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The Ubyssey Jan 22, 1993

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Array Freeze on fees thawed,
students burned
Photos by Lisa Xjvan
by Omar Kassls
Just hours after outraged
students stormed the faculty
club yesterday to protest the
proposed tuition hikes, BC premier Mike Harcourt announced
that post-secondary tuition increases will be capped at ten per
cent.
The announcement came
after the UBC board of governors passed UBC president
Strangway's proposed fee increase of 12 per cent. The board
also decided to raise the maximum number of credits a student must pay for from 38 to 42
per year. If the cap had been
abolished, as expected, students
in engineering would be facing
a $1,000 tuition increase next
year.
The largest protest at UBC
since the 60s was ignited by fear
that the university would impose a fee increase of 18 per cent
to compensate for the NDFs
freeze on fees last year.
When asked whether he and
the rest ofthe administration—
whose salaries have increased
by 90 per cent in the last seven
years—might take a pay cut as
a sympathetic gesture towards
students, Strangway replied,
"that would help a little bit, but
we've got a big fiscal problem
here."
Tuition for undergraduates
in Arts and Science faculties at
UBC has increased by 100 per
cent in the last ten years. As a
result, UBC students pay some
ofthe highest tuition fees in the
country. Arts and Science tuition is fourth highest, while
UBC law students' fees are the
second highest after Dalhousie.
Student council graduate
representative Michael Hughes
and AMS president Martin Ertl
handed Strangway a petition
with 10,000 signatures and
3,000 post cards demandingthat
fee increases be kept at the rate
of inflation.
More than 2,000 students
from all faculties voiced their
anger at a fee hike four times
the rate of inflation.
Most of the revenue from
this tuition increase will go towards the University's general
operating fund. According to
BoG rep Derek MUler, "this
leaves out programs that benefit students directly, like the
student aid fund and the Teaching and Learning Enhancement
Fund." These are the programs
that fund student bursaries and
projects on campus.
Protesters also complained
about cuts in services while the
cost of education is going up—
such as the $1 million cut from
the library's journal budget and
the demise of free computing
services at the Computing Centre over the summer.
"University education is
becoming a privilege for the
elite," charged Pam Rogers of
theAcadiaTenants'Association.
". . . I know students with
families that can't afford to feed
their kids and who have to live
in parking lots during the summer so they can afford to return
to school."
After several speeches outside the SUB at noon, the crowd
of students marched across
campus and through Sedgwick
Library to title Faculty Club,
where the BoG had convened
for lunch. Piling into the building and heading upstairs, they
were then admitted to the Social
Suite by President Strangway,
for a rare opportunity for students to confront board members directly.
By this time there were over
2,000 students disrupting the
board's luncheon with chants
and placard waving.
When students stormed the
Faculty Club Social Suite hoping for some dialogue and maybe
a little lunch, President
Strangway attempted to counter
students' accusations of UBCs
elitism by distinguishing between the "academic" elite
"which is what universities are
here for" and the "social" elite.
UBC, he claimed, has already
tried to do a lot for those who
aren't part of the "social" elite.
Most stud ents who attended
the rally felt; it was effective
despite apprehension over an
exorbitant tuition increase.
"It was the first time I'd
seen some passion, or some solidarity among students," said
Arts student Kathryn Weiler.
"Ifs hard to participate on
this campus," agreed Wendy
Hyman, also in Arts. "But this
was an occasion where everyone was united."
"Even if they don't agree to
our demands, I think at least
they listened to us, and that's
important," said AMS director
of finance, Bill Dobie.
Volume 75, Number 29
Friday, January 22,1993 Computer layout
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Friday, January 22
Science Undergrad. Soc. Blood
Drive (Red Crocs). 9i30-3:30pm,
SUB Lounge Area.
Science Undergrad. Soc. Science
Week'93: Dept Displays. 10:30-
2:20pm, SUB Concourse.
Chinese Clubs of UBC (CCF,
CCS, CSA. CVC, DSC). Chinese
New Year Celebration. 11:30-
2:00 pm. SUB Party Room.
Centre for Korean Research.
Seminar. 12:30 pm. Asian Centre Room #604.
UBC Student Counselling & Re-
sourccsCentre. Workshop- Study
Skills: Your First Step. 12:30-
1:20. Brock Hall Room 200.
Eco Theatre Company. As part of
Science Week we will perform
"Being Evolved: A Visit with
Charles Darwin." 12:30 - 1:45
pm. SUB Auditorium.
%    »    ST S    a-r- - <V V* >■*< aO"
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Science Undergraduate Society.
"Being Evolved: A Visit with
Charles Darwin" - a play by Robert Light. 12:30-2:30 pm. SUB
Auditorium.
Science Undergraduate Society.
Gyotaku - the Japanese Art of
Fish Painting. 12:30 - 3:30 pm.
SUB 207/209.
Psychology Students Association.
Beer gar den. 4-8pm. Buchanan
ATS 200 Lounge.
Science Undergraduate Society.
Mkrobi HomeBrew Contest/Beer
Garden. 4:32 - 8:00 pm. SUB
207/209.
UBC Trotskyist League Club.
Forum. 7:30pm. Britannia Community Centre, Rm. L3, 1661
Napier Si
UBC School of Music. Magic
Flute in the Wind. Co-production
School of Music Theatre & Film
Department. 8:00 pm. Recital
Hall.
B»gmm§ir
Science Undergraduate Society.
Science Week - Fe-*turing The
Hard Rock Miners and The Love
Bugs. 8-00 - 12*00 pm. SUB
Ballroom.
QUEERS FIGHT BACK! Rally
to stop the anti-queer fascists.
Meet at Nelson Park, 5:30pm
sharp (corner of Nelson A
Thuriow, behind St. Paul's Hospital).   Rally at Art Gallery, 6-
Grad. Student Soc Great people
earth bond & guest No cover, all
welcome. 8pm, Thea's, grad centre.
Saturday, January 23
UBC Sump Club. New Year 1A
weekend trading; new face-value
mint available, lpm. SUB 212.
Sunday, January 24
Lutheran Campus Ministry.
Worship service and fellowship.
7pm, Lutheran Campus Centre.
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Gays, Lesbians A Bisexuals of
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Campus Lutheran Church
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UBC Student Counselling & Resources Ctr. Workshop: Stress
Out? Relaxation Techniques.
Noon -1:20, Brock Rm 200.
SchooiofMusic. Flute and Horn
Recital. Fret 8pm, Recital Hall,
Music Bldg.
Volunteer Connections. Fair -
Volunteer Fair - a number of organizations will be represented to
recruit volunteers. 9:30-3:30,
SUB Concourse.
International Socialists. Meeting: Stopping STRANGEWAY-
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SUB 215. -"-N
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2/THE UBYSSEY
January 22,1993 X"
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Controversial ombudsperson resigns
by Lucho van Isschot
AMS ombudsperson Yuri
Fulmer resigned yesterday amid
controversy over his professional
and personal conduct.
Allegations that Fulmer used
his office for political ends and that
he knowingly misrepresented himself to the Student Administrative
Commission are the latest in a series of controversies that have involved the former ombudsperson.
Some members of the AMS
executive and the ombudsoffice felt
that it was inappropriate when,
during last Friday's emergency
council meeting, Fulmer spoke out
strongly in favour ofthe UBC Young
Conservatives' drive to hold a referendum on the future of The
Ubyssey.
Fulmer's address to the student council was seen by some as an
overstepping of the boundaries of
the ombudsoffice.
However, both the AMS executive and the ombudsoffice declined
to comment on the matter.
Fulmer said his address to the
student council was not intended to
be political—that he does not have
an opinion on the question of the
future of The Ubyssey.
"What I believed I was doing
was voicing the concerns of students—I was neither hoping to shut
down The Ubyssey nor to ensure
that it be kept open," Fulmer said.
"Unfortunately, I think it was perceived as a clear political stance."
"Either way, I think that the
publicity I have brought to the
ombudsoffice does not best serve
the office, and that is why I resigned," he said.
"If the case workers at the office
are adversely affected by this, then
students will be as well. If one student does not bring their case to the
office because of these perceptions,
then I'm not fulfilling my role as
ombudsperson."
There is speculation that
Fulmer has also resigned in order to
divert attention away from the allegation that he applied to the Student Administrative Commission for
a travel grant on behalf of the De
bating Society, without the Society's
approval.
AMS president Martin Ertl
said, "The executive ofthe Debating
Society has complained that Yuri
[Fulmer] applied for a travel grant
on behalf of the Society and did not
have the authorization to apply for
that grant."
Fulmer, who is a member ofthe
Debating Society, applied for and
received a $450 travel grant to attend a four-day debating tournament in England over the winter
holidays.
.Tanya Paz, who sits on student
council for the Arts Undergraduate
Society, remembers Fulmer boasting, "Thanks to my friends at SAC,
More PC than thou
by Ranees Foran
The UBC Young Progressive
Conservatives' attack on this student paper has caused a rift between officials in the federal party
and the "more conservative" PC
youth wing.
While PC bigwigs from Vancouver to Ottawa are scrambling to
disassociate the party from the anti-
Ubyssey drive, the UBC Young Tories and their petition have the firm
support ofthe Progressive Conservative Youth Federation.
"Many papers are funded by
students, and we encourage our
members to take on student organizations and institutions that don't
have conservative philosophies or
are not representative organizations," said Marc Arsenault, president of the PCYF.
"We fully support [the UBC
Young Conservatives'] petition."
Post-secondary director of the
PCYF Justin Brown said the elder
PCers who have spoken against the
UBC Young Tories "don't speak for
the PCYF."
"The youth of this generation
are more conservative as a whole
and the Youth Federation reflects
that. We are concerned with the
I'm going to England and France for
a month," at a council meeting in
early December.
Fulmer attended the tournament, but because of the Debating
Society's recent complaint, he is not
going to receive any grant money.
Fulmer denied that his
behaviour in this instance was out
of order and Baid, "I didn't think
that I had to consult with the [Debating Society] to get a travel grant."
Former ombudsoffice case
worker Bernard LaRochelle is,
however, critical ofFulmer. He said,
"It's my guess that Fulmer resigned
in order to avoid an investigation
into the matter, which SAC was
considering."
LaRochelle said he believes
Fulmer's resignation has come because of a series of complaints that
have been lodged against the former
ombudsperson dating back to last
semester.
"It surprises me that these recent events have come so soon after
the complaints which came up last
term. I gave Yuri credit for being
intelligent, but this would seem to
refute that notion," LaRochelle said.
The members of the
ombudsoffice have said Fulmer's
resignation should not affect the
functioning of the office, nor its
ability to service students' needs. A
new ombudsperson will be appointed within the next month.
deficit and fiscal responsibility. The
concerns of the PCYF reflect the
concerns of 'generation X'," said
Brown.
Highlighting a generational
and political gap between the Youth
Federation and the party, grownup PC members have had nothing
but harsh criticism for the Young
Tories' petition to cut the paper's
funding.
"If The Ubyssey were a right
wing paper, [the UBC Young Tories] wouldn't be going after you,"
said Lome Waldman, an executive
of the Vancouver Quadra Progressive Conservative Association.
"It's a veiled attempt to silence
your views, not an issue of subsidizing the paper," he said.
Even the office of federal MP
Kim Campbell has notified this
newspaper that the UBC Young
Conservative's petition drive does
not reflect the national party's
views.
National vice president John
Maclean has also disclaimed the
UBC Young Tories' representativeness ofthe party.
Coming from members of the
party which represents the interests   of   the   established   right,
THE PUCK STOPS HERE! Altar making some groat saves In a losing effort against Lethbridge last
weekend, will UBC netmlnder Paul Hurl get his second consecutive start when the Birds take on the
U of A Golden Bears In Edmonton this weekend? siobhan roantree photo
admonitions ofthe UBC Young Tories—and the PCYF by extension—make the Young Conservatives appear to be right-wing renegades.
The adult Conservatives' embarrassment over the anti-Ubyssey
petition follows the controversy
sparked by a Youth Federation
document which calls for a "takeover of student government" by
Progressive Youth. Leaked by the
Reform Party earlier this month,
"PCYF: Strategies for 1992-1993" is
an unofficial master plan for
training young PC "troops" for "un
dermining the institutions of the
student left."
The three-tiered campaign to
achieve this objective includes an
"anti-political correctness campaign," an "attack on the Canadian
Federation of Students," and a campaign aimed at "student government takeover."
Arsenault said a few PCYF
members submitted the document
to the organization's executive last
summer but it was not released as
official policy.
According to Brown the m**gor
reason it was rejected is the section
prescribing a "student government
takeover . .. to divert the student
government resources away from
the political causes of the student
left and towards the accomplishment of the goals of the PCYF and
our party in Canada."
"There are certain things in
[the document] that we believe in as
a matter of principle, except for rasing
student government resources [to
promote the prarty]—we don't advocate that," Brown said.
"As much as there are good
ideas in there, it isn't our party
policy," he said.
How the Young Tories will take over universities?
This is the fuO, verbatim
text of the Progressive
Conservative Youth Federation document released
by the head office of the
Reform Party of Canada
earlier this week—eds.
PCYF POST-SECONDARY STRATEGY FOR
1992-93: YOUTH IN
ACTION
First Principles:
Tha PCYF is comma-
ted to Training, Recruiting, Organising and
Fundraising young Progressive Conservatives
across Canada under the
TROF Strategy.
We all agree that the
PCYF mutt play a vanguard role in all facets of
framing the political debate on the future of our
country and party. We will
be effective only if we
■-peak with one voice, one
purpose and one mind. This
■requires that we build an
organized, mass-based
campaign lo recnril and
bain youth activists. University and College cam-
puaes play a critical role In
die PCYF program, ft is here
that we will find the organizational and intellectual troop*!
to fight the upcoming battles
and regenerate our patty.
Overall Objective:
The overall objective of the
PCYF Campus Strategy foir
1992-93 is to builda sustained,
cross-Canada, network of student activists that may be mobilized for conservative
projects.
Primary Objectives:
There are essentially three
ambitious yet attainable goabi
for the PCYF on campuses, a»
follows,
1. Participate in the Intelleauat
Debate
We must take over the intellectual debate on campus from
the organized student Left. We
must demand "fair bearing" of
our views at first, then we wilt
attempt to "control the debate,"
setting the agenda and creating
issues that benefit our party.
2. Challenge and Undermine
Institutions of the Student Left
We must take a ptoactivist
role in challenging the established left-wing network on
campus. These organizations
currently serve a political
agenda hostile to our own and
we must render them ineffective as electoral tools on campus.
3. Recruit and Train Student
Activists
In the course of implementing the objectives above, we
will effectively recruit and train
Student activists on campuses.
Our student activists will gain
training and experience during
the accomplishment of these
goals, thus PCYF will, by the
owclusionoftheprogram.have
a database of battle hardened
troops. These PC Youth will be
ready for the upcoming dec-
total challenges, for example.
The Strategy in Earnest:
11>e PCYF will only be Ale
to accomplish its objectives if
we are able to position our local members as "nonpartisan*'
campus activists playing a
leadership role in challenging
the student left Local PC Campus leaders will therefore need
to be trained in a number of
tactics that they will require to
implement the strategy. Spc-
cifically, three related campaigns will be developed, ac-
oampaniedbynewrecnBtment
and training materials, all of
which will be introduced by
local campus leaden during the
National Campaign College
CNCC).
Three related campaigns are
as follows:
1. Anti-Political Correctness
Campaign:
By attacking Political Correctness on campus w e can provide an entrance into the campus intellectual debate. The
potential to make allies from a
broad range of groups is substantial. We also create the issue of "free speech** which can
be used in the campaign that
follows.
2. Attack on the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS):
Develop and execute an attack on the CFS. It is 'dearly the
key student organization hostile toourparty on campuses all
across Canada and --days a crucial role in providing resources
to the organized student left
This campaign has lihe potential for spin off benefits, such
as the potential for national
media attention.
3. Student government take-
oven
Attempting to influence the
election of sympathetic cam
pus activists and student governments to student associations and student governments
is the final step in this prow-it strategy for PCYF. We
will by this time have identified and created two issues that
are "in oar comer" as conservative campus activist*: The
"free speech" issue on campus
and the "anti-CFS" sentiment.
Thus student government takeover is our next logical step.
Success at taking student government will allow us to
divert the student government
resources away from the political causes of the student
left and towards the accomplishment of the goals of the
PCYF and our party in
Ownnfn i
How WW The Strategy Unfold:
•May—June 1992:
PCYF Post-Secondaiy Director will form a "PCYF
Working Group" for the purpose of developing tactics for
implementation, materials for
training, and recruitment based
on the strategy outlined here.
Hus group will also research
existing campus activism program* operating successfully
in other jurisdictions and in
other nations.
These materials will be premiered at the NCC in August
1992.
•June-July 1992:
PCYF materials developed
by a working group will be
produced.
Canada's Campus Calendar—format will be developed
under the direction ofthe Post-
Secondary Director and Mr.
Noel Kivimald, who will edit
the Calendar.
Campus Speakers Program
will be organized under the direction of the Post-Secondary
Director and Ms. Lauren
Andre, Director of the Campus
Speakers Program. Speaking
engagements on campuses
across Canada will be
booked in advance for Phase I,
between September-October
1992, and between January-
February during Phase IL
•August 1992:
NCC—will contain a significant campus training component for conservatives on
campus.
New PCYF materials for use
during fall recruitment and
training period will be premiered at NCC
Materials will be distributed from PCHQ to PCYF
campus contacts.
•September 1992:
Campus recruitment period.
Post-Secondary Director
will implement issue-campaigns I and II.
•Sepumber—October 1992:
Campus Speakers Pro-
grant, Phase I will be implemented.
•November—December
1992:
Local Campus activists to
collect recruitment data.
Crsate a "campus profile"
for each campus that will
allow us to effectively target
our resources during the
second term student government campaign.
•January 1993:
Student Government
Takeover implemented.
Campus Speakers Program. Phase II implemented.
Issue Campaigns I and II
Continued.
•February—April 1993:
Possible Pre-Writ Period,
changes to the Campus
Strategy To Be Announced
by Post-Secondary Director
as necessary."
January 22,1993
THE UBYSSEY/3 -*«*<S«SSgS? '^5%,^%>^'5V,*
STUbHNTs
DESPERATELY SEEKING $V#Xfi
(who are desperately seeking $$$)
WE ARE LOOKING FOR OUTGOING,
ENTHUSIASTIC UBC STUDENTS WITH
EXCELLENT COMMUNICATION SKILLS TO JOIN
OUR SUCCESSFUL ALUMNI CAMPAIGN
If you possess excellent verbal skills and enjoy
working in a fun atmosphere with oilier students
CALL THE UBC DEVELOPMENT OFFICE AT
822-8920
Earl's on Top
IS HIRING
Great Money $$$
• Part-time Work
Interviewing on Campus
BROCK HALL, Room 215
Thursday, January 28th
8:30 am -12:30 pm
JANUARY 25,26,27,28,29,1993
NOTICE OF POLLING STATION LOCATIONS
Toll locations and times are subject to the availability of Poll Clerks.
DAY/EVENING POLLS
Tuesday/Friday 9:30am —3:30 pm
Monday / Wednesday / Thursday 9:30 am — 7:30 pm
Sedgewick Library and S.U.B.
EVENING POLLS
Monday through Thursday 4:30 pm — 7:30 pm
Totem Park Commons Block
Place Vanier Commons Block
Walter H. Gage Commons Block
DAYTIME POLLS
Monday through Friday 9:30 am - 3:30 pm
Henry Angus Law
Buchanan Scarfe
C.E.M.E. MacMillan
Chemistry War Memorial Gym
Computer Science Wesbrook
Graduate Student Centre Woodward Library
Friday only 11:30 am — 3:30 pm
Landscape Architecture Studio
Bring your A.M.S. Card
\i
After a two year absence, Bad Religion returned to Vancouver to headline u sold out show with Coffin Break
and Chrome Dog. The crowd was dominated by the new g****e breed, complete with size XXXXXL jeans and
flannel shirts.
There were few old punks there, surprising considering that Bad Religion has been around since the early
80s.
MUSIC
Bad Religion, Coffin Break and Chrome Dog
The Commodore
Friday, January IS
*
^^fTGHmshire
a*d Ian Lloyd
Perennial favorites ofthe SoCal hardcore scene, Bad Religion came to convey their messages about loneliness, individuality and religion. The lyrics reflect the writers' intelligence, one of whom is a PhD student at
Cornell University. Bad Religion has always been thought of as "the thinking man's hardcore"; after all, how
many bands use the word 'anthropocentric*?
Their live show was a non-stop barrage of punk rock; they never even stopped to tune their guitars.
We feel sorry for the people in the book store underneath the dancefloor because the crowd was "outta
control, baby!"
The vocals are the backbone of their sound; ifs important that their message is heard. Bad Religion was not
there to force their ideas on the crowd, but rather to get them to think for themselves.
"No Direction," a song off their new album Generator, says: "No one can live with the decisions of their own/It
seems as though they look to someone else to tell them what to be/tell them what to wear/tell them what to say/
tell them how to act..." We hope the crowd got the point and were not there just to slam.
The show started with Chrome Dog, a band with an original metal sound. They have a heavy guitar dominated sound which was quite enjoyable for an opening act. If this is your kind of thing, they will be featured at
the Humbuzz Thing CD release party on January 28, at the Commodore.
Coffin Break, thankfully not caught in the Seattle sound wave, dispelled the myth that they had no
Vancouver following with thoir politically aware, dirtier-and-heavier-and-slower-than-thrash sound; we hate the    i
"G" word. 1
Three guys and a "metaphysical clown" cranked out tunes from their new CD Thirteen. They didn't play
many of their older songs. Much to Ian's chagrin, "White Collar Man* was left out, but they did play their cover of i
Husker Du's "Diane." '
This was our first time seeing Coffin Break; their CD, albeit good, pales in comparison to their live show. The ,
lack of clarity was made up for with an overabundance of unchanneled energy. '
"A Riveting Romantic Thriller!"
NKW lOKkDAII.I \K\\S
..
Daring, Poetic and Eweloplngly Sfjnsfoi's!"
— TrrmicT KulT.-rt*,. TIIK \K\* \OKkKK
"The Best Movie Of The Year!"
— DuiiaM I.m.ii.. KII.M ( OMMKYI
SEX. MURDER. BETRAYAL
NOTHING IS WHAT IT SEEMS TO BE.
tpvt
*%*?
*£*>,
"An Elegant
New Film!"
— \ im cut Canl>\.
TIIK. NKtt >OKK TIMES
— Jaini Hcriiunl.
NEW ^OHk POST
"A Sexy,
Super-Heated
Thriller!"
— Bob Campbell,
NEWHOl'SE NEWSSERVICE.
•fc£\ ff* Some violence and very
coarse language, occasional nudity,
suggestive scenes
THE CRYING GAME
HALF PRICE TUESDAY - ONLY $4.00
STUDENT SUNDAY - ONLY $4.00
ETT3TT^4375W.10th&vS
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7:00 & 9:30
Sot & Sun 1:30 & 4:00
If SJ
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In the U
1-800-3:
4/T.HE UBYSSEY
January 22,1993 151 LECTION SUPPLEMENT
President
Kevan Dettlebach
Independent
1) Well the basic thing Is Just the leader of the AMS.
To lead the general direction of council that year,
set policy and lead the others to a common goal.
2) - More student Involvement
- I'd like to se« the general population's opinion
about university change. The trend is university's are
being looked at kind of as a big technical Institute
where you Just go to get training for a Job and I'd
like to see that attitude changed a bit.
- A better llason with the administration so that the
whole thing hi run more smoothly
3) Well It's not that many. This year, I was the
treasurer of the personal computer's club. I'm really
good at dealing with people and that's really about
It. I don't have too many qualficatJIons.
Erik "the Fish"
enSen   Ra-stolBaec Faction
J
1) The   greater   te   role   the   greater
the    president.    For    Instance,    a
president   with   three   rolls   In   his
beer   belly   Is   a   far   better
determinant   of   campus   mood   than   a
president    with    only    two.
2) -A    greater   cummlng   together    of
the   AMS   and   the   student   body
-flashback   days   at   the    pit   where
pints   are   $1.76   (   and   with   no   rap  to
be    found)
-to    see    David    Strangway    finish    that
pint   of  Pub  Guineas   I   gave   him   at
graduation.
3)l'm   the   best   candidate   for   prez,    'cause   I   have   fewer   middle
names   than   Bill   Frank   Al   Dobie   III,   can   boatrace   any   other
candidate   on  the   slate   (am  willing  to   prove  that   at   the   Science
Week   Dance   tonight!)   and   because   I'm   not   letting   this
campaign   run   MY   life   (I   sleep   at   night...).
Mary-Jean
O'Donnell
Independent
1) I would like to see the AMS president
be open to good conflict resolution and
have an open AMS that's fun and able to
see the lighter side of things as well as
get some serious work done and try and
stremline the bureaucracy and let go of
Robert's    Rules   Just   a    little    bit.
2) -  I  would  like  to  see  more   people  get
Involved    In   the    AMS
-  I  would  like  to see the AMS  become
more    environmentally friendly
I  would  like  to see the AMS
about   race      but,   just   more   of  the   non-obvious   sort   of   groups   that
are   out    there
in   working   with   all   kinds   of   different   people   and   working   on   all
kinds   of   different   subjects   and   coming   tco   good   resolutions   of
varied     goals
Viirl}iat dQ you see as being the role of the
2) What three things would you be eager to
see happen durtngyour term as presiaent?
3) What experiences do ypu have whicft
makes you the best candidate for president?
Bill Dobie
Students First
1) Besides   the   obvious,   which   Is   to
direct   Student   Council    meetings,   the
AMS    President    is    also    responsible    for
representing   the   AMS   to    Its   students
and   so,   they   should   try  to   get   to   know
as   many   students   as   possible   and   to
promote    involvement    In    the    AMS.
2) I   would   like   to   see   the   President's
offlte   become   more   open   to   students.
My door  now   Is   always   open   and   my
office   Is   always   a   mess   because   of
peoftle   coming  In   and   out.   I   would   really
Ilka to  see  that   happen  with  the
presidents    office   too.    (except    I'll    keep
It    clean)
-  My   second  goal   would   be   to develop  a   long  term   plan  for  the
AMS.      One   of  the   AMS's   problems      Is   that   the   executive   changes
every   year   and,   so,   the   priorities   also   change.   Things   like
tuition   campaings   are   needed   almost   every   year      though   and   the
AMS   always   seems   to   be   re-hventing   the   wheel.   A   long   term
plan   could   help   to   provide   tout   continuity.   3)   This   year,   as
director  of  finance,     I   have   had  a  good  view  of  how  the  AMS
works,    not   Just    from   a    financial    perspective    but,    also,    by
watching   the   way   In   which   tie   Internal   politics   happen.   Alarge
part   of   the   president's      Job,   for   better   or   for   worse,   Is   ego
management.    In   order   to    have   people   Involved,    It's    Important   to
make   everybody   feel   happy   about   the   part   that   they   play,   be   that
part    very    big    or    very    small.
John F. Kennedy
Famous   Dead   People
1)   When   at   some   future   date   the   high   court
of   history   sits   In   Judgement   on   each   of   us,
recording   whether   In   our   brluf   span   of
service,    we    fulfilled    our    responsibilities    to
the  state,   our   sucess,   or   failure,   In
whatever   office   we   hold,   will   be   measured
by   the   answers   to   four   questions:   First,
were   we    truly   men    of    courage...Second,
were    we    truly    men    of    Judgement...Third,
were   w*    truly    men    of    Integrity...Finally,
were   w*   truly   men   of   dedication?
2)If we   all   can   persevere,   If  we   can   In   every
land   and   office   look   beyond   our   own   shores
and   ambitions,   then   surely   tiie   age   will
dawn   In   which   the   strong   ant   Just   and   th*
weak   secure   and   the   peace   preserved.   Let   every   nation   know,   whether   It
wishes   us   well   or   III,   that   we   mat   pay  any   price,   bear   any   burden,   meet
any   hardship,   support   any   friend,   oppose   any   foe   to   assure   the   survival
and   success   of   llberty.AII   this   will   not   bs   finished   In   the   first   one
hundred   day*.   Nor   will   It   be   finished   In   th*   first   on*   thousand   day*,   nor
In   the   life   of   this   administration,   nor   even   perhaps   In   our   lifetime   on   this
planet.   But   let   us   begin.   And,   so,   my   fellow  American*,   ask   not   what
your   country   can   do   for   you;   atk   what   you   can   do   for   your   country.
achnowledge    more    of   the       minority   groups,    not    necessarily   talklnf   3)   Let  th*  word  go  forth  from  this   time  and   place  to  friend   and  foe
alike,   that   the   torch   has   been   passed   to   a   new   generation   of   Americans,
born   In   this   century,   tomperedby   war,   disciplined   by   s   haird   and   bitter
3)   I   used   to   be   a   real-estate   broker   and   that   gives   me      experienc-f   poaee,   proud   of   our   ancient   heritage   and   unwilling   to   wltnett   or   permit
the   slow   undoing   of   those   human   rights   to   which   this   nation   has   always
been   committed,   and   to   which   we   are   committed   today   at   home   and
around    the    world.
Bin Johnson
1) I want to make sure that there are no
more tuition Increase*. I think that's lealy
important We're paying too much money
its it Is right now. The Ideal dream would
be to have a tuition decrease but, I dont
expect that's going to happen. But, it's
something to work towards.
2) The board of governors deals with the
money matters. The senate deals mostly
with the academic matters, faculty
appointments, course changes, etc
3)lam«tnentlyamember ofthe BC
field hockey board of executives. IVe
done a lot of management work with
looking after variow-ajorte teens. I harve
a pretty good head on my shoulders, I
Moieal Hughes
i) Me-nt now I tee that the untventty hat a
various praUanri with naWia^tgemtirL Fat*
ttudent* have ever met their dears or
oapafiaTMnt ntoos warono ino nrvprasaienc
ortlwiMsMentand Vth*unlvsi*jty toto
**-rovktoaMrv1cetothestSidente****-dmest December, hre been on the AiMS student
their educ*rtlon*d r»ecls,tlheyinast know them, council for two yean now and If you Mow my
That tontbelngdonerlghlt now. More than Just record there, IVe done quite « bit to lepetent
lotting the board ofgovennen know of the students to generaL IVe alto been on the
needs of the ttudBrts, I vwant to change the ^uatoartudenfsooundlfortwoandahaV
process to let the unlveisUty become mora yean. IVe been one of the executive's of the
open andactualy change* HsmentalMy to stent Global Diiwlopment centre ft* the three yean
thinking t*outpr<wldlr« a seivtee to students I've been at UBC. At my prevlout university I
hstead of Just having sto-dents them as a
problem and getting on wrlth research.
2) The board of governors*, to chiefly response***
far the finances of the unllvenlty. It sets tuition
and sets the budget and i stuff Ice that but the
senate to mora concemeid with academic
aMra -tit-hough K does nrnaks
recotmmendartlont on thei budget. The tenate to
mora concerned with prapgtana.
3) Wei, right now, I'm knvolved a* on* of ths
primary organtasn of thei antttuMon Nke
campaign. I oigaiibed bioth '■'estet-a-ay's tsly
and the one to Novtmbeir. I'm chahpenon with
Martin Ertl of the outnlttree and I ofchestjstad
the meeting wrlth Tom Pveny that ws had In
did many of the same kinds of thktgk and IVe
chaired rnany coniiilleet
Ian Flirt
•yAneffeerUve-rtudr^v^iontheboar-dof
governors. That cover a lot of different Issues
ficmflnancettoaammunlcaBonttothewsy
ttuderrts an treated to campus We. A lot of
UIM-MIl uungs*
2) I think I'm going to -rawer that on
pMotopMcd g*raunds, mora than anything
my political experience to batlcaly nen-
extotant I grew up In a poKcal family but,
that's Irrelevant As far as representing the
students goes, IV» had a fang academic
career, 10ies* you could put It I'm a ffad
ttudent here and IVe had exposure to various
dlflefeirt universes **rou*xl the countiy and I
Ike what I tee at UBC but I alto tee a lot of
things which couM be Improved. So, I think
that that background gives me a very unique
to government becawe IVe been associated
with governments tea So, I think that I can
cover not only the s-ademtc and aocU
aspects of the Job brt, I also have an overview
of the "what are you going to do when you gut
outT question. I ttikik that people Ike that
are needed on the board of governor* tor the
poky decisions and to forth. Especially
entering what has been termed the Information
age where everything Is being timed up-slde-
penpeebve In that IVe taken arts courses, IVe    down and topsyturvy. I think tha* a bit of long-
taken science courses, IVe taken engineering     term vision to needed.
courses. IVe seen It both from the perspective
of a g*rad student and an undergrad student
but I'm sttl dote enough to being an
undergrad that I understand what they're going
through. At the same time, I have a
perspective ton different unlveraffle* and
dlleient Jurittlctlons across Canada. IV* atoo
elseuThebi-aWdafgovenaemtom-Mofapoacy    wori-*dh|-**-atoln4i*byfarafr»wj-*an,ln
Mddeddonthk«whleth**tnarto-iaal* derdgn team* and *o, IVs had a tot o
atoc-tywRhK-adei-rict. tsperieneew-oiklngwrth other peopta. And, to
3) Wr*M you w-s-ttpolltk-al experience than       **^ I hare spratty varied bar*0ound. Bran
Jeff West
1) I hope to add to the board a real voice for
students. I dont think students have had very
good representation on the board for the past
teveral years. A lot of the previous board
men-ben have tended to be rather wtoliy-
washy In terme of putting students and
student btuetflret There an two totuet
which are really Important to ms. On* to,
obviously, the tuition hcient*. I dont think we
should have tuition kicrease*. I would deBnlMy
January 22,1993
ELECTION SUPPLEMENT/1 LECTION  SUPPLEMENT
Vice-President
Janice Boyle
Independent
1) It would have to ba a
combination of the two roles.
2) Hey, I've done that. A motion
to divide Is a motion to separate a
question Into two or mora votes.
You forward It when you're not
sure about which way you want to
vote because you're in favour of
part of a motion and against one
or mora of the other parts of the
same motion.
3) Pull out my lipstick and scrawl
my epitaph on the wall. It would
probably be "No Regrets!"
1) Should the vice-president have a
political or an    administrative role?
2) What is a motion to divide?
3) If you were in an elevator on the
twelfth floor of Gage     when the cord
broke, what would you do?
Christa Cormack
Students       first
1)   It's   a   dual   role.   Although   the   routine   work   of
the     Vice     President     Is     primarily     administrative,
every   time   you   bring   something   to   council   or   to
a    constituency    or    service    organization,    you    are    doing    something    political.
2) A   motion   to   divide   takes  the   motion   on  the   table   and   divides   it   Into  two
sections   to   be   voted    upon   separately.    For   example,   the    referendums   this
year   were   passed   all   In   one   motion   but,   last   year,   the   question   was
divided   up   Into   three   or   four   parts,   one   for   each   question   and   council
voted   on   them   separately.   Dividing   a   motion   gives   some   parts   of   It   more
of a  chance to  pass  or to  fail.
3) That's   an   Improper   question   because   the   elevators   In   Gage   never   work
anyway.
Ron Freeman
Independent
1) Mostly   an
administrative        role
2) A   motion   to   divide
separates     something     Into
two    parts   which   council
can   vote   on   separately.
3) Nothing    really,    It
would   be  too   late.   By  the
time   i   could   have
screamed    or    done
anything,   I   would   be   dead
anyway.
Shalom
Parks
Students    for    What's
Right
1) An     administrative
role.
2) I'm   not   sure.   I'd   have
to    consult    my    Robert's
Rules    of    Order.
3) I'd    probably    faint.
Coordinator of
ExternalAffairs
Carmen "the blonde"
1VT c\d n i ffh t    *■> Enwirt|*ti th«* my tuition
•LTA^-i X& Increase Isn't 18%. Following that,
I'd re-open the Victoria Invasion
Fund In order to establish a
"working" relationship with
Gordon Wilson.
2) Hold a not-so-great Trek back
to VGH, then trek south to Queen
Elizabeth Park to set up a new
University, thus leaving SFU with
absolutely nothing to brag about
(you weenies!).
3) Students are lame because the
price of beer Is so exorbitant. If
students could afford more beer,
they could afford greater
participation in the AMS. "Give
me a beer and I'll give you my
time, " I've heard many a student
say.
1) What would be your first priority as CEA?
2) How would you want to change the AMS's current relationship with the
university?
3) Why do so few students participate in the AMS?
not accpet anything mora than an Inflation
iMraaoo became It hrrftt *no8sr*lbHty which
to already pretty low. The Mcond Imm to alto
an accoatdblHy totue and, thafs cam-put
saMy.
2) The tenate to a •orttfa-n Internal body
wtthJn UBC which oasis with acaoanac
matter*. ITi a large BOG
BOG (continued)
body. The boon! lv quits siral - fifteen
Eight of them, bcludlng the prat-Mont, an
appointed by the pravkicbtl government The
■enate to a subordinate body to the board of
governon. The board of g***t*o**no***t'to the body
that deato with M totuet on campus fauNdlngt,
teltan.rg'-Ung aid tomtacademfc Ik-twee.
3) IVe been poWcafy acoVe on campus the*
nt   my
Quayl
Rob "Woodchuck"
MCGOWSII  Radical    Beer    Faction
1) The   role   of  a   vice   president   Is   both   political
and   administrative.   For,   If   he   Is   loaded   when   he
makes  his  decisions,   he   should  be   loaded  when   he
explains   them.   You   can't   get   more   neutral   than
that,   unless   you   have   a   beer   In   each   hand   and
can't    decide    "left    or    right?"
2) A   motion   to   divide   occurs,   when,   after   you
have   bought   a   case   of   beer   for   an   impressionable
young   first    year,    you    have   to    determine    how
much   of   their   change   you   would   keep   as   profit.   A
"motion    to    divide"    therefore    occurs    when    you
return    them    less    change    than    they    deserve    while
boldly    proclaiming    "Hey,    half    that    case    is    mine,
you     little     punk!"
blessings   because,   although   my   living   hell   is   coming   to
e's      is     Just      beginning P-O-T-A-T-O.
1) He might even help out doing small odds and ends.
Doing little odd jobs he could be of some aid...
Such as selling balloons and the pink lemonade.
2) and now here Is a hoodwink
who winks in his wink-hood
without a good wink-hood
a hoodwink can't wink good
3) He starts down In a dive such as no man alive could come
out of alive! But he smiles as he falls and no fear does he feel.
His nerves are like iron, his muscles like steel. And he plunges!
Down! Down! With his hair still combed neat four thousand, six
hundred ninety-two feet. Then he'll land In a fish bowl. He'll
manage Just fine. Don't ask how he'D manage. That's his Job not
mine.
Carole
Forsythe
Students
first
1) I would Hke to see what the new
government proposes to do about
student loans. The matter was filed
away to some committee and Its
been sitting there ever since. If no
changes o the program are made,
with the tuition rise, many students will face further reduced
incomes in 1993-94. This will add additional hardship to
what Is already a gruesome financial picture for many
students. I'd say, therefore, that this Is somewhat more
pressing than most of the other Issues I would like to
address.
2) Over the last few month's, the current executive has
managed to work out a reasonable working relationship with
the administration. Basically, the AMS and the Vice
president student sevlces hae agreed to co-operate. Really,
we're working towards the same goal so, it doesn't make
any sense for us to be fighting each other.
3) That's a sad question. I think that many students do
participate bi the AMS If not In the AMS proper, there are many
clubs and service organisations which seem to draw good numbers of members. As to how to get
students more Involved in the political AMS, that's an Interesting question. I shall be Interested
to see how the tuition rally (which will already have happened by the time this Is printed) goes. It
will be Interesting to see the response because we've ben doing lots of publicity work on this
one, leafleting, postering, talking to classes and so forth.
I got here. Three yean now. I tat a* ai AMS
rap. for the arts undea****rad toclety for two
yean. IVe been on the board of director* for
CITR. I've been on teiectlont ouriiilUeo,
honoraria oomrnlttee. The ad hoc oommlttee
to review Ubyteey honoraria.
Orvin Lau
1) For the pott three yean, I have been
woridng on teaching btuet with Ihe tenate.
Now, I wart to bring these concern* to the
Boowd of Governors.
2) The Senate to an academic body, maMng
dedlont about drriculao, teaching,
examlnatlont and ao forth. The BoanJ of
Govenen to In charge of financial mattera,
Including, of courte, the financial
reprecutelont of academic decltlons.
3) Generaly, my experience on the tenate at
wel at the other tudotiet IVe been Involved
In tbice IVe been at UBC give me the
experience nocoaury fortnt potation.
Mike Wagner
Mfce Wagner to atoo running for BOG.
1)    M-lt.t
af.   ya.   »<>•>.   t.   ae*i./r.
if  .i.et.e   t.   Boar
2)    Whtt
1.    (ft.    eifHr....
fe.hr.-M
Bo*    me    M.    tmmmtmt
S)     WUrnt
MPavt-MC.     q.lllt.t
J-M     t*t
till.    poBltl—f
2/ELECTION SUPPLEMENT
January 22,1993 LECTION supplement
Director of Administration
Caroline
J \Jxl.%».& independent
1) I  fell  that  I'm  well
qualified   to   be   the   DOA
because    of    my    experlenoe
on  SAC.  I   can  tee  some  of
the    Important    things    that
have   to  be  done  and   I   think
that   I   could   bo   effective   In
doing     them.
2) Wo  set   policy  and
Implement   policy   but,   we   do
not   make   any   political
decisions.    That's    handled    by
student      council.
3) I've   had   the   experlenee
of  being  on  SAC  for  the   past  year  and   I've  seen   how  the
eurrent  DOA does  her Job.  So,   I  think  that  I  can  see  how  I
can   both   eontlnue   what   she's   boon   doing   and   also,   make
some       Improvements
MarieneTecson
Independant
1)   I  want  to  serve  the
students   of   UBC   to   the   best
of   my  abilities   and   bo   able
to   give   the   students   of   the
campus    the    oppurtunlty    of
more   than   Just   merely
obtaining   a   degree.   I   want   to
Improve   and    expand    the
service*    program*    (such    at
carpoollng,    houtlng    and    walk
home)   to   ensure   that   the
studentt   of   UBC   will   find
them   easily   accettlble   and
utefull.
1) Why do you want to be AMS Director of
Administra tion ?
2) What is the role ofthe student administrative
commission?
3) What experience do you have which prepares
you for this job?
Ryan "D-Day"
McCuaig
Radical    Boor   Faction
1) I   want   to   bo   AMS   Director   of   Administration   bocause   I'll
bo  able  to  pee   In  the  pool  and  get  away  with  Itl
2) The   rolo   of   Student*   Against   Clubs   Is   to   ensure   that
beer   drinking   on   campus   Is   mado   an   unon|oyablo
experience.      I   therefore   propose   to   declare   UBC   a   "free
city"    under   the    Geneva    Convention    thereby    allowing
anyone      to   obtain   beer   at   any   time.   Furthermore,   we   shall
enter   Into    negotiations   with    tho   Granville    Island    Brewery
to   operate   a   satellite   outlet   where   Blue   Chip   cookies
currently   Is   awaiting   Its   demise   (Long   live   Duke'sl).
3) The   first   experlenoe   I    had   with   administration   oeoured
In  the  back  seat  of  an   '84  Volvo.
Roger Watts
Students     First
1) I feel that Its time for a change  within   SAC  and  that  I
can   bring   about   that   ehango.
2) The   role   of  SAC   Is   to   administer   and   enforce   AMS   policy
and   regulations   and   to   look   after   the   day-to-day   operation
and   maintenance   of   the   SUB   and   other   AMS   buildings.
3)1   have   had   lots   of   experlenoe   working  with   the  Science
Undergrad   Society   and   with   the   432.   I've   also   sat   on
council  for  the   past  year  as   science   rep  and,  so,   I   know
pretty   well   how   eounoll   works.   Some   people   have   criticised
my  lack  of  experience  with  SAC   but,   I   tend  to  look  at  It  In   a
slightly   different   light.   Having   never   been   on   SAC,   I   have   o
preconceptions   about   how   thing*   ought   to   be   done   or
about   how   they've   been   done   In   the   past.   When   we've
reached   a   situation   In   which   SAC   ha*   been   nicknamed
"Students   Against   Club*",   I   think   that   a   new   perspective   Is
As   a   member   of  several   clubs   myself,   I   feel   that   I   can   do   that.   II   would   like   to
Student   shouldn't   dread   coming   to   SAC.
in   order
see   SAC   become   much   more   open   and   welcoming
Instead,   I   would   like   to   see   them   coming   out   to   talk   with   the   commission
Groucho Marx
Famous   Dead   People
1) When you're running a bureaucracy, the
best way to safeguard your Job Is to make
sure that you're the only one who knows how
everything works. I wouldn't want to belong
to any club that would have me as a member.
2) How do you know? That's suppose-ill to be
top secret. Guards, arrest that man.
3) I paid good money to become what I am
today. I attribute my success to
amfaltk>n,guts, Integrity, fairness, honesty and
having enough money to buy people with
those qualities.
Donovan
Kuehn
Independent
Donovan Kuehn Is also a
candidate for Director of
Administration
Elise Brady
Senate -at -Large
1) What does the senate do? °
2) What is the worst aspect of academic life at UBC?
3) What would your first priority as a senator be?
1) The senate Is the academic decision making
body here at UBC.
2) The worst aspect of academic life here at
UBC Is the lack of accessibility of education to
disabled people. An example of this Is the two
year language requirement. This takes no
account of ,for example, deaf people who Just
can't learn a new language that fast. The
administration Is Inflexible and seems to show a complete lack of Interest
3) My first priority would be to give a voice to disabled students at UBC. But, by
addressing disabled peoples Issues, I am also addressing the Issues of able bodied
people. Access and flexibility concern us all.
Talman Rodocker
1) The senate decides matters of academic policy In the university
and, to that extent, the senate's probably one of thn most Important
governing bodies for the university.
2) Having to trudge through the mow. That'* It thi* year.
3) My first priority would have to be to become completely familiar
with the Issues that are at hand. What's going on In the senate
sometimes seem* to be a mystery to most student* and I'm not
completely famMar with all aspects of the senate.
Chris Sing &
Samson Hui
are also running for the senate
Marilyn Monroe
Famous    Dead    People
1) My *•* prtortfj* w-MM ba to cMr Dm Ext-Ma-J aMra
•MnmHtM. It toot, flu* I* Ox CEA's tMly ataty. at My. aa IB
tkakjMam.
2) I WOtaTM iTWlto PaWlt StaTWaStT/iy aa-artasiyplaoaaaia1
tta*«kwae-^iattl.aa]rart-MOMa--taemt-MSUB.
S) B«aH aa artm. unto haa baa* taa* far flatty yuan
cm gat oato Ota batot In ttw wueirtlva ataefloa.
Emile Woo
1) Wei, as you know, the senate
Is the academic governing body of
this university.
2) The worst aspect of academic
life at UBC would have to be
those Instructor* who really don't
oars about teaching and the
attitude of the administration
towards teaching. Good teaching
Is only minimally recognized and
promotions conwdttoes look
almost exclusively at a professor's
ability to chum out paper after
paper. I think that the student
questionalree and teaching
evaluation surveys should have
more weight In the overall
consideration of faculty members.
3) Over the past three years, I have been working on teaching standards
and, there ha* been a committee set up by a student to evaluate the
environment of teaching. If I am re-elected, I will have the oppurtunlty to
move on to that committee.
Regan McNeal
As senator-at-large, I will ensure that the student voice li heard. My goals
Include
1) Fairness for all students
2) Academic Equity
3) That the amount of program* and teaching quality Is proportional to fee
Increases, not the other way round!
January 22,1993
ELECTION SUPPLEMENT/3 ■-.^■'
LECTION   SUPPLEMENT
Director of Finance
Salvador Dali
Famous    Dead    Peoples
1. As   a   mystic   I   believe
man   Is   an   alchemic   matter
capable   of   being   turned   Into
gold.   This   can   be   harvested
and   placed   In   GICs.
2. The    two    requirements    of
understanding    RecFac:    to    be
Spanish   and   to   be   named
Galla    Salvado    Dall.    Politics
Is     merely     historical
anecdotes,      therefore      Hitler
had  six   balls  and   no
foreskin.
3. Obviously   not   enough,   Is
there?      Look,   I'm   a   painter.
What else am I supposed to say? Sometimes I sit with
pleasure on my mothers portrait. I d0R't know about
the    AMS. Lobsters.      Lobsters.      Lobsters.      Lobsters.
Lobsters.      Lobsters.      Lobsters.     Lobsters.      Lobsters.
1) What are the major factors contributing to the
incredible wealth of the AMS?
2) How do you feel about the way in which the AMS has
handled the Student Recreation Centre question?
3) How much money does the AMS spend each year on
art? Where does this art go?
Kerry Kotlarchuk
Independent
1) Well,   we   kind   of   have   a   captive   audience
here.   The   way   the   economic   times   have   been
In   Canada   and   the   US,   students   are   going   back
to school In record numbers. In fact, you can see that with the
Grade Point Averages in the McLean's university Issue. The
grade point adverages to get Into UBC now are huge. So,
university's the place to be now and we have a large
population of students. All the students pay their 40 dollar
AMS fees and that contributes to the 1.2 million dollar
discretionary Income that the AMS will be allocating. Also,
the AMS businesses have done reasonably well. The profit
margins aren't large but the businesses are there to provide
employment, not to make money.
2) I think that It could have been handled better. A lot of
students really don't see what's going on behind the scenes
in the AMS. After the referendum, the first I heard of all this
was when I read an ad In The Ubyssey saying that I could get my money back.
3)   I'm   not   sure   but,   I   know   It's   quite   a   bit.   It   all  gets   put   away
somewhere   where   its   really   hard   to   get   to   see   it.
Beer
Scott "Scooter"
Davidson KSST.
1) We actually returned all the empties this year. AMS flights to
Hawaii were all booked coach, instead of first class. And, since
we can't actually prove that all of the executive are human, we
actually saved money on food promos, honoraria and rabies
shots.
2) I particularity admired the gloves the AMS wore when they
handed us the information on where to pick up our tax credits.
3) That crap In the gallery? Nothing, if you have a keen eye for
the topic. And by comparison to what they spent on beer, they
spent too much. Where does all the "art" go? Well, right now,
it's In Southern California, being applied to velvet for future
decorative use around AMS pool tables.
Phillip Stringer
Students for What's Right
1) A relatively large portion must come from the student
fees at $39.50 which each student pays and which should
be handled correctly by the AMS. The AMS would also get
revenue from other sources, from the events that they hold
such as the concerts. Our slate Is looking to make an
increase in getting students involved and this would also
bring round an increase in the amount of money that the
AMS would have and Increase the overall enjoyment of the
students at UBC.
2) The student recreation centre came up In such a way
that not too many students got Involved with It. If they had
handled it in a way to tell more students about It and get
more students involved then they could have done
something good with it but I don't think they handled this as
directly as they should have with getting as imany students
Involved.
3) As nominee for director of finance, I have read the AMS budget for this year but I am unable to
quote figures directly relating to AMS expenditures across campus
Jason Saunderson
Students for what's right
2) I Blink that th* AMS's rdatJoneNp with thai adversity
at tf» mom-Hit I* tolrly good. Not Mui but, a tot better
than It was ■ month age. Ifs Important tor the AMS to
stand up for students' ittfita but, wo should ba cooperating with the adinbdalialaoa. A canfraataSaa-d
approach rarely If over worho.
1) One or tha major liaaai tor our Hata la atadaat
tovolvomout. Evaats no-ad to ba bottor peMdaed aad tfca
AMS aaada to try to maka Itself mora idevont to students
Sum It la at tha aaonto-rL
Pam
Rogers
Dean Leung
Students      First
1) The    major   factor,    I   think,
Is    good    financial    management.
As   well    as   collecting   money
from   the   students,   we   do
manage   to   turn   a   profit   on
most    of    our    businesses.
2) Well,   this   Is   a   question
which   you    shoul   perhaps   ask
Christa    about    since    It
concerns    code    and    by-laws
but,   I   think   that   there   was
really   no    better   way   In   which
the   whole    affair   could    have
been   handled.   When   a
referendum    fails     to     reach
quorum,     you     can't
legitimately   act   on   Its    results.    It   was    unfortunate   that
this   all   had   to   happen   this   way   but,   under   the
circumstances,      council      acted      responsibly.
3)   On   art   specifically,   I   couldn't   quote   figures   but,   I   do
know   that   the   AMS   art   collection   Is   valued   at   about   half   a
million   dollars   and   that   at   least   $3600   goes   to   the   art
gallery   each   year.   The   art   all   goes   down   into   the   vault.
Rodney Snooks
Independent
1)    I'd    say   tha   large   numbar   of
atudanta    aad    also    tha    bualaaaaas    It's
• bla   ta   raa   la   tho   SUB.
S)   I   eaa't   agraa   wtta   It.   If   a
rrrereedum    goaa    agalaat    a    maaaara,    I
caa't    agraa   with    going    ahaad    with    It.
lv   Jaat    imbi    Ilka    eommoa    aaaaa.
t)   I'd   have   ta   admit   I   dea't   Know.
1) My Bret priority would ba to sat up a eatnmtttoa oa housing. I am
tha badgjot rap for Acadia Park and I am awara of tha larga pronto
which UBC housing la extracting from Its atudanta. For example, laat
yaar, th-ey profKad **.» anion dollara. I (uat tMnka that makas
umvarality eiacceeslils. UBC la la a poaHloa to oftor aflajail state
houfdng! and, yet. It doee not. It la always looking at tha market and
trying to) do a percentage of tho market. I think that kind of
reasoning Is aiolovraiL The land la rtee and Its hero for the people of
BC and other people who want to study
2) I think poeplo need to tali to each other. Even If Issues are
dMcult„ people have to keep taking.
g) Well, that's a vary good amotion because I am one of thooe
-atad-mtsi that haa never participated la the AMS. I have felt the AMS
r (stoning to Its atudanta. I nave been Involved hi howelng tor many years, the AMS never gives ue any attention
I have given different people oa the AMS totormatloaS about trende In aceasalillty. They never seem to pey any
attention or to give tho matter serious contddaratloa. Thla past year the MM haa realy been working hard against the
tvtltlon kicrease and Marya McVlekara waa oa the Barriers ta f*"oot gecondary Education Group and I was a contributor tv
that -(roup. So, I'd say m tha laat tour months, I've aeea a real -change and I guess that's why rm Involved now.
Pavlov
la
1)
There   la   ao
why    the
external        affaire
ofltce        ahouldnt
be   aa   buzxlng    aa
the    other    AMS
offlceo.     I    would
Hke   to   eee   more
networking     between     different     dubs     and     groups     at     different
universities.    For    example,    If    a    student    from    the    UBC    stamp-
collecting   dub   wants   to   know   whits   gdng   oa   at   tha
stamp-collecting   dub   In    Ouelph,    he    should   Just    be    able   to
coma   Into   the   office   and   I   would   have   a   packet   ready   for
Mm.    Things    Iks    that.
2) Tha   AMS'a   relationship   with    the    university    raa't   aa    bad
aa   It   waa.      I'l   probably   get   killed   far   saying   this   but,   I
think    that    both    eMea    here    probably    aee    themeelvee    aa    tar
to*   Important.       There   aeeda   to   be   a   oft   of   compromise.   K
sounds   eNly   but,   tha   AMS   baa   to   realae   that   without   the
eahrerelty,    there    would    ba    ao    ualverelty    aad    tha    adversity
baa   to   redlee   that   without   students   there   would   bo   aa
aalverslty.
3) Tha   AMS   aeeda   to   be   more   relevant   to   students.   If   rt
ta    de   tha,    mere    atadenta    urttt    get    Involved.
4/ELECTION SUPPLEMENT
January 22.1993 A thousand cultures and languages in one book
Thev dot
usually don't approach
s
on but thi'V do
BOOK & INTERVIEW
Yasmin Ladha
Lion's Granddaughter and Other
Stories
NeWost Press
She admits that her ways of
making' others aware of her point of
view are subtle.
From Avoiding the Company of
Woman: "As you see, dear Readerji. I,
woman story-maker, waffle with
cunning."
Ladha says, "I waffle with cunning.
I don't like to hit people on the head. It
just spoils communication."
Ofthe political and social upheaval
she faced in Tanzania she says:
At the airport in Dor es Salaam
our hems ripped
East Indians, Like dogs
tail between legs
suitcases tied with silly ropes
our entry to the West
by Stan Paul
She moves carefully around the issues but, nevertheless, makes
' people aware of them. Ladha believes this skill may be only found in
get things done, she said. She quotes
writer Trin Minh Ha in saying that
women solve problems by "heating the
heart of the matter."
In Ladhas new book she also
deals with her role as a Moslem
woman. She believes she is "an Indian
subcontinent Moslem . . . that is very
different from Arab Moslem . . . with
different values."
She doesn't believe in the traditional view that women should be
submissive to men. But she does not
believe that women should be too
defiant either. She is seeking a balance.
From Beena: "Away with the
practice of wife burning on her
husdband's pyre. Away with widow      i
exile and her foods without garlic."
In her work, Ladha says she is
also "trying to find a relationship
between Allah and a woman." She asks
her CJod, "What is my space with you?" .■
From Giving up the Company of
Woman: "Of course, words like mufti o
ii mm a occupy almost all space in Islam,
and gender is specific: male."
With another glass of pineapple
juice on the way, the waiter teases that
thev won't have any left at this rate.
■Xiidd:X Ladha and I began a slightly
'**'"* heated discussion on the question of'a
"woman's devotion" ;to everything and everyone—the social belief
' that a woman is looked upon as the nurturer.
She believes it may be "an organ that we have . . . always
giving." '
She says: "A woman should know when she can stop and when
she can give."
She concludes that a woman's devotion may be "a self-protection
thing. It is a form of independence. If she gives everything, then she
is free."
From The Play Begins: "Yes that's Him, my husband. He walks
ahead of me slightly behind, like Queen Sita, who walked a few
paces behind her Lord Rama. And I am as resolute in my vocation ai
she was. Sita and I are true wives."
Although I disagreed with some of her ideas on the role of |
women, I was fascinated by her ability to bring cultures and religions from around the world into her work.
But that, "readerji," is for you to find out.
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MUSIC
Wednesday
Wednesday Noon Hour
Terence Dawson, piano
Camille Churchfield, flute
Victor Costanzi, violin
William Jenken, clarinet
Andrew Pearce, cello
12:30 pm Recital Hall  $2
Thursday
UBC Symphony Orchestra
12:30 pm Old Auditorium
Distinguished Artists
Robert Davidovici, violin
Rena Sharon, piano
8:00 pm Recital Hall $14/7
Friday
Symphonic Wind Ensemble
12:30 pm Old Auditorium
UBC Symphony Orchestra
8:00 pm Old Auditorium
Saturday
Symphonic Wind Ensemble
8:00 pm Old Auditorium
Monday
UBC Student Composers
12:30 pm Recital Hall
Next Wednesday
Wednesday Noon Hour
Edmond Agopian, violin
Paul Dornian, clarinet
Nicholas Pulos, viola
John Kadz, cello
Marilyn Engle, piano
12:30 pm Recital Hall $2
Collegium Musicum
8:00 pm  Recital Hall
For information call 822-5574
January 22.1993
THE UBYSSEY/5 I- "AxjL''
Eat this, Dave
The ten per cent tuition Increase Is a direct result of
arbitrary and unnecessary actions taken by the UBC board of
governors. This is clearly indicated in president Strangway's
January 8 discussion paper which recommends a 12 per cent
tuition hike.
Strangway's recommendation is grounded on the premise
that the provincial committee to examine barriers to access to
education found that "tuition was not a barrier to access and
recommended that each institution be free to set Its own
tuition." This despite the fact that the ministry for advanced
education has not accepted or rejected any of the committee's
findings.
When the NDP fulfilled Us election promise to students
and froze tuition fees last year, the BoG agreed to comply to
the freeze on several conditions that are hurting us now.
The board stipulated Oat the University Act not be
changed to limit their unilateral "right" to set tuition fees the
way they see nt—students' ability to pay, market value of a
degree be damned. *
Higher tuition plays a strategically vital role in the
project closest to Strangway's heart, the one he announced
when he took office: making UBC a "world class" university,
(remember "Stanford north"?) It's no accident that his discussion paper compares UBC tuition with fees at the top
American schools. This bit of nationalism is intended to m ake
us feels grateful to live la this country, of course. Why not
compare our tuition fees with those of many European countries where education Is considered a right and is free of
charge?
Higher fees make a school less accessible: mat enhances
the prestige of "getting in." It also legitimizes the dismemberment of your education.
This is happening now. Services that were once cost-free
are being eliminated: the free services at the Computing
Centre were cut this summer. With $1 million cut this year
from the library budget, many of the Journals we expected to
be available for our studies are gone. Despite students' demands that adequate lighting be installed on campus, nothing
has been done to this effect
Over the last seven years, the administrators have given
themselves a 90 per cent wage increase to make UBC the
largest employer of wage earners over $100,000 in tiie BC
public sector. This year, they have demonstrated their contempt for students, through avarice or negligence, by retaining over $93,000 of our fees for students' supposed debts to the
university even when their own estimates of write-offs is
$7,000.
Yesterday, over 2,000 of us shouted, "We can't pay, we
wont pay." Since politicking and polite protesting aren't
working to help students secure their basic needs, perhaps it
is time to abandon the approved channels of dissent. The
Ubyssey declares a tuition freeze at UBC starting now,ending
never. In '93, don't pay more than you did tills year. Don't pay
more than you can, and pay with small, easy-to-carry install-
ments.They are going to screw you anyway, and then bill you
for the pleasure.
theUbyssey
Friday, January 22,1993
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia.
Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The editorial office is room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone 822-
2301; advertising, 822-3977; FAX 822-9279.
Tic Uiyssey s unk>rtunath.y a founding membbi of
Canadian University Press,
sorry.
Paula Welunqs commanded Dense Woodlev and Patrick Shu to speak unbonneted to Omar Kassis on page 1. Theresa Lemeux
OCT A NEW LOOK AS SHE MOST DREAM OF WtNONA N PAULA FORAN's CASTLE M DeMHARK. SAM GREEN SAID "WHAT DRUGS, WHAT CHARMS?" FRANCES
Foran replied ths only is the witchcraft I have used whle Lucho van Isschot was making the beast with two backs to the owl. "O brave
NEW WORLD, TO HAVE SUCH PEOPLE M If" SIGHED MlRANDA JOYCE AND HER COHORT MlRANDA AlLDRITT, VIEWS*** YUKIE KuRAHASM PLAY THE UON TO
Matthew Mart** who was search-no for that scurvey knave Romeo. "Get thee to a nunnery" Siobhan Roam-tree counselled Rod McFarland.
Quoth Sara Martin to Stan Paul "thy madness shall be paid with wait I" Christ-he Wallace led her delicate and tender prince Jan Forcieh
to Peaseblossom. Thev say Douglas Ferris was a baker's daughter, actually so was Martm Ertu In the outer realms of sycromzed
existance, blllamna suggested that all mght now cluck uke barn fowl, and brian lee m excitf-mbit sprouted peno.um wings. usa kwan had
MPROVED AVIATION KNOWLEDGE ANO WITH PIGEON WINGS SOARED UP *NTO THE ATMOSPHERE TO MEET AN ALREADY AIRBORNE HELEN WiLLOUGHBY-PrICE.
Editors
Sam Green* Lucho van Isschot  •  Yukie Kurahashi
Frances Foran  • Paula Wellings
Letters
Voices from
the grave
editor's note re: Ashley
Kroecher's letter in The
Ubyssey Tuesday, January
19th, Jennifer Johnson
claims that Kroecher inaccurately quoted her article
on David Suzuki, stating that
there are "50 000 species per
day" going extinct. Johnson
wrote '50 000 per year becoming extinct." (stat. from
Harvard Institute)
Johnson phoned Suzuki
to confirm this statistic. He
said in his lecture that 5
species per hour are becoming extinct, amounting to
approximately 50 000 per
year. Dead is dead; why
quibble?
Defence of The
Ubyssey
I was expecting some
form of negative response in
reaction to the feature on
the gulf war that came out
on Friday. However, this
specific response was not
only unnecessary, untrue but
even irrelevant. The letter
by David Chivo began by
claiming that the sources
used must be inaccurate and
that the statistics were false.
I cannot help but notice that
he failed to mention any
sources that he felt were
authentic enough. Perhaps
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed end are not to exceed 300 words In length. Content which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist racist or factually Incorrect will
not be published. Pteaso be concise. Letters may be edited for brevity, but It Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring them, with kjentlflcetlcn,
to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, end signature.
I may suggest a few: It Was,
It Was Not-ed. Mordecai
Briemberg; The New Inter-
nationalist-Oct,92; From
Camp David To The Gulf-
Adel Safty; Desert Mirage—
Martin Yantl; or any periodicals from the Arab world.
A word of advice, if your
sources differ from mine then
make sure they were not
endorsed by the American
propaganda-spreading
agency, Hill & Knowlton.
In addition, an aspect of
David Chivo's criticism towards The Ubyssey is their
inability to cover other major international atrocities
such as those occurring in
Yugoslavia, Germany, Iran,
etc. Well, if he is informed
enough (knows someone that
is) or is willing to do the
research then he should
write some expositions and
bring them up to room 241k
where no one will object to
their publication. As a matter of fact, those 'Bolsheviks'
would be glad to print such
important stories.
Finally, may I add that
The Ubyssey is merely a
display of students exercising their right to discuss
their views and expose news
that the mainstream media
ignores. Dismantling this
alternative newspaper
would only be censorship,
better off in a totalitarian
society where propaganda
brainwashes the masses and
the media is controlled so as
not to display the power and
corruption in the system. Be
carefUl what you wish for.
NohaSedky
Arts 2
Come unto me,
my children
This is in response to
the open letter to me regarding concerns with
teaching in the Department
of Computer Science that
appeared in The Ubyssey on
January 8th. I have already
had a long discussion with
the author of the letter in
The Ubyssey about the importance the department
places on teaching.
As undergraduates who
are majoring in Computer
Science may have noticed,
we have tried very hard to
hire excellent teachers in our
recent wave of faculty recruiting. Recent teaching
evaluations of courses in our
department seem to reflect
this with many comments of
the form "best instructor Fve
had at UBC."
There were certainly
problems in the teaching of
the course referred in the
letter.
However, I cannot agree
with the letter writer's general evaluation of the professor in question.
At least as far as I have
been able to determine, until the last two years this
professor was regarded by
most students (and faculty)
as a good teacher.
Even this last term, the
teaching evaluations for the
other course he taught were
not negative. I was not expecting the problems that
arose in the teaching of the
course described in the letter.
I really wish someone
had come to me earlier during the term so that I could
have tired to do something
about it.
I will try to make sure
that similar problems don't
occur this term.
Each year I make a point
of telling students that I really appreciate it when students tell me about problems
in teaching.
Although I read all the
comments that students
write on teaching evaluations each term and that
gives me a reasonable idea
ofthe problems that need to
be addressed, at that point
the courses are over.
It's much better when
students tell me about serious problems while the
course in question is still
being taught. It's not always
possible to fix problems that
arise, but we do try.
Maria Klawe, Head
Department of
Computer Science
Dear Dumpling
Dave,
I saw you at the anti-
tuition increase rally on
Thursday and I must say
that I was greatly impressed
by your oratory skills. Oh,
what was your name again?
David? Dave Strangeway?
No, Dave Strangway—what
a lovely name. Your luminous blue eyes and radiant
smile ignited my soul. I am
serious, you're wonderful.
Personally I would not mind
paying extra, that way I
know you would enjoy yourself. It's true, I care about
your pleasure! I am a luscious, nubile third year student, well trained in the art
of Swedish Massage (how
else could I earn my tuition
money, you little sausage!).
Why don't you call me at the
UBC Young Conservatives'
office and ask for PC 984 —
they'll know what you're after.
Sincerely,
The Secret Admirer
Huh?
PC or not PC?
I would like to respond
to an article which appeared
in the Sunday, January 17th
edition of the Vancouver
Courier.
The article was in reference to the student move
ment at the University of
British Columbia to hold a
referendum on student
funding of The Ubyssey
newspaper. While it is my
understanding that Mr.
Saunderson and the UBC
Young Conservatives had
originally raised the profile
of the issue, it is my belief
that many other students
have contributed to the discussion.
It is important to note
that Mr. Saunderson and the
UBC students do not necessarily reflect the views ofthe
British Columbia Progressive Conservative Youth
Association. However, I
would personally like to
commend of those students
on campus, regardless of
political affiliation, who
worked to foster discussion
of a local issue at UBC (regardless of which side ofthe
issue they supported).
Russell Morrison
president
British Columbia
Progressive Conservative Youth Association
6/THE UBYSSEY
January 22,1993 crepuscular (kri-pmig-kew-ler) adj. of twilight; appearing
or active at dusk or dawn, not at night or in full daylight.
The Routes to Success
/=7I
Part-time Job
JOB FAIR
Organized by Volunteer Connections, the companies
participating in the Job Fair provide an opportunity for
students to learn and experience a career of their choice.
Volunteer work adds to your portfolio of education and
work experience, and to your social life.
January 25th and 26th
SUB Concourse
9:30am - 3:30 pm
AUTO     IMPORTS
AUDI. MERCEDES. VW & VOLVO SPECIALISTS
Complete Repair Service
HONDA
VOLVO
VOLKSWAGEN
MAZDA
AUDI
TOYOTA
MERCEDES
BMW
10% DISCOUNT FOR
UBC STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF
Very competitive rates & fast, quality service.
fSoscHl   BOSCH
Authorized Service
1505 W. 3RD AVENUE
v(at the entrance to Granville Island)
AirCare
Repair Centre
^
ELECTION
STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVES TO
SERVE ON THE
BOARD OF GOVERNORS AND
THE SENATE
January 25 - 29,1993
Day/Evening Polls
Tuesday/TFriday 9.30 a.m. - 3.30 p.m.
Mon/.Wed./Thur. 9.30 a.m. - 7.30 p.m.
Sedgewick Library and S.U.B.
Evening Polls
Monday through Thursday
4.30 p.m. to 7.30 p.m.
Totem Park Common Block
Place Vanier Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
Daytime Polls
Monday through Friday
9.30 a.m. to 3.30 p.m.
Henry Angus Law
Buchanan Scarfe
C.E.M.E. MacMillan
Chemistry War Memorial Gym
Computer Science Wesbrook
Graduate Student Centre Woodward Library
Friday only, 11.30 am. - 3.30 p.m.
Landscape Architecture Studio
(Subject to availability of students to run polls)
BRING YOUR A.M.S. CARD
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
(Two to be elected)
Ian Flint (Ph.D. Candidate - Mining & Min. Process Eng.)
Michael Hughes (M.A.Sc. Candidate - Eng. Physics)
Bill Johnson (Fourth Year Science)
Orvin Lau (Fourth Year Science)
Dean Olund (Fourth Year Engineering)
Mike Wagner (Third Year Arts)
Jeff West (Fourth Year Arts)
SENATE (AT-LARGE)
(Five to be elected)
Elise Brady (Second Year Arts)
Paul Marsden (Fourth Year Arts)
Regan McNeal (Third Year Science)
Jerry Olynyk (Fourth Year Arts)
Talman W. Rodocker (Fourth Year Arts)
Samson Shui Yan Hui (Second Year Commerce)
Christopher M. Sing (Fourth Year Science)
Emile C.-H. Woo (Fourth Year Pharmaceutical Sciences)
NO PROXY VOTING WILL BE ALLOWED AND
STUDENTS REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S. CARD
TO VOTE.
It should be noted that any allegations of irregularities
with regard to these elections must be submitte
writing to the Registrar within 48 hours oftl . cawt- uj
polling (exclusive of weekends or public holidays) and
must include the signatures of at least three students
eligible to vote.
731-8171
January 22,1993
THE UBYSSEY/7 I N T E R V I E W
Reassessing the war
by Lucho van Isschot
Adel Softy is a professor in the
department of Language Education at
UBC and a scholar of Middle Eastern
politics. His recently published book,
From Camp David to the Gulf War
(Black Rose Books 1992) discusses the
negotiations and propaganda campaigns which led both to the watershed
Camp David agreements and to the US-
led war against Iraq.
Your book focuses, in large
part, on the US-led war against
Iraq. In light ofthe most recent US
bombing raids against Iraq, I waa
wondering if we could discuss this
aspect of your work. You imply that
the US administration was prepared for an attack against Iraq
several years before the war began—even before the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. How did you reach
this conclusion?
Evidence suggests that the
possibility of confronting Iraq was being
consideredby the US State Department
and the White House many years ago.
American forces were being trained in
a desert-like environment for warfare
against an enemy that could easily be
conceived as being in the Middle East.
In the late 1980s the conceivable
enemies in the region were Iraq and
Syria. Iraq and Syria were specifically
mentioned and singled out in secret
documents which detailed the national
security directives of the Bush
administration. These documents
basically said that the threat no longer
comes from the Soviet Union—it having
been disintegrated—but from regional
powers such as Iraq and Syria. US
forces must, therefore, be prepared to
confront and decisively defeat these
powers. Interestingly, shortly after the
Iran-Iraq cease-fire in 1988, a campaign
to demonize Iraq began in the US
Congress, a campaign which eventually
developed a momentum of its own and
it soon became clear that a
confrontation with Iraq may be
inevitable.
It seems to me that for years
the US was simultaneously supporting and fighting against Iraq.
Is that at all accurate?
Yes, in the sense that one could
say during the Iran-Iraq war the US
was supporting both parties simultaneously. The US was saying: we might
as well let them kill one another until
they weaken each other. The best scenario as far as the Americans were
concerned would be that both parties
emerge as losers, so as they would not
pose any threat to the balance of power
which is essentially favourable to
America's friends in the Middle East.
In the campaign to demonize
Iraq, western media continually
referred to the alleged use of
chemical weapons by Iraq against
the Kurdish village of Halabja in
1988. In your book you seem to
imply that this incident may not
have actually happened, or that, if
it did, it didnt happen in the way
we here in North America were led
to believe.
CAREER TRAINING FOR THE
HEALTH SCIENCES
BCIT will offer an information session on four important career
programs, in the new year.
Biomedical Engineering Technology
The technologist is responsible for ensuring the highest
standard of performance in a wide range of technical
equipment and instnimentation for medicine and biology.
Technologists work with health care professionals in hospitals,
clinics and research labs, as well as for medical equipment
companies.
Medical Laboratory Technology
Building on first-year university science courses, BCIT's
technologist program consists of!" months of academic
studies at BCIT followed by a 12- <   >nth training period in one
of the clinical facilities affiliated with the program. A new
program is planned, which w :id replace the first -vir ->f
university with a technology-^"0'11' first year at lv.Ji.
allowing high school graduates direct access to th* p;>'gram.
Occupational Health and Safety
This science-oriented program is a combination of studies in
health, engineering and business. It prepares graduates with
the knowledge and leadership necessary for the development
of health and safety programs for industry. BCIT offers a part-
time studies certificate program and a 2-year diploma
program.
Environmental Management of Real Estate Assets
This certificate program is available throughout B.C. via
guided independent study. It addresses the requirements of the
Canadian Environmental Pollution Act and will be of interest
to anyone involved in real estate assets and transactions:
appraiser, banker, developer, lawyer, notary, and those
interested in "green" issues.
Find out more about these career programs as follows:
Time:   6:30-8:30 pm
Date:    Monday February 1
Place:   Boardroom, Administration Building, BCIT
3700 Willingdon Avenue. Burnaby, B.C.
Phone: 432-8573    Fax: 433-1184
BRITISH COLUMBIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
We cant say that this was a fictional incident, because the incident
did take place. All we can say with
certainty is that the accusation that
Iraq was solely responsible for the attack was embraced immediately and
uncritically by both the media and by
the US administration under Bush.
This served a specific propaganda purpose: to demonize the Iraqi regime and
to make them look like monstrous
people killing their own citizens. Some
American officials, who I quote in my
book, eventually recognized that the
American administration knew that
both the Iranians and the Iraqis used
chemical weapons in that incident. And
some officials speculated that it was
more likely that it was the Iranians
who were the ones who caused the
damage that was automatically
attributed to Iraq. It is also sig-   .    ,    _ .    „ . ,
nificant to note these same ^ European Community Commission  WlaraeLa-^ditU8
verse the aggressive move of one member state against another. That mandate was fulfilled when the Iraqi forces
offered to withdraw after the tremendous punishment they endured from
air strikes. But the Bush administration did not accept the withdrawal and
continued to pursue war. The withdrawal was taking place and yet the
war continued. And after that the cease
fire conditions were so harsh that it
was quite evident the cease fire conditions were not intended to prevent further aggression, but to weaken Saddam
Hussein's power over his country and
to violate Iraqi territorial sovereignty
by imposing no-fly zones in the South
and in the North. The hope was maybe
to humiliate Hussein sufficiently so
that someone close to him would over-
in North America were lead to believe that most Arab nations were
behind Bush's efforts. Was that accurate? Who supported the US-led
war, and why?
Two groups of countries supported
the war against Iraq: the Gulf countries, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait, for
obvious reasons, and Egypt and Syria.
Egypt really had no choice due to the
fact that Egypt is heavily dependent on
the US to the tune of $2 billion in
American aid every year, and had a
debt of some $7 billion that the Bush
administration offered to wipe out. As
for Syria, Syria realized that it could be
left out in the cold. Its traditional superpower ally, the Soviet Union, is no
    longer. It badly needs to
American officials recognized
that the number of victims ofthe reported that some 20,000 Bosnian
attack was not in the thousands,  j    **_'1J i_ i_      _
but in the hundreds, and possi- women and children have been
now
realizing that the United
States is the only channel through which it can
bly even lower than that. But by  raped, many of whom died during Or   deal effectively with Is
the tune these recognitions came        r       J X      n -i -i '  Ti   ' '	
out, it was too late. immediately after the rape. And yet
Do you believe that the the champions of the new world
usdoescareaboutthefateof or(jer are just watching it happen.
the Kurdish people, or any of ^ ° f_f_	
the peoples in Iraq for that
matter?
If the Bush administration indeed
cared about the Iraqi people, why did it
not intervene on behalf of the Shiites
when they rebelled against the Hussein
regime immediately after the war? Why
did it not intervene when, as recently
as last year, Turkish forces killed hundreds of Kurds both in Turkey and in
Northern Iraq? By some estimates as
many as 1,000 Kurds were killed. Yet
we haven't even heard about these
things. So it seems to me that the
argument that the US cares about the
Kurds or cares about the Shiites is a
spurious argument. The real motivation for the Bush administration's most
recent action is the personal vendetta
that President Bush is carrying out
against President Saddam Hussein,
and the desire to accomplish what the
war failed to do—the removal of
Hussein.
What are the Americans trying to accomplish with these latest
attacks?
It is clear to me that Bush is trying to accomplish a number of things
that reflect American foreign policy
priorities, rather than a UnitedNations
mandate. The UN mandate was to re
throw him. That did not happen.
It seems that in some ways
these latest attacks are little more
than a slap on the wrist—they certainly weren't decisive political
moves. Why is the Bush administration holding back?
I think [Bush] realizes that the
prevailing conditions are different today than they were when they launched
the most massive bombardment of any
country in history for six weeks. The
context of two years ago is not the
context of today. Even the Arab allies
which supported the war against Iraq
do not support what is happening now.
The current attacks are designed to
weaken a specific regime, to undermine its sovereignty—which puts most
Arab nations, and the notion of the
nation-state itself, at risk. The Arab
world and the Third World have the
right to be outraged. They cannot support a carte blanche given to the President of the most powerful country on
earth to go and bombard a country
because he does not agree with its
leader, much as we individually may
abhor Saddam Hussein and the atrocities he has committed.
During the war itself, we here
rael. It also needs support from Egypt and
Saudi Arabia. If Syria
had allied itself with the
Arab nations who supported Saddam Hussein,
it would have found itself in a losing
camp.
So would you say that
there is a renewed mistrust of
American foreign policy amongst
Arab leaders?
Well, the Arab nations are witnessing what is essentially a genocidal
war against Moslems in Bosnia. For
nine months Bosnia has been subjected
to a merciless siege and the UN has
clearly declared Serbia to be the aggressor. Serbia has also violated a
number of cease fire agreements. A
European Community commission reported that some 20,000 Bosnian
women and children have been raped,
many of whom died during or immediately after the rape. And yet the champions of the new world order are just
watching it happen. The Arab states
are aware of all of this. They are seeing
what is happening. They see what the
new world order champions are doing
to resolve the situation in Bosnia and
Serbia—essentially nothing. They are
witnessing the indifference of the US
when it comes to dealing with Serbia,
but their total fury when it comes to
dealing with an Arab nation.
8/THE UBYSSEY
January 22,1993

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