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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 5, 1988

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Array tbe Ubyssey
Time is running out for the Lubicon
s
Oil companies hold key
to natives' freedom
By Elizabeth Pasternak
Canadian University Press
The Canadian government has not
always known much about Northern Alberta. In the 1920s, they were quite surprised to find the Lubicon Cree hunting,
fishing and trapping in a 25,000 square
kilometre region north of Peace River.
Having omitted the Lubicon from the treaties signed at the turn of the century, the
government promised them an agreement.
The Lubicon are still waiting.
But their patience has been long wearing. Disregarding native land claims, more
than a dozen oil companies have been indiscriminately drilling on Lubicon territory.
In the past six years they have destroyed
the band's lifestyle and economy, with consent of the Canadian and Alberta governments.
For Bernard Ominayak, chief of Lubicon Cree, the issue is quite obvious. "It is
genocide. I looked up the definition of
'genocide' and it spells it out very clearly."
The Canadian criminal code defines
genocide as "killing members of an identifiable group or deliberately inflicting on the
group conditions of life calculated to bring
about its physical destruction."
"Government policy since day one has
been to deny any self-reliance among Indians in order to get the land, the resources, to
re-educate the children so they don't have to
hunt, so they can be taught to consume and
work nine to five, speak English, go to
church, watch TV - a total cultural absorp-
tioon? said Brian Wright-McLeod, national
office coordinator for Canadian Alliance in
Solidarity with Native Peoples (CASNP) in
Toronto.
In the last six years, oil drilling in the
areahas increased at an alarming rate. The
companies have built roads, bulldozed the
band's traplines and driven away the animals. The moose, on which the 457 Lubicon
Cree depend, have all but disappeared.
In 1984, there were two fires in the
region, one caused by an oil company, the
other by lightning. "The provincial forestry
VOLUME 70, Number 36
officials refused to allow the fire to be put
out. 200 square miles of traditional land
were destroyed and the bottom fell out ofthe
traditional economy? said Fred Lennarson,
advisor for the band since 1974.
The Alberta government defended
their actions by saying firefighters should
concentrate their efforts on more densely
populated areas.
With vegetation destroyed and animals gone, the band has been forced to
change its diet to processed foods, deficient
in protein. Because of this Lubicon are, on
average, twenty pounds underweight.
As a result, an epidemic of tuberculosis
has broken out in the community. Forty-
one active cases have been diagnosed and
107 ofthe band members are being treated
with preventative medicine which is toxic to
the liver.
"TB is a pre-industrial disease, related
to resistance? said Lennarson. The disease, which on average affects one in 150,
000 Albertans, has been diagnosed in one in
three Lubicons. Two-hundred-and-fifty-
three Lubicon Cree are being checked a
second time and another 20 to 30 cases are
expected.
In 1979, the trappers had an average
annual income of $5000 and just under 10
per cent of the population was on welfare.
Now the average annual income for the
trappers has dropped to under $400, and 95
per cent of the population is on welfare.
"When a man can't provide for his
family because there is nothing to hunt?
says Lennarson, "he sits at home and stares
at the wall, depressed and disgraced.
"His wife is angry because the man she
marriedis not a good provider...The kids see
their fathers staring at the wall and their
mothers yelling at their fathers and the role
models are shot to hell."
In one family, a woman left her husband, taking the children with her and went
on welfare. Her husband shot himself— it
was the first suicide in the Lubicon people's
history. see 'settlement' page 5
By Nona Biro
he Spirit Sings,
an exhibition of
Canadian native artifacts at Calgary's
Glenbow musuem,
has split the anthropology community,
.he museum commu-
rity and the native
.ommunities in Can-
ida.
The flagship show of the Calgary
)lympic Arts Festival opened amidst con-
|troversy fuelled by The Alberta Lubicon
_ake Indian band's boycott of the show.
At issue is the role of corporate and
^government sponsorship of cultural activities. The Lubicon blame the government
and Alberta oil companies for the destruction of their traditional culture, the same
culture these companies seek to glorify in
museum exhibits.
Alberta's conservative government
has leased out their traditional hunting and
trapping lands to oil companies, and has
repeatedly defeated the band's court at-
tem pts to stop drilling pending a settlement
ofthe disputed land.
The past eight years has seen a complete deterioration of their lifestyle owing to
the construction of 4500 kilometres of roadway, the bulldozing of traplines and cabins,
and the establishment of 400 oilwells
within a fifteen kilometre radius of the
Little Buffalo settlement.
The major sponsors of the Olympic
show are Shell Oil who donated $1.1 million
of the show's $2.6 million dollar budget
(Shell is boycotted by anti-apartheid groups
for its investments in South Africa), and the
federal and Alberta governments, the
groups that Bernard Ominayak, chief of the
Lubicon band, regards as the perpetrators
of his people's genocide.
"Our problem is not with athletic competition or with cultural displays, but
rather with that small group of wealthy
powerful interests in Alberta who are trying
to wipe us out? Ominayak says. "These
people are using the Calgary Winter Olympics and the Olympic Arts Festival to try to
achieve international respectability and
credibility?
"The multinationals are taking all our
resources - these are the same people organizing the Calgary games? Ominayak says.
The Glenbow museum itself is tied into
the corporate world through oil companies'
domination of Glenbow's Board of Governors. The Board of Governors are appointed
by the founding Harvie family (oil millionaires) and by the Alberta government and
form a virtual who's who of the Alberta oil
industry.
Five oil company executives, two senior
oil company lawyers (representing oil firms
drilling on Lubicon land), and the director of
the Independent Petroleum Association of
Canada, sit on Glenbow's Board of Governors.
One of the Fellows of the Glenbow is
Judge
McDermid,
one of three Alberta Court of Appeal Judges who declined   to   grant   the
Lubicon an injunction to1
stop gas and oil drilling on,
Lubicon land in 1982.
Glenbow exhibits, especially major exhibits, are often
sponsored   by   oil   companies.
Regular contributors to the Glenbow, who are major developers in
the disputed Lubicon area, include
Amoco,  Canterra,  Chevron,  Gulf,
Husky, Mobile, Petro-Canada, Roxy
Petroleum, Union Oil, Westcoast Petroleum, and Shell.
To support their cause, the Lubicon
started an international letterwriting
campaign asking museum directors not'
to lend requested artifacts to the show.
While many museums complied with
the band's request, Dr. Michael Ames, Director of the Museum of Anthropology at
UBC, agreed to lend artifacts.
Ames says Canada is a resource nation and that large scale funding of cultural and educational institutions is necessarily derived from resource companies.
"Mac-Bio floats this province... museums and universities couldn't exist without corporate and government support?
Ames says.
Ames did not support the boycott because he sees it as de facto censorship of
museums and the academic community at
large.
"I would never take theirinstructions
(corporations who fund exhibitions), or let
them have any editorial control over the
exhibit? Ames says.
"Mac-Blo floats this
province...museums and
universities couldn't exist
without corporate and government support."
—Michael Ames, Director of the Museum of Anthropology
Ames says he supports the Lubicon in
principle.
"They do have a grievance that is
longstanding. The Lubicon boycott would
be a reasonable request if they said that
the content was erroneous? says Ames,
but he believes that passing the "white
man's burden' onto museums is completely unfair and unfounded.
Some, however, disagree with Ames'
stand.
"There is no way in the modern world
that a museum can claim immunity as a
cultural institution from the political implications of its policy decisions? says Dr.
Bruce Trigger, an eminent professor of
anthropology at McGill university.
Trigger resigned as honorary curator
of Montreal's McCord museum over
McCord's loan of artifacts to the Calgary
show.
In  his  resignation  letter,   Trigger
states his belief that "if the treasures of
the past mean so much to museums, the
see 'Boycott' page 5
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, February 5,1988 Classifieds
85 - TYPING
05 - COMING EVENTS
GRAD VALENTINE DANCE
Chemistry grads, the Free Radicals, will
shake you up on Friday, Feb. 12th, 8:00-
12:00 p.m. at the Fireside Lounge, Grad
Centre. Everyone is welcome. No cover
charge. For information call 228-3203.
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
EDUCATION AND
SOCIETY:        INSIGHTS
FROM THE PAST
Dean Nancy Sheehan
Faculty of Education
University of B.C.
Saturday, February 6
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Building        8:15 p.m.
TRAVEL TALKS #5
"A lunch hour series"
THURSDAY FEBRUARY 11
CHINA AND TIBET
Get to know affordable China
by China World Travel
12:30-SUB 205
Presented by TRAVEL CUTS
20 - HOUSING	
BEDROOM & DEN AVAILABLE to share-
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home, laundry facilities. Ideal for mature, n/
s grad student. $325 includes util. 251 -1002.
For Feb. or March 1 st.
N/S FEMALE PREF. to share apt. on campus, Feb. 15-May 1, $185/mo., 266-7611.
Maria.
30 - JOBS
JAPANESE SPEAKING TOUR
GUIDES
We are looking for tour guides and driver
guides who can work from early May to
September. Applicants must be fluently
bilingual (Japanese/English) and be able
to work in Vancouver and take short trips
to surrounding areas. We are alsolooking
for office staff, preferably bilingual and
with basic accounting knowledge. Experience is an asset in both jobs but we will
train promising applicants. Send resumes to: Tourland Travel Ltd., 200-900 W.
Georgia St., Vancouver, B.C., V6C 2W6.
Resumes should be written in native
language of applicant but follow traditional Canadian resume format.
S.W.A.P. TALK
Come learn about working
holidays in Britain, Ireland,
Australia, New Zealand, and
Japan.
Fri. February 12th
SUB AUDITORIUM
12:30-1:30
Presented by TRAVEL CUTS
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Join the Grads on Mondays at 7:30 or 8:30.
Set of 5 for S20. Drop-in for $5. Everyone is
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BAMBOO BLINDS 80 x 180 cm $5 ea., 120
x 1 80 cm S8 ea. Andrew Storm 327-3136 or
228-3887.
VOLVO 1976 244DL. Good condition, some
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SHEET MUSIC & BOOKS in reasonable
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get bettor marks. I fyour writing is less than
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STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION,
1 position for
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and 1 position for
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Applications and further information can be obtained in the
Administrative Assistant's office,
SUB Room 238.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED
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TO SUB RM 238
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 years exp.,
Word Proc. & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
I
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS - U
write, we type. Theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds., 736-1208.
WORD-PROCESSING $2.00/page, IBM or
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FAST! Word Processing $1.50/pg. daisy
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welcome. 737-8981.
WORD WEAVERS - 41st bus line, upstairs
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MacINTOSH WORDPROCESSING: Experienced editing, reason, rates. Call Jack -
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Using IBM-XT with WordPerfect #202-1515
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The Ombudsoffice would
to remind all students that
Feb. 12 is the last date for
withdrawal from a second
term course with a standing of "W" noted on transcript.
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|:HtM^
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NOTE: "Noon" = 12:30 - 1:30
p.m.
TODAY
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Meeting - film; new members
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p.m., SUB 205.
Graduate Student Society
Bzzr Garden. 4-7:30 p.m., Fireside Lounge, Grad Centre.
Arts Undergrads
Bzzr   Garden   -   "All   Departments?  4:30-7:30   p.m.,   Buch
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Pre-Arts Week Bzzr Garden, in
conjunction with AUS. Everyone
welcome. 4:30-7 p.m., Buch
Lounge.
Pre-Medical Society
Free Bowling Night (Members
Only). 5-7:15 p.m., Varsity Bowling Lanes, 15th and Arbutus.
Graduate Student Society
DJ  Night:   7-12  p.m.  Fireside
Lounge, Grad Centre.
ALSO: Darts Night. 7:30 p.m.,
Fireside Lounge, Grad Centre.
Lutheran Student Movement
TGIF Movie: "Life of Brian." 7:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
CITR Radio FM102
Basketball Broadcast: UBC vs.
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Memorial Gym.
Political Science Students'Association
Film Night: 7:30 - "The Name of
the Rose"; 9:30 - "The Conformist." Gate 4, International
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SATURDAY
CITR Radio FM 102
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JAPANESE
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FROM
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Orthodox Christian Fellowship
Vigil, 5 p.m. St. Andrew's Hall,
6040 Iona Dr.
SUNDAY
Orthodox Christian Fellowhsip
Sunday ofthe Prodigal Son: Liturgy. 9:30 a.m., St. Andrew's
Hall, 6040 Iona Dr.
Lutheran Student Movement
Communion Service,  10  a.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
Maranatha Christian Church
Worship Service. 12 noon, 2490
W. 2nd.
Psychology Students' Association
Volleyball Game - reminder to
the team of time change. 3:30 and
4:30 p.m., Osborne Gym.
MONDAY
Institute of Asian Research
Free noon-hour film: "Life Begins in January." Noon, Asian
Centre Auditorium.
UBC Personal Computer Club
IBM   Meeting:   "Stephen   welcomes  revolutionary  support."
Noon, SUB 211.
Graduate Student Society
Video Night. 6 p.m. - "Witness"; 8
p.m. - "The Colour Purple." 6 and
8 p.m., Fireside Lounge, Grad
Centre.
UBC Film Society
Classic   SUBFilms:   "Casa-
blanca."Playit, Sam. Admission:
$2.00 each or $3.00 for couples. 7
and 9:30 p.m., SUB Theatre.
School of Music
Free Recital:  "Moito Viola? 8
p.m.,  School  of Music  Recital
Hall.
International House
Free movie night: "When Father
Was Away On Business" (Yugoslavia). Subtitles, rated R. 8 p.m.,
International House, 1783 West
Mall - upstairs in Gate 4 Licenced Lounge.
TUESDAY
Ballet-UBC Jazz
Ballet, Jazz and Modern classes
daily. Details in SUB 208.
Environmental Law Group
Calvin  Sandborn  speaking on
"The Practice of Environmental
Law." Noon, Law Building, Room
180-182.
Pacific Rim Club - Travel Cuts
Visions of Siam: narrated slide
show on modern and ancient
Thailand. Noon, Asian Centre
Auditorium.
Maranatha Christian Club
A look at the issues that involve
us. Enjoyyour lunch while listening to an enlightening talk. Everyone welcome. Noon, SUB 212.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Lesbian/Gay Week'88-areading
by David Watmough, author of
The Year of Fears. Noon, SUB
211.
Jewish   Students'   Association/
Hillel
Hot Lunch. Noon, Hillel House.
UBC Film Society
Classic SUBFilms: "A Midsummer Nigh t's Dream. "12:40, 7 and
9 p.m., SUB Theatre.
2/THE UBYSSEY
February 5, 1988 Still making traditional choices
Women continue to choose arts over sciences
By Elynn Richter
Women tend to study arts
over sciences because society's
educational practices have failed
to keep pace with legal guarantees
of sexual equality, according to
Nancy Horsman of the women
students office.
Dianne Herbst from
Vancouver's society for women in
science and technology agrees. "A
lot of times women are shortsighted, and don't realize that
most women have to have a career?
On the other hand, young men
have been programmed to prepare
for their future, says Herbst.
Forty-one per cent of women
are enrolled in arts at UBC, about
14 per cent in education, approximately 15 per cent in science, 2.3
per cent in engineering and agri
culture, and less than 1 per cent in
forestry, according to 1985-1986
UBC statistics.
"Faculties have to see women
as serious students, not just as
shopping around (for a husband)?
said Horsman.
"We have to educate the non-
traditional fields and faculties to
be receptive to women and make
them feel comfortable? she said.
Women students in male-
dominated fields such as engineering and forestry are put at a
disadvantage by peers who make
sexist comments and derogatory
remarks, Horsman said.
Kris, a third year engineering
student who didn't want to give
her last name, said that while
many male engineering students
feel they have to live up to the
image of "red-neck, sexist pigs,
they are not really like that?
But "some of the professors
are? she said.
The percentage of women in
non-traditional fields of study is
climbing but, as a ratio to the
number of women in university,
the increase is insubstantial, said
June Lythgoe, director ofthe office
for women students.
Unlike other universities,
UBC has no programs which encourage women to enter male-
dominated areas of study. Here it
is up to the individual departments to extend their encouragement to women, Lythgoe said.
But at the University of Alberta, the women in scholarship,
engineering, science, and technology committee actively supports
and encourages the participation
of women in decision making roles
in society.
Another group, the University of Alberta women in science
and engineering, sponsors panel
discussions and workshops which
offer women role models, support,
and practical information hke how
to choose a graduate school.
But UBC applied science dean
Axel Meisen questioned the effectiveness of university level programs which attempt to encourage women to enter non-traditional fields.
"(Career) decisions are generally made in high school? he said.
With this in mind the faculty
of applied science arranges visits
to high schools and colleges where
both men and women are encouraged to consider careers in engineering, said Meisen.
Lythgoe also said encourag-
Power failure hits Vanier
By   Ross   McLaren   and   Laura
Busheikin
PlaceJVanier residents have
been living in the dark because of
power failures hitting four houses
- Hamber, Ross, Mckenzie, and
Modsley - over the last three
weeks.
The power failures, caused by
Place Vanier's archaic wiring,
shut down lights, smoke alarms,
emergency exit signs, emergency
lights, and heat and hot water
said Hamber house resident Merrin Penney. The longest blackout
lasted 15 hours.
"The biggest thing is the
safety factor? Penney said.
"Technically, we're not supposed
to use candles but people don't
have much choice."
Penny said the fire depart
ment was not informed of the
power failure even though house
advisors- walked hourly fire
watches and flash lights, which
burned batteries quickly, substituted as emergency lights.
Assistant chief J. Affleck, of
the University Endowment Lands
fire hall, when asked if housing
should have phoned the fire department, said "no, because the
fire alarms still work?
"Their (Housing's) problem is
money. When the buildings were
built the wiring complied with the
code of the day. Recently, we've
been working with them to upgrade (the wiring)? Affleck said.
Mary Flores, director of student housing, said power has been
restored through the use of temporary wiring.
Flores said the line periodically breaks down and is repaired.
Housing facility manager,
Gerry Harley, said work to permanently fix the wiring will begin
Monday and will cost approximately $40,000, to be taken from
housing's emergency funds.
"The wiring is 20 years old?
Harley said. "It just gave up."
Some students, citing the inconvenience of studying in the
dark and showering in cold water,
want their rent back, but housing
has refused to refund their money.
Juline Macdennai, of Place
Vanier, said "we have to go to the
commons block to study because
the rooms are dark. It is not very
conducive to studying."
Engineer attempts to prove the theory of water surface tension.
mandel ngan photo
MLA's offer
different
views on
university
accessibility
By Mandel Ngan
High tuition fees limit
post-secondary?education to
those who can; afford it and
increases should no longer be
implemented automatically,
says Darlene: Marzari, the
NDP advanced education
critic.
"The government should
be establishing criteria and
goals for accessibility? said
the MLA for Point Grey-Kitsi-
lario during a visit to SUB.
Monday.
Marzari said current tuition structures assume built-
in, regular increases, shutting
out those who can't pay.
"All tuition increases
should be subject to a provincial review process? she said.
"There are deep accessibility-problems built into the
tuition structure because we
gave up so much in the last five:
years. Financial aid hardly
scratches the surface of need?
Marzari said.
But Social Credit MLA
Kim Campbell does not think
the tuition fee increase will
have much of an impact on accessibility.
"I find it hard to believe
that a five and a half per cent
increase will limit enrolment.
Accessibility is not only a question of tuition, it is a complex
problem? she sai3.
Campbell said the student aid program works and
cited the recent loan remission
program as an example.
She admits the five and a
half per cent increase is worse
than no increase at all.
"However if they are going
to have them, it's better to
have them a little at a time.
Small increases are easier to
deal with than big ones. But I
would like to see fees kept
down? she said.
ing women to enter science, engineering, and other traditionally
male fields should begin at an
early age, especially around the
time of puberty.
"It is important to have a supportive, and encouraging role
model or mentor? she said.
Jean Elder, chair of status of
women, said "very few women go
to grad school, therefore women
are not available to teach at universities and there are a lack of
role models."
She suggested women may
want to work outside the university when they see the gender inequity in faculty salaries of about
$2000 per year.
The university could be doing
more to encourage women "by indicating they believe in equality?
said Elder.
1__«»|
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LOUNGE
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11:30a.m.-11:30 p.m.
lunch specials
Everyone is welcome for
• Ballroom Dancing
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• Film discussion
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• Free Friday Dances
Grad Centre    228-3203
JOIN US FOR SOME "R & R" AT
HILLEL'S FAMOUS HOT
LUNCH
Tuesday February 9th
12:30 pm
Hillel House
(Behind Brock Hall)
For more information: 224-4748
li! Oscar's Donair & Pizza ill
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Also, We Have Regular & Dark on Tap
Dine in and take out only.  1 per customer per visit.
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February 5, 1988
THE UBYSSEY/3 Join the Ubyssey. We dare you.
Writers, photogfraphers, reviewers, production volunteers, SUB 241k
UBC BOOKSTORE
presents
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WED. FEBRUARY 10th • 8:30 am to 8:30 pm
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special $37.25
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special $58.25
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mm BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
Bob talks
some more
about being
an uncle
from page 7
expected, and Peter does such a
good job at playing keyboard
lines as well as harmonica lines.
He's got such an unusual style",
explains Junger.
Not content with the static
presentation of most other
bands, Bob's Your Uncle make a
concert a theatrical treat by
providing a visual motif to
accompany the music. In describing their performance, the
energetic sylph-like Sook-Yin
Lee says,"There is lots of energy,
costume changes, some elements
of vaudeville and cartoons, and a
lot of rock and roll to our performance."
Although he shrugs off the
label of "art band", James Junger
admits "We make art and we
make music. People can watch us
perform, or they can just zone
out and dance." While most
bands are content in making a
concert a listening experience,
Bob's Your Uncle make their
concerts a total experience: for
the eyes, ears, feet and mind.
Bob's Your Uncle was
formed in October of 1984 to play
small clubs and on the street, but
they quickly outgrew these
modest aims. Living in the same
apartment, Sook-Yin Lee and
Peter Lizotte decided to combine
their talents and form a band.
Fortunately for the pair, the
guitar bass duo of James Junger
and Bernie Radelfinger had
recently broken off from another
band and were looking for
another project to join. The most
recent addition is Steve Lazin on
drums. But two ofthe most
important people to Bob's Your
Uncle are not even members of
the band: Craig Burner their
producer and David Litzotte, the
roadie and light man.
Their only vinyl release to
date is a self-titled six song ep,
released in 1987, which aptly
demonstrates the flexibility of
the Bob's Your Uncle sound. The
songs range from the angry and
semi-political Acid Rain, to the
eccentric Talking to the Birds,
and to the dancey Too Many
Mirrors. Lee, who writes about
70 per cent ofthe lyrics, says
"Inspirations for the lyrics run
from going to the dentist to acid
rain." Thanks to producer Bill
Buckingham the ep captures the
essence of Bob's Your Uncle.
If you're unable to catch
Bob's Your Uncle either this Friday or Saturday at the Railway
Club, or ifyou don't like celebrating St. Patrick's Day by watching 40 year-old drunk musicians
with thick beards and even
thicker accents trying to sing
classic Irish folk songs (?), Bob's
Your Uncle will be performing at
86 street on March 17.
H*0*L*l-D-A-Y-S
JOIN 4000 YOUNG
CANADIANS FROM ACROSS
CANADA BUSTING LOOSE
TO MEXICO THIS SPRING IN
MAZATLAN, PUERTO
VALLARTA & CANCUN.
FOR MORE INFO CALL
STEVE WILSON 255-3586
4/THE UBYSSEY
February 5, 1988 UBC museum ignores boycott,
lends artifacts to Glenbow
from page 1
welfare of their creator's living
descendents should mean no less".
Another anthropologist, Dr.
Joan Ryan, resigned from her
position on the Programs Committee of the Glenbow museum after
learning that the department of
external affairs was intervening
abroad by asking Canadian embassies to 'defuse' the boycott situation.
External affairs insisted that
the support for the Lubicon was
marginal, and urged European
and American museum directors
to lend to the Glenbow.
"It seems to me that this is
political influence at its highest
level - the diplomatic one...The
message is clear: save the show,
never mind the people? Ryan
says.
Aaron Greycloud, President
of United Native Nations Local
108 in Vancouver, agrees with
Ryan that the External Affairs
intervention was a face-saving
measure.
"Canada likes to be known
abroad as a multicultural society,
but it fails completely when it
comes to Canada's First Nations?
Greycloud says.
Greycloud believes that the
Olympic show only "adds insult to
injury", and obscures the fact that
"this country's government does
practice apartheid and genocide".
Saul Terry, President of
Union of BC Indian Chiefs, says
"The Lubicon situation is a concern for all non-treaty Indians in
BC, of which there are many. The
boycott is trying to bring some
attention to the manner in which
the government has dealt with
Indians, and that is why we must
support them".
Support for the Lubicon has
come from virtually every major
aboriginal organization in Canada
and abroad, including the Assembly of First Nations, the Metis National Council, the United Native
Nations, the Native Council of
Canada, the National Congress of
American Indians, and the World
Council of Indigenous Peoples.
But not all native Canadians
agree with the Lubicon's methods.
Many turned out for the opening
night reception of The Spirit Sings
and contributed to the curating of
the show.
The Spirit Sings is for some
Canadians a celebration of native
culture. But others can see that
the governments of Alberta and
Canada and the oil companies are
prepared to sacrifice a whole aboriginal society in the name of
profit.
It has been almost fifty
years since the Lubicon were
promised a treaty by the federal
government, and today they are no
closer to a resolution. The difference is that today the people who
have lived on those lands for generations must fight not only the
government, but a far stronger
opponent - the oil companies.
Some will say it's only an art
exhibit, but art at what cost?
Everthing you ever wanted to know
about being single in Vancouver
SINGLES   FAIR
f~"_"__*=h_iaj=*v ia -i3 1-4-
EMTERPRISE BUILDING
ON THE EXPO SITE AT THE DOOR
South Side of B.C. Place      Tickets At VTC/CBO
Time     Fri.    Feb. 12      12-10
Sat.   Feb. 13     10-10
Sun. Feb. 14      10-6
Relationship Seminars
Mini Cruises
Displays - Services
Fashion Shows
No settlement in sight for
from page 1
The communication between
generations relies on an oral tradition that has broken down. "We're
dependent on the old people,
they're resource people? said
Ominayak. "But because the environment has been destroyed the
tradition that could be transferred
to the young people is no longer
viable." Unable to solve the band's
probelms, many elders have lost
their status and the young people
have turned to welfare and alcohol.
"On the one hand? said Ominayak, "I think of what would have
happened if they had come in with
guns and just finished us off- the
way it is now it's a long slow death
with the same result... The bottom
line is we don't have a future until
we achieve a land base."
For the Lubicon, the land
base is their only means for survival. For the Alberta government, which collects huge royalties from the oil and gas production, the land is a source of power
and wealth.
Technically the provincial
government does not play a role in
negotiation. "The negotiations are
reallly between two sovereign
nations — the government of
Canada and the Lubicon Cree,"
said Wright-McLeod.
Yet, time has shown that the
federal government has not kept
its promises to the Lubicon band.
In 1939, the department of
Indian Affairs offered them a 25
square mile reserve with mineral
rights near Lubicon Lake. But the
land survey was never conducted
and the band was left without a
reserve. In the 1950's when oil
companies showed interest in the
area, the Alberta government
demanded that Ottawa determine
the status of the Lubicon Lake
area. When Ottawa did not respond, the Alberta government
unilaterally and illegally claimed
the area as provincial crown land.
When oil exploration of the
lake area dramatically increased
in the 1970s, the Lubicon people
filed a notice with provincial government to suspend development.
"The provincial government
wouldn't accept the caveat? Lennarson said, "so the band took the
provincial government to court
and the government asked for a
postponement. During this time,
the province rewrote the law and
made it retroactive."
Under the new law, the band's
caveat had no legal basis. "If the
caveat had been accepted? contin
ued Lennarson, "the millions of
dollars that the oil companies
have gained in the area would now
be questionable."
In 1982 with no settlement in
sight, the band filed a suit against
ten oil and gas companies operating in the area and against the
government of Alberta.
The Lubicons claimed title to
the land, as well as exclusive
rights to all the natural resources
found in their lands, based on their
aboriginal rights. They also proposed $700 million in lieu of royalties and revenues gained from
resource extraction to date.
In addition, the band included an injunction to halt the
activities ofthe oil and gas companies while the suit was in progress,
to prevent irreparable damage.
The Alberta court denied that injunction.
"As the Alberta court of appeal sees it, there is no way of life
left to be protected, and an injunction would be harmful to the oil
companies? said James O'Reilly,
lawyer for Lubicon Cree for over
seven years.
"You can't sue the provincial
government, so they are immune
to an injunction. The oil companies are merely agents ofthe government and so they are covered
by crown immunity? says Lennarson.
"The damages to the Lubicon
are not irreparable, says the court
- if they win the case they will have
enough money to compensate the
damages done to the land? he
added.
"Even if the damages are irreparable? continued Lennarson,
" the court says the band's application shouldn't be considered because it would be damaging to the
political economy of the province.
And finally, if the band lost, it
couldn't compensate the oil company and government for their
losses?
For the government, it is a
question of control. "The Alberta
government feels threatened by
the natives? said O'Reilly. "It was
only made a province in 1905 and
it only got control over its lands
and resources in 1930. It's a
struggle for power and resources."
"It's clear that Canada is a
coward because it won't face up to
Alberta and say right and justice
must be done? he added.
The Canadian justice system
is failing the Lubicon Cree and
they know it.
The Lubicon Cree have taken
their case to the United Nations
human rights committee. In July
1987 the committee decided that
"the State party [Canada] (must)
take interim measures to avoid
irreparable damage to Chief Ominayak and other members of the
Lubicon Lake band.
"The U.N. told Canada to take
immediate measures - Canada, as
usual, did nothing? said O'Reilly.
But the Lubicon Cree's most
dangerous enemy, next to the
governments, the courts and the
oil companies, is time. Said Ominayak, "If it takes too much longer
our people are going to lose even if
we win?
Twin Volume Shoes
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Running, Aerobic, Indoor Court,
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Dozens of Clothing Items
Selected Footwear
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With AMS Card
Open     9:30 am - 6:00 pm - Saturday - Wednesday
9:30 am - 9:00 pm - Thursday and Friday
3355 W. Broadway 733-1612
February 5,1988
THE UBYSSEY/5 m:
srt
1mN_________
• • • •»_ '■ nr*.
Medical
sciencell
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B
If you are bothered by "cold sores" or "fever blisters" - 3 or more in the past 12
months...
If you get a "warning" prior to their eruption...
If you are healthy, oyer 16 and unquestionably not pregnant...
If you wish to participate in a study of a new cream treatment called
undecylenic acid...
If you don't mind that the study is 'Placebo-controlled" (1/2 of the entrants get
a "fake" cream with no active drug)...
If you would accept an honorarium after completion of approximately 9 daily
study visits to the UBC Herpes Clinic...
If you are interested in finding out about participation in a drug study..
Then call 228-7565 or page 687-7711 #2887 before your next recurrence.
NOTE: These instructions are for information only. A decision about entry
into a study will occur only after the research assistant has talked to you
further and you have decided you wish to participate.
6/THE UBYSSEY
February 5,1988 By Cathy Aarde
If you've successfully
avoided art so far by
staying away from galleries, watch out!
There's a growing trend in Vancouver
to exhibit art in everyday places rather
than strictly in traditional venues. After
a class you might stop for a drink with a
friend in the SUB Gallery Lounge and
find a painting across from you. While
getting your hair cut, you might notice
that there are arts and crafts on display.
The bank, the library and even window
fronts are all increasingly playing host to
the diverse works of local artists.
FEATURE
"I*'i a general trend with groovy
downtown cafes? explains Kelly Williams,
manager of Cafe Zen. Montgomery Cafe
and Cafe Taf s are two other examples.
Closer to UBC, Cafe Madeleine on West
Tenth and various Fourth Avenue
restaurants provide "alternate hanging
spaces". The West Point Grey branch of
the public library, just outside the UBC
Gates, shows local arts and crafts, as does
Twizzle Hair Studio and The Hair Club
on West Broadway.
"There's a very large artistic community in Vancouver and there certainly are
not enough spaces to provide exhibitions,"
says Keith Wallace, curator of the Vancouver Art Gallery. Wallace says alternate exhibitions complement traditional
galleries and are good for everyone.
Dietrick Madsen, the artist who did
the December CITR Discorder cover, is an
artist benefiting from increased display
spaces in the city. His first show is
coming to a close at Cafe Zen and has
netted him sales and another show.
One established artist voiced a
concern about the physical space of some
a *rw* \*«
L*
-■ *•_
ii
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Art: hanging out at Cafe' Zen
alternate venues, saying that wall colour,
harsh light and lack of space may distract
the viewer. Wallace thinks that artists
are more concerned with being able to
show their work than with the imperfections of a particular display space.
Many people are not accustomed to
the art community and "they feel kind of
awkward going into an art gallery,"
reflects Newton. For these people,
exhibitions in familiar environments, at
cafes, on street corners, at the library, can
be a way to be comfortable with art.
Art "increases our visual sensitivity
to our surroundings, our environment, the
way we do things," says Chappell. With
this increased sensitivity, art becomes
more than what is hung neatly in galleries. We will become aware of the visual
art expressed in architecture and fashion.
This awareness enhances our understanding of our culture, in turn allowing us to
see in a new light other cultures.
Owners want "to expose the local artists to the public and the other way
around? says Dennis Newton, Twizzle's
owner. The exhibitions also draw people
to the venue by providing an interesting
environment.
Artwork generally stays up for
periods varying from two to six weeks.
The artists hang their own work, sometimes receiving help from the owner or
person in charge. Promotion is usually
done by the artist, though this is not
always the case. Fettucini's provides
posters for its artists and has regular
opening nights.
Goodwill and appreciation between
owner and artist are usually the only currency changing hands, although some
venues do charge a commission. The
commission at Isadora's restaurant, on
Granville Island, is used mainly to
improve display space, asserts Janice
Tetlock, on the Art Committee.
Window fronts also offer exhibits. The
Window for Non-Commercial Culture, located at 455 W. Pender, exhibits work
that is "political, conceptual, intellectual,
I guess I could even bear to say instructional, but certainly having to do with
communication and different ways of
seeing a variety of ideas? muses Geor-
giana Chapell, artist and sessional
lecturer in Fine Arts at UBC. The public
library windows at Robson and Burrard
also exhibit.
You may want to get the jump on the
new trend in art exhibits it before it
jumps on you. Many exhibits are not
advertised, with news travelling by word-
of-mouth.
But the joy of alternate exhibits is
precisely in the way art shows up when it
isn't expected.
BOB'S
YOUR
UNCLE
By Chris Buchanan
While Bob's Your Uncle has performed the ordinary band
rituals: changing drummers as often as their shirts, running
into wildlife on their cross-country tour, and having to push their
broken down bus through Queen street; their hard work, modesty
and an innovative approach to music set them far apart from the
majority of top-40 cover bands that proliferate on the club scene.
INTERVIEW
BOB'S YOUR UNCLE
The most alluring aspect ofthe Bob's Your Uncle sound has to be
the eclectic vocals of Sook-Yin Lee. Sook-Yin Lee's tentative first
attempts at singing are described bluntly by guitarist James Junger:
"It took Sook-Yin a while because when she started she couldn't sing
that well."
But eventually hard work and an
open approach to music proved successful.
"One day when I was in the studio something clicked in my head. In the beginning
my vocals almost verged on rap, I would
always be talking the lyrics. But in the
studio, when we were recording the
album, it clicked in my head that I
didn't have to restrain myself, I can
just fly, let myself go," comments
Lee on her unusual style.
Parallelling this artistic
abandonment is the harmonica
style of Peter Lizotte. Using
effect pedals to alter the sound of
the harmonica, and not
restricting himself to the twelve
bar blues style common to the
harmonica, Lizotte's surprisingly versatile style is responsible for much ofthe
success ofthe band. "It adds
a lot because it's not
See 'Bob', page 4
■C/Von/c/i
iron/c/es-
UNIVERSITY   OF  i
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February 5, 1988
THE UBYSSEY/7 40 - 50% OFF
OFF WHAT? MANY JEWELLERS CONSISTENTLY ADVERTISE SAVINGS OF 40 TO 50%, SOMETIMES EVEN MORE.. ARE THEY REALLY TRUE DISCOUNTS? OR IS THEIR "REGULAR" PRICE
INFLATED TO LURE YOU INTO THINKING YOU'RE GETTING A BARGAIN? THERE'S NOTHING
WRONG WITH LEGITIMATE DISCOUNTS...BUT WE ARE AGAINST DECEPTIVE ADVERTISING.
REMEMBER ONE STORE'S40OR 50% OFF COULD BE THESAME AS ANOTHERSTORE'S REGULAR PRICE. YOU OWE ITTO YOURSELF TO SHOP AROUND AND COMPARE QUALITY AND
SERVICE AS WELL AS PRICE. WE ARE NOT A WHOLESALE WAREHOUSE NOR AN UPSTAIRS
DISCOUNT STORE. SHAMIN IS A FULL SERVICE JEWELLERY STORE WITH VERY REASONABLE
PRICES.  FOR HONEST VALUE AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICE, VISIT US.
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Showtimes effective
February 5-11
_ VANCOUVER CENTRE
Daily-2:15 4:30 7:15 9:45
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NO   3 ROAD _ ACKROYO 270 7788
Evenings-7:15 9:15
MATS. Sat'Sun ■ 2:00
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BURNABY 421 4122
Evenings-7:00 9:20
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FAMOUS PLAYERS
I
Palestinian
propaganda?
By Katherine Monk
Does propaganda have a
valid place in the realm
of art? Not an easy question, but
a good exhibition should force
the viewer into self-examination,
and make us look twice at what
we take for granted. And after
seeing Visioning Palestine, a
multi-media presentation on the
Israeli occupation, I left questioning not only the role of art
and propaganda, but the whole
problem of peace in the Middle
East.
ART
Visioning Palestine
Pitt International Galleries,
36 Powell
With the death toll rising
every day in the occupied territories, the exhibit couldn't be
better timed. It provides another
way of approaching what is
shows us a pair of feet caught in
barbed wire while trying to stake
a land claim, and one more
shows nothing but the corner of a
room.
One disappointment is that
these are not the original
artworks for the prints; instead
they are offset copies, reproduced
due to fear of confiscation by
Israeli authorities. It was
especially annoying given the
artistic eloquence and technical
excecution which were obviously
there, only a little harder to feel
after mechanical reproduction.
The photographs by Jane
Story, on the other hand, made
good use of the mechanics of photography; her prints were for
sale. The approximately fifteen
black and white prints are
technically impeccable, but the
accompanying captions were
disturbingly anti-Israeli.
One photo shows the
weather beaten face of a Pales-
«<'■.:*»,'«*, . *
WT'-m-:   •■
Blurring the fine line between art and propaganda
happening, outside ofthe blood-
and-guts headlines.
The show promotes itself as
the work of sixty-seven Israeli
and Palestinian artists joining
together in the hopes of putting
an end to the occupation. Good
idea, right? Anything to promote
peace must be, by the nature of
its end, a good thing. But by
what means are they achieving
this end, and ultimately, does
the means justify the end?
Big questions for a little exhibit, and it is little, taking up
only two rooms. But the show
embraces issues which have remained unresolved for centuries,
and it was with a somewhat
sceptical attitude that I approached the show. A sort of
Clint Eastwood "Go ahead, make
me believe peace is possible in
the Middle East."
The actual show consists of a
set of photographs by Toronto-
based photojournalist Jane
Story, a sampling of Naji-Al'Ali's
political cartoons, a video
presentation, painting, and
foremost in the show, a series of
posters. Each poster was different, with the exception of the
message, reproduced identically
on each poster: DOWN WITH
THE OCCUPATION.
The posters are by far the
most interesting pieces at the
show, because they are made by
both sides: Israeli and Palestinian. They are also works of
propaganda: they are ideas
spread to promote a cause. In
this case, the cause is the return
ofthe territories, and the end of
the Israeli occupation.
One poster shows a faceless
head, another a small child in
the middle of a whirlwind while
a woman looks at herself in a
compact mirror. Another one
tinian refugee with a quote from
Golda Meir alongside: "It was
not as though there was a
Palestinian people and we came
and threw them out and took
their country away from them.
They did not exist."
The mixture of the anguished face and the quote make
Golda Meir look like she was an
inhuman Arab-hating politician.
Maybe she was, but I resented
the overt attempt at manipulation. The photographs are good
enough to stand on their own
without a context for their
interpretation forced down my,
or anyone else's throat.
Aside from the photographs
and the posters, there was little
else worth seeing artistically.
Poor art makes for a poor statement, no matter how good the
idea might have been.
And the idea was a good one.
As the poster series stated it:
"The return of the territories will
make peace and freedom possible. Both people will be able to
be fully independent and we,
Palestinian and Israeli artists,
will be able to exchange information, knowledge, and experience
unhindered to enhance the
creative work in which we are
engaged."
Because these artists are a
part ofthe unrest, their art
emerges as more than propaganda; it is a reflection of their
world. And, depending on
whether you think art should reflect society or vice versa, the exhibit may justify itself.
Ifyou see this show, notice
how you feel when you walk in,
and how you feel when you walk
out. It's a little show but a big
message; good for self-examination if not self-indulgence.
8/THE UBYSSEY
February 5,1988 Athlete photos^hack through hype
By Kathy Chung
Imagine a photography exhibit titled
"Athletes" and what images come to
mind? Nike runners? Wealthy and elite
media personalities in Sports Illustrated,
the students you see in Storm the Wall or
your neighbour jogging down the street?
Whatever your visions of athletes and
sports are, the Presentation House exhibit
organized by the International Center of
Photography and the Smithsonian
Institution Travelling Exhibition Service
is bound to challenge your preconceptions.
PHOTOGRAPHY
Athletes: Photographs 1860 -1986
Presentation House Gallery, NVan
to February 28
This exhibit is especially interesting
keeping in mind the Calgary Olympics
and the recent Super Bowl. The show
highlights the joy, beauty and spirit ofthe
nature of sports and its social origins
which are at times overshadowed by the
hype and fanaticism associated with
athletes today.
This eclectic collection of fine arts
photographs show professional and
serious amateur athletes as well as the
recreational sport lover. The artists
range from anonymous contributers to
well know photographers such as Ansel
Rosskam's social life at the Bowling Alley—captures sport as a social phenomenon.
Adams, Sid Avery, Margaret Bourke-
White, Robert Capa and Bruce Weber.
Their subjects vary from a YMCA exercise
class to Mao Tse Tung playing ping pong
to a surprisingly young and unmuscular
(relatively speaking) Arnold Schwarzenegger.
There is a timeless quality to Weber's
Mike Storm, Modern Pentathalon. At
first glance, the black and white figure in
fencing clothes holding a sword seems to
be from the beginning of the century. The
only detail bringing the image into the
1980's is his wild hair style.
Borenstein's Young Boxer, showing a
boy in a boxing pose standing before an
American flag, hangs next to Nelson's
moody, dark photograph ofthe famous
boxer, Joe Louis. These two pictures are
interesting in the similarities between the
young boy photographed in 1982 and Joe
Louis in 1935. With their fists held up in
identical poses, they share the same self-
conscious bravado.
Gayle Olinekova, Champion Marathon Runner is caught in mid-stride, arms
and legs propelling her flying body. Determination, power, and potential energy
absolutely radiates from this incredable
photograph by Newton.
Fascinating portrayals of sports as
social, recreational and leisure activities
contrast with the depictions of serious
competition. Capa's Ernest Hemmingway
and His Son Gregroy show the two doing
nothing more atheletic than lounging together on a dock with their rifles by their
side. Lunch Hour shows men playing
stick ball in a city alley with cars and
pedestrians stopping to watch the game.
The social enviroment of a sport is
delightfully recorded in Rosskam's Social
Life at the Bowling Alley.
The beautifully composed Headstand,
showing one man doing a head stand on
another's head reveals the performance
side of sports. There is an element of the
surreal in the distorted image ofthe man
in Swimming Under Water and the
breath taking leap of the tiny figure in
Leaping the Chasm at Stand Rock.
Humour and charm enliven Gordon's
Casino Pool and Sharon Dill-Hopping's
delightfully entitled Mother & Daughter
Bowling Champs: Bowling - it's in the
blood.
Vixen enlivens Vancouver
By Chris Fraser
A spirit-dampening Saturday evening of swirling
snow , and an unhappy cultural
week for a symphony-less
Vancouver were both pushed
from centre stage as the curtain
rose for Vancouver Opera's
Canadian premiere of Leos
Janacek's The Cunning Little
Vixen.
The audience was greeted by
a majestic pastoral scene,
enhanced by Janacek's overture.
Lush greens, subtle sunny
oranges, dispersed through a
rolling wooded landscape, were
intertwined with the simple but
proud harmonies of the music. A
celebration of Nature's wonders
had begun.
OPERA
The Cunning Little Vixen
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
But suddenly, the leafy
trees rose from the stage,
floating away like fickle clouds.
And in their wake? A frolicking
cohort of fantastical creatures,
each with its own distinct
melody. The lethargic badger,
the ever-busy crickets and flies,
the comic frog, the glittering,
hovering dragonfly, and the playful foxcub: Sharpears the Vixen.
Just as suddenly as it was
revealed, this scene is invaded.
The aggressor—a grey-costumed,
stumbling Forester— is in all respects alienated from the scene
he intrudes upon. He is an ugly
aberration. He spots the Vixen,
and seizes her as a prize. The
celebration of Nature has ended,
and Janacek moves on to
explore the conflict between
humans and nature.
All this is captured in a
stark changeof tone in the score:
harsh, strident, percussive
themes dominated by brass
replace the previous gracious
string melodies (drawn from
Czech folk melodies).
This establishes the basis
for the remainder ofthe Opera,
as Janacek traces through three
acts the Vixen's captivity,
relationship to the human world
and return to her natural
environment.
The audience is, in the
course of this voyage, confronted
by a series of reflections and
mood changes: near burlesque
comic scenes, graphic demonstrations of nature's violence, her
profound splendour (expressed
with great power in the final
crescendo ofthe Opera), and
Janacek's challenging thesis:
that much of human individual
and social behaviour consists of
guilt, sexual and other forms of
repression, and meaningless
programmed repetitious behaviours.
These thematic offshoots
from the original "nature
fantasy" character of the opera
broaden its perspective and,
using powerful symbolism,
provoke the audience with
suggestions they might find
difficult to accept. Janacek is ap
parently adamant in his belief
that art must challenge its
audience's assumptions.
The opera works because of
Janacek's flexibility as a composer. His shifting music, not
atonal but presenting melodic
and harmonic evolution in a
manner which explicitly rejects
classical tradition, is the real
reason for this success.
However, at several crucial
moments, the score lacked the
required intensity to convey with
conviction what Janacek seemed
to have had in mind. Some
mood changes during the opera
could have greater effect if the
musical themes driving them were
more sustained and fully developed.
Janacek's urgency to communicate left me a step behind at times,
chasing after his train of thought.
But at the same time, it is the
urgency of the thematic material in
this opera which lends it such
appeal.
Vancouver Opera is extremely
fortunate to have recruited for this
ground-breaking production the trio
of Conductor Martin Andre, Director
David Pountney, and Set designer
Maria Bjornson. Each is internationally reknowned and makes an
invaluable contribution to the uniformly excellent quality of the
opera.
piUS free services
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224-6225
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$2.00/CARNATION
Order in SUB Concourse
February 8th to 10th
12:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m.
Delivered
February 11th and 12th
anywhere on campus
THE 3RD ANNUAL
CONFERENCE ON LAW &
CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL ISSUES
LAW AND THE FUTURE/THE FUTURE OF LAW
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12TH
9 A.M. PANEL
•IMMIGRATION POLICY IN CANADA
2 P.M. PANEL
•ABORIGINAL FISHING RIGHTS
INFORMAL RECEPTION TO FOLLOW
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13TH
9 A.M. PANEL
•A.I.D.S -MANDATORY TESTING
AND QUARANTINE LEGISLATION
2 P.M. PANEL
•MATERNAL AND FETAL RIGHTS
INFORMAL RECEPTION TO FOLLOW
ALL SESSIONS WILL BE HELD IN THE MAIN LECTURE HALL OF THE FACULTY
OF LAW, UBC.
ADMISSION TO THF    INFERENCE IS FREE.
FORFURTHE]     -JFORMATION,
CONTACT THE FACULTY OF LAW AT 228-3151.
PRESENTED BY TI IE LAW STUDENTS OF UBC
February 5,1988
THE UBYSSEY/9 Dragon debate
exposes sexism
A peculiar debate dominated Wednesday
night's student council meeting. Peculiar because it concerned a controversial video game
deemed sexist by University College in Toronto
and BCIT but not by our newly elected Board of
Governors representative Bob Seeman. Peculiar
because the word censorship was tossed around
frequently but the words objectification and
misogyny were not. Peculiar because the debate
was dominated by men. Peculiar because the
eight votes cast in support ofthe sexist game
were cast by men.
The game is Double Dragon and in its opening seconds a thug strikes a woman on the head
and tosses her over his shoulder. It doesn't get
any better.
The students have elected a man who
promotes hedonistic pleasure at the expense ofthe status of women.
The game was pulled from the SUB games
room by the owner ofthe machines because of
complaints about its sexist content.
Seeman engineered a motion, which was ultimately defeated, that read that the AMS president should write a letter to the owner stating
that, in principle, the AMS is not opposed to the
game.
The motion was later amended to replace
president with director of finance when president
Rebecca Nevraumont took a commendable stand
and refused to write the letter. But Nevraumont
was one of few women who spoke adamantly in
opposition to the inane motion. The motion was
defeated thanks to the persuasiveness of a few
men who said what the women on council should
have.
The relative silence of women on council
cannot be attributed to indifference. Attribute it
to an oppressive atmosphere that inhibits women
from speaking their minds. Loud women are
mouthy bitches but loud men are charismatic.
Seeman said the game is enjoyable and
unless you have played the game, your concerns
are unwarranted. "Ifyou played the game, you
would enjoy it," he said.
The pleasure in violence against women is
what is so frightening about this game. There
are also men who find pleasure in watching
videos in which a woman is beaten and raped.
The students of UBC have elected a man
who promotes hedonistic pleasure at the expense
ofthe status of women.
Incidentally, Seeman also said (six times),
any woman downtown in a mini-skirt is a prostitute.
^M&AtfjWOPPftiS®//*
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 19,1988
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays through-
outthe academicyearbythe Alma MaterSocietyofthe University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and not necessarily those ofthe university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of
Canadian University Press. The editorial office is Rm.
241k ofthe Student Union Building. Editorial Department,
phone 228-2301; advertising, 228-3977.
It was truly a sad occasion. Rick Hiebert, Ubyssey staff peon, had bought the farm
(died). Peter, Randy, Mandel,Laura, Victor, Deanne, Elynn, Steve,Ross, Jennifer,
Dona, Jeff, Corinne, Steven, Mary, Mike, Gabrielle Dumas, Alex, Chris, Katherine,
Chris Buchanan, Cathy Aarde, Mike Laanala, Pamela and Peter were too busy
putting out the vilest rag to come to the funeral, but all Rick's student journalist
buddies flew in for the occasion (except for Tim Crumley, who was still asleep).
Jack, Krishna and Eric were a little out of sorts. They were sure Rick was to be
the next coach of the Blues football team and now their scoop was ruined, Jack cried
to Matt (Gateway), Aaron (Link) and Donne (ofthe real Toban. Accept no substitutes). Nick (Cap Courier) and Carl (fresh from his truimphs at the SMU winter
festival) played air guitar as Initial, Todd (C.C.) and Steve (Cord W.) sang Billy Fury
songs to the mourners entering the chapel.
Although Rick, Heidi (Musers), Ross n' Paul (Picaro) caused a wee disturbance by
dancing around the coffin yelling "Jaysus, b'y J-ird, Tunder n' (blip)!" after the
eulogy, the service went well, all mourners dozing soundly.
Pallbearers Rob, Gub, Larry n' Art (the Lance from Windsor, home of half decent
Ukranian food) tossed the coffin into the ground as Michelle (paying attention
Catty?), Jeanne (Daily), Lynne (buro), Stephanie (Peak) and Beth (CUPODD) wept
at the loss of CUP's least eligible bachelor. Chris n' Jerry (Daily n' Sil) told Valerie,
Larry and Melinda (who was contemplating "Rick Bonked for the Ubyssey' as a
head) all the sordid details of Rick's life.
Finally, there were only two at graveside, the Wild Thing (Vahsity editor) and a
friend. Said Thing, "Fve heard of pouring a bottle of brandy over a grave. It's an old
British custom." Replied the mourner, "Yes, but rd prefer to run it through my
kidneys first. Old Havergal custom."
And then Rick opened the lid, resolving never to crash on the couch after production
night again and said, "I'd prefer ifyou didn't. Vm not into that sort of thing."
city desk:
features:
entertainment:
sports:
Corinne Bjorge
Ross McLaren
Laura Busheikin
Victor Chew Wong
„. and after /fyc rten of
fhujt'll? council fad
(reed iScner] frOh
^ibefdi^ahor\,
}hin for '<■
fclafir\c4 boar of
Video 'Mmcs.,,
Letters
Double Dragon
move silly
I am writing in response to all the recent
bullshit surrounding the
video game Double Dragon.
The people involved in have-
ing the game removed have
no guts. Why not tackle a
bigger problem and get
more to the root ot the problem of sexism and violence
against women? Why did it
take so long to get anything
done about sexual harassment but only two days to
get a video game removed? I
hope the people involved
don't seriously think that
they have solved the problem here because they
haven't even touched it. But
we will let them bask in
their perceived glory and we
will play other video games,
at least as long as they don't
offend anyone. Maybe
somebody should invent a
Sesame Street video game
or a Mr. Rogers video game.
Charles Marty
Arts 3
Bird replies re
differentials
Graeme Luke, thank
you for your letter to the
editor in the January 29th
Ubyssey. You raised some
important points regarding
the foreign student differential tuition fees and how
they relate to my position as
an AMS executive. Your
points are well taken.
I do not quite understand why this concern was
not mentioned in our conversation the day before
your letter appeared. However, since you chose to
communicate this matter
via the Ubyssey, I will do the
same, as I assume other
students are also concerned.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, or racist will not be published. Please be concise. Letters may be
edited for brevity, but it Is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes. Please bring
them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must include name, faculty, and signature.	
Upon reading your letter I was inspired to make a
number of inquiries into the
problem of these high differential fees. As it turns out,
the students I approached
were more jconcerned with
overcoming the social, cultural and language barriers
that accompany life in a new
country. This small sample
is not representative of all
foreign students I'm sure,
but the students I spoke
with were more concerned
with these other barriers
than merely the financial
burdens.
I would like to encourage more input regarding
this issue to be brought to
my attention, Room 254 in
SUB, or in a letter to the
Ubyssey.
Tim Bird,
Director of Administration,
A.M.S.
Blood Drive
sucksessful
The blood drive
Wednesday to Friday last
week during Science Week
was a huge success! The
clinic had a total of 770
people attending and 652
pints collected.
The Science Undergaduate Society, co-sponsor
of the blood drive with the
Red Cross, would like to
extend deep appreciation to
those people who donated.
In addition, I would like to
thank those Science and
other students who helped
organize this clinic and
make it a success. The Red
Cross was very pleased with
the turn out. They said it
was far better attended
than the two previous UBC
blood drives and, for first
time organizers, was the
best turn-out ever.
Sara Fisher
Blood Drive Coordinator
Pro-lifers lashed
"If.i.(wQmen) are careless and a negligent, they
must suffer the consequences" (Pamela Taylor,
letter to The Ubyssey editor, Feb. 2) I can't swallow
that argument. A distressingly large part of our
population, both men and
women alike, view rape as
being the woman's ■fault:
after all, $he did walk
alone at night -that was
asking for if. Careless and
negligent? How may rapists would be considerate
enough to wear a condom?
My heart {Swells with
pri de, that I have the great
good fortun. to live in a society that subjects women
to involuntary pregnancy.
The whole issue of
abortion law reform is not
One of morality, however
loudly our nation's self-
appointed moralists might
proclaim it to be so. In
actuality, the abortion
debate concerns access to
health care: abortion is a
medical procedure which a
woman might undergo following informed discussion between her and her
doctor. Politicians and
priests are not doctors. As
it stands, we have a situation where women's access to health care is limited by their finances. If
we consider abortion to be
a back-up method of
contraception, employed
when other methods fail
(and they do fail despite
the best of intentions),
then itis one which is only
available: to rich women,
for only they can afford to
travel to obtain one.
Gwyneth Cathyl
Graduate Studies
Pro-lifers, please do
not read this. This is a
letter dealing with the
realities of life in the world
today.
Pamela Taylor (Feb.
2) states "Women have the
ultimate freedom to choose
what happens to their bodies..", what about the 13
year old who gets raped by
her boyfriend, or father, or
a stranger?
Would you force your
young daughter to go
through with the pregnancy, to bear a child, at an
age where the biggest
worry in her world is
whether or not she has a
pimple on her nose? Ifyou
don't trust your daughter
to drive the family car, just
how much would you trust
her to raise a child?
Taylor also states
'there are thousands of
people waiting to adopt
children',butjusthowmay
people are waiting to adopt
a non-perfect child such as
one with Down's Syndrome, only one arm, or the
like.
Women will get pregnant. It is a fact of life and
some women will seek
abortions. If not in B.C.,
then in Alberta, or in
Washington State. Or
some dirty back room
downtown, with a 'doctor'
wielding a coat hanger.
Women should have
the choice of avoiding, or
terminating, an unwanted
pregnancy. A woman desperate enough to seek an
abortion should have the
option of being granted
one.
Paui Nagelkerke
Computer Programmer
Critic slammed by critiqued
Well, Greg Davis has
graciously conferred his
wisdom of many years on
the masses of the huddled,
hopeless non-Ubyssey writers. His review of The Musicians' Network annual Ballroom Bash was at best the
child of ignorance, at worst
yet another shining example of The Ubyssey's
impeccable reporting style.
We don't mean to sound
ungrateful - we have been
trying for several years to
get some kind of mention in
The Ubyssey; a substantial
review is more than we
could have hoped for. But
Greg needs to be set straight
on a few things. Our more
than one hundred members
are full-time UBC students
for the most part, who play
music as a hobby, and who
would dearly like to be able
to devote as much time to
working up a four hour set of
original material as they are
required to devote to school.
Mr. Davis proposes that
the Musicians Network
should form an association
with CITR to devise a "new
music scene" on campus;
based upon the "idealistic"
and "imaginative" music/art
which the radio station
churns out. The kind of
original music one finds
around CITR is generally
played by black trench-
coated, black-haired, nose-
pierced neo-punks who do
not attend school and thus
have all kinds of free time in
which to compose their very
original noises. But we are
getting off track; our real
point is that Greg missed
his: our purpose in staging
the Bash was to provide our
members with a chance to
play in front of a crowd (often for the first time) to raise
money for the club, and to
have a good party. Of course
we played songs that the
crowd knew and wanted to
dance to; nobody wants to
listen, or dance, to the
unintelligible thrashing of
"alternative" music for five
hours. Well, almost nobody.
If Greg Davis had paid attention, he would have seen
the amount of effort that all
the musicians put into
making the show the success it was. He would also
have noticed that the bands
were, in order: Floydian Slip
(not Freudian, Greg), the
Gear Jammmers, Generix
(who are obviously named
for the type of music they
play, Greg: it's a joke! Get
it?), Men Without Work
(they didn't do any Van
Halen), and Sleepy Boy
Floyd (Greg's favorite.
They've been playing together for six times as long
as any ofthe other bands he
saw that night). It was not a
competition, it was a party:
we had a terrific time, and so
did our 500 new friends.
The Musicians' Network
Executive
Deon Scott, Science 3
Mike Valentine, Arts 4
Keith Kennedy, Arts 2
Wes Takahashi, Comm. 3
Mike Rowley, Science 3
10/THE UBYSSEY
February 5,1988 Free trade - bum idea should be wiped
The Canada-United States
Free Trade Agreement was
signed by conservative leader
Brian Mulroney December 11,
1987. Since its inception, the
agreement has proved to be a"
hot topic". The agreement has
been advertised by the govern-
Freestyle
ment to set a new course for both
Canada and the United States in
trading. According to the government both countries are supposed to grow and prosper.
After reading the agreement, I can't help but think Canada is getting a bum deal. We are
giving away a lot for little in return. That's a real cost to our economy, culture and future. The government says that social programs
will improve. If we become closer
trading neighbours with the U.S.
our laws will gradually change.
Our socio-economic structure will
become more like our neighbours.
Privatization is inevitable.
It's fine if you own the hospital,
day care, school, housing corporation, group home, but for the majority who don't we may find less
dollars in our wallets to pay for
these services.
The government states that
poorer regions in the country will
improve due to foreign markets
localizing, creating employment.
Those areas will be foreign
owned, controlled and little regulation or protection will come
from the Canadian government.
One more part of the pie to give
away to our neighbours in the
south.
By the very fact that our
population is one tenth the size of
the U.S., and our manufacturing
and production plants are
smaller, we will be eaten alive.
Still, as Canadians, we have the
power to control our future. If we
do not like the effects ofthe agreement, we must take responsibility initiating change.
Gabrielle Dumas is a Ubyssey
staffer who isn't soft on free trade.
Cruise missile not a first strike weapon
The letters debating the
testing of the Cruise missile in
Canada have all assumed or
conceded one point: that Cruise
missiles are first-strike weapons. They are not.
A successful first-strike requires that all "time urgent hard
targets" (silos) are destroyed.
This must also be done simultaneously so as to avoid retaliation.
This means that hundreds
of missiles would have to be
launched from dozens of airplanes hundreds of miles apart
at very precise times and locations - an impossible task after
eight hours of flight with radio
silence. The missiles targeted on
the coast would be launched hours
after those penetrating farther
inland making the co-ordination
even more difficult.
Even after being launched
Cruise missiles take from 2-4
hours to reach their targets. This
would leave far too much time for
detection in the minds of US military planners. These missiles are
difficult but not impossible to detect. Airplane mounted "look
down" radars such as the US
AWACS and the Soviet "Mainstay"
can see Cruise missiles.
Even if all the missiles were
launched at the exact time they
should be they woul d be affected by
wind. A small head- or tail wind
could affect their time of arrival
by 8-10 minutes quite easily.
Since they would be launched
from different directions this
could create a "window" between the arrivals of the first
and last missiles of as much as
15-20 minutes. This window is
unacceptable when targeting
time urgent hard targets. No
US military planner would use
this uncertain a weapon for a
first strike.
The Cruise missile is not a
destabilizing first-strike
weapon. Any challengers?
Bruce Gailey
Arts 4
Best use for the cruise is no use, writes reader
The(Feb.2) Ubyssey's letters
on cruise testing underscored
how often debates of peace and
security issues evoke strong values. Ms. O'Donnell vehemently
spoke of the "people's opposition
to the cruise"; Mr. Blazek lamented Ms. O'Donnell's "far left"
attitudes; and Mr. Lanning
alerted us to Soviet "land-grabbing" tendencies.
Perspective
Yet none of these address the
crucial dilemma posed by cruise
missile testing: whatcan Canada
do to reduce the threat of nuclear
war?
Mr. Lanning's misstatement
that "all weapons are first strike"
or second strike, depending on
"human choice", confuses a crucial distinction. There are actually two competing conceptions
for nuclear deterrence, each defining  in  very  different  ways
what types of nuclear weapons are
to be developed, and the likelihood
of their use in a crisis.
Most people would presume
that nuclear weapons are only for
deterring wars, according to the
doctrine on Mutually Assured
Destruction (MAD). They might
be surprised to learn that official
Western nuclear policy has, for
over a decade, been defined by a
"nuclear war-fighting" doctrine.
Should nuclear deterrence break,
nuclear weapons must now be
capable of fighting and terminating wars on terms "favourable" to
the victor; hence the development
of highly accurate weapons systems (such as the cruise), purposely positioned by both superpowers in the blind hope of gaining
an early "advantage" in a limited
nuclear confrontation.
The Canadian peace
movement's values dictate against
openly advocating MAD wholeheartedly; but concerned Canadians should demand that this most
destabilizing "war-fighting" conception of nuclear deterrence be
challenged and dismantled.
That is why Canada shoul d advocate a more limited deterrent
role for nuclear weapons; a role
for which cruise missiles would
be entirely unnecesssary.
Until governments come to
structure their military forces
according to the realiztion that
nuclear weapons can have no use
except for their non-use, we will
continue to be governed by Mr.
Lanning's myth that Soviet nuclear weapons deployments demand Western counter-deployments, instead of appreciating
the mutual nature of the threat
of nuclear destruction and attempting to deal with it prudently.
Tony Rogers is a third year law
student who recently completed
an M.A. thesis on the Canadian
peace movement.
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February 5,1988
THE UBYSSEY/11 Campbell supports
section 80 voting
By Deanne Fisher
Point Grey's Social Credit
MLA, in response to public pressure, wants to keep voting-day
registration in BC's election act.
Bill 28, a baby of the provincial government, would remove
Section 80 of the Elections Act
which allows voters who were not
enumerated to regi ster at the polls
on election day.
Kim Campbell said she will
suggest to the Socred caucus "that
we drop the provisions with respect to section 80. If we still have
chaos (on registration day), then
we will reconsider eliminating
section 80 voting."
The bill must be reintroduced
before the end of February or it
will die on the order paper.
"I think that it's great she'll
support (the preservation of section 80)? AMS president Rebecca
Nevraumont said of Campbell's
decision.
Section 80 is particularly
important to students "because
students are a transient population? said Nevraumont.    'They
shouldn't be persecuted because
they are forced to lead a transient
lifestyle."
In the last provincial election
10,000 Point Grey voters took
advantage of section 80.
Campbell said removing section 80 was not an effort to disenfranchise the student voters. "It
came about from concern that
arose from administrative chaos,"
she said.
Point Grey's NDP MLA Darlene Marzari said Section 80
should be used "as a canary in a
mine - to see how well the registration system is working."
The registration of voters has
been "so cut back by restraint that
hundreds of thousands of voters
are left off the voters list? she said.
Marzari said she would like to
see BC implement a system similar to Ontario where a complete
registration takes place within 28
days before an election.
"My argument is that if you
have a decent registration system,
almost everyone will be on the
voters' list? said Marzari.
Student council opposes Bill 28
Student council voted Wednesday night to write a letter to
provincial secretary Elwood
Veitch opposing the dropping of
election day registration on the
grounds that it disenfranchises
students.
"There is no real benefit to
having section 80 erased other
than the fact that a specific proportion of the voting population
will end up nothaving a vote? said
AMS director of administration
and president elect Tim Bird.
"That portion I'm referring to
is a large number of students who
are too busy to bother seeking out
the other methods of registering?
he added.
But Francis Furtado, a member of the AMS external affairs
committee said Bill 28 "doesn't
strike me as a brazen attempt to
suffocate democracy."
Furtado said removing election day registration puts the onus
to register on students. "If the
students aren't really interested
enough to register, you have to
question how serious the voter is?
said Furtado.
Furtado added that both the
University of Victoria and Simon
Fraser University are "taking a
much stronger stand (against) it."
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12/THE UBYSSEY
February 5,1988

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