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The Ubyssey Jan 13, 1987

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UBC Archives Serial
THE UBYSSEY
^V
•^   Vol. LXIX, No. 28
■t
'Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 13,1987
228-2301
Sikh chair grant raises protest
By PATTI FLATHER
Some UBC students say they're
angry with how Ottawa is tying a
grant application for a UBC chair
in Punjabi and Sikh studies to
Canadian foreign relations with India.
The UBC Sikh Students Association is sending letters to external affairs minister Joe Clark and
secretary of state David Crombie to
protest how the application is being
handled, said club president
Palbhinder Sandhu.
The university and the Federation
of Sikh Societies agreed in March
1985 to establish a chair in Punjabi
language and literature and Sikh
studies. Sandhu and others charge
that Indian government interference is behind the almost two-
year federal delay in processing the
grant application — a charge Indian
government representatives deny.
The external affairs department
did intervene in the application for
a $300,000 multiculturalism grant
to help set up the chair, arguing
support for the program linked to
Canada's Sikh community could
harm bilateral relations with India,
according to documents obtained
by The Globe and Mail.
In a Dec. 13, 1986 article, The
Globe said documents obtained
under the Access to Information act
show that an external affairs official thought the Indian government would misunderstand a
federal grant for the UBC endowment.
E.G. Drake, an assistant deputy
minister in the external affairs
department, sent a memo in April,
1985 to the secretary of state, which
is processing the application, saying
"... the implications in terms of
foreign policy must also be considered."
"I hope, therefore, that the Indian government's likely reaction
can be taken into account before
any conclusion is reached," Drake
wrote.
Palhinder Sandhu said the
establishment of the chair concerns
the rights of Sikhs and other Canadians to learn about the Sikh com-
Optimistic new
minister loves job
By JENNIFER LYALL
Stan Hagen, R.C.'s new minister
of advanced education and job
training, doesn't think there are any
difficulties facing post secondary
education in B.C.
"Why are there difficulties?" he
asked. "From what I've seen the
students are getting an excellent
education and the faculty and professors are doing a good job."
Hagen said the people of B.C.
agree with him that the system is
essentially free of problems.
"The public seems generally happy with the universities, colleges,
and training institutions." He said
he has received few complaints
about the post-secondary system.
Hagen said the one exception to
the general public satisfaction with
advanced education has been the
widespread concern expressed
about the government's student aid
policies and skyrocketing student
debt loads.
The average debt of 1986
graduates with student loans was
$15,000, an increase of $12,000
since 1984. Hagen said the figures
suggest there is a "problem" with
student aid.
"It's unjust for students to be
graduating with high debt loads —
they're just starting out in life, so to
speak.''
Hagen hopes to find some solutions to the debt problem through a
government commission on student
aid. He said the commission will
continue to solicit public proposals
and criticisms until January 19, and
was reluctant to comment on the
issue until he has read the submissions.
He did say that "the answer is
not for the government to pay 100
per cent of everything for
everyone."
When revising the student aid
program, he intends to ensure that
all British Columbians will have an
equal opportunity to gain a post-
secondary education. He did not explain how this would be accomplished.
"The ability of someone to get an
education   shouldn't   depend   on
munity. More than 200,000 Sikhs
live in Canada, including about
80,000 in the lower mainland.
The Federation of Sikh Societies
has raised $300,000 towards the
chair, including $175,000 in B.C.
Sandhu said the chair is needed
"especially to get rid of a lot of
perceptions that the community is a
violent community," adding the
program was all set to start in
September 1985.
Amritpal Shergill, past president
of the Sikh Students Association,
said he cannot understand the logic
in the external affairs memo.
"Is offering Soviet literature and
where they live," he said. "We
want to attempt to make it
equitable."
At the college level, Hagen said
community colleges continue to
fulfill their purpose of increasing
the accessibility of post-secondary
education to students from the interior and remote regions of B.C.
He doesn't see any more serious
problems facing the colleges than
those facing advanced education in
general.
"I don't have any difficulty with
the way the colleges are operating
— they respond extremely quickly
to public demand," he said.
Hagen's new ministry has
undergone metamorphosis since
last October's election. Previously,
the ministry of post secondary
education was expanded to include
job training after the election, and
was eventually renamed the
ministry of advanced education and
job training.
Hagen dismissed the suggestion
that the association of education
with job training might detract
from academic programs.
"I think it's a natural step to include job training because the two
go hand in hand," he said.
"There's a real interaction between
the two."
Since Hagen's appointment, the
ministry has been further expanded
to include youth, and at Hagen's
own suggestion, women's interests,
which he says "revolve around"
education and job training.
This is Stan Hagen's first foray
into provincial politics. His
previous political experience has
been limited to four years on the
Courtenay school board and two
years as chair of the local Christian
school to which he sends two of his
five children. He is a devout
Lutheran and once studied to be a
minister, but, deciding he didn't
have the calling, moved to
Courtenay and became the president of Comox Valley Ready Mix
Ltd.
Hagen likes his new job. "It's the
best portfolio there is," he says.
Soviet classes going to affect their
(the Canadian government's) relationship with the United States?"
Shergill called on Indian government representatives in Canada to
publicly support the UBC chair,
and end suspicions that India is lobbying against it.
But Jagdish Sharma, Indian
Consul-general for Western
Canada, declined comment on what
the Indian government thinks of the
UBC chair.
"We have not put any pressure
whatsoever on the government of
Canada or UBC," Sharma said. "It
would be presumptuous on our part
to attempt to do so."
The UBC professor who has been
involved with the Federation of
Sikh Societies in establishing the
chair said the Indian government
has not pressured UBC on the issue.
Ashok Aklujkar, a Sanskrit professor and past head of the Asian
studies department, called the
delays and controversy "a sad
situation."
He said academically the chair is
needed in Canada to further study
of Punjabi and Sikh traditions, and
that he became involved in
establishing the chair before tensions increased between the Indian
government and Sikhs.
— dan andrews photo
OH THOSE SUMMER beach parties. Young UBC student decides to drink the year away trying to forget about
all the crap going on in her life. Glasses allow no light to penetrate.
Student MPs play at politics
By BETSY GOLDBERG
On-the-job child care and tax reform are in, but
the Red Ensign and child suffrage are out.
These were just four of the concerns debated at
this weekend's thirteenth annual British Columbia
Universities* Model Parliament held in the B.C.
legislative chamber in Victoria. Model Parliament is
a three-day mock session of the House of Commons.
The "Members of Parliament" for the weekend are
largely members of the political clubs at B.C.'s three
universities. Each of the three federal parties submits
a bill and three resolutions to the House for debate.
The Liberal government's bUl creating an elected
Senate was defeated. Likewise, the opposition New
Democrats' bill to legalize abortion died due to the
expiry of the allotted time limit for debate. However,
due to an alliance with the NDP, the Conservatives'
tax simplification bill went through.
The resolutions passed included the Liberals'
policy of revised parental leave regulations and on-
the-job child care, and the NDP's position against
Canadian involvement in Strategic Defense Initiative
research. In keeping with the mock spirit of the
weekend, three mock resolutions were also submitted
by the parties. These were the readoption of the Red
Ensign as the Canadian flag, a Canadian military
takeover of Point Roberts, and the granting of the
vote to six year olds.
Each yearly session begins with a speech from the
throne read by the governor-general and ends with
closing ceremonies, as in Ottawa. In adddition to
debates on the throne speech, bills, and resolutions,
the government also had to contend with a twice-
daily question period. ;
Tbe number of seats each party receives is determined by polls taken on the three B.C. university
campuses. Following an especially strong showing at
the University of Victoria, the Liberals formed the
government with twenty-five seats.
Many of the "MPs" were UBC students, including
Progressive Conservative leader Dennis Prouse and
the Liberal and NDP House Leaders, John Whyte
and Freyja Bergthorsen.
The annua! general meeting of the Universities'
Model Parliament Society of B.C. was also held during the weekend. UBC students Ken Dickerson and
Shelagh Ryan were elected to the UMPS executive as
president and secretary. Page 2'
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13, 1987
Attention to the
miniscule minority of you
not running for the senate
or board. There are a
select few spots remaining
on The Ubyssey news
writing and photo-taking
staff. Candidates must
have a working
knowledge of English ...
Well actually they must
know God Save The
Queen ... Well actually
the Sex Pistols' version ...
Actually they have to
know the Queen personally ... Yeah that's it,
you have to know the
Queen and have slept
with the Sex Pistols. SUB
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AWARDS
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ATTENTION
B.C. Student Loan Recipients
If your BCSAP Notification of Award shows that you should be receiving a B.C. Student Loan in January 1967, and
you have not yet picked up your BCSL document, PLEASE NOTE THAT YOU MUST CALL AT THE
REGISTRAR'S OFFICE TO CLAIM YOUR AWARD. You will be required to present photo ID such as a student
card or driver's licence. The signed B.C. Student Loan document must be taken to your bank to be cashed. You are
reminded that second-term tuition fees must be paid in full by January 14.
The second instalment of a Canada Student Loan may be obtained by having a Schedule II signed in the Registrar's
Office. The signed schedule should then be taken to your bank.
The Registrar's Office is open on weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. It is located on the second floor of the
General Services Administration Building.
Awards and Financial Aid • Room GO. Qanaral Sarvicea Adminiatration BuHding • Tataphona: 228-6111
/k
LAST DAY TO RETURN
YOUR WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS IS...
JAN. 31st
UBC BOOKSTORE RETURN POLICY
Course Books - Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by original receipt)
for full refund any time up to JANUARY 31,1987 for WINTER SESSION TEXTBOOKS. After
this deadline all course books will be NON-RETURNABLE.
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR SALES RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND - NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
ELECTION
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO
SERVE ON GOVERNING BODIES
Evening Polls, Wednesday, January 14, 1987
as follows:
4:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
(Board and Senate at-Large Elections Only)
Totem Park Common Block
Place Vanier Common Block
Walter H. Gage Common Block
Sedgewick Library       S.U.B.
Daytime Polls, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday,
January 14, 15 and 16, 1987
9:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
S.U.B.
Buchanan
C.E.M.E. Building
Computer Science
Scarfe
Hebb Theatre
Woodward Library
Sedgewick Library
MacMillan
Law
Henry Angus
War Memorial Gymnasium
(Subject to students being available to run these polling stations.)
BRING YOUR A.M.S. CARD
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
Candidates from which TWO are to be elected:
Martin Cocking (Fourth Year Arts)
John A. Pearce (Fifth Year Teacher Train
ing - Elementary)
Simon Seshadri (Fourth Year Commerce)
Doug Stewart (Second Year Law)
SENATORS AT-LARGE
Candidates from which FIVE are to be elected:
Sean Byrne
Barry Dumka
Mark Elliott
Don Mustard
Rob Regan
Jim Snell
Alex Speers
Brent Watkins
Justin Williamson
(Second Year Arts)
(Second Year Arts)
(Second Year Arts)
(Fourth Year Science)
(Third Year Arts)
(First Year Commerce)
Ph.D.   Candidate   -   Food
Science)
(Fourth Year Arts)
(Ph.D.   Candidate   -   Civil
Engineering)
SENATE REPRESENTATIVES
FROM INDIVIDUAL FACULTIES
FORESTRY
(One to be elected)
Derek Challenger (First Year - B.Sc. Forestry
Program)
Grant Loeb (Third Year - B.S.F.
Program)
Steve Meldrum (First Year - B.Sc. Forestry
Program)
(Voting will take place in the MacMillan Building
only.)
LAW
(One to be elected)
Randy S. Brant (First Year)
Andrew J. Pearson     (Second Year)
(Voting will take place in the Law Building only.)
SCIENCE
(One to be elected)
Gary Mark (Second Year)
Shawn McDuff (Second Year)
(Voting will take place in the Computer Science
and Sedgewick Buildings only.)
NO PROXY VOTING WILL BE
ALLOWED AND STUDENTS
REQUIRE THEIR A.M.S.
CARD TO VOTE
(It should be noted that any allegation or irregularities with these
elections must be submitted In writing to the Registrar within 48
hours of the close of polling (exclusive of weekends or public
holidays} and must include the signatures of at least three students
eligible to vote.) Tuesday, January 13, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Student elections;
SENATE CANDIDATES
Five of these candidates will be
elected as student members-at-large
to the UBC Senate. They will join
12 other students, elected from the
faculties, on the 87 member body
that includes the president, the
chancellor and representatives from
the faculty and the outside community. The senate decides, subject
to Board of Governors approval,
UBC's academic policy, including
academic priorities and standards
and decides on programs and
courses. It deals with awards, appeals and program admissions. All
candidates interviewed were asked:
What will be the main issues facing
students next year? What can you
do on Senate to improve UBC?
Stories were written by Svetozar
Kontic, Rick Hiebert, Evelyn
Jacob, David Ferman, Mary
McAlister, Corinne Bjorge. Photos
by Dan Andrews and Malcolm
Pearson.
^ttm«ttmWI^
BARRY DUMKA
In seeking the position of senator
at large, apart from promising to
work effectively towards increasing
student interest in the affairs and
decisions of the senate — I have
refrained from making any "campaign promises." It is my belief that
personal agendas are inconsistent
with the aims of the senate.
Commitment, not campaign
rhetoric, is essential. This year I
believe I have displayed a strong
willingness to involve myself in
campus affairs. I am an executive
council member of the International Relations Students' Association; editor of the IRSAGRAM, an
international affairs journal; and
was recently elected as student
representative to the Board of
Directors for International House.
In the past several years, our
library system has come under
siege. Many good professors have
left, services have been cut back and
tuition fees have gone up.
Stopping this slow decay must be
the Senate's first priority, for the
quality and prestige of UBC is important to all of us.
GARY MARK
The most important issues facing
students next year as a student
senator will be the tuition hike and
misuse of the student athletic fund.
The senate must look into course
changes and withdrawal periods.
For those who withdraw from
courses after the deadline there
should be a standing called "incomplete."
The question of South African
divestment also has to be acted on.
What they've (the university) been
doing has been positive, but it has
been too little and too slow — it's
(the divestment so far) been
miniscule.
But the money (the $32 student
athletic fee) currently being misspent is the big problem. There
should be more facitilies for the
average student. They are not
allowed on most fields now, and
there are no baseball diamonds on
the campus.
There have always been student
representatives on the senate but
over the last while they haven't been
reporting back to each other and
the student body. The Pattison
issue could have been brought up
earlier and yet when the vote came
up it surprised the student senators.
But there was a student senator on
that committee.
SEAN BYRNE
Why me for senate? I have had
no previous experience in politics,
but I am interested in representing
the student body. I am on the executive of the speakeasy peer
counselling and information centre
and I am a member of students for
a free Southern Africa.
Some of the issues I hope to address include the divestment of
UBC funds from firms having
South African links, and the
ludicrous honorary degree which is
unfortunately to be bestowed upon
Mr. Jim Pattison. I am aware of
and up-to-date on campus and international events and will try to
echo the sentiments of students as a
representative to the senate.
Should you decide to vote for me
this week, I will show my sincere
appreciation and humble gratitude
by taking your grandmother out for
tea and biscuits (limit one O.A.P.
per person).
GRANT LOEB
I believe that our faculty should
have a strong voice in the senate
and I believe that I have the
necessary experience to be that
voice and to act upon your behalf.
I have been active in student
council, working on different council events including a position as
treasurer for "students for forestry
awareness."
I think that senate is something
that most students keep away from.
It's important however, because it
is the upper workings of the university. It puts the final stamp on
everything that happens at the
university.
I don't think that there is one
thing that concerns foresters that
doesn't face other faculties. Some
of the main issues that face all
students are crowded classrooms,
problems with course scheduling
and tuition fees.
There was a great deal of discus
sion about post-secondary education during the provincial election,
but so far we haven't seen anything
concrete. If the projected tuition increase goes through, it's just
another burden to students and it's
up to the provincial government to
do something to ease this burden.
r
MARK ELLIOTT
I see the most imporant function
of the senate as preserving and
maintaining continuity in
academics. We must maintain the
curriculum but also modify it to
keep it contemporary.
Some decisions made by senate
are just whited over, like the Pattison degree. When it came up the
student members only had two
minutes to look it over and one
minute to vote.
The student representatives
should meet, to get a bit unified.
We should see if we can vote as an
effective block. I would see myself
unifying as a moderator. I like to
see myself as a liason. I would also
want to inform the students of
senate decisions, through the
newspaper and the radio station.
Senate has to be concerned about
cautiously adjusting for curriculum
and admissions, so that a few years
down the road we don't have to cut
courses or have overcrowded
classes.
BRENT WATKINS
I believe I have the experience to
work effectively in the senate. (Two
years of committee and club work
in the AMS). I am well accustomed
to and look forward to presenting a
student's view to senate.
When it comes to voting on contentious issues, I can only hope to
use my single vote in the most
meaningful way possible and use it
to represent the wishes of the
students I meet each day.
In regards to current "hot"
issues, I am interested in showing
student concern for library hours,
book prices and having issues like
the Pattison-hoopla resolved.
On this point, I believe the issue
of Pattison's degree to be a no-win
situation. Added publicity hurts the
university community's image. Ignoring opposition pleas can do
nothing but harm the university internally. If I am elected to the
senate, I would push to have the
topic reopened for discussion, and
have concerned interest groups approached for their input, making
sure all senators are well-informed
about the implications of conferring this degree, and then move for a
vote.
I don't hope to solve any major
problems by myself but I do hope
for a chance to work hard and
represent a student's viewpoint on
senate.
*>*
rf-0
rf°
<**
JUSTIN WILLIAMSON
I hope to be elected again this
year — with your help. This will
allow continuity on some committees, which is important.
Fortunately, the issues facing
Senate this year do not include
disastrous cutbacks, but there are
always interesting items like
honourary degrees, academic
honesty, grades and grading, etc.
The committee that I have done
the most work on is the Committee
for Appeals on Academic
Discipline. I think we've come
a long way on that. The voice of student senators has become accepted
as respectable and legitimate. I
think in the last year that students
have been very successful in their
appeals.
One issue that will come up is
honorary degrees. I think that it is
long overdue. I would like to see
some more specific criteria for the
committee to examine. Particular
individuals in the community are
affecting the outcome and perhaps
that wouldn't happen if it was dealt
with by the senate as a whole.
ROB REGAN
There is a prevailing attitude on
campus that student representatives
are powerless to take effective action — an attitude to be expected
when less than 10 per cent of the
student body supports these elections.
At the election speeches last
Thursday in SUB, there were more
candidates than audience members.
We need a solution for the apathy
that grips the campus.
I would like to see better communication between the students
and their elected representatives. I
feel that my practice of talking to
students one-on-one or one-on-one
hundred is an active step towards
improving this communication. I
want to be your voice, but I can't
do it alone. I need your votes and
feedback. Everyone has something
to offer this university in the form
of thoughts and ideas. Why not give
these a voice?
i*'-°*H**>»**
JIM SNELL
One of the main issues for
senators is the apathy issue. When
you go up to the average student
and ask about the senate the usual
response is "it's a mind-numbing
affair of boring tedium." The rest
haven't heard of it.
Another issue is the library crisis.
A couple of years ago, UBC had the
second most credited research
library in Canada. Now we're down
to about twelfth because we don't
have the funds to continue
upgrading our resources.
Another problem is shelf capacity
in the main stacks. We just don't
have enough room for books even if
we could acquire them.
Another main issue this year is
the Pattison issue. The workings of
the senate are mysterious. There's a
flaw in the process that offered him
a degree. It was introduced and
voted on in the same meeting
without a chance for discussion.
We should look at new w^ys of
reforming the process through
which these degrees are granted, so
we'll be acting in the best interest of
students.
DON MUSTARD
Students are facing many important issues. One major concern is
the quality and cost of education in
B.C.
Student aid is also a big one.
There just isn't enough, and
students are graduating with huge
debt loads. Unfortunately the
university is not open to everyone.
I'm also concerned with the condition of the library. It is taking a
beating and we are losing valuable
periodicals.
I also have to wonder about the
board's proposed four per cent tuition increase. Yes there are costs —
but are students being scapegoats
for all the university's financial
shortcomings? Our tuition is
already one of the highest in
Canada.
As a senator I know getting communication between what students
want and what the administration
thinks is needed. We (students)
haven't been strong enough in voicing our concerns. I also want to see
improved communication within
the student senate caucus, and with
the rest of senate and faculty.
ALEX SPEERS
Senators at large should represent
groups of students who are not formally represented. I think it is going
to be hard work — it's not so much
politics, but a lofof committees and
meetings. I'd like to pledge to work
hard as a senator at large.
I think the main issues facing
students are going to continue to be
financial. Students working
together can have some input in
preventing funding cuts, especially
if they liaison with the student
body.
There's a general vacuum when
you ask what the senate does — I'd
like to see communication improved so students understand just what
it is we do.
On the Pattison issue, we have to
consider that the vast majority of
senators voted in favor of him
receiving the award. I'm not in
favor of him being given an
honorary degree. It's bad press for
UBC regardless of the outcome. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13, 1987
Illusions
Optimism is not a positive trait if it is founded on illusion. Our
new minister of advanced education and job training, Stan Hagen,
is deluding himself if he really thinks there are no difficulties facing
B.C.'s post-secondary education system today.
B.C. students pay the highest tuition fees, acquire the heaviest
debts, and have the lowest participation rate in the country. And to
add insult to injury, they now have a minister who blithely assures
them that they are getting an "excellent education."
Less than three months ago the crisis in post-secondary education was one of the key issues in the provincial election that landed
Mr. Hagen in cabinet. Today he claims the people of B.C. are
"happy" with their universities. Such a miraculous reversal of
public opinion is inconceivable, especially since no solutions have
yet been suggested.
Other recent developments in the ministry present cause for
alarm. One which could have especially far-reaching implications is
the seemingly innocent change of name to combine job training
with advanced education. The implied suggestion that education is
no more than training for a future career is frightening to many who
recognize the value of a general, liberal arts education in our increasingly insecure society.
Mr. Hagen seems genuinely intent on doing his best for post-
secondary education in B.C. We hope he will come to be more
sympathetic to the concerns of students and to understand the
complex issues involved in education.
■^^m^^^wwmwB^wKw^pw
Letters
Student says Pattison not appropriate for degree
This university's granting of its
highest distinction, the Doctor of
Philosophy, to Mr. Jimmy Pattison
(albeit an honourary degree) must
be regarded as one of the most ill-
conceived decisions ever to issue
from the Office of the Senate.
Traditionally, an honourary degree
is a means by which the university
recognizes an individual's outstanding contribution to a branch of
learning, or a great humanitarian
effort which has enriched our society; and in the happiest instances,
both.
How is it that Mr. Pattison
deserves this honour? Before Expo
'86, he was just another entrepreneurial success story, and not
a well-known one at that. Most people were aware of him through his
name appearing on decals pasted on
the trunks of cars.
And Expo '86, the vehicle by
which Mr. Pattison rose to the
stature of a demigod, was an event
which took a devastating toll upon
this and other provincial universities — Notre Dame at Nelson was
even closed. Health care institutions
also fell victim to Mr. Pattison's pet
project, grossly attested to by the
three to four year old cavern behind
St. Paul's Hospital — the beginning
of what was to have been a splendid
and much-needed addition to that
facility.
What concern did Mr. Pattison
show when streams of informed
protest rose from the highest
echelons of the faculty of this
university,   as   more   and   more
operating funds were withheld? We
all remember the departure of the
UBC president himself to an Ontario university in the midst of this
controversy.
Returning to the usual criteria for
an honourary degree, we need not
concern ourselves with the first,
unless it can be established that car
dealerships, sign companies and the
amassing of personal wealth represent a branch of learning. As to the
second, the distribution of pornographic material, continuous use
of bizarre personnel practices (the
monthly firing of that salesman
registering the lowest net sales) and
even the shrewd management of a
world's fair seem, at least to this
writer, to be the very antithesis of
humanitarian activity.
Furthermore, Mr. Pattison has
shown not a whit of interest in
education in general and universities in particular. It seems,
therefore, that the granting of an
honourary degree in this instance is
highly inappropriate.
In our time we frequently hear —
particularly from persons of Mr.
Pattison's mindset — disturbing
comments that a university degree is
really not important, that society
would be better served and our
energies better rewarded if we
undertook some more
"productive" pursuit, preferably in
the downtown area. The conferring
of an honourary degree upon Jimmy Pattison does nothing to change
that sort of thinking.
David Henry
arts 3
Kurds oppose injustice
Teacher wants freedom of speech
In the spring of 1985 I wrote two
letters in The Kamloops News
highly critical of the educational
policies of the Administration of
Cariboo College and the provincial
government. I was suspended for
three days from my position as
psychology instructor. This action
was grieved. In a non-binding hearing held in October, 1985, the college's lawyer successfully convinced
the arbitrator of the appropriateness of the disciplinary action.
At that point I circulated a memo
to fellow members of my faculty
association seeking their support in
taking the dispute to binding arbitration. In response to a
reporter's telephone enquiry, I
stated I did not accept the ruling
and would continue to fight for
what I perceived to be my right to
free speech and academic freedom.
Immediately following these two
actions, on December 11, 1985, I
was dismissed and instructed to
vacate my office by noon the next
day. No discussion took place
regarding my students who were
then in the midst of final exams.
Various discussions and negotiations followed. The college offered
monetary settlements but not
reinstatement, the only condition
acceptable to me since I considered
the dismissal unlawful. The case
now goes to binding arbitration
before Mr. Don Monroe, January
12-20, 1987, more than one full year
since my dismissal. Throughout this
period I have received the support
of my own association, the Cariboo
College   Student   Society,   the
r
THE UBYSSEY
January 13, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
It was a dark and stotmy night (actually, just rainy), but it was Jennifer Lyatl's birthday. So Mary
McAlister bought her two Zombies, Dan Andrews dared her to eat then jalapenos, Evelyn Jacob didn't
eat her Caesar salad, David Ferman and Ross McLaren stuck to Coke, Betsy Goldberg gulped her beer,
and Malcolm Pearson observed all with a critical eye. Svetozar Kontic and Michael Groberman were
too busy being exclusive to participate in the revelry. Dave Wilkinson, Chew Wong, Paul Penner,
Steve Neufeid, and lan Robertson were too busy writing sports to make the bash. G.S. Gates was too
busy trying to figure out what his initials stood for. Patti Flather and Robert Beynon were too busy doing something else. But Janet Patterson. Corrine Bjorge and Rick Hiebert sent their regrets.
College-Institute Educators'
Association of B.C. which
established a Legal Defence Fund,
numerous other organizations and
unions, including the B.C. Civil
Liberties Association, the Canadian
Association of University Teachers,
and many professional colleagues,
students, and ordinary citizens.
Because I believe the significance
of this issue goes far beyond my
personal circumstances and
ultimately affects us all, I think it is
important that people be reminded
of this dispute. My hope is that the
judgement following the upcoming
hearing will re-establish the principle of freedom of speech in our
educational institutions. However,
win or lose, the struggle goes on.
Allan A. MacKinnon
Kamloops, B.C.
The right stuff
Have you or any of your readers
ever heard about "Ubyssey
Glacier"? I recently noticed this
uniquely named glacier when looking at a map of the Whistler area.
The glacier is situated southeast of
Whistler, in the McBride Range of
mountains. Ubyssey Glacier lies at
the base of Mt. Sir Richard and The
Gatekeeper. If anyone can shed
some insight about how this glacier
got its name I would like to hear it.
G. Davidson, 1 Phillip Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K2E 6R6. P.S. Hi
all the Alpha Phi's and Sigma Chi's
on campus.
Gerry Davidson
Carleton University—Arts
The Kurdistan Information Services read with dismay your article
entitled "Peace Activists Meet
Apathy", which appeared in
Ubyssey, January 6, 1987.
The article began by proclaiming,
"Some things are better left
unsaid." However, we of K.I.S. felt
it absolutely necessary to point out
some little known facts of history to
you. (In fact, we believe that for too
long, the voices of the Kurdish people have been intentionally silenced,
due to colonialist nations such as
Turkey.)
We sympathize with your desire
that NATO not install a tactical
fighting and weapons training centre in Happy Valley-Goose Bay in
Western Labrador. However, we
are under the impression that you
encourage the building of this same
NATO centre in Konya, Turkey, or
at least do not protest against it!
The indigenous Kurdish people
have inhabited the land in Kurdistan (the Turks refer to it as
"Eastern Turkey") for 4,000 years.
Part of the policy of the government of Turkey is to intimidate, imprison, torture, execute and commit
acts of massacre against the Kurds
in the area (in fact, it is not commonly known, but many of the
"Eastern Turks" that recently flew
to Montreal to seek refugee status
are, indeed, Kurds, some from the
area not far from Konya).
Also, Turkey's oppressive
policies against the Kurds in the
region include: usurping
Kurdistan's land, implementing
forced assimilation, moving entire
Kurdish villages to other parts of
Turkey, prohibiting the use of the
Kurdish language and native
costume, forbidding the Kurdish
language from being taught in
schools, keeping the Kurdish areas
in poverty, not providing health
and welfare in the area, not providing sewage systems and electricity, not introducing mechanization
in agriculture for Kurds, adopting
scorched-earth policies and introducing militarization on Kurdish
soil. In addition, Turkey has built
numerous NATO and other
military intelligence-gathering and
training installation on Kurdish
land, including areas east of Konya.
The Kurdish people in
Diyarbekir, Erzurum, Kars and
Van and other Kurdish lands in
Turkey have protested vehemenent-
ly against the militarization of Kurdistan, and there are resistance
organizations that actively fight
against NATO presence in occupied
Kurdistan in Turkey.
We find it amazing that you
would cry out in defence of the
native populations around western
Labrador, but exclude self-
determination for the indigenous
Kurdish peoples in occupied Kurdistan in Turkey! These native
peoples, also, suffer the hazards of
NATO installations. We Kurds cry
out for an end to further militarization of Kurdistan, not only in
Turkey, but in Iraq and in Iran,
also!
We Kurds would like peace and a
healthy environment, the same as
the native peoples of North
America! Our group is opposed to
NATO militarization anywhere in
the world! We would suggest that
you report on the native peoples of
Kurdistan, also, and the oppression
committed against our peoples; in
addition, publicly denoucne
NATO's presence (and its future
plans) in Konya, and in occupied
Kurdistan in Turkey!
Khadijeh Huseyni Group
Kurdistan Information Services
All letters must be brief and typed on a triple-spaced, 70-character line.
They must be delivered in person with identification shown to The Ubyssey
office, SUB 241k. The Ubyssey reserves the right to edit for brevity, spelling and grammar, and libel. Sexist, racist, and homophobic letters will not
run. Tuesday, January 13, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Two of these candidates will be
elected as student representatives to
the UBC Board of Governors. The
15 member BoG is the ultimate
authority at UBC and is responsible
for administering business affairs.
It sets university policy, has final
control over al fiscal policy and all
hiring and firing of faculty, support
staff  and   administrative   offices.
All candidates interviewed by
The Ubyssey were asked the same
five questions.
BOARD CANDIDATES
JOHN A. PEARCE
John Pearce, a fifth year, teacher
training student believes UBC
should divest itself of its South
African holdings.
"Part of the process of education
is the process of making day to day
decisions of moral import that affect other people."
Pearce does not favour the
board's proposed four per cent tuition increase.
"Well, I don't like it, but it (the
increase) may be a necessary evil.
Pearce's main goal would be to
make the campus more aware of
student concerns as opposed to the
"ivory tower concept."
Pearce feels post-secondary
education accessibility is an important issue.
He added a media campaign
stressing the need for post-
secondary education, combined
with an improved economy, may be
the answer.
"I'd like to see student loans
made available to all students, with
conditions such as collateral for
older students to secure loans and
for young students, a system like in
Alberta where they remit 25 per
cent of loans upon graduation." He
added that a ceiling on student
loans might be a good idea and that
students intending to default on
their loans should face the consequences.
MARTIN COCKING
Cocking says no one wants higher
tuition fees but the government will
not improve base level funding so
the money has to come from
somewhere. Cocking believes it
should come partly from students
and from Fund for Excellence in
Education.
His most important goal is making sure that board members who
are from the downtown business
community are aware of what
students are thinking and feeling.
"That simply means we voice our
concerns to members of the board
about tuition, athletic fees and
whatever concerns students might
have. The BoG may go ahead and
make decisions without knowing
what's really going on — we may be
able to change their minds."
Cocking said he would like to see
the re-establishment of the student
aid program at pre-restraint levels.
"That includes the grant program which the government got rid
of and beefing up what little of the
remission program is left." Once
they have established pre-restraint
levels they can look at strengthening
student aid, Cocking says, adding
the government is going to have to
improve basic levels of funding.
Cocking said the BoG should
divest.
positions on the board of governors.
Stewart thinks UBC should divest
itself of its South African holdings.
"I'd support divestment, because
I feel it's the only real position to
take. General student attitudes
seem to support it. The planned
AMS referendum (on divestment)
will tell us more."
Stewart has mixed feelings about
the board's four per cent tuition increase.
"It's unfortunate we have to increase tuition now after the increases of the past few years, but
four per cent isn't that bad. It's
fairly low." The new minister for
advanced education and job training may have a mandate to reduce
tuition, he said.
Stewart said his main goal as student board representative would be
ensuring low tuition fees.
"I support no increase in tuition
or   as   little   as   possible.
Stewart thinks student representatives on the board have to realize
that they are only two out of 15
members, and that the eight provincial government appointees will
basically be able to get what the
provincial government would want.
You can influence them (the eight
appointees), in some areas, if you
are careful and have a pragmatic,
realistic approach."
DOUG STEWART
Doug Stewart, second year law, is
running for one of the two student
Representatives from Canada's largest GRADUATE
MANAGEMENT SCHOOL will be visiting your campus.
Come and meet us!
FRIDAY, JAN. 23
anytime between 9:00 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
Room 215, Henry Angus Building
University of British Columbia
FACULTY      OF
ADMINISTRATIVE STUDIES
YDRK
up.
Seshadri said his most important
goal as a student BoG representative is to effectively communicate
student concerns.
"It's unrealistic for student candidates to ensure lower tutition and
less crowded classrooms — they
can't do that. What we can do is
make sure the board is aware of our
concerns. Input comes best from
students with experience in these
areas."
As an AMS president, Seshadri
says he's had the opportunity to
visit 85 high schools around the
province in the past two years.
Seshadri said the grant program
has to be returned along with a
much better remission rate which
forgives accumulated student debt.
Seshadri said the BoG should not
invest in any companies which have
operations in South Africa. He
would like to see the board divest
itself of its current South African
connections.
UBC TAE KWON DO Club
Consolidated Martial Arts
• To develop self-defense skills,
physical fitness and self-confidence
• Instruction by 4th degree black belt.
• Group    classes.    Experienced    &
beginners welcome.
• Discount for women members.
Classes - Mon./Thurs. 5:30-7:00 p.m.
Sub 207    209
Drop by or leave message Sub Box 219
SIMON SESHADRI
Seshadri thinks the proposed
four per cent tuition fee hike viewed
in isolation seems like a reasonable
adjustment to the cost of living. But
when it is considered as part of the
increases to tuition over the last
four years it adds up to about 50 per
cent, and students are getting hit
pretty hard because of it.
The problem is the university is
not getting enough money from the
government, he says.
If government funding was adequate, tuition wouldn't have to go
FASTEST
GLASSES
IN SO
At Pearle, getting you
vour glasses quickly is
something we see to ourselves. Our on-premises
lab lets us make your glasses right on the spot.
So depending on the prescription,
thev could be ready in a matter of hours.
Without compromising quality.
fPEARLET
\^ vision center^y
NOBODYCARES FOR EYES MORE THAN PEARLE.
1742 West 2nd Ave. at Burrard
• 736-7516 or 733-5122
'iS? .
ams
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
for A.M.S.
Executive Positions
President
Vice-President
Director of Finance
Director of Administration
Coordinator of External Affairs
Close of Nominations:
4:00 pm, Tuesday, January 20
Nomination forms can be obtained and then returned to the A. M. S.
Administrative Assistant, SUB 238.
:<mk'j Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Amiga lecture by Anion Mah, noon, SUB 111.
Also, IBM welcome back meeting pt. 2, noon,
SUB 206.
SUBFILMS
Film: Laurence Olivier in "Hamlet," 12:40 and
7:00 p.m., SUB auditorium.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon to 2:30 p.m., SUB 215.
UBC SQUASH CLUB
Squash   night.   8:00-9:30  p.m.,   UBC  Winter
Sports Centre.
JEWISH STUDENTS- ASSOCIATION
Hot lunch, 12:00-2:00 p.m., Hillel House.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on "Family Practice," guest speaker. Dr.
B. Weaver, noon-1:20 p.m., Wood 11.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
THE AYN RAND CLUB
videotape:   "Introduction   to   Objectivism,"
9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m., SUB main concourse.
INTERNATIONAL RELATION8 STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Council meeting — aH welcome, noon. International House.
WEDNESDAY
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Third general meeting — we will be sailing grad
tickets to fourth years for $26, noon, SUB 212.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Atari  group  meeting,   hosted  by Andre,  4:30
p.m.. SUB 212A.
CAMPAIGN AGAINST SEXUAL HARASSMENT
ON CAMPUS
Volunteer training for sexual harassment clinic,
3:00 p.m., Women's Centre, SUB.
UBC SQUASH CLUB
Squash   night.   7:15-8:46  p.m.,   UBC  Winter
Sports Centre.
JEWISH STUDENT8- ASSOCIATION
Topics   in   Judaism   —   discussion   group,
1:30-2:30 p.m., Hillel House. Also, Tex Mex and
Bzzr-dinner, 5:30-7:00 p.m., Hillel House.
THE UBYSSEY
Rake tha constitution meeting, 7:30 p.m., 2894
W. 16th at McDonald, side entrance, nice dog-
g«.
CINEMA 16
(Part   of   UBC   Film   Society).   FHm:   "Wild
Strawberries," directed  by  Ingmar Bergman,
7:00 and 9:00 p.m., SUB audrtorium.
UBC SKI CLUB
Broomball game. 4:46-6:00 p.m.. Winter Sports
Centre rink #1.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Ganaral meeting, noon, Buch D206.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study, 7:00 p.m., 1888 Knox Rd.
THURSDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Commodore holiday rehabilitation session, by
guest speaker  Donald Law,  noon-2:00 p.m.,
Buch B319.
LE CLUB FRANCAI8
General meeting, noon. International House.
SCUBA ARCHER CLUB
Practice and workshop — new time, new place,
Universite de Montreal
Faculte de I'education
permanente
Ecole frangaise d'ete
n«rv   members   welcome,   6:30   p.m.,    SUB
ballroom.
SIKH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Seminar   —   Sikh  youth  in  Canada   —   non-
members welcome, noon, SUB 111.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Talk given by Data Maranda, entitled, "You Have
the Power to Change the World," noon-1:20
p.m., Buch B225.
NEWMAN CLUB
Welcome back lunch — it's on us, noon, St.
Mark's College, Music Room.
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
General meeting — surprise speaker, Chem 250,
12:30 p.m.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and discussion, noon. Brock 304.
HAMSOC
General   meeting,   licensing   class   following,
noon, Brock Annex 368.
FRIDAY
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Party and fundraiser, 8:00 p.m., Grad Student
Centre.
hot flash
The Canadian University Press is
looking for a bureau chief for the
Atlantic Region.
We are looking for someone with
writing ability, organizational skills
and a working knowledge of student newspapers.
Applications must include the
following: 1) A resume pertinent to
newspaper experience. 2) Six (6)
clippings (or copies of) previous
years work. 3) A short handwritten
report (not typed) on why you want
this job.
Applications close Thursday,
January 22nd.
Please submit resume, clippings,
and report to: ARCUP Bureau
(attn. hiring), C/O Dalhousie
Gazette, Student Union Building,
Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S.
B3H 2J4. (902) 424-8825.
"mE SIlENCEO  MAJOKl
Amandla Ngawetu — Party
Against Apartheid. Join the
students for a Free South Africa in
the Grad Student Centre, Friday at
8:00 p.m., on the lighter side of the
struggle against apartheid. No Carling O'Keefe beverages will be served.
Bienvenue
L'Ecole frangaise d'ete
welcomes you to its 1987
French summer edition.
Boursiers
6 weeks reserved tor
Canadian citizens and
landed immigrants applying
to the Federal-Provincial
Program.
Session internationale
3 weeks of total French
immersion for people
from any part of the
world.
Oidactique
Specialization for those
who teach French as a
second language.
a Montreal
L'Universite de Montreal
welcomes you to a
memorable, cultural,
sensual and culinary
adventure.
Montreal, the liveliest
place to learn French!
WELCOME BACK
FREE WORKSHOPS
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
An introductory workshop to teach assertiveness skills.
Four 2 hour sessions Thursdays, 12:30-2:20 p.m.
Commences Jan. 29
STUDY SKILLS
For those who want higher marks this term & need some
help to improve organization, concentration &
efficiency.
Four  1 hour sessions Wednesdays  12:30-1:30 p.m.
Commences Jan. 21
CAREER EXPLORATION—PART II
Researching   fields/options.   Decision-making   model.
Approaching the market place.
Three 1 Vi hour sessions 2:30-4:00 p.m. Mondays Jan.
19, 26 and Friday, Jan. 23.
Workshops are free. Interested students should sign up at:
STUDENT COUNSELLING AND
RESOURCES CENTRE
Room 200, Brock Hall
□ Send me your folder
Surname
City
Return to:
Ecole frangaise d'ete
Universite de Montreal
CP. 6128, succursale A
Montreal (Quebec)
H3C 3J7
JpSJjh
•*$W province or _,»•>
"V coto^
BRITISH COLUMBIA LEGISLATIVE
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
PURPOSE
To provide university graduates with an
opportunity to supplement their academic
knowledge of the Legislature with practical legislative and administrative
experience.
WHO IS
ELIGIBLE
The competition is open to graduates in
the fields of political science, history,
economics, sociology or geography from
a British Columbia University.
HOW MANY
8 to 10 interns are selected each year.
LOCATION
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
WHEN
Six months from January to June 1988
STIPEND
$1,200 a month.
APPLICATION
DEADLINE
February 15, 1987.
HOW TO APPLY
Program literature and application forms
are available from the eligible departments
at Simon Fraser University, University of
Victoria, University of British Columbia or
from the Office of the Speaker, Suite 207,
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
V8V 1X4.
The Ubyssey Needs
A Few Good
Men and Women
(POSITIONS AVAILABLE)
SUB 241k
****************** **** *-¥**¥
J NEW YORK SELTZER presents *
i PUNCHLINES!! I
FREE COMEDY
TOMORROW - WEDNESDAY
JANUARY 14 - 12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM - FREE
WIN $$$$$
-¥■¥*-¥* -¥• *-¥-*•¥■•¥*-¥■ -¥- -¥■-¥■■¥■¥-¥■-¥-** -¥• •¥■<¥--¥■* -¥■
THE CLASSIFIEDS
| RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines. 1 day $2.75; additional]
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and .65c.
| Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day |
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
B - COMING EVENTS	
FOOD IRRADIATION - A PUBLIC HEALTH
CONCERN? A forum sponsored by Agora
Food Coop. Sun. Jan. 25, 7 p.m. 17th &
Dunbar. For further info call Greg 731-0894.
SCIENCE SENATE ELECTIONS. Vote for
the best candidate, Gary Mark. Polling stations in Sedge & Comp. Sci.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
SHERWOOD TUNER-AMP., Altec speakers. Excellent condition. Teak finish. Great
buy at $380. 228-0804.	
15 - FOUND	
SILVER RING tt silver bracelet over Xmas
in Chem. Building. See Tilly to identify &
claim in main office in Chem. Dept.
A MAN'S WATCH on the sidewalk bet. the
parkade & hospital construction site on
Jan. 7. Ph. Deidre 228-5246 bet. 8 & 4.
20 - HOUSING	
ROOM & BOARD available at Vancouver
School of Theology for UBC students.
Quiet, friendly on-campus accom. Contact
housing office 228-9031, local 231.
41st & SELKIRK. Female share 3 bedroom,
2 bathroom house. On 41st bus route to
UBC. »185. 266-2636 (Tom)
25 - INSTRUCTION	
INTENSIVE HANDS-ON instruction in word
processing (WordPerfect, WordStar,
Word). 2 per class. Wordpower 222-2661.
PIANO LESSONS by graduate of Juilliard
School of Music. Morning & early afternoon lessons arranged at your home.
321-4809.
SPANISH LESSONS - at all levels, essays,
translations. Mr. Gerardo Avila, M. A.
Hispanic Studies, UBC 738-4080aft. 3 p.m.
30 - JOBS	
TYPESETTER P/T for weekly near University. Layout exp. an asset. Speed and accuracy essential. Phone editor 228-1156
days, 738-0653 evenings.
PART-TIME HELP NEEDED to care for 2
girls (1 & 3) & do light hsekeeping. Required 3-5 times/wk., 4 hrs./day. Flexible
hrs. Kerrisdale area. 261-3565.
40 - MESSAGES
BRENT WATKINS for senator at large. Vote
Jan. 14, 16, 16.
70 - SERVICES
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
presents
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, JAN. 18
following the service,
An address by
Archbishop Ted Scott,
former primate of
Anglican Church of Canada
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
85 - TYPING
75 - WANTED
JAPANESE-ENGLISH translators required
by international consulting company on
project basis. Send resume (mail replies only) to: Attn: Mr. B. Konar, 1821. 810 W.
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. V5Z 4C9.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED - Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0629.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
WORDPOWER- editing, proofing ft word
processing — Custom, self-serve in eves.
Stud, rates. 3709 W. 10th at Alma.
222-2661.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
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UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
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Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m. 910/hr.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Tuesday, January 13, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Hockey 'Birds split Bears
The Alberta Golden Bears,
defending CIAU hockey champions, came to town this weekend
and settled for a split with the host
UBC hockey team.
Friday night, the game was close
until the final bell. The Birds, playing  spirited hockey,  overcame  a
T-bird takes
talent south
This weekend, Stanford Stadium
in Palo Alto, California provided
the stage for two Canadian university 'footballers' to join some of the
best new U.S. college talent in an
annual benefit game.
The "Shrine Bowl" is a charity
event to raise funds for the
Shriner's Children's Hospital and
at the same time serves as a
showcase for football newcomers.
The NFL and AFL scouts buy the
game films, the television rights
generate even more revenue, and
the end result is dollars toward a
worthy cause.
This is where UBC fourth year
physical education student Leo
Groenewegen enters the picture.
The highly regarded offensive
lineman of UBC's Vanier Cup winning team was one of two Canadians (and the first ever from UBC)
invited to participate in the event.
This meant a week of practice
and the resulting East versus West
game on Saturday.
The west won 24-21 with
Groenewegen's help. Although not
a designated starter, he appeared in
50 of the 55 offensive plays that the
west team ran and represented the
Canadian football program well.
In the final series, Groenewegen
lead the blocking on a reverse that
ultimately set up the winning field
goal.
UBC coach Frank Smith, who
was in attendance with approximately 100 other coaches and
scouts, was pleased with
Groenewegen's performance.
Smith said, "Leo worked very
hard and handled himself well
against the big boys."
three to two second period deficit to
win four to three. Paul Abbot
scored the game winner with 4:49
left in the third period.
UBC's goalie Carl Repp, was
outstanding, stopping 46 shots,
many of them difficult.
Friday's victory was especially
sweet for UBC as it was their first
win against U of A in three tries.
The win also kept alive UBC's slim
playoff hopes.
Saturday night, in a rout, the
T-Birds lost seven to two.
The Alberta team skated well,
outhustling and outmuscling the
Birds to the puck.
UBC did have several excellent
scoring opportunities in the first
period but failed to score. As well,
the 'Birds had two goals disqualified, one on a definite kick-in,
the other on a short whistle by the
referee.
After UBC failed to score, the
team seemed to quit, and Alberta
controlled the rest of the game.
UBC coach Terry O'Malley
blamed fatigue for his team's lacklustre performance.
"We played four games in six
days and it showed on Saturday
night," he said.
UBC plays in Manitoba this
weekend and at home against
Saskatchewan in two weeks.
"These are key games,"
O'Malley said, "and we need wins
in both series to get into the
playoffs."
WAKE UP THIS NEW YEAR
TO TEX MEX AND BZZR
AT HILLEL HOUSE
Wednesday, Jan. 14
5:30-7:00 p.m.
Cost: $2.50 Includes Food and Drink
Free Lunch Today for all First Year Students
For more info: 224-4748
SPORTS
UBC track starts off
The UBC men's and women's
track and field teams opened their
competitive seasons Sunday at the
University of Washington Indoor
Invitational meet.
Several UBC team members
achieved qualifying standard for
the CIAU championships. The
men's team was led by high jumper
Jim Gamlin (2.07m), triple jumper
Kevin Godden (14.04m), pole
vaulter Boyd Mason (4.42m), long
jumper Malcolm McNeight
(6.76m), and sprinter Ed Neeland
(5.53s/55m).
The women's team was paced by
hurdler Joanne Gaspard
8.33s/55m).
Last year the men's team had its
best season ever, clinching its
fourth consecutive Canada West
Championship and finishing second
at the national finals.
Without adequate facilities and
the loss of consistent competitors
like Canadian 800m champion
Simon Hoogewerf, due to graduation, 1987 may have to be considered a building year.
The women's team, smaller in
number, has to rely on strong in
dividual performances. Gaspard is
the current CIAU champion
hurdler and high jumpers Jeannie
Cockcroft and Tami Lutz have
alternated the CIAU championship
over the last three years.
The meet was strictly exhibition
and served as a warm-up for the
team.
niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim
|  AMS Speakers present |
I    ARCHBISHOP TED SCOTT      I
"Stop Apartheid
in South Africa"
| Friday, January 16, 12:30 pm j
( SUB BALLROOM |
| All welcome |
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U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
Invites Applications for the Position of
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1987-88
These positions are open only to full-time registered U.B.C.
students. Successful applicants will be required to live in the
residences. Application forms and detailed job descriptions
are available at the Ponderosa Housing Office and at the
Front Desk of each single residence area: Totem Park, Place
Vanier, W.H. Gage, and Acadia/Fairview.
Applications will be accepted from January 5 to January 16,
1987 at the Front Desks of the Single Student Residences, or
at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
DISPLAY YOUR
CHARACTER.
Kinko's self-service
typewriters and copy
creation centers give your
reports arid presentations
the clean and impressive
professional look they
deserve.
kinkes
CiRl-.AI COI'II SC.RI AT I'i Ol'l I
5706 Uimersitv BKd.
222-1688
MTH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
You're Invited
Come join us for the grand opening of "Thunder Bar"
"The Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre Lounge"
DATE:
TIME:
PLACE:
January 16, 1987
Doors open at 3:00 p.m.
U.B.C. Winter Sports Centre
6066 Thunderbird Blvd.
U.B.C. Campus
"Entertainment All Night Long"
Starting at 6:00 p.m.
featuring
"Elvis The True Revival"
The King Lives On
starring Ricky Dunn
"The Human Robot"
appeared daily during Expo on the Expo Site
"Hawaiian Dancers"
"The Original Madhatter"
starring Ray Parker
Entertainment on stage & table to table
doing magic, crazy comedy & balloon sculptures
We hope you will join us for this celebration
"No Cover" Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 13,1987
Basket 'Birds dunk Alberta duo
By CHEW WONG
After a shaky Christmas break
including losses to McMaster
University, University of Toronto,
and Western Washington University — the UBC men's basketball
team got back on track this weekend
downing the University of Calgary
and the University of Lethbridge in
conference play at War Memorial
Gym.
On Friday night the 'Birds played
near flawless defence in their victory over the fourth ranked University of Calgary Dinosaurs 63-46.
Aaron Point led the UBC assault
with a perfect six of six from the
field and ended the game with 15
points. Co-captain Kevin Hanson
was the candy-man for the 'Birds
shelling out an amazing IS assists.
"We   had   good   scouting   on
Calgary," said Hanson. "All week
in practice we keyed on the Calgary
game."
On Saturday night the Thunderbirds won a foul (as in foul filled)
game against the Lethbridge Pronghorns 70-63.
The officials called a total of 55
fouls in a stop-and-go game that
never went for more than 30
seconds without a break in play.
"I don't usually like to comment
on the officials, but they set the
tone of the game," said head coach
Bruce Enns. "It was difficult for
the players to know what was going
to be called."
UBC's Paul Johansson led all
scorers with 23 points. Aaron Point
added 13 and skyed for 15 rebounds. Harbir Bains tallied 19
points for the Pronghorns.
Despite fine performances by
Johansson and Point in this
weekend's games, it was fifth year
guard Kevin Hanson who anchored
the UBC victories. His 15 assists in
the Calgary contest was a season
high, but it was his defensive efforts
that were instrumental in the two    times and force several other turn
wins.
Hanson played his two best
games of the season according to
coach Enns.
Anyone who was at the game saw
him steal the ball no fewer than 10
overs. Hanson was the glue that
held the Thunderbird defence
together this weekend.
The two wins give the 'Birds a 2-0
conference start while pusing their
overall record to 14-6.
y mm jjtr
#**%
Water fowl aloft
Both the men's and women's
swimming and diving teams came
out victorious this past Friday over
the University of Alberta.
The women dominated the opposition 85-27 winning 11 of 13
events. Winners included Monique
McGinnis (800 free), Ann Martin
(50, 100 free), Allison Gilbert (400
intermediate medley), Sandra
Mason (100 fly), Janet Oakes (100
back), Jen Good (100 breast).
The medley relay consisting of
Good, Mason, Gilbert and
Stephanie Brown, and the freestyle
relay consisting of Oakes, Martin,
Gilbert and Angie Haveman also
placed first. In addition Mindy
Kalchman won both one and three
metre diving competitions.
The men showered the Golden
Bears 61-44 winning 9 of 13 events.
New team records were set by Chris
Bowie (800 free, 400"free) and
Turlough O'Har (200 free). Other
winners included Kevin Draxinger
(100 back) and Rob Traynor (200
breast).
The 400 medley relay of Draxinger, Traynor,  Steve Nordstrom
and Clint Hirst provided the only
other swimming victory. Michel
Hameury dove unopposed for the
Birds.
Coach Jack Nelson said, "this
meet was a good indication of the
steps the team is in. We've just
returned from a tough training
camp in Arizona and the team is
ready to swim fast."
STO-O-TOTHC?
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THE LATEST DEVELOPMENT in
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— tactal math. Recent studies into ways to make abstract
n-dimensional calculus more real to the average student show that this method gives the learner an edge.
Gymnasts third as rookies learn ropes
By PAUL PENNER
UBC's men gymnasts placed
third in their opening meet of the
season at Osborne Centre Friday
night.
University of Saskatchewan took
top team honors with strong individual performances from Jim
Govett and C. Baranuik who finished first and third respectively.
University of Alberta rounded
out the field taking second spot in
the team standings while UBC's
Kevin Seburn finished second in the
individuals with a combined score
of 49.10 over the six events.
Skiers descend to top
The Ski Birds got off to a flying
start last weekend at the first
Northwest Ski Conference meet of
the year in Snoqualmie Pass,
Washington. First place finishes
were recorded by the men's alpine
and nordic teams to give them a
perfect score in the alpine-nordic
combined.
Veteran Stu Gairns once again
showed top form, winning the
slalom in 1:24.19 over
Washington's Robert Bartsch
(1:29.33). Birds Sean Jaegli and
David Buckley were third and fifth
respectively.
Gairns and Buckley also placed
second   and   third   in   the   giant
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THE SCHOOL
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BY Moliere
JANUARY 14-24
Special Previews—
Jan. 14 & 15
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Curtain: 8 p.m.
Box Office * Frederic Wood Theatre * Room 207
slalom behind Bartsch.
SFU clinched the women's alpine
title, but the Birds had a strong second place finish, capturing four of
the top ten spots in both the slalom
and giant slalom. Andrea Jaegli
was UBC's top finishers in the
slalom, placing fourth behind
SFU's Elke Socher and Carol
Webert, and Dagmar Heinzsch of
the University of Puget Sound.
In the cross-country events,
UBC's rookie team surprised the
competition. In the 3 x 10 km relay,
Birds Terry DeLong, Jaime
Cathcart and Simon Koch trounced
second place University of
Washington. DeLong also won the
15 km individual event in 41
minutes, 18 seconds ahead of
Cathcart (42.15) and Oystein Hagen
of Pacific Lutheran University.
In the women's 10 km race, Sue
Hagen of the Birds alpine team was
another surprise, placing third.
The Birds compete again this
weekend at Crystal Mountain,
Washington.
Coach Hardy Fink had not expected to win the meet as his team
lacks the depth of previous years.
Fink characterized the 1987 season
as "not even a building year."
Three of the five team members,
including former Thunderbird football player Mike Adams, are new to
the sport and were competing for
the first time Friday night.
The team lost two veteran gymnasts this year with the departure of
Brent Thibault and former national
team member Mark Byrne.
Danny Fedder, who turned in
strong performances in five events,
would have been a welcome addition to this year's Thunderbird
team but unfortunately cannot
compete for them as he exhausted
his five years of university eligibility
with U of Toronto.
Fedder, who trains with the
Thunderbirds, believes the younger
gymnasts are "making great progress."
Kevin Seburn, last year's CIAU
rings silver medalist, is the only real
veteran left on the team. Seburn
was pleased with his performance at
this point in the young season but
concedes that he made a number of
"mental errors."
He is looking forward to the invitational meet in February where
he feels the Thunderbirds "should
beat Alberta."
All six UBC women gymnasts are
now eligible for the Canadian National championships in March
after an exceptionally strong per
formance at the Denver Invitational
on Saturday. UBC placed third
overall in the team standings against
Denver University and University
of N. Colorado. Both universities
have scholarship teams competing
in the highly experienced NCAA
Division I. Top Thunderbird performers were Cheryl Ormand
(34.65), Bev Beres (33.85) and Jennifer Dong (33.80).
Tennis'Birdsfind love
The UBC women's varsity tennis
team returned to action on Saturday evening to face a strong Jericho
Tennis Club team.
In only their second competition
of the year, the T-birds experienced
a see-saw battle in two of the
matches, while appearing overpowered in the other two.
Jocelyn Dilay lost her first set
6-2, with Jericho winning the second set marginally, 7-5. Nancy
Wilkins and Susan Demchuk
displayed some fine tennis in a double   match,   and   were   narrowly
Island impales rugby lads
The UBC rugby team dropped
their first match of McKechnie Cup
round robin action this weekend.
Playing on a good field and under
excellent weather conditions in Victoria, the squad was trounced 30-7
by Vancouver Island's Crimson
Tide.
Coach Barry Legh said some early critical mistakes which left the
Birds down 12-0 in the first ten
minutes were a major factor in the
loss.
"A five week exam and holiday
LOOK
layoff has left the lads in a rather
sluggish state. The team's poor
tackling in the second half led to
another 18 points by the Crimson
Tide," he said.
The Blue and Gold will have a
chance to redeem themselves
against the "Island Reps" when
they play host on January 24 at
T-Bird Stadium. Until then, UBC
will have the opportunity to improve its 0-1 double round robin
record when they play Fraser Valley
in Abbotsford this Saturday at 2:30
p.m.
defeated at 7-6, 6-4.
Michelle Fischer (singles) and
Michelle Giesen and Sam Reynolds
(doubles) faced strong opposition
against their Jericho counterparts,
losing both matches.
UBC's coach, Helen Christiaanse
said although losing four to nothing
is always disappointing, a hard
match was expected since Jericho
has many experienced, high calibre
members.
"This match sends us back to the
drawing board. Changes in the lineup as well as strategy will be made
in preparation for February when
Jericho visits UBC. It will be a
whole new ball game, with our team
much more prepared for what is to
come."
In her first year as coach at UBC,
Christiaanse faces a rebuilding year,
but is optimistic.
"The team is dedicated, and
substantial progress has been made
since September. However, we are
basically coming from out of
nowhere, and still have a long way
to go before we will really establish
ourselves as the team to beat."
The T-birds return to match play
Saturday, January 24 when they
visit the Burnaby Racquets Club.
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