his turned
outlaw. But Castillo has no moral
dilemma. 'I can't let you walk,' he
tells the friend, 'It's my duty. It's
what I am.' This kind of dedication
certainly goes beyond the hard-
boiled detective and into Sattturai
ethics."
Another contributing factor to
the show's innovative look is its
music. "Usually in television," says
Klovan, "music is used reinforce
the action of, say, a love scene or a
chase scene. In Miami Vice it is used
to comment either directly or
iroptcally on the action, like the
chorus in ancient Greek theatre.
For example, in one show over a
shootout involving Crockett, Tubbs
and a gangster, we can hear the
Clash singing 'No Peace in the
Western World.' The lyric comments directly on the action and this
creates emotional excitement."
Miami Vice's musical score is
notable also for its use of original
songs, not cheap made-for-TV imitations. If necessary, executive producer Michael Mann will spend
$10,00 per episode just to acquire
the rights to an original work. According to Harpers Magazine, the
budget of a single episode of Miami
Vice is greater than the entire annual budget of the real vice squad in
Miami.
"The visual style of Miami
Vice," says Klovan, "has its roots
in the expressionist elements of the
later films of the West German
director, the late Werner
Fassbinder." In Fassbinder's later
films, the whole screen is awash in
flamingo pink and cobalt blue
neon, the predominant colors of
Miami Vice. But where
Fassbinder's world was very grimy
seedy, Miami Vice is, in
See page 2: VICE
By DEAN BENNETT
Reprinted from the Gateway
Canadian University Press Page 2
- >:'d ^ovirioiA 'y:U<
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 31, 1986
^vS^w^ir ptf@Q®ffi d)<g>y§ hsmte
By RHONDA COSTAS
reprinted from the Arthur
Canadian University Press
Nothing is better than a
doughnut. They are made from
dough, sugar and grease, and I love
them. Doughnuts are better than
Don Johnson. I've never actually
met Sonny, but I think he's really
hot. I have met plenty of doughnuts
though, and they've always treated
me right. I love doughnuts and Don
Johnson.
If I had to choose between having
Don Johnson forever, but no more
doughnuts, or doughnuts with no
Don, I think I would have to take
Don. Then I would switch to
chocolate bars, which are also very
near to my heart. Picture me and
Sonny in the Ferrari with melting
Crunchie bars. Oh, I can't stand it!
THE DON JOHNSON
CHOCOLATE BAR DIET:
Morning:
Take a shower with Don. Then help
him do his hair.
Afternoon:
Drive around
Don.
in the Ferrari with
Evening:
Do tons of coke and have the big
pork fest with Don.
Vocg® U®y Sim fficgrfifiKfQtf felhlDOlnl
From page 1
Klovan's words, "more streamlined
for a cooler colour and a jazzier
look."
Miami Vice's visual style is interesting for the dichotomy it
creates. The world of Miami is a
very polished one. (Before shooting
night scenes, for example, the
streets are watered down to get a
nice smooth reflection of moonlight
off the pavement.) Yet underneath
this glittering world of polished
streets and winking pastel
nightclubs are sleazy degenerate
dope dealers and outlaws. The setting for the show has been appropriately coined 'glitter-sleaze'.
There is one very strict rule on the
Miami Vice set and that is 'no earth
tones.' Pastel shades are definitely
the rule and anything red or brown
is strictly taboo. "One of the
reasons for this," said Klovan, "is
to reinforce the dream-like quality
of the show."
Another appealing aspect to the
programme is its quick, rock videolike editing.
"Miami Vice is the first show to
use rock video-like editing," said
Klovan. "In conventional television
every shot must either reveal
character or advance the plot. It is
linear narrative. Every shot must be
self-explanatory so that if you leave
the room for a few minutes, you
can still follow the few strands of
plot when you return. It's like
Dallas. Every three months or so I
watch 15 minutes of it. Don't ask
me why, but in those minutes I'm
caught up in everything that's going
on. The techniques of TV restrict
the range of choices. Since every
shot must be self-explanatory, one
show is pretty much like the other."
"Miami Vice is quite different.
It's told in non-linear fashion. Like
Flashdance, gaps are left in the
story. Each scene does not
necessarily build on the preceding
one. And after the first ten minutes
the story doesn't give you a lot of
exposition. If you miss the first few
moments of the show, you're lost.
"The scenes themselves contradict the edicts of television.
Usually the TV scene is a complete
entity unto itself. There is a beginning and a middle and an end. Not so
in Miami Vice. The viewer will enter
a scene in the middle and leave
before the end. Miami Vice likes to
do this. It likes to challenge you. It
throws you into the middle of
something and lets you figure it out.
Also the quick editing from one
scene to another gives the impression of a dream.
The knock on Miami Vice has
been style and sound at the expense
of storyline, but Klovan does not
see this as legitimate criticism.
"Miami Vice's audience doesn't
read. It wants images and emotion
and energy rather than plot or
words."
Although he applauds Miami
Vice for the innovative use of visual
and aural techniques, he also sees
the show's success in the context of
television just keeping up with the
times.
"Forty years ago," he said, "the
television screen was very small, as
was the speaker. Because of this,
the producers didn't bother with
composition or mise-en-scene and
paid little attention to the music
score. Today, though, the screens
are much larger, the picture is better, and you can hook your television set up to speakers the size of a
refrigerator. But television has
refused to adapt. Their visual style
is forty years out-of-date. Miami
Vice is alluring and powerful
because it uses modern techniques
to present an ancient theme. I can't
wait to see the number of imitations
it will spawn."
Norwegian
Leather
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224-2421
STUDENT SPECIAL
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— Parallel/Serial/Game/Clock Ports
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20 MB HARD DRIVE PACKAGE
PERIPHERALS & ACCESSORIES   .   .   .   CALL
*UBC STAFF Et STUDENTS ONL Y
Limited Offer — Free Joystick With System Purchase (Student Only)
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IPC SYSTEMS INC.
553 W.BROADWAY
873-6303
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1986 SPRING LECTURES
HERBERT SIMON
Dr. Herbert Simon, Nobel Laureate, is a Professor of Computer Science and
Psychology at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh. A scientist of world-wide
renown, his work has made important contributions in economics, as well as in
cognitive psychology and computer science with emphasis on artificial intelligence.
His extensive publication list attests to his extraordinary intellectual versatility and
curiosity.
Series Title:   "INTELLIGENCE IN PEOPLE AND COMPUTERS"
THE MIND AS AN INFORMATION PROCESSING SYSTEM
Tuesday, February 4—In Room 104, Angus Building, at 12:30 PM
SOME RESEARCH FRONTIERS OF COGNITIVE, MOTIVATION, EMOTION, IMAGERY
Thursday, February 6—In Room 104, Angus Building, at 12:30 PM
EXPERT SYSTEMS AND THE SOCIAL IMPLICATIONS OF ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
Friday, February 7—In Room 104, Angus Building, at 12:30 PM
WHY ECONOMISTS DISAGREE
Saturday, February 8—In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resourses Centre, at 8:15 PM
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
PIZZA FACTORY ltd
2630 SASAMAT STREET
PHONE 224-3333
FREE FAST DELIVERY
PICK UP OR DELIVERY
SUPER SPECIAL
Italian Pepperoni, Fresh Mushrooms,
Green Peppers, Cheese & Tomato Sauce
1. 2 Small Pizzas only $10.95
2 Medium Pizzas only $13.95
2 Large Pizzas only $15.95
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2 Medium Pizzas only $13.95
2 Large Pizzas only $15.95
GET ONE FREE 26 OZ. COCA COLA OR SPRITE
with any of the above specials
30c Bottle Deposit (no substitution)
OFFER EXPIRES FEBRUARY28. 1986
Representatives from Canada's largest GRADUATE
MANAGEMENT SCHOOL will be visiting your campus.
Come and meet us!
MONDAY, FEB. 3
12 noon-1:00 p.m. and 1:30-2:30 p.m.
Rm. 212 Student Union Bldg.
University of British Columbia
FACULTY      OF
ADMINISTRATIVE STUDIES
YDRK
>
On 4th Avenue
Come to
Maples on 4th Ave.
2006 W. 4th Ave.
Corner 4th & Maples
Upstairs
Relaxing atmosphere
overlooking the city. Special
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selection of entrees ranging
from BBQ ribs, Pasta, succulent
charcoal broiled steaks,
gourmet burgers, specialty
pizza, salads and lots or
muchies. Featuring daily drink
specials, Mon Thurs 10%
off CBC students with student
I.D. card. Great food, great view,
and most, great prices
MAPLES ON 4th AVE.
Call 733-3187
Open daily at 11:30 a.m.
■ » Friday, January 31, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
2,000 petition against godiva ride
By EVELYN JACOB
The Godiva ride will continue —
but in a different form — assures
The Coalition Against Sexism on
Campus.
Coalition members met with
President David Strangway and
Dean Axel Meisen of Engineering
Thursday to present a petition containing more than 2,000 signatures
opposing the event — a tradition
that has been an annual campus fixture for more than 30 years.
CASC member Anita Srivastava
said Strangway and Meisen made
clear their opposition to the ride
and has warned the Engineering
Undergraduate Society that "direct
and immediate" sanctions would
result if the event is "offensive."
Srivastava said that Meisen will
attend the ride to decide whether
the event is offensive. The EUS has
UBC loses
experiment on
"Challenger"
By VIRGINIA McKENNA
A UBC professor's cell separation experiment, second in a series
of space-based tests to find a better
treatment for blood cell cancer, was
destroyed Tuesday in the explosion
of the space shuttle "Challenger."
Pathology and chemistry professor Donald Brooks said the experiments, which will be slowed by
Tuesday's disaster are studying the
separation of solutions in the
absense of gravity, possibly leading
to a method of separating different
cell types.
On the ground solutions don't
completely separate because the
lighter liquid floats on the heavier.
The medical profession currently
uses chemotherapy and radiation to
kill cancer cells, but this method
also kills healthy cells, said Brooks.
If doctors could separate the good
cells from the bad, then they could
kill only the bad cells and put the
good ones back into the body, he
added.
"But this is a very long way off,
and would be only one of the many
applications of the cell separation
procedures," said Brooks.
The explosion of the "Challenger
has further delayed such a medical
breakthrough. The experiment was
scheduled to fly again in about six
months, but this will not be possible
with the N.A.S.A. slow-down, he
said.
"The best they could do now is
three-quarters as fast as the
previous year, because they only
have three of their four space shuttles left," said Brooks.
The experiments started ten years
ago when Brooks approached
N.A.S.A. with his ideas.
"They were interested in experiments that would specifically be
aided by performance in space," he
said, adding N.A.S.A. funded the
project alone until three months
ago, when Canada became involved.
It is illegal for N.A.S.A. to supply funds to Canadian researchers,
so most of the work is done by a
small team at the Health Sciences
University in Portland, Oregon, he
said.
Brooks received his PhD from
HSU and presently has an adjunct
appointment there.
The only other Canadian who has
worked on the project is Jim Van
Alstine. He recently got his PhD in
experimental pathology under
Brooks and is now at work on the
project in Huntsville, Alabama.
"Space science is not like doing
regular science," said Brooks. "It is
very expensive, and slow to produce
results. You have to have pretty
special kinds of problems, otherwise they get solved in the interim."
since informed both the Administration and CASC that the
event will not be "offensive to
women."
"The president stands against
public nudity," said Srivastava.
"He suggests that if the engineers
persist in the Godiva ride that
Godiva be garbed in period
costume."
Despite assurances from Meisen
that sanctions placed on the society
would   be   "appropriate   to   the
event," Srivastava said CASC was
"disappointed" that no specific
sanctions were detailed.
"If we don't know what the sanctions will be, we fear the event will
happen again."
Both Strangway and Meisen
could not be reached for comment.
According to some engineering
students, the undergraduates
themselves have no say in the
organization and continuation of
the tradition.
"It is all up to EUS," said one
student who asked not to be identified. "Once we vote them into office, they become like a government."
Alfred Fischer, University of Victoria acting engineering dean, said
the ride is in "bad taste".
"It should never have been acceptable, and certainly not in
1986," he said.
Fisher said the administration
does not want UVIC engineers to
even think about holding a similar
event.
Terry Hunt, Canadian Federation of Students pacific region chair
said   the   term   "Peeping   Tom"
parade was accurately coined by'
CASC.
"Personally, I think it's a sexist
event," he said.
Srivastava said coalition
members plan to attend the ride but
have not determined if or how they
will protest.
THINNING SLIM-FINGERED cancer victim reaches for yet another    and delivers dozens of noxious chemicals from equally noxious companies,
pack of coffin nails. Despite Cadillac-like lettering, machine takes money    Victim died after pushing single button.
Apartheid protest changes library name
PETERBOROUGH, ONT.
(CUP)—Trent University students
want to rename the university's
Bata Library because of the Bata
company's investments in South
Africa.
Six hundred students, out of
3,000 registered, signed a petition
circulated by the South Africa Action Committee demanding the
board of governors change the
library's name.
Besides supporting the apartheid
regime in South Africa, Bata has
considerable investments in other
developing countries such as Chile
and Indonesia.
Some want the library to be
renamed the Stephen Biko
Memorial Library to honour the
black student activist who was killed in a South African prison on
Sept. 12, 1977.
Trent students should not increase the company's profile by
allowing the building to be named
after company head Thomas Bata,
said Richard Hamilton, a fourth
year sociology student.
"We are fundamentally opposed
to honoring a man with that kind of
corporate profile," Hamilton said.
The library was named after Bata
because he organised a library fundraising campaign and donated
large sums of money to the university. Bata now sits as an honourary
member of Trent's board of governors.
Susan Wheeler, Trent's commun-
ciations director, said the university
is not able to reveal how much
money Bata donated to the library.
The students' petition is being
considered by the social responsibility committee of the university
senate. Student senator Chris Wiggins said he expects opposition based on practical, not ideological,
grounds.
A decision to change the name of
the library must be approved by the
senate and board of governors and
be discussed by the appropriate
committees of both bodies.
Should the board not act soon,
the committee plans a boycott of
the library, a candlelight vigil and
civil disobedience, he said.
Basil Baker, secretary of Bata
Limited, said he is surprised
students do not understand how the
company is actually helping end
apartheid by working within South
Africa.
"I've been associated with this
organisation for 35 years and I've
seen some amazing things this company has done. The company is doing the same in South Africa as they
are doing in developing countries
around the world," Baker said.
Bata employs 3,200 black
workers in its South African
manufacturing plants but the
workers at these plants make less
than subsistence income, according
to   Canadians   Concerned   About
Southern Africa, a Toronto lobby
group.
CCASA member Joanne
Nayman said Bata receives large
grants from the South African
government to locate there.
"It's hardly a situation which
Bata can turn around and try to
change the system," she said.
"Bata is in there pro fitting from
apartheid."
The company has consistently
refused to allow its workers to join
unions. In 1982, Bata refused to
meet with a textile union that had
signed up hundreds of workers and
fired those involved with organising. Workers at the time made between 60 and 117 rand per month.
Subsistence income at the time was
236 rand per month per average
family.
But the student council, which
has its office in the library, has not
waited for official approval. The
council's address is listed in the
Canadian Federation of Students'
national students council directory
as the "Biko Library, Trent University."
Chickens fall from sky
U of A students flunk writing test
EDMONTON (CUP) — The
university informed fifteen university of Alberta students over the '
Christmas holidays that their
registrations have been cancelled
because they did not write the
Alberta Writing Competency Test.
Seven students wrote and passed
last week, and then registered, but
eight others are out of the university
for good.
Five hundred-and-three U of A
students registered in 1985 and '84
who have written and flunked the
test were in danger of expulsion
from the school. The U of A senate
decided to give them until April
1986 to pass the test.
Caroline Nevin, U of A student
council   vice-president,   said   the
council has no plans to intervene on
the students' behalf.
"If they wish to challenge it in
court, we'd probably back them,"
Nevin said.
Nevin said she has recommended
some changes to the test to benefit
students, and also said the senate
should accept other proof of
writing competence like a passing
grade in a full English course or a
pass on the Test of English as a
Foreign Language, which international students have to pass before
studying in Canada.
"The exam itself is stressful and
detracts from most students' performance. An English course is a
better reflection of their abilities,"
Nevin said.
EDMONTON (CUP) —. Two
University of Alberta agriculture
students will appear in provincial
court Feb. 20 in connection with the
death of five chickens during the
university's engineering week.
Reginald Shandro and Earl
Greenhogh were among five
students who, acting independently
of their faculty society tossed a bag
of chicken feathers followed by live
chickens off the second floor
balcony in the student union
building during a noon engineering
week rally.
"They thought they would flutter
down, but they fell like rocks," said
director of campus security Doug
Langevin.
They thought the chickens would
land safely because chickens are
capable of flying short distances.
The chickens were bought from a
local farmer. "We told him it was
engineering week and that we were
going to use the chickens in a prank
against them," the students said.
"He said he didn't like engineers
either."
The chickens were "half-dead",
said engineering students' society
executive Dale Hildebrand. "Two
of them couldn't even lift their
beaks off the ground."
The engineering students running
the event disposed of the chickens
by wringing their necks and tossing
them into a dumpster, Hildebrand
said.
Greenhogh and Shandro are
charged under section 402 of the
Criminal Code with willfully causing unnecessary pain, suffering or
injury to an animal or bird. The
maximum penalty is a $500 fine or
six months in jail.
"We didn't want to hurt
anybody or the chickens," the two
said. The stunt was organized "in
order to maintain the ongoing
rivalry between the aggies and
engineers," they said.
Marks go down
Physics 110 students are getting
worse at physics — only 55 per cent
of them passed the Christmas exam
this year, compared with an average
of 70 per cent in past years.
"The performance this year is
not as good as in the last two
years," said physics department
head D. Llewelyn Williams.
Williams said he was "not very
happy with the sudden change in
performance of a large number of
students."
"If it became a trend we'd start
seriously worrying," he said.
Betty Howard, who is in charge
of Physics 110, said it was difficult
to determine the cause of the
decline.
"The students were not as well
prepared perhaps," she said. "Each
year students have more trouble
with elementary physics."
Both Williams and Howard
thought the poor showing could be
due to the fact the exam was written
on the last day of an intensive exam
period.
Howard said declining performance is also a problem in first year
math courses. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 31, 1986
Alternative ride proposed
I would like to make an interesting proposal vis a vis the Lady
Godiva issue. This proposal was
suggested to me by an intelligent,
independent lady friend. As with
myself, she finds the Godiva issue
rather inane. But she feels that if
the women opposed to the Godiva
ride want to do something significant, they should stage their own
ride, with a naked male. I thought
this was hilarious, but upon further
contemplation, I figure she's right.
AMS booking
line-up soon
This is a reminder to the Bookings Representatives of all AMS
Constituencies and Clubs. The Spring bookings line-up will be held
Tuesday, February 11, 1986 at 8:00
a.m. outside of SUB 230C. If your
organization is planning an event
for the 1986 Fall term and will require a room in the SUB, be in line
early (or late the night before) in
order to get good booking. Also,
please note that each organization
must have one representative in the
line at all times.
Lorna Pritchard
bookings commissioner
Elementary school
celebrates reunion
As Vancouver celebrates its
centennial year, Lord Strathcona
Elementary School will also be
celebrating its 95 years of
memories. A reunion, "back to
strath" will be held on June 13 and
14, 1986 and all former students
and staff are invited to share in the
festivities and nostalgia. Help make
this reumion a memorable event.
Call your former classmates and
register now!
To register: phone 255-5882 or
533-4497 or mail your name, address, telephone number and year(s)
of attendance at Strathcona to:
Reunion, Strathcona Elementary
School, 592 E. Pender St., Vancouver, B.C. V6A 1V5. See you
there!
Nancy Woo
graduate studies—CMTE
0i'
,*&
Why don't all the protestors get
together, and go for it?
Don't tell me that sexism,
regardless of the gender, is wrong;
therefore a male ride is not the intention behind the opposition. Just
do it and note what kind of protest
occurs from the male population. I
doubt if there would be much, if
any opposition from us. We can
usually take a poke thrown at us,
and come out laughing.
I know, I know what the next
rebuttal is: women have been abused and mistreated in our society
since "Quest for Fire" times, the
Godiva ride further symbolizes this
abuse, and since men have not been
exploited as such, of course they'll
get a laugh out of a male ride, it's
no threat to their ego or dominance,
directly or symbolically. Hell, that's
the way it should be! Neither ride
should be considered a threat to
anything, and one should laugh,
regardless of sex. There are more
important and constructive issues
that should be concentrated on.
Take the ride, or rides for what they
are, purely external fun and
foolishness! But don't ask me to get
up on the horse . . . Hire a male
stripper, that's his job.
J. R. Good murphy
political science 4
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Hairy Puce Blorgs on this tiny
island kingdom were dumbfounded
as Please Fuckme and Crisp Dong
attempted to take over the entertainment section of the Daily Blah
with the magical weapon, "PDA."
"What about me," cried Avid
Vermin. "I like to entertain too."
The Pre-Medical Society of UBC
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a symposium on
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Saturday, February 1, 1986
1:00-5:00 p.m.
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UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT Friday, January 31,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
F'age 5
Summer students get reprieve
OTTAWA (CUP) — The
Treasury Board came through with
an 11th hour reprieve for university
students last week, when it voted to
allocate $7.5 million to ' federal
departments for summer student
hiring. Last year the department got
$10 million to hire students, but the
budget had been eliminated in the
announcement of student summer
job creation programmes just
before Christmas.
The government; now expects
3,600 students will work in federal
ministries this summer, the same
number as last year. And Career-
Oriented Student Employment application forms for the programme,
are moving like hotcakes at the
Canada Employment Centre on
campuses across the country.
But the Canadian Federation of
Students is worried the government
might be juggling money to replace
full-time employees with the summer students. Because of "person-
year decontrol", ministries are being encouraged to find extra money
in their budgets and use it to hire
students.
The extra money may result from
full-time positions being eliminated
while budgets stay the same.
Other parts of the government's
summer employment programme
may also be giving students jobs at
the expense of others. A total of $30
million from employment and immigration is going to Statistics
Canada, providing StatsCan hires
students to fill more than half of the
45,000 jobs available on the 1986
census.
"Traditionally the census is done
by retired people or housewives,"
said Sandra Kearns, public relations
officer at Employment and Immigration. But now students will be
given priority.
"Now we're supposed to be glad,
that we're taking away jobs from
other unemployed people," said
CFS chair Barb Donaldson.
There are other problems for
students who want to work for the
census.   The   training   date   at
Ss*
Queen's University in Kingston is
April 11, right in the middle of
Queen's students' exam period.
And most census jobs end halfway through the summer. "It's
completely criminal that students
will take this $6,800 on census work
and, having passed up other jobs,
will find themselves out of work by
mid-June," Donaldson said.
Hopi threatened
Fourteen thousand Navaho and
Hopi are resisting U.S. government
efforts to move them off their traditional homelands, said a member of
Seattle's Big Mountain support
group Wednesday.
"There is a possibility of violent
military action to remove them by
July 8, 1986," said Marilyn James.
These tribes have shared a 1,500
square mile area of northeastern
Arizona for over 400 years.
The traditional leaders of the
Hopi and the Navaho say there is
no conflict between them, but the
U.S. government still wants to partition the area, said James, to 20
people in Buchanan A204.
In 1934, the U.S. government rejected traditional native democracy,
declaring it would only deal with
elected tribal councils, she said.
Only a small minority of Hopi
and Navaho support these councils
to this day, said James.
But "progressive" leaders of the
Hopi tribal council — all men,
though the traditional elders were
always women — tried to have the
courts partition the joint use area.
However, the courts refused,
declaring it to be "for the common
use and benefit" of both tribes.
The traditional people were convinced partition was aimed solely at
making it easier for large corporations, already strip-mining coal and
uranium extensively nearby, to
move into the area, said James.
But in 1974 Congress passed a
law "to provide for final settlement
of the conflicting rights and interests of the Hopi and Navaho
tribes ... to lands within the joint
use area."
Navaho and Hopi, led by their
traditional women elders, resisted
relocation from the start, beginning
at Big Mountain, James said.
The land was divided equally between Hopi and Navaho, but the
Navaho are far more numerous.
Though the Navaho as a whole
own over 24,000 square miles, the
land is either occupied already or
uninhabitable, James said.
Thus, the traditional Navaho
sheep herders in the joint use area,
who had adapted themselves over
the centuries to raising sheep on
vast tracts of desert, now have
nowhere to go to follow the only
way of life they know, James said.
Yet until now, they were self-
sufficient.
James stressed the spiritual
nature of her message. "We need to
let people know the traditional,
spiritual way, that all people — red,
white, yellow, black — are put here
to protect the environment and the
planet."
Thus, the struggle in Arizona incorporates environmental, nuclear
disarmament and human rights
issues, she said.
James said the Navahos in particular need our help.
"Because of the possibility of
military action to relocate them, it
is important that more people —
nationally and internationally — be
aware of that. This way we will have
a better chance to avert or at least
minimize the violence," James said.
The Dali Lama and Bishop Desmond Tutu of South Africa are
amongst world figures invited to
join with the Navaho and Hopi
before the deadline date, she said.
Canadians can urge their government to pressure the U.S. government to repeal the relocation law
and end the human rights violations
caused by it, James said.
Muster food
UBC science undergraduate
society raised $362 in last week's
food bank in the student union
building.
Science undergraduate society
representative Nindy Duggal said he
was pleased with the student support given.
"We had a good response from
students," he said.
The food bank was organized as
part of the week-long SUS week last
week.
SUS president Donald Mustard
said students donations varied in
amount and some were as high as
$10 per donation.
He said they came up with the
idea for a food bank because they
wanted to support a local cause
with a lower profile.
Students were able to purchase
food at the stand or donate money.
Mustard said organizing last
week's food bank was more effective than their earlier attempt in
November which did not allow
students to purchase food on the
spot and raised in total less than
$50.
ACID RAIN KEEPS falling on my head, sings intrepid, unprotected soul on left while other less indomitable
youth carrying umbrellas notice contraptions dissolve after two or three weeks. Persistent rain isn't really sinister;
it's just there to make your car faster and lighter for the spring racing season through the modern miracle
substance, iron oxide. Oxide treatment also provides extra ventilation after a few years and creates new, interesting, ever-changing patterns on sides of cars.
Huge student aid fraud charged
TORONTO (CUP)—A Kitchener,
Ont. couple are to appear in court
this month in connection with a
$175,000 student aid fraud that
spanned two years and five provinces.
Ontario Provincial Police arrested Paul and Lena Schuler in
December and charged them with
fraud.
The investigating officer, Corp.
Nelson Kinkaid, said the pair are
suspected of swindling $108,000 in
Ontario student grants and $67,000
in Canada Student Loans between
1981 and 1983.
Kinkaid said a man and woman
forged the high school transcripts
of 60 living people, then registered
at 23 universities and applied for
student aid. Thirteen of the universities were in Ontario, with the remainder in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Col-
Students invade Montreal newsroom
MONTREAL (CUP) — Sixty students occupied the
McGill Daily office last week to protest what they call
the biased and irresponsible journalism of the student
paper.
"The Daily is totally unresponsive to student
needs," said Perry Smyth, a third-year economics student. "What students want is more campus news."
Students also claimed the Daily is "cliquish" and
anti-Semitic.
In a petition circulated after the occupation, the
students called for an amendment to the Daily's statement of principles "to accommodate the free expression of diverse opinion."
Organisers of the occupation made rallying speeches
in the cafeteria and student union lobby before going
to the Daily offices. According to Smyth, at least 30
people spontaneously joined the occupation.
"There was a wide cross-section of students there,"
Smyth said. "They weren't all conservatives by any
stretch."
Students carried placards that said "Put the dogma
to sleep" and "Free speech at the Daily."
Senior news editor Brendan Weston objected to the
disruption. "We've always discussed issues with any
student who asked, and our staff and staff meetings
are open and democratic," he said.
"We've explained this to the organisers. It's just a
few students grandstanding."
Editor-in-chief Melinda Wittstock pointed out that
all newspapers are biased. "The difference is that we
admit our bias," she said.
"The Daily is an alternative press," said Wittstock.
"Its purpose is to combat racism, sexism, heterosex-
ism, and economic injustice, while covering news fairly, accurately, and to the best of its ability."
Co-editor of The Ubyssey, Stephen Wisenthal said
he would love to have hordes of students occupying
room 241K in SUB. "We have plenty of filing for
everyone," he said.
Smyth said staff members told him if he wants to
change the paper he should write for it. "To get
something worth paying for, I don't think I hae to do
that," Smyth said. "Most students don't have time to
be journalists. We have careers and whatnot."
The Daily is being attacked on other fronts as well.
The McGill Students' Society is refusing to sign a rent
agreement with the Daily unless its statement of principles is changed. An opt-out campaign, where
students could choose whether they want to pay fees to
the paper, has also been organised.
The Daily's statement of principles is based on the
belief that Canada is a class society and that the
newspaper should be an agent of social change.
"I don't want to see the paper die," said Smyth. "I
think having a McGill Daily is great, but there has to
be some way to set up so students can register their approval or disapproval."
The McGill Daily is celebrating its 75th year of
publication.
umbia.
Police say the pair visited the
universities twice—once to register
and once to pick up their student
awards. They did not attend classes
but were former students at the
University of Waterloo—ironically,
one of the two Ontario universities
not used in the scam.
The Ontario Ministry of Colleges
and Universities grew suspicious
when several people approached
about overdue loan payments were
able to prove they had never applied
for the money. Police tracked down
the suspects using duplicate student
photos kept by some of the universities.
Because of the theft, the
ministry's student awards branch is
reviewing the method used to hand
over aid money to students.
"Nobody's ever considered that
people would go to this limit (to
defraud the programme). . .but
now that it's happened, we've got
to take a close look at it," said
Doug Anderson, the manager of
the branch's verification section.
He said students will probably
have to give university student aid
officers more identification before
being able to receive their money.
Anderson said he knows of only
one similar case of fraud. However,
in that instance, which happened
several years ago and ended in a
two-year jail term, the scope of the
operation was considerably smaller,
Anderson said.
Of the $175,000 taken, a portion
was paid in fees to the universities.
Police have not been able to recover
the rest. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 31, 1986
Friday, January 31, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
L_^
Berger seeks solutions
By KENNETH SALLITT
In 1971 the U.S. Congress passed
the Native Land Claims Settlement
Act. Forty-four million acres of
Alaskan Territory and nearly a
billion dollars was transferred to the
native population in the form of
shares of stock in village and
regional corporations. In 1992 the
stock goes public, the land can be
taxed and the native peoples stand
to lose control of it, and with it,
their culture.
Village Journey
By Thomas Berger
New York: Hill and Wang, 1985
The Settlement Act has been an
attempt by the U.S. government to
bring the native peoples of Alaska
into the mainstream of American
life by forcing them to become corporate citizens and manage their
land and its assets as a business venture. Few of the corporations have
made money, many have been en-
mired in litigation and poor investments, some are bankrupt.
Often the beneficiaries of the native
corporations are non-native
employees, advisors and lawyers.
The collaboration of the corporations with oil concerns has raised
the possibility that self-
determination may be compromised
by the politics of oil.
Thomas Berger, who is professor
of law at UBC has become
something of a hero in the north.
Between 1974-1977 he headed the
enquiry that recommended a
moratorium on the shipment of gas
by pipeline down the Mackenzie
valley. This study provided many of
the models for land-use and occupancy studies across the north. In
1979 he headed a commission which
looked into Indian and Inuit health
care.
In 1983 Berger was commissioned
by the Inuit Circumpolar Conference to hear testimony
throughout Alaska on the effects of
the Settlement Act. "Village
Journey" is a presentation of some
of the testimony and Berger's
analysis of the dilemmas facing the
Inuit, Aleut and Indians of Alaska
and indigenous peoples in general:
enforced assimilation into colonial
society, the imposition of alien
mores and the replacement of hunting, fishing and gathering subsistence systems by artificial
economies.
Berger has perceptively interpreted the concerns and priorities of
the native peoples, particularly
those in the outlying areas, hence
the title of the book. He has also
clearly documented how the settlement act once hailed as enlightened
legislation, has provided the
• framework for what might be the
greatest misappropriation of land in
history.
His recommendations support
native self-determination, a radical
reassessment of the concepts of
land and natural resource ownership and the establishment of tribal
governments to replace the corporations in the administration of land
and stock. While Berger himself has
no legislative power in Alaska, his
recommendations may influence
Congress to forestall a clearly
preventable tragedy.
^r^
tH
5353
Passion plays in the West
By MARY CAMERON
With a slow drawl, quick smile,
spurs on his taped-up boots, and
faded jeans and jacket, Sam
Shepard is a cowboy. He lassos
jukeboxes, car hood ornaments,
garbage cans and he loves his
woman. Shepard plays Eddie, the
American mythic cowboy, in
Robert Altman's film adaptation of
Shepard's play, Fool for Love.
Fool for Love
directed by Robert Altman
at the Royal Centre
Altman's done a great job here.
Unlike his last play adapted to the
screen, Streamers, which took its
claustrophobic, staged time in an
army barracks, this movie has a
great sense of the immensity of the
American West, roads shooting off
into the darkness, high dark skies,
and wild sage-covered land with
sudden monstrous cows approaching in the dark. The story, or
"exploded play", as Shepard calls
the  film,  takes place at the  El
Royale Motel, a dusty, peeling, six-
unit motel with sputtering pink
neon signs, in the Mohave Desert.
Eddie comes hundreds of miles
off his route, in a battered truck
while towing a trailer of horses, to
find beautiful May (Kim Basinger)
who is working at the motel. The
two circle around each other like
boxers, attacking and retreating as
part of their obsessive, passionate
relationship. May's motel room
door is repeatedly bashed in, until
eventually just the frame is left.
Then May's current boyfriend
shows up, Martin (Randy Quaid).
This marks the shift in the movie's
momentum, and turns it into the
popular, money-making film that it
undoubtedly will be. Martin is a
small-town gardener who waters the
high school football field before arriving on his date, wearing an
orange leisure suit and bow tie. He
becomes the outside figure to which
the other characters must confess,
in the tradition of Who's Afraid of
Virginia Woolf. There's a deep
dark connection between Eddie,
May and the Old Man.
The Old Man is Harry Dean
Stanton, last seen in Paris, Texas
(also written by Shepard). He's got
the dark glassy eye of an alcoholic
and is persistently after Eddie's
stash of tequila. He lives in a rusted
trailer in the middle of a junkyard
behind the motel, rocks in an old
chair and plays harmonica beside
an empty picture frame. Very surreal. And he tells stories in a low,
mellow voice like Bing Crosby's.
There is also, unbelievably, a
Countess who shows up at the
motel. She was Eddie's last fling.
It's this Countess, with her high
teased hair, tights, diamonds and
high heels, standing in front of her
Mercedes Benz that suddenly, briefly, turns the movie into a rock
video. She uses a .357 Magnum.
This movie has everything.
There's a big explosion at the end
too.
But aside from this "exploded
play" that Altman has created, the
movie deals specifically with the
characters' awareness of their own
past and how film can comment on
A whole lot of hailing going on
B> USE MAtiEK
It is hard to believe that
something so lame could inspire so
much controversy: the only offensive thing about Jean-Luc
Godard's, Hail Mary (Je Vous
Salue, Marie) is how terribly dull it
is.
Hail Mary
Directed b\ Jean-Luc Godard
Opens Fridat, Januar> 31st
al the Ridge
The Roman Catholic hierarchy
has dubbed it blasphemous and
even the more liberal of the
church's critics insist Hail Mary is
an irreverant, tastelss, parody of
the Virgin Birth. Merely by virtue
of his subject-matter Godard verges
dangerously close towards
blashphemy.
There are some, shall we say.
playful parallels with the Gospels.
For example, the Virgin Mary i.s a
sober young Swiss woman obsessed
with basketball, Joseph is a taxi
driver and the Archangel Gabriel
drives to the Annunciation (at a gas
station) in a cab. But Hail Mary is a
tasteful treatment of a lender subject by a film maker who seems to
sincerely want to explore something
a   little   more   transcendent   and
spiritual than usual.
Predictably the film is charged
with being vulgar. Marie (Myriem
Roussel) is seen nude a number of
times. Yet none of this nudity seemed excessive or unnecessary. In the
inimitable style or Godard these
scenes arc beautifully rendered and
certainly nothing that a contemporary film-going audience would
find pornographic. It' anything, he
treats women as too sacred. He sees
them as, due to their role as the
child bearers, bestowed with a
superior knowledge and a stronger
link to the creator. If anything he is
guilty of convoluted sexism.
There are things in the film that
are annoying. The plot verges on
painfully simplistic — woman gets
pregnant and spiritual, even though
an agnostic virgin, boy marries her
even though he isn't lcsponsiblc
and isn't convinced about Who is
(boy never gets spiritual). The baby-
is born, grows up, and the woman >
gets hedonistic and wears lipstick,
the end. All that rivetting action is
interspersed with music by Bach,
Dvorak and Coltrane as well as
philosophical musings about life,
the universe and everything by-
various characters.
Actually Godard's film is not
nearly as enjoyable as the 25 minute
long Hail Mary Part 1, directed by
Godard's associate Anne-Marie
Mieville. It has nothing to do with
Godard's film despite the title and
how both of them have main
characters named Marie. It is a
charming piece about a young girl
(Rebecca Hampton) whose parents
have separated. She is a haunting
lovely child who longs for the
strong feeling of love that she experienced as an infant. She is tender
and unaccustomed to the harshness
of existence. It is a touching portrayal of a heart-hurt sadness.
What is truly curious about the
controversy surrounding this film is
that no one has objected to what. in
our modern secular society, Godard
is saying about spirituality. He
de\otcd a great deal of dialogue to
discussions of the relationship between (he soul, the spiiii and the
body as well as the utterly taboo
subject of God. Coming from .lean-
Luc Godard. a man who ha? in the
past espoused his own brand of
Marxism, makes it all the more
remarkable. Potentially intriguing
subject matter . . it's too bad it
had to be so relentlessly dull . . .
the past. The other guests at the
motel are subtly woven into Eddie
and May's own story, so that
memories become tangible. Eddie
and May eventually tell Martin
about moments in their childhood,
but while we hear what they want to
believe happened, we see what really happened.
Humour comes from the Old
Man and Martin, and especially
from Eddie. He lopes around the
motel, leaning forward as though
he's riding a horse, takes swigs of
tequila and winces, watches May
through her room window and
awkwardly tries to make contact.
This is only the second time
Shepard has acted in one of his own
plays. For one night, he played in
Cowboy Mouth, co-written by Patti
Smith. He should do it more often.
At one point he's lying on the floor,
bugging Martin as they wait for
May to come out of the bathroom.
Eddie's cowboy hat swings back
and forth like a puppet balanced on
a two-by-four while Eddie gives
some mocking sweet advice to Martin.
The soundtrack is good country
music, eight songs written and performed by Sandy Rogers, Shepard's
sister, and the cinematography is
excellent (lots of shots through windows and an especially good one
through  the mud-spattered windshield of Eddie's truck) and done by
Canadian Pierre Mignot.
By MAIDA PRICE
Your slightly-strange family and
the skeletons in its closets are going
to look positively banal once you've
seen Buried Child.
This Pulitzer prize winning play
by Sam Shepard should reveal
home truths about every family, but
in this production the acting, while
always competent, is often not
strong enough to release the universal meanings of the play. ■
Buried Child
Directed by Robert Garfat
at Dorothy Somerset Studio
until February 1st
The return of Dodge and Halie's
sons and grandson to the decaying
family home and the consequent
unearthing of the buried child,
emotionally and literally, is an event
capable of moving off the stage and
into real life. Yet in this recent
Dorothy Somerset product the actors cannot always sustain the intensity of the piece, allowing their
characters to flatten and edge
towards caricature, they become
merely a bunch of interesting
crazies in a farmhouse in Illinois.
The best performance comes
from Don Johnson, who rises well
above competency to give a convincing portrayal of Dodge, the aged
patriarch of the family. His Dodge
shifts effortlessly from malevolent
prodder to querulous old man and
back again as the action unfolds
around this pivotal figure!
Every line Dodge utters is
perfectly delivered, from the opening scene, as he sits on the couch
trading barbs with the unseen
Halie, to his final speech, the darkly
comic recitation of his will as he lies
on the floor. Although marred
slightly by overdone facial and head
movements in the opening scene,
Johnson's portrayal evened out as
the play progressed. He has the
power lo sustain his role at center
stage.
Others in the cast did have their
moments as well. A particularly
strong image was the symbolic
burial of the sleeping Dodge by his
eldest son Tilden, played by Peter
Giaschi, who carefully arranged the
corn husks over the body and then
stood surveying his work with a
beautifully detached air.
Karen Austin is Halie, and as a
voice upstairs calling down to
Dodge she is very effective. It is unfortunate that the disjunctions between her appearance and her role
disrupt her onstage presence.
Other moments which should
carry power fall strangely flat, as
when Bradley (Christopher Beck)
orders Shelley (Beatrice Boepple) to
open her mouth, and then sticks his
fingers into it. The heavy sexual
connotations and the power carried
by Bradley are conveyed weakly,
and this serves to lessen the later
shift in power onto Shelley, the
catalyst who allows the revelations
about the buried child. \
Despite having too much play for
his actors, Robert Garfat has done
a solid job in directing this. He pays
careful attention to the thematic
concerns of the piece, and small
details are not overlooked: when
Vince sits down on the couch to
take over Dodge's place his feet fall
into the same position as Dodge's
previously took. As well, Garfat's
usual good sense of pacing is evident here, with only a slight lag in
the middle of the final scene as
Vince is kicking Bradley's leg
around the room. Sound effects,
another Garfat hallmark, are also
good, and he is well supported by
his technical people. •
Runaway Train needs quick crash course
By RICHARD WOLOSHEN
That Runaway Train is such a
disappointment can't be blamed
solely on Jon Voight's performance; almost everyone in the film
embarrasses him or herself with acting so shrill and hammy as to make
Sylvester Stallone look like Olivier
by comparison. No, Voight's
characterization is on the same level
and in relative terms is no worse
than any other in the movie.
Runaway Train
directed by Andrei Konchalovsky
at the Dunbar Cinema
The basic premise is also fairly
sound, and could have resulted in a
good action film. Two convicts,
Manny and Buck (Jon Voight and
Eric Roberts), escape from an
Alaskan penitentiary on a small
freight train, unaware that the conductor has died and that the
locomotive is hurtling at ever-
increasing speed towards various
deadly obstacles. Their trip is
monitored by harried railroad officials as well as by the psychotic
warden   of  the  prison   (John  P.
Ryan). The convicts' trip is further
enlivened by the appearance on the
train of a young railworker (Rebecca DeMornay).
On paper, these elements make
an exciting, if standard, action
movie. On film, the screenwriters
and the director (Andrei Konchalovsky) conspire to create as
cliche-ridden a motion picture as
was ever churned out in Hollywood
in the 1930's.
The script has it all: a legendary
older con, Voight, who has seen it
all, done it all, knows it all, is a
crazed loner, and whose every move
is cheered by his cellmates; an over-
eager younger con, Roberts, whose
clumsiness, dopiness, and puppy-
dog devotion to the older con
endear him to one and all; a young
woman, Demornay, accidentally
thrown together with the escapees,
who ends up helping them more
than her conscience would normally
allow; and a brutal, relentless
warden, Ryan, engaged in a battle
of wits with Voight and determined
to track and punish the prisioners.
There is nothing inherently
wrong   with   jamming   so   many
stereotypes into one script. In films
like this, the simpler the characters,
the easier it is for the audience to
identify with them and their
predicaments. Nevertheless, even
the most rousing action flick should
be tempered by a little subtlety or
intelligence, either in the script or in
the performances. In Runaway
Train, the actors are made to rant,
rave and scream with wide-eyed
hysteria.
The script encourages this
hysteria, and the direction
underlines it. Andrei Konchalovsky
spares us no overused prison-film
device, right down to a mournful
harmonica solo echoing from some
distant cell that would make James
Cagney and Edward G. Robinson
blush. There are a few deftly handled action sequences, such as an attack on Voight during a prison boxing match and some freight-car
acrobatics on the train, but these
are brief and their effectiveness is
more than outweighed by the many
close-ups of the three protagonists
at various stages of emotional
stress, and by the ludicrous final sequence of Voight standing atop a
disconnected engine-car riding off
into the wintery wastes with the
warden now prisoner. The scene is
intercut with the sad, staring faces
of the convicts behind bars back at
the prison, all to the strains of
Vivaldi's Gloria!
As mentioned, Jon Voight's acting is really no worse than that of
anyone else's in the movie, but his
credentials render this particular
performance a real curiosity piece.
The hallmark of Voight's best work
has always been understated intelligence, as in Coming Home
(1978). His efforts in genre remakes
like The Champ (1979), or
"rehashes" such as this film (usually acompanied by impossibly
phoney tough-guy accents), have
resulted in overblown, ham-fisted
portrayals that seem to be at complete odds with this fine actor's
talents, and incidentally make a
mockery of the Golden Globe
award he recently (and incredibly)
won for this film.
Let's hope Runaway Train remains an unfortunate oddity for
Voight, as it is for anyone unfortunate enough to pay to see it. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 31,1986
F
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v
I'M DEPRESSED.
WHY?
I FAILED ALL MY
MIDTERMS.AND
MY TERM PAPER
is dueyesterM
I KNOW HOW YOU
FEEL.T/VEVER
HAVE  ENOUGH
TIME  TOOOALt-
MY HOMEWORK.
Yah! mi wo if
I swrrcH
CHAMMELS?
)(fr^^
SZE:
B-Lot a waste of money
The board of governors decision
to turn B-lot into a giant toll booth
has to be the most blatant attempt
at highway robbery this university
has seen. Mr. Hutchinson has said
the daily fee paid by students will be
about   $24.   To   do   this   means
Help Rick's
fund effort
This week is the Rick Hansen
"Man in Motion" fundraising
week. In order to help Rick on his
journey to raise money for Spinal
Cord Research, and to honour one
of UBC's most distinguished
graduates, I am requesting all student organizations to get involved
in the drive. Please hold benefit
events or set up posters and donation boxes in your building. You
may pick up posters and donation
boxes from the AMS Programs Office, SUB 220 or phone AMS Programs Coordinator, Bruce Paisley
at 228-5336.
On Friday, Feb. 7, 1986 at the
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Alberta
Golden Bear's in a benefit game for
Rick Hansen, the half time show
participants will be Rick Hansen's
wheelchair basketball team. Also,
Chris Hansen, Rick's sister, will be
at the game on behalf of Rick, to
officially accept all donations collected.
Please collect money from your
respective organizations and present Rick's sister with your donation. Rick needs your support,
show you care and get involved!!!
Groups presenting donations at
the half time of the game, please
contact Bruce Paisley for confirmation.
Nindy Duggal
Chair
Rick Hansen
Fund Raising Committee
feeding the machine twenty cents
each day for the 122 regular days of
school. Two dimes, not likely. We
can expect to pay a quarter, which
raises the fee to $30. But currently
we can park in B-lot all year for
$24, that means at twenty cents the
fee becomes $73, a 67% increase,
unless of course we pay seven cents
a day.
Cost aside, what about the
reasoning the new parking system
will reduce congestion in the mornings? Well what about the new line
ups caused by people fumbling for
change, caught without quarters,
waiting to be let out at 4:30 or 5:00?
This system is currently in use at
Douglas College, where it has proved to be anything but a traffic
mover. As for the gate closing when
B-lot is full, what about the person
who discovers that there are no
spaces wide enough, or that another
car has taken up two spaces?
Remember how people parked at
Christmas?
How can the board of governors
feel justified in spending $100,000
on a system that will be more a
hindrance than an asset. A $100,000
that could be used to hire much
needed T.A.s, or used for loans,
bursaries and scholarships.
The Ubyssey is cracking down on
fake letters. So, while S.
Gluzenheimer, Erick Chu, Wayne
R. Sankey, Michael Glenister and
others submitted letters typed triple
spaced on a 70-character line, we
can't run their letters until a staff
member has seen their ID or phoned them. If you do provide ID, we
reserve the right to edit for grammar, brevity and taste, and to
refuse sexist, racist or homophobic
letters. That said, we do love hearing from you.
Christian needs charity?
Since I have been attacked, I may
as well respond. The segments ofv
my previous letter quoted by Susan
Thornwaite et al. (Self-respecting
men and women, Jan. 21) were
taken completely out of context and
represented to mean something
quite different from what they were
intended to. Maybe these women
have an axe to grind and deliberately misrepresented my comments;
more likely they simply did not
understand what I meant.
What I have to say to them is
this. Maybe you four do not feel
that your feelings or opinions have
ever been repressed: many people
feel that way. Many others, men
and women both, do not (and not
only in engineering). Yes, I have
met some of the female engineering
students at UBC. And I have heard
some of them complain that they
feel threatened, afraid to express
their feelings for fear of ridicule and
ostracism. If you four have never
felt this way, more power to you.
Maybe you were sufficiently well
conditioned as children that you
have never felt any need to say or
do things that would make men (or
women) who have stereotyped ideas
about how women should behave
feel threatened. Or maybe you just
don't give a damn. But accept that
some people feel differently from
you: from the hostile tone of your
letter I suspect that this is
something that you find rather difficult.
Jim Christian
science 4
B-lot has seen a lot of improvements recently, new lights are
going up, the dusty gravel was paved over and lines were painted,
albeit the parking spaces are a tad
too narrow. B-lot is still a bargain
even at $30.00, but not at $91.25
(one year at 25 cents).
The best thing to do, and the
cheapest, would be to scrap the
whole project. A few dollars lost is
better than $100,000 wasted. If this
is not feasible to the board of governors, the least they could do would
be to issue magnetic strip keys to
each user. Each key would plug into
the gate machine to allow passage,
either in or out for regular users,.
occasional users could still pay by
change.
Kyle R. Kirkwood
science 3
We're bugged
You can bug them, you can hug them, you can tap them, you can slap
them.
We're talking about Canadian phones and the fallacy of private phone
calls.
The Law Reform Commission of Canada said yesterday police wiretaps
are 20 times as common in Canada as they are in the United States.
At the same time deputy prime minister Erid Neilsen has admitted to
listening to closed Liberal caucus meetings during the Diefenbaker years. Is
nothing sacred?
We have to wonder about trust in our supposedly free society when the
police, who are charged with protecting citizens, clandestinely eavesdrop
on them instead.
They are noted for their broad definition of what is a threat to society,
often including disarmament and social reform organizations in their "hit
lists."
So, if the official opposition was spied upon by man now our unofficial
prime minister, how can any member of the university community involved
in political agitation, however benign, assume their activities are private
from a judicially approved police surveillance operation.
They can't, and neither can any other Canadian. This is a sad comment
on our society. The government and the judicial system should interfere
with our right to communicate privately only under the most grave circumstances, and certainly not as often as they do now.
Letters
Esperanto course offered at SFU
Increasingly the business community needs people trained in
foreign languages in order to effectively compete in the international
marketplace, in countries such as
Germany, Japan and China where,
for all their good will towards
English, people know that it is the
buyers who determine the conditions. Suppliers who serve in the
language of the consumers have the
best chance for making a sale. As
Germany and Japan have become
economic powers in their own right,
English, as the language of the
U.S., has lost its monopoly as the
international language of business.
Learning a foreign language,
however, is easier said than done,
because learning a language to any
reasonable degree of fluency means
learning a different variant of a
system so intrinsic to our lives that
it seems almost as "natural" as
walking. Thus, high motivation is
required.
Most students surely do not study
foreign languages at UBC for love
of foreign cultures so it is important
to give the students a feeling that
learning the foreign language is a
pleasurable experience, while
teaching important grammatical
concepts so that students end up
speaking the language in a socially
acceptable way.
One way of easing students into a
foreign language is by first presenting to them concisely a language
whose grammatical constructs are
very clear and which is related both
to the learner's own language and
to the "target" language. For centuries Latin was used to introduce
speakers of English to other
languages, but there are a number
of problems with using Latin as an
introductory language.
Firstly, its large system of conjugations and declensions is bulky
and very irregular, which tends to
overwhelm the English speaker
rather than give him/her a
pleasurable introduction to foreign
language and secondly, the community of fluent speakers of Latin
is so small that there is little point in
the student making the great effort
to reach fluency in Latin.
In recent years, however, innovative educators in countries as
diverse as Germany, Yugoslavia,
Brazil and China have been trying
another "introductory" language,
Esperanto, with great success.
Esperanto presents its grammatical
concepts clearly and without exception and its word stock is related
not only to languages such as
English, French and Spanish but
also to German and Russian.
Thanks to its regularity it is
relatively easy to learn, which
means that, with proper study,
students can learn to use it for conversation, letter-writing and reading
in much shorter time than would be
necessary to reach the same level in
another language.
This means: a) the student quick--
ly sees that learning a foreign
language need not be hard (and this
positive attitude will greatly ease the
learning of another foreign
language) and b) many people (with
diverse interests) already speak it
fluently, so that it is worthwhile
continuing the study of Esperanto
to communicate in the community
of Esperanto-speakers (Esperan-
tists).
The Esperantists of UBC would
like to share the opportunity to
learn Esperanto with others and are
therefore, in cooperation with the
SFU Esperanto Club, sponsoring
an intensive course designed to give
learners   a   basic   competence   in
Esperanto. This course will be held
at SFU on the weekend of Feb. 1 &
2 (9 a.m.-4 p.m. both days). Details
are available from the Esperanto
Information Centre, tel. 298-6019.
Paul Hopkins
Mark Fettes
students from SFU
THE UBYSSEY
January 31, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Let's eat at the SUB," cried Debbie Lo. "Yeah," agreed David Ferman and Neil Lucente. "No, no,
no," cried Evelyn Jacob and Ronald Stewart in horror, as Maida Price, Kenneth Sallitt and Richard
Woloshen slumped slowly down their seats in disgust. "Let's go to the William Tell," suggested Lise
Magee. "Yes, yes," said Camille Dionne, Mary Cameron, and Sarah Millin. "Wait . . ." screamed
Virginia McKenna as Stephen Wisenthal pulled up beside the drive-in window of a strange little
building with a big yellow sign. "God, no", moaned Chris Wong, Jennifer Lyall and Dan Andrews.
Hunter S. Thompson and Bob Freeman started to fashion some kind of noose with their seat belts
while Jeffrey Kibble and Tom Wolfe began to pray. Meanwhile, Steve ordered himself twelve Big-
whatchimicallits and subsequently died of a big attack! Todd Wong pastelled out over the vice
page at 3 a.m. Courier time. Gordon Clark put in a cameo appearance. Friday, January 31, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Was disaster inevitable?
By DUNCAN STEWART
Tuesday, January 28 provoked a
lot of different reactions in people.
The explosion of the shuttle
Challenger affected everybody, and
it is a little hard to understand all of
the reactions. Some who heard the
news right after their first class raised their eyebrows, shrugged, and
went about their usual business.
They, like all of us, knew that a
disaster like this was bound to happen sooner or later, and that each
perspectives
successful shuttle launch was merely a postponement of the inevitable.
But not everybody reacted in this
accepting way. Some older people
compared this disaster with the feelings that they had when they heard
that John F. Kennedy had been
shot. Wednesday will turn out to be
day that some people will remember
the rest of their lives, and will
always remember where they were
when they first heard the news. I
don't know about you, but I felt
that way. That explosion meant a
lot more to me than seven lives or
the destruction of a billion dollar
piece of technology. I wonder why
I spent my first hours that morning watching the television footage,
trying to find some sense in that
minute and a half. Time after time I
heard the words of the tower, heard
the shuttle commander respond,
then watched those tiny flames
creep up the hull. Within
milliseconds it was all gone, only a
fireball and the two horned vapour
trails of the boosters left on the
screen. No matter how often it was
explained or analysed, I still refused
to accept what had happened.
Then I had to take a walk across
campus to deliver a package. Going
past students, people just walking
from one place to another. They
probably knew all about it, but it
just didn't make sense, that they
could walk as if nothing had happened. I wanted to run up and grab
them, to shake them, to ask them,
didn't they know what had happened?
I'm not really sure what it was I
wanted them to do. How should
they act differently? How should
they move, how should they talk
after 8:29 a.m.? The problem was,
my world had changed, but the people hadn't.
The Space Shuttle was the
culmination of everything humans
have stood for since we first left the
apes a step and a light-year behind.
Humanity is thought and reason,
and the shuttle was the ultimate.
Maybe not the ultimate of faith,
.those  are  cathedrals  or  temples.
Maybe not the ultimate of creativity, that is some poem or painting.
Challenger was the ultimate of
science. It was our most complex
creation, and as I saw it, as close to
perfection as we have ever attained.
I'm not saying I believe in the
following, but the whole thing
makes some kind of sense if you
believe that mankind was not meant
to leave earth. If we are being
presumptuous, and some God or
Gods disapprove of what we are doing, what better way of showing it?
Those films of the disaster show an
annihilation that was so swift and
so complete that one can almost imagine a divine hand of retribution
closing about the shuttle.
Even if such is not the case, the
shuttle launches to which we had
grown so accustomed are not
perfect. While I knew that
technology could not be failureproof, I subconsciously believed
that nothing could go wrong with
the shuttle. It may have been
foolish, but I believed in the shuttle
and in technology. The atomic
bomb must have caused similar
feelings to those alive in 1945. But
all I know is that the explosion of
the shuttle brought an end to an
ultimate belief in science.
Other shuttles will leave our
planet, and technology will rise to
new heights and accomplishments. I
do believe that humanity's destiny
transcends one very small planet,
and that our accomplishments will
number more than destruction and
hatred. But the failure of the shuttle
makes that a little harder to believe
than before. Apollo 11 left a
message on the moon that stands as
the highest ideal that we can aspire
to. "We came in peace for all
mankind." Challenger hasn't
changed that ideal, it has just made
it more difficult to reach. And
maybe that's the biggest tragedy of
the episode. Maybe that's why I
want to go out and hit something
Duncan Stewart is a third year
arts student about to finish his term
as Alma Mater Society director of
external affairs, which doesn 't ex-
: elude responsibility for outer space.
RICK HANSEN DAYS AT UBC
FEBRUARY 5r 6, 7
Schedule of Events:
Wed., Thurs., Fri.—SUB Concourse—
11 a.m.-3 p.m.
"MAN IN MOTION" DISPLAY
T-Shirt Sales, Audio-Visual Presentation
Thurs., Feb. 6th-SUB Party Room - 3 p.m.-8 p.m.
RICK HANSEN FUNDRAISING BZZR GARDEN
$1 Door Donation —Music by CITR —Hosted by FIJI'S
Fri., Feb. 7th —SUB Race Centre, lntramurals-12:30 p.m.
RUN FOR RICK
$5 Suggested Donations. 3 km & 6.8 km routes
UBC vs. U. of Alberta Basketball-8 p.m.
Women's Basketball—6:45 p.m.-War Mem. Gym
Free to AMS Students. Donations Suggested
HALF-TIME: WHEELCHAIR GAME
Vancouver Wheelwings vs. UBC All Stars
— Message to UBC from Rick Hansen
-BZZR GARDEN at Game
(kwal#e»tee)n. 1. the degree of excellence of a thing 2. superiority 3.
higher in order; status; etc. 4. above
average 5. Kinko's
kinko's
5706 University Blvd.      222-1688
M-Th 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
\\\ Oh What A Fun ill
\\\ PLACE TO BE    '"
Home of the frosted mug
Thru' Feb. 1st-Night Shade
Feb. 3-8-David Sawchuk
###
All groups wishing to make donations at the game please contact
Bruce Paisley, 228-5336
HERTZ ft UBC
HIVE BECOME * TEM
Simply present your UBC identification at Hertz on
Broadway, and you will receive your special
UBC/HERTZ discount sticker. This sticker is valid at
all Hertz locations worldwide.
VANS
CARS
TRUCKS
For more information call:
HERTZ ON BROADWAY
731-9296
1322 W. Broadway
Open 7 days a week 7:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
The #1 way to rent a car or truck
Hertz rents Ford & other vehicles
WORLD  WIDE   RESERVATIONS  CALL  1-800-268-1311 Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 31, 1986
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TODAY
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Speaker: Gerry Weiner, noon, SUB 207.
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible and government teaching, 7 p.m., SUB
213.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bzzr garden, 3:30 p.m., SUB 205.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes,
you may take any or all of the classes offered just
S45. 9:30-10:20 a.m. and noon, SUB 208.
AMS ROCKERS
General meeting, important to all members,
noon, SUB 241B.
THE UBYSSEY
Staff meeting, 3:30 p.m., SUB 241K.
AUOIOPHILE CLUB
Organizational meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 215.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for winter dance classes, you may
tak any or all of the classes offered for only $45,
noon, SUB 208.
COALITION AGAINST SEXISM ON CAMPUS
Petition table, noon-2:30, SUB foyer.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible and government class, 7 p.m., SUB 215.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Cantonese conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
UBC JAPAN EXCHANGE CLUB
Broomball, 11:45 p.m.-12:45 a.m.. Winter sports
center.
UBC SAILING CLUB
New members wanted, noon, SUB 58.
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
General meeting, new people always welcome,
5:30 p.m., room 142 Astronomy and geophysics
building.
DANCE HORIZONS
1986 program "Two sides to the wind", Tickets
$6, 8:30 p.m.. Centennial theatre.  North Vancouver.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
UBC hosts an indoor women's field hockey tournament featuring the best club teams from the
lower mainland, 6-11 p.m., the Armouries.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENT'S ASSOCIATION
Bzzr garden, 4-7:30 p.m., Buch lounge.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Novice rally, 6:30 p.m., old bus,toop, in front of
new bookstore.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE ANO MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Simon Rosenblum: "the cruise missile, star
wars, and Canada", noon, SUB 205.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Old bronze dance practice, noon, SUB partyroom.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD SWIMMING AND DIVING
UBC hosts SFU clan and the Victoria vikings in a
B.C. university meet starting at 2 p.m. in the
Aquatic Centre. UBC students admitted free
with AMS card.
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
UBC hosts day two of a three day indoor
women's tournament at the Armouries. 9 a.m. to
6 p.m.
INTRAMURALS
Badminton tournament, all day, Osbourne gym.
DANCE HORIZONS
t986 program — two sides to the wind, 8:30
p.m., Centennial theatre. North Vancouver,
tickets $6 at the door or AMS box office.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Bowling tournament against ISA-SFU, 9 p.m.,
Thunderbird lanes, 16th and Lonsdale, North
Van. Contact committee members for information. Also contact Rustum I985-9436) for details
about the Blackcomb ski-trip Feb. 20.
SUNDAY
THUNDERBIRD FIELD HOCKEY
Final day of UBC indoor women's tournament, 9
a.m. to 6 p.m., armouries.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon-4p.m., SUB ballroom.
INTRAMURALS
Badminton tournament, all day, Osbourne gym.
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Worship service, 10 a.m., UBC day care gym,
2845 Acadia road.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Variety  show  organizational  meeting,   all are
welcome, 2 p.m., Asian centre 604.
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
Belief and the pursuit of knowledge-challenge or
conflict?    First    presentation,    faith   and   the
economy: labor relations: Dr. Mark Thompson, 8
p.m., St. Mark's college music room.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Cultural and variety show, tickets $4, children
6-12 $2, 6 p.m. SUB ballroom.
UBC ARCHERY CLUB
Regular practice, all newcomers welcome, 7:30
p.m., armouries.
First there was soccer . . . then
indoor soccer. Then there was field
hockey . . . and now indoor field
hockey. And it's just as exciting as
ever, especially since UBC's ace
squad is featured in the women's
indoor field hockey tournament to
be held Friday from 6 p.m. to 11
p.m. in the Armouries. The
Thunderbirds former Canadian
champions and leading contenders
for this year, will be one of many
top troops trying for the tourney
trophy.
Are you tired of violence against
women? Want to learn violence
against creeps or how to avoid getting into a dangerous situation in
the first place? Check out the
women's self defence course offered by the AMS Women's Centre. There are enough rapes and
assaults on this campus already
without you contributing to the
statistics. Register tonight, 7 p.m.,
in Brock 203.
All letter writers and tweens people. Take heed and note this down.
The Ubyssey will publish only once
in the week Feb. 10 to 14. So
deadline for letters and tweens is
Wednesday Feb. 12. But wait.
Don't stop reading. The Ubyssey
will only be publishing once the
week after. Deadline for the Feb. 19
issue is Tuesday, Feb. 18. You have
been warned.
AQUASPORT
$io°°
$3.oo
1668 W. 1st Ave. Vancouver
Performance Suits & Equipment
OFF any women's suit
OFF any men's suit
with AMS STUDENT CARD
Swimwear by
ARENA     SPEEDO     HIND
1736-6446
OFFER GOOD UNTIL FEB. 28, 1986
vs JERRY RUBIN
Ss   "The Debate of the Decade"      ^tf***'
"     SAT. FEB. 8th
ORPHEUM
Networking 7 pm
Great Debate 8 pm \
Yippie vs Yuppie ^ '
Questions 9-11 pm
\ RESERVE YOUR
.A TICKETS NOW ^
All VTC/CBO outlets, Eaton's, Woodward's, Mall Info Centres, AMS UBC or charge
by phone 280-4444; Common Ground, Healthy Gourmet, Banyen & Duthie Books
MONDAY
ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Redeye pancake brunch,  all proceeds to the
Variety club telethon. 8 a.m.-12 p.m., Cheeze
factory (between CEME and Macleod).
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes,
you may take any or all of the dance classes offered for just $45, noon, SUB 208.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance practice, noon, SUB partyroom.
TUESDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginners' Mandarin conversation class, noon,
Buch B317.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., SUB 205.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Tutorials, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Brock hall 350.
SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
BALLET U8C JAZZ
Registration for unlimited winter dance classes,
you may take any or all of the classes offered for
just $46, 11:30 a.m.-12:20 p.m., SUB 208.
MARANTHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon. Brock hall 302.
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
Lecture by Daniel Liebskind on "three lessons in
architecture" noon, Lassere 102.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Executive meeting, noon, executive office.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance practice, noon, SUB partyroom.
Vve always had a
soft spot in my
heart for you! The
Ubyssey is now
accepting Valentine
messages. Forms
available in Room
266 SUB.
&w-
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THE CLASSiFEEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial —
1 day $4.50; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.00 and 66c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977
5 - COMING EVENTS
AUSTRALIA-NEW ZEALAND FILM-
NIGHT Feb. 4. Planetarium. Camping
(Kontiki) Adventure Tours/Biking. Pre-
registration ($3) only at ANZA TRAVEL,
201-1754 W. Broadway, Vane, 734-7725.
VAN. C.S.F. PRESENTS "Nutritional
Management of Depression" by Janice
Berg (M.Sc. Human Nutritionl Feb. 1st, 8
p.m., A130 — Langara College. Admission:
$5. Students: $4.
FOR A TRULY "SMASHING" experience.
"FROG AND PEACH" 3:30-5:30 p.m. and
9:30 p.m. onwards. 4473 W. 10th.
228-8815.
SMASH your worries, FROG AND PEACH
3:30-5:30 p.m.  and 9:30 p.m.  onwards.
4473 W. 10th Ave. 228-8815.
30 - JOBS
STUDENTS' DELIGHT. Earn $400-$1000
per month, part-time working from your
home. Call Mr. Morgan, 687-3927.
WANTED: Friendly, energetic person for
part-time reception work in family doctor's
office. Good telephone manner & typing
skills essential. 731-8201.
WANTED COMPETENT BLUES, jazz or
folk musicians. Frog and Peach, 4473 W.
10th, 228-8815.
80 - TUTORING
35 - LOST
LOST JAN. 20: A 6 ft. black mohair scarf
near Sedge Et Bus Stop Cafe. Please phone
Jo Ann, 228-8631.
LOST: Ladies black wallet, SUB Main Concourse. Reward. Wed., Jan. 28. 1:15 p.m.
Ph. Lenore, 277-3951.
TUTORING IN
ENGLISH
Private Assistance for students
at all levels.
W.S. Parker, B.A., M.A.
733-4534
85 - TYPING
40 - MESSAGES
The Vancouver Institute
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
Dr. Birute Galdikas
Archeology, SFU
ORANGUTANS: PEOPLE OF
THE FOREST
Saturday, Feb. 1
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building, 8:15 p.m. Free
11 - FOR SALE - Private
'72  VW  VAN.   Good  cond.,  2nd   motor,
radials & 2 snows. AM/FM cassette, $950.
• 922-8238 after 6 p.m.
640 K M.S.-DOS lap top computer, 80x25
line display. Fully portable, only 12 lbs. Et 4
hrs. free training, 10 free disks. Only
$123/mo. Phone Capricorn, 681-5713.
KAYPRO 16, 10 MB Hard Disk. IBM corfipat.
512 KB RAM; 360 KB Flop. Drive. Internal
mono monitor, RGB £> composite outputs,
colour graphics, para. & serial ports. MS —
DOS & Menus, W.P. & Filemerge, DB
manag. sys., s. sheet, Telecomm., Basic,
Tutorials. Still on warranty. Price new:
$5700. Sell for $3975. Danny 732-0157 wk.
20 - HOUSING	
INEXPENSIVE ROOM Er BOARD $350
(double occupancy). $400 (single!. Includes
a VCR, TV, sauna, laundry facilities Et use
of IBM Computer. 222-4470. Ask for lan.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PRIVATE INSTRUCTION in vocal and key
board performance. Professional European
artist gives supplementary training re: style
and performance practices. Call: 687-7377
Eva. Location? Your Choice.
PREGNANT? 731-1122
Free tests—confidential help.
SECTION 563-The Griggle Group, Happy
Pseudo-Valentin's Day! Remember: When
life gives you ankle biters, make lemonade!
Mom and Bobo.
LOOKING FOR RIDE, tired of bus. Do you
drive to campus from/thru West End? Will
help pay gas. Dave, 682-0128.
CONGRATULATIONS to the new exec's
of Alpha Phi! Hope you're enjoying Mardi
Grasl! Happy weekend. A Phi-Be.
NEEDED: Witnesses to Wesbrook Mall
accident 6 p.m. Mon. Jan. 27 involving
silver sports car. 228-3393 or 224-3036.
PREGNANT  &  DISTRESSED? We are a
childless couple desiring to adopt. Perhaps
we can assist each other. Please respond in
confidence with your name Er address to
Pauline, P.O. Box 48552, Bentall Centre,
Vane, B.C. V7X 1A3.
MAY THE SACRED HEART OF JESUS be
praised, adored & glorified throughout the
world forever. Amen. Say 6 times a day for
9 days & remember to promise publication.
Your prayer will be answered no matter
how impossible it may seem to you before
the 9th day.
65 - SCANDALS
CLINT, ARNIE, Kirk, Bobo, Joan, Mir,
Marc, Big G, Greg, Karen, Ben, Alan,
Astrid, and Joanne,
Thanks guys —I loved it!!
Love Darcy (Mom)
YOU STICK IN MY MIND like peanut
butter sticks to the roof of your mouth.
Send you Valentine's message in The
Ubyssey, Feb. 13th. Form available Rm.
266 SUB. $2.50 for 3 lines.
UNFROGETABLE SMASHING ludicrous
prices. FROG AND PEACH, 3:30-5:30 p.m.
and 9:30 p.m. onwards. 4473 W. 10th.
228-8815.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write, we type theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027.
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing Er word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
TYPING FOR YOU. $1.00 per page, double-
spaced. Call Marlene at 736-4675 anytime.
WORD WEAVERS Word Processing
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
TERM PAPERS & ESSAYS. Minimum
notice. 222-4661, Mon.-Fri. 12-5 p.m. only.
FAST. ACCURATE TYPING. Student rates.
All types of typing jobs. Fraser-Kingsway
area. Paula, 873-2227.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING. Student
discount. High quality work. 10th Et
Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
SPEAKEASY TYPIST REGISTRY. Find a
typist or register as a typist. No charge.
SUB Concourse.
W/P 8- TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mepts., essays, tech., equal., letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
MASTER TYPIST. Expert wordprocessing.
Very fast. $1.50 per double-spaced page.
228-3881 or 224-0866. RACHEL.
ANY TIME. Term papers, theses, etc. $1.25
per page. Cad Chrystai Typing Service.
5940 Crown Street. Ph. 261-3157.
GALAXIE WORD SHOP for all your WP Et
typing needs. P/U del. on campus. Stud.
•ates. Mastercard, Visa. 985-4250.
70 - SERVICES
TUITION
Weight-training workshop with REC.
UBC Saturday, Feb. 8th, 10:00 a..-4:00
p.m. War Memorial Gym, Room 211 E>
213. Register EARLY Room 203 War
Memorial Gym. Students $15.00. Others
$20.00. Suits ALL strength training
needs. Fabulous instructor.
A SMASH  a day,  etc.,  etc.  FROG  AND
PEACH. 4473 W. 10th, 228-8815.
75 - WANTED
LEFT HANDERS needed for Neurological
Study. UBC. Involves MRI Brain Scan.
Volunteers call 228-7390 or 228-7367.
Student Rates $1.50/pg. db. sp. text
Theses - Equations - Reports
All work done on Micom Word Processor
FAST PROFESSIONAL SERVICE
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING
201-636 W. Broadway
876-5333       (hrs  9-4:30 p.m.)
Eves., Sun.-Thurs.   939-2703 Friday, January 31, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Buried Child, the Pulitzer Prize winning play by
Sam Shepard, directed by Robert Garf&t, at Dorothy
Somerset Studio (228-2678), until February 1st, at
8:00 p.m.
Fiddler on the Roof, presented by MUSSOC in
the UBC Old Auditorium (tix. AMS Box Office or
phone 228-5656/228-6902) until February 8, at 8:00.
Special 70th Anniversary Alumni Performance,
February 1st at 5:30.
Krapp's Last Tape, written by Samuel Beckett, at
the Pitt International Gallery (36 Powell Street,
681-6740), until February 8tH, at 8:00 p .m.
The Belle of Amherst, a one-woman play based
on the life of Emily Dickinson, late night at the
Firehall Theatre (280 Cordova, 68U-0926), until
February 1st, at 9:00 p.m.
Only in Vancouver, a lively musica comedy that
pokes fun at our city, at the Arts Club Revue Stage
(687-5315), Monday to Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturdays
at 6:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Fool for Love, another Sam Shepard play, at the
Arts Club Seymour Street, (687-531 >, Monday to
Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturdays at 6:30 and 9:30 p.m.,
special price matinees on Thursdays at !>:30 p.m. and
low price previews until February 1st a   8:30 p.m.
Crossing Borders, performed by tie San Francisco Mime Troupe, at the Vancouver Hast Cultural
Center (1895 Venables Street, 254-9578), until
February 1st, at 8:00 p.m.
Of Mice and Men, held over for only six performances at the Richmond Gateway Theartre (6500
Gilbert Road, 270-1812), February 4th-7th at 8:00
p.m., and February 8 at 5:30 and 9:00 p.m., 2 for 1
Preview on Tuesday, February 4th.
The Fairies are Thirsty, a staged reading of
Denise Boucher's play starring a wife, i hooker and
the Virgin Mary, at the Firehall Theatrn (280 E. Cordova, 689-0926/689-0691), until Februa-y 1st at 7:00
p.m.
The Slab Boys, a comedy by John Byrne, at
Studio 58 (Langara Campus, 324-5227), February
4th-23rd Tuesday to Sunday at 8:00 p.m. with Sunday matinees at 2:30 p.m.
On Tap, a fast-paced musical tribute to tap dancing, at the Arts Club Granville Island Theatre
(687-1644), Tuesday to Friday at 8:30 p.m., Saturdays at 5:30 and 9:30 p.m. and Sundays at 3:00 and
8:00 p.m., until February 16th.
Wu&
't£
The Choir of Christ Church Cathedral, singing
the music of Monteverdi and Purcell (Tickets at the
Cathedral office), February 7th at 8:00 p.m.
The King Sisters, will sing event-thing from
English madrigals to the Beatles at the Orpheum
(738-6822), on February 5th at 8:00 p.m
The Purcell String Quartet is featured in the 7th
concert of the Masterpiece Music Chamber Series, at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (1895
Venables Street, 254-9578), February 2nc at 2:30 and
8:00 p.m.
Albert Collins, "The Houston Twister' blows into
town for two shows at the Town Putnp (tickets,
734-2828), February 7th and 8th.
Ciacona, a baroque chamber ensemble, will be
playing French and Italian Baroque music at the UBC
Recital Hall (732-1610), February 1 at 8:00 p.m.
Buddy Rich and His Big Band, will te appearing
at the Hot Jazz Society (2120 Main Street,
873-4131), February 4th at 8:30 and 10:33 p.m.
Rebekah, a folk musician playing traditional and
popular folk music, with violin, guitar and vocals, at
La Quena (1111 Commercial Dr., 251-66*6), tonight.
Letters
Art About Issues, a group exhibition of social and
political subjects, at the Surrey Art Gallery (13750
88th Ave., 596-7461), until February 4th.
The Basketry Link, at the Cartwright Gallery
(Granville Island), until February 16th.
Hinda Avery, an exhibit by an artist concerned
with the environment, at the Contemporary Art
Gallery (555 Hamilton Street, 687-1345), until
February 1st.
New Visions, serigraphs by Susan A. Point, coast
Salish artist, at the UBC Museum of Anthropology, until March 30th.
Free Admissions, new sculpture by Ray Reedyk,
at the Pitt International Gallery (36 Powell Street),
until February 23rd.
10 + 1, an exhibition of the work of ten
photographers and one sculpture from the Emily Carr
College of Art and Design, at the AMS Art Gallery
in SUB, February 3rd until 7th, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Michael Morris, Early Works 1965-1972, Vancouver Art Gallery, until March 23rd.
A Measure of Consensus: Canadian Architecture in Transition, at the UBC Fine Arts Gallery,
until March 1, Tuesday to Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Saturday noon-5 p.m.
An exhibition of lithographs by Steve Nelson
and Ken Pattern, at Granville Island Graphics
(1650 Johnstone St., 687-8914), until February 22nd.
y&XKi.tr
■*■
Two Sides of the Wind, a collection of ethereal,
the spiritual and the baser human instincts, presented
by UBC Dance Horizons, at the Centennial Theatre
(228-6668), January 31st and February 1st, at 8:30
p.m.
Human Sex, dance, performance art and musical
spheres interacting with La La La Human Steps, at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre (1895
Venables, 254-9578), February 6th to 8th, at 8:30
p.m.
Dance Week, Vancouver's best dance troupes
and companies, performing at a number of venues
(call 682-8098), February 2nd to 9th.
FACULTY OF BUSINESS
UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA
Edmonton, Alberta
MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
MASTER OF PUBLIC MANAGEMENT
Are you interested in an MBA or MPM degree?
Students from all faculties are invited
to discuss the MBA and MPM programs
offered by the Faculty of Business, University of Alberta
with
Professor Rodney Schneck, Associate Dean
in
214 Brock Hall, 1874 East Mall
Monday, February 3, 1986
from
9-12 noon and 1 - 4 p.m.
Parking numbers
I am writing with regard to your
recent article on B-lot parking fees
in the Tues., Jan. 21 issue. First, the
current parking fee is $32 per year,
not the $24 stated in the articfe. The
$24 was the cost last year, thus there
was a 33% increase in the last year.
Secondly, the estimate of future
cost, $24 is grossly undestated.
Some of the coin boxes to control
the B-lot gates have been installed.
The coin boxes have spaces to insert
2 quarters. Thus the cost will be
either 25c or 50c per day,
A typical undergraduate using
B-lot 150 days per year will pay
$37.50 or $75 for the privilege. A
graduate student who uses B-lot 300
days per year will pay $75 or $150.
Therefore, the suggestion in your
article that "students who park on a
regular basis will spend approximately $24 during the school
year," is a gross understatement of
the true cost. At 25c per day
undergraduates will be facing an
180% increase next year, and
graduate students will be faced with
up to 234% increase.
The statement that parking fees
have yet to be decided upon is
patently false. The action of controlling parking through coin
operated gates dictates that the
charge will be either 25c or 50c per
day, with the 50c being unlikely. I
hope!
Cris Guppy
graduate studies Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 31, 1986
Reason #67 for becoming
a Ubyssey Staffer:
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Amugrajrfj
&tubiae Utft.
Phone now lor your complimentary sitting, free 4"x5" color photo,
choose from   18 previews (proofs)
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADVYA Y
Resume photos as low as 75c in
colour.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisme
228-9114
10°- DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Vm..  Fr,    11  30 t 00 p  n-
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sumtd.-S dnd  HoliJ.iy,      .
4 00 p m    9 00 p n,
2142 Western Pj-kwdv
I UBC Village
UBC
Th e  eateri
1 FREE BURGER
If you've always been a quiet, reserved kind of person (I.e. a wimp) have no fear. Just drop by The Ubyssey at
SUB 241K and we'll make you the kind of Interviewer who makes mike Wallace look like fTllster Rogers. The kind
of Interviewer who forces prepple AfTlS election candidates shivering hysterically Into the tacklly-wallpapered
corners where they belong. We'll also show you how to do reviews, layout, photography, triple half-turn backfllps
and all sorts of neat stuff.
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF &TOFU BURGERS ONLY,
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HAVE A NICE DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
r
738-5298

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