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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 15, 1980

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Array B.C. teacher
glut predicted
By PETER MENYASZ
A predicted teacher shortage in
B.C. might produce a new crop of
unemployed education graduates.
Assistant deputy education
minister Jim Carter warned Monday that although a teacher shortage is projected for 1983, a rush to
enter the education facilities of
B.C.'s universities could cause a
surplus in the more desirable areas.
"We do have, in certain areas of
the province, a surplus of teachers.
"What is needed is a very careful
counselling process," said Carter.
"It's something that's going to take
special counselling."
Roy Bentley, UBC's acting dean
of education, predicted Monday
there might be a sudden jump in
education faculty enrolment if
potential teachers are told of an impending shortage. "What I'm
afraid of is an over-reaction,"
Bentley said.
And Carter said there is little to
prevent new education graduates
from staying in the Lower
Mainland and Okanagan areas and
avoiding the northern areas of B.C.
where shortages are occurring. "It
becomes a matter of individual
choice," he said.
There will likely be a shortage of
teachers at the elementary level in
the near future, B.C. Teachers'
Federation spokeswoman Ann Dahl
said Monday. But she added that
education graduates' preferences
for certain areas in the province
might cause problems in filling the
shortages.
"That's the problem," said
Dahl, the federation's coordinator
of employment information service.
"One has to accept the responsibility that they may not get a job in
their chosen area right away."
And Dahl said universities cannot
exercise much control over where
their education graduates decide to
work. "They will accept the people
who want to be teachers," she said,
adding that UBC cannot accept
students on the basis of where they
are willing to work.
University students are unwilling
to enter the education faculty
because of declining school
enrolments, Dahl said.
But she said declining enrolments
are not a province-wide problem.
"There is no decline outside the
Lower Mainland and the East
Kootenays."
Bentley said the provincial
government's attitudes toward
declining enrolments and student-
teacher ratios directly affects education faculty enrolment.
He said when the government increases student-teacher ratios,
students are discouraged from
becoming teachers.
"We de know that entrance to
the teaching profession varies with
government policy," he said.
ADMINISTERING LAST RITES, aquatic centre staff put finishing
touches on patron caught running on pool deck. Capital punishment for infringement of pool rules was initiated at staff inservice Sunday, where
guards Janet Figone (left), Roxanne Bean and Don Howerton also practis-
— kevin finnegan photo
ed first aid and rescue procedures. Pool is open free to students for morning, noon and afternoon sessions each weekday, and rules are posted in
conspicuous places. Bewarel
Gov'f cancels all PVI apprentice programs
By GLEN SANFORD
Time ran out for almost
1,000 student apprentices
waiting out the strike of instructors
at the Pacific Vocational Institute.
The B.C. ministry of labor
cancelled all apprenticeship programs at the institute after instructors were off the job for one week.
"We decided Monday afternoon
to cancel classes. They (apprentices)
had missed too much time already
and the situation is still uncertain,"
said Blair Anderson, director of the
provincial government's apprenticeship training programs.
"We held back (cancelling) for as
long as we could, but now they've
missed too much."
Four, five, six and eight week
programs have all been cancelled,
and Blair said students taking five-
month pre-apprenticeship programs
could be sent home if the strike does
not end by Friday.
Blair said re-scheduling will occur
for students on cancelled programs.
"They will be contacted when the
strike is over and hopefully they will
all be trained by summer," he said.
Blair said students have been ad
vised to seek temporary employment for the rest of the strike.
But Chris McNaughton, the institute's student union executive advisor, charged that many students
had just left jobs in order to take
the programs. "Now they've lost
not happy with the administration
not in support of the strike.' "
The programs had been operating
for one week when instructors
walked off the job due to contract
grievances. Pickets have been up at
the institute for eight days.
Yesterday the B.C. Labor Relations Board declared the strike legal
and at press time late night talks
were still taking place between
union and management.
Institute instructors say they are
not happy with their administration
changes made to the contract
negotiated in November.
McNaughton said the institute's
student union has recommended
that students honor the picket lines.
He added that "as far as the strike
goes our concern is with the
students."
The strike is causing hardship for
students   and   consequently   they
have mixed feelings about the situation, said McNaughton.
"As one student said to me 'I'm
in support of the teachers but I'm
not in support of the strike.' "
The instructors, members of local
57 of the B.C. Government
Employees Union, will not return to
work until contract changes are
taken out and each page of the current agreement has been approved
by union and management. (A
union spokesman said the union
never saw the final agreement,
which due to management changes,
affects  holidays  and  retirement.)
Research park opponents
pool resources for protest
Opposition to UBC's proposed
58-acre research park gained a new
dimension Monday — a pooling of
resources between student and community groups.
Representatives of the student
representative assembly's research
park committee met with members
of the University Endowment
Lands Ratepayers' Association, the
Endowment Lands park committee,
the president's committee on land
use, the Point Grey community and
the Simon Fraser University student
society.
The groups' next step in opposing
the park's development is a public
Peter Pearse te pick a pest with peeped Pierre
By TOM HAWTHORN
It's not often that students get to judge a
professor.
But come Feb. 18, about 7,000 students will
be able to pass or fail UBC economics professor Peter Pearse, who announced Monday
his bid for the Liberal nomination in
Vancouver-Quadra.
And Pearse admits students could be the key
to victory.
"The student vote alone is almost enough to
win," he said Monday. "If I couple that with
the national trends, and couple it also with an
uninspiring opponent, I think it's very promising."
While Pearse is considered a shoo-in for the
Liberal party nomination meeting to be held
Friday, he faces an uphill battle against Conservative incumbent Bill Clarke, who
demolished star Liberal candidate Paul Manning last May.
Pearse said he only decided to run after being convinced that the Liberals could win the
riding, held by Clarke since 1972. And he will
be bringing in the big party guns to shoot down
Clarke.
Pierre Trudeau will attend the Friday
nominating meeting, while Pearse said Jean
Chretien and other former cabinet ministers
will be speaking at UBC.
"It's a rather choice riding. Quadra is one of
the choice ridings for the Liberals in this election. I've done my own kind of crude polling
and I think Quadra is a microcosm of the
federal scene."
The Canada Student Loan program should
be improved as far as the qualification criteria
is concerned, Pearse said. He also said it is important that student aid increases must be
made when tuition fees are increased.
But Pearse said most students have political
interests beyond "rather parochial university
concerns, although there's nothing wrong with
that."
Pearse, 47, a member of the Economic
Council of Canada who is currently on leave of
absence from UBC to conduct a United Nations fisheries management project, said he is
concerned that residence students are not being
given an adequate opportunity to register.
forum planned for Jan. 24 at 7:30
p.m. in the University Hill High
School gymnasium, said SPA committee chair Marty Lund.
"It'll be similar to the one we had
for the students," said Lund.
Government spokesman Don
Larsen and UBC administration
president Doug Kenny have agreed
to attend the forum, he added.
Monday's meeting centred on
each group's concern over the
research park concept and protection of the community from its
possible effects.
UBC students' main concern is
the secrecy surrounding negotiations for the research park's, said
Lund.
Point Grey resident Tom Shandel
said a further public forum should
be held outside the UBC community, with six to eight weeks' preparation and contact with community
groups. "It's a first-time thing," he
said. "But it's high time."
Student protest similar to the
1969 takeover of UBC's faculty
club is necessary to bring the
research park problem to the
public's attention, said Jan
DeVries, a president's committee
on land use member. "It requires
radical action."
But Bowie Keefer, a UEL parks
committee member and industrial
researcher, was skeptical. "You're
not going to have too much control
over what happens there," he
predicted. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15,1980
W.M. ROBERTS
Prof dead at 51
A UBC poultry science professor
died Friday after suffering a heart
attack outside Sedgewick library.
W.M. Roberts, a 51-year-old
geneticist, collapsed at noon while
walking from the library to the
faculty club. Despite attempts by
firefighters and paramedics to
revive him, he was pronounced
dead shortly after the attack.
He would have celebrated his
52nd birthday Saturday.
Mr. Roberts had been with the
UBC faculty of poultry science
since 1962, after graduating with a
PhD from the University of Minnesota. He was the head of the UBC
genetic teachers' committee for 10
years.
"He was dedicated to his
students above all else. Any timid
and bewildered student knocking at
his door found a personal friend in
this warm and kindly man," said a
former student and friend in a written tribute.
"His time was given generously,
whether   the   students'   problems
were personal or academic. Free
cups of coffee and sometimes even
dinner were offered to those he felt
needed more attention than he
could give over the office desk,"
wrote Debbie Douglas Monday.
Former teaching assistant and
student Anne McClelland
remembers Roberts as an intellectual sparring partner and friend.
"A textbook in one hand and coffee in the other, our friendship
began with a heated discussion of
Chi-squared calculations," she said
in a similar tribute.
"Since then, many hours of
discussion, gallons of coffee . . .
and late evenings spent over a bottle
of ether and thousands of
drosophila have brought me to love
and admire Dr. Roberts as a teacher
and friend," she said.
Mr. Roberts is survived by his
wife Sally, and his three sons Lee,
Lyn and Kit. Services for Mr.
Roberts will be held this Thursday
at 2 p.m. in the Boal chapel, 1505
Lillooet road, North Vancouver.
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HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
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WEDNESDAY Jan. 16th VEGETARIAN LUNCH BAR
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House.
THURSDAY Jan. 17th HEBREW CLASSES and
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ALL THOSE INTERESTED MEET AT 12:30 HILLEL HOUSE
Classes will be taught only if there is a substantia/ turnout.
The taste
says it all. Tuesday, January 15,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Unarmed student beard rivals
vying for victory prise in UBC's
lack lustre 'battle ef the bland'
This year's student board of governors election race is an ideological battle
of the bland — student administrators
vs. politicians.
Candidates John Pellizzon, applied
science 3, and Anthony Dickinson, applied science 4 say they are sympathetic
to the "smooth, efficient" style of the
student administrative commission,
while the other three candidates are
veteran politicos on the student
representative assembly.
Assembly members Shirley Waters, home
economics 3, Bob Staley, arts 3, and Valgeet
Johl, arts 2, differ strongly on key campaign
issues: indexing and raising of tuition fees,
the future of UBC's research park, increases
in residence fees, board confidentiality and
the university's academic balance.
Bob Staley, currently SRA arts representative, says UBC is undergoing academic
changes and he promises strong representation for students.
"I think this university is at a crossroads in
its development and a strong student
representative is needed on the board."
'Tuition feet will
go up no matter
what students say'
- DICKINSON
Staley says he is concerned the university
will not maintain an academic balance between applied disciplines and pure arts,
sciences and social sciences. "We have to
maintain the balance and be critical of any attempts which may be made to change that
balance."
Plans for a 58 acre research park at UBC
indicate a serious swing toward upsetting this
balance, he says and claims there is little
students can do to prevent construction of
the park.
"I think we have to view the research park
as a fait accompli. It's something that probably even (UBC administration president
Doug) Kenny doesn't really want."
Staley says he will fight for student input
on the research park's management board.
"I will work to ensure that the regulatory
bodies that control the park are as open,
democratic and responsible to the entire
university community as possible."
He promises he will also fight the board's
new plan to index student tuition to increases
in the university budget. "Instead of indexing tuition fees the board should impress
upon Kenny to go public and seek public support for increased university funding."
Staley claims he will not be intimidated by
the board and promises to break board confidentiality in the student's interests. "I can
be hard-nosed, too. I intend at the first board
meeting to tell otl.er board members that my
primary responsibility is to the students and
that l.will keep them informed."
Valgeet Johl, currently Alma Mater Society external affairs officer, says the main campaign issues are student accessibility, tuition
indexing and the research park.
"I think the board has taken the wrong
tack in indexing tuition fees," she says.
"Students are affected in the same way as
others by inflation, but they're not in the
same class of the rest of society as wage
earners because they can't work for the
whole year."
Johl promises she will make it clear
students won't be able to afford tuition increases. "The whole question of accessibility
and student aid will have to be raised."
Johl adds she will not respect board confidentiality on important issues and criticizes
current student board representatives for not
revealing secret board discussions about the
research park. "If we had known about it
then (when the board was discussing it), we
might have been able to press for some of the
things we are asking for now."
Johl says she intends to work to halt plans
for the research park until students' concerns
about the park have been answered. "I'd like
to see some sort of halt put to the whole pro-
1 am non-political
and I don't like
political parties'
- PELLIZZON
cess until some of the questions students are
asking have been dealt with.
"As a student representative I would bring
forward to the research park committee and
the students everything in the (research
park's) lease that would affect them
directly," she says.
University investments in repressive
governments in South Africa and Chile are
another major concern for Johl. "We can't
limit ourselves in disregarding that issue
because many students feel strongly about
it," she says.
Shirley Waters, now president of the home
economics undergraduate society, says she is
running because she likes being part of major
decision-making. "I figure I can do a good
job and I think I've proven myself responsible enough to handle a lot of problems."
Waters says she will be responsible enough
to keep almost all secret board matters confidential. "The student voice is just new on
the board so you have to have the respect of
the board," she claims. "You must always
remember that you are there to represent
students, but you are also there to work with
the board."
Waters says she will not be opposed to
moderate tuition increases because, as a student, she knows how much other students
can afford. "I feel tuition fees should rise a
certain extent depending on the cost of living.
My voice is going to be very similar to what
the students are going to be feeling."
Tuition fee increases are inevitable says
Waters, but adds she will attempt to ensure
they are minimal and student financial aid
programs are improved.
Waters says she is ignorant of student concern about university investments but will try
to examine them thoroughly. "I haven't
given as much thought to it as to some other
things, but I think it's important to take the
time and see where they (the board) are investing."
By GEOF
WHEELWRIGHT
Photos by
GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
and ROSS BURNETT
Waters denies that her involvement earlier
this year with Lifespring, a self-improvement
program or her current position as student
senator will hamper her effectiveness as a student board member. "The more I have to do,
the more I can do. And nothing like Lifespring is probably going to continue." (Waters
won by acclamation as at-large student
senator earlier this month.)
Anthony Dickinson and John Pellizzon are
running together for the two board positions
to provide "non-political, united representation." Pellizzon and Dickinson charge that
past student board members spent too much
time bickering when they should have been
representing students.
Too many student representatives are
political and not enough listen to students,
says Dickinson. "I find myself receptive to
good ideas," he says.
Pellizzon and Dickinson predict the main
campaign issues will be residence and tuition
fee increases, and the improvement of study
facilities. Dickinson says tuition will rise, but
promises he and Pellizzon will work to ensure
the increases are minimal.
"Tuition fees will go up no matter what
students say, but they should not be above inflation, says Dickinson. "I would like to see
tuition kept below 10 per cent, but I think
students are much more affluent than they've
ever been, our tuition fees are still good."
Dickinson promises he and Pellizzon will
encourage the board to seek more funding
from the provincial government, instead of
blaming fee increases on the board. Leaking
confidential board secrets would be his last
resort in getting board action on an issue,
says Dickinson. "You have to be careful doing that. The board may lock you out of the
confidential parts of their meetings and
jeopardize student representation."
Pellizzon says his main political experience
'The board took
the wrong taek
in indexing fees'
-JOHL
has been on SAC and he promises to bring "a
reasonable voice" to the board. "I'm running because in the past few years representatives have gone up to the board and made
demands on it. I am non-political and I don't
like political parties."
Both Pellizzon and Dickinson say students
will have to accept the research park as
something imposed by government.
But they promise to get the best possible
gains out of the park for students.
But the candidates in this election might
not really be the ones to watch. Look for
stuffed ballot boxes, electioneering and questionable campaign practices if tradition at
this university means anything.
A recent AMS constitutional referendum
vote was riddled with complaints of irregular
election practices and electioneering. A
board of governors election scandal two
years ago resulted in an investigation by both
the UBC senate and AMS.
The board election investigation revealed
improprieties and possible ballot box stuffing
in the civil and mechanical engineering
building. This motivated the board to suspend the voting privileges of student board
members for the duration of the investigation.
Last year's student board members, Glenn
Wong and Bruce Armstrong, also took their
posts as student representatives
under fire from the board. (Outgoing board
member Paul Sandhu had been suspended
from the board in 1978 for leaking confidential board information to the press.)
Board confidentiality has become an increasingly important issue for student
representatives and forced this year's board
members to maintain secrecy about the
research park planning.
Students will vote for two board candidates Jan. 21 and 22.
'My voice is going
to be similar to
students' feelings'
- WATERS
'We have to view
the research park
as a fait accompli'
- STALEY Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15,1980
Worn porn
Over the wild fields of the African savannah comes the sound of thunder
under the clear sky, hoof-thunder of the rhinoceros in full flight, charging
its helpless victim.
A brick wall.
The same brick wall we voters come up against every so often, and very
often of late. On Feb. 18 we are invited to bang our heads against it again,
by grace of HM the Queen and her representative, the Commie from
Manitoba.
First sharp pointed brick on the noggin is courtesy of the Social Credit
(Creditiste) Party of Canada, who have the convictions and political
acumen of an entity somewhere between glow worms and apricots. Fabien
Roy and The Erratic Puppets, playing from a platform not nearly as strong
or specific as that of the Rhinoceros Party.
The second blow is from the Trendy P. They've given up trying to
change the system they say doesn't work and instead run all over the place
promising the moon, the stars and a quasar or two.
The NDP is becoming kind of hard to label at that. It used to be you
could call them social democrats. The unthinking types called them commies. But today, now that they think they can win and change policy about
as often as Broadbent changes shorts, you'd have to call them pseudo-
liberal-social-leftist-middle-of-the-roaders.
And that's only in the early mid-afternoon.
Trudeau is a brick up the ass. Like hemorrhoids, he just won't go away.
The infection he leads, the Liberals, has a single platform: in governing 39
of the last 45 years, they have turned.Canada into a paradise on earth. Or is
it purgatory? They leave it to us to decide if they should return to the poppycock throne.
The Conservatives crumble at a baby's breath. Robert Stanfield was so
embarrassed he couldn't wait the year he was told to wait before telling
Joe Clark the Jerusalem embassy proposal was as silly as a bikini on a polar
bear.
Clark has the grace of a bull moose in heat. He is Canada's first walking
(almost) one-liner. He's done more for Canadian humor than Province
editorials.
Kindergarden is out and the kiddies are having a jolly time bouncing
through the frozen tundra. ,
Yet, as is invariably the case when the kids are unleashed on unsuspecting parentages, we are not amused. Even boring reruns of the King of
Kensington reruns are drawing more attention that the Joe & Pierre & Ed
& Fabian show in lonely places like Gaff Topsail, Nfld. With good reason
too. King of Kensington has more social consciousness than any three
Ottawa-bound gadflys.
All of which brings us to the Rhinos, who won't accept reality, have no
respect for democratic institutions and make public asses of themselves.
Not a bad option. But then again, they are organized anarchists. Sigh.
We're caught on the horns of a dilemma.
NEWS ITEM: Clark announces PetroCan may buy into other businesses.
Out of five shirts, he gave me back two and sold the others to the highest bidder."
THE UBYSSEY
January 15, 1980
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
"I've got the Monday editing blues," Heather Conn warbled as tears slide down her freckled cheeks into her beer." Well then take a Vivarin, that'll pep you
up," Tom Hawthorn said with a twinkle in his eye and hallucinatory drugs in his body," Whenever I feel miserable I drink myself into a stupor," Peter Menyasz
belched cheerfully. Glen Sanford and Erica Liren chimed in unison, "Oral sex and kinky positions always do it for us." Ross Burnett and Gerre Galvin looked
puzzled and went out for milk, cookies and teddy bears which Mother promised would always chase away the blues, especially at the beginning of the week.
Geof Wheelwright was fiddling around in the darkroom muttering something about cold baths doing something for his body while Julie Wheelwright found
Heather's problem trying." I never get depressed", she sobbed. Bob Trowsdale, Maxine Sevak and Ed O'Brien put on Mary Poppin's in a valiant effort to cheer
up Dave Francis who was also suffering from the editing blues, but from the other end. Suddenly Verne McDonald burst in with a shower of gunfire and in
moments the staffers lay dead and dying on the newsroom floor." There go the blues, I really don't tike Mondays."
'Tieleman should work for The Enquirer'
After reading Bill Tieleman's
"Perspectives" article in the Jan.
10 edition of The Ubyssey, I must
agree with many of his opinions.
True, this year's Alma Mater
Society executive seems to be condoning "regressive measures" to
make a post-secondary education
almost inaccessable. True, some
hack politicians seem to be preoccupied with less important subjects
(i.e. Lifespring program) instead of
more important student concerns.
True, the student government at
UBC does not command the respect
it once did.
But how on earth can Mr.
Tieleman — the national bureau
chief for the Canadian University
Press    —    possibly    use    an
undergraduate society publication
as fuel for his argument?
The arts news is a publication
which was started this month to
create an effective medium of communication for arts students. The
$179 that will be spent on the monthly tabloid represents much less
that l/50th of the available monies
of the arts undergraduate society. If
Mr. Tieleman had read all of the
arts news (of Jan. 7), he would have
also learned the paper will be open
to articles, drawings, etc., from arts
students who are inclined to contribute.
As for our "insulting" references
to engineering students, they are
borne out of a respect for their
levels of student participation. A
graduate engineer told me he was
happy to see artsies retaliating for a
change.
The fact is arts news does not
concern itself much with UBC student politics. It does offer other
social comment in a light-hearted
text and it does keep our faculty
abreast of upcoming events.
Nowhere in the Jan. 7 edition of
arts news are references to the student representative assembly, the
board of governors, the senate or
any other AMS politicians. So why
is Mr. Tieleman so worried about us
"bringing arts news to the
masses"?
Bill Tieleman's article brings
back bad memories of my
hometown, Ottawa.
Back there, we have journalists
who will go to any length to write
anything about politics (though I
seriously doubt they would use
years of old drawings to illustrate
their point). If Mr. Tieleman plans
to   shape   his   career   by   using
distorted facts and insulting inferences to support his opinions,
then perhaps he should apply for a
position with "The National Enquirer".
It is unfortunate that I must
spend time responding to accusations from people outside of UBC, I
have more progressive matters to
tend to.
Paul Yaskowich
arts intramurals coordinator
Staley still waiting for apology
Reviewer listens to the Knack
wearing paper bag over his head
Ultravox was the perfect concert to start off the '80s. The music has
changed since their first album in '77, and the concert showed clearly in
which direction they will continue.
Anyone expecting a punk band should have been warned by radio ads
that they are now heavily electronic. In fact, at several times all four
members worked with synthesizers. Ultravox is not a band to enjoy at a
first listen. The music is complex and most of the material was new, but
their energy quickly proved they were no manufactured band. (I should
mention that Vancouver's Warren Cann was flawless on percussion.)
In my opinion, Ultravox! is the best so-called "new wave" album ever
released, and I was disappointed not to hear anything from it, but they
are no longer the original group of '77.
Friday's two concert reviews read like a debate. Steve McClure's
"Kraftwerk clones" shows that he knows nothing about Ultravox and
their influences. A reporter with a paper bag over his head. I suggest
listening to the first album, though it may be hard to find.
Actually, I hope Ultravox remains a cult favorite, like pre-76
Genesis, to avoid being trivialized by people who don't understand their
music. Go listen to your Knack records.
Rick Awender
V. mechanical engineering 2y
Once again, Staley doth protest.
In the Friday edition of the
Ubyssey, right after a letter by
myself addressing assertions made
about by conduct by Mr. Tieleman,
I was dismayed to find a "note"
which sought to "clarify" the situation.
To be precise, let me state exactly
what happened on that fateful day
of Mr. Trudeau's visit to UBC.
In the course of his speech, Mr.
Trudeau made some comments
about the fairness and equity of
marijuana laws. Due to the crowd
of people surrounding me, I found
myself unable to proceed to a
microphone, to question him about
his comment. I then proceeded to
ask my question out loud, in
rhetorical form. That question, entirely correct in the context of the
prime minister's comments was,
"What about Margaret?"
Mr. Booking's assertion, mouthed anew by Mr. Tieleman, is false.
The only reason that I did not question Mr. Bocking about it when the
story originally appeared in The
Ubyssey was because I was not
mentioned by name.
I need not remind people that
Mr. Bocking is a former member of
the Liberal Party. Is it not possible
that in the course of writing his
story, Mr. Bocking may have been
influenced by partisan leanings, and
that a single legitimate "in context"
question became questions plural?
This error then spread by word of
mouth to Mr. Tieleman who (having probably not attended the
speech and therefore not knowing
what he was talking about) changed
the story to "repeatedly shouting
'Where's Maggie?* "
I do not deny that I made a
(singular) comment. That comment
was a legitimate one. I did not, as
Mr. Tieleman asserts, repeatedly
shout "Where's Maggie?"
Much of Mr. Trudeau's speech
was aired on CKO radio. If a tape
recording of that speech exists, you
will find that it verifies my assertion, not those of Mr. Bocking and
Mr. Tieleman. And I don't need to
hide behind I8V2 minute gaps.
Again, I wait for Mr. Tieleman to
apologize for comments he made in
obvious ignorance.
Yes, indeed, Staley doth protest.
Bob Staley
arts rep
student representative assembly
Flip, flop, start again from the top
In the Tuesday, Jan. 8 issue of
The Ubyssey, I was quoted as saying several things about Shirley
Waters running for both the board
of governors and senate.
My comments about it being an
advantage to have both positions
should not be taken as a personal
reflection on Shirley, but merely
that in my own opinion, anyone
running would be better informed if
they held both positions. There are
also arguments against that which
were pointed out in the article.
Several people pointed out that, as
Alma Mater Society president, I
should not endorse any candidate
and I wanted to set the record
straight. Brian Short
AMS president Tuesday, January 15,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Vote early...
Election fever is in the air, but
UBC student politicos aren't catching it.
The UBC student representative
assembly's five executive positions
are currently going begging with only one nomination submitted for the
Jan. 28-30 at-large elections.
And at least one student politician said he is worried about the
apathy SRA members and students
have shown towards the upcoming
Alma Mater Society election.
"I haven't heard anything about
who's running and I'm really quite
concerned," student administrative
commission chair Don Tolson said
Monday. "The person who takes
over my job will have a lot of work
to do."
Under the new constitution, the
SAC chair will become the director
of administration, eliminating the
director of services post currently
held by Steve Jung.
Tolson said the job will require a
person effective in public relations
and organization and added he will
not be seeking re-election.
The only student politician to
throw his hat into the ring so far is
AMS finance director Len Clarke,
seeking re-election in his current
post. Clarke claims he can bring
continuity to the job and will avoid
problems of introducing a new person to his current position.
Meanwhile, the nominations for
AMS president, vice president,
director of administration and coordinator of external affairs are
unclaimed, though some politicos
have indicated interest in the jobs.
AMS external affairs officer,
Valgeet Johl said she will not seek
re-election and has heard nothing
about possible contenders for her
position.
... and vote often
rots burnett photo
BOARD OF GOVERNORS candidates gathered for group photo Monday to show students' heads were screwed
on right, but most observers realized politicos had holes in heads and were full of gas. Flakey characters in front
want tuition to rise and research park to expand, but were fortunately shipped to Pango-Pango before further
harm could be done.
Students living on campus can
begin to register nine days earlier to
vote in the Feb. 18 federal election,
Vancouver Quadra's election clerk
said Monday.
Isadore Pelman says the first day
for on-campus student representation has been changed from Jan. 25
to Jan. 16. The head returning office in Ottawa vetoed Quadra's
original returning office plan which
would have had eight revising teams
criss-crossing the campus for two
weeks, he said.
The registration will now last until Feb. 4, but only two revising
teams will operate. "It's the best we
can do. If more are needed (teams)
will be sent," said Pelman.
The enumerating station will run
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. in tower A
lounge of Walter H. Gage
residence.
And from Jan. 25 until Feb. 4 a
revising officer will be available
from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from 7
to 10 p.m. said Pelman. The office
will enumerate all students living on
campus, in Acadia camp, Acadia
park and on the endowment lands.
Students who read the original
plans in the Jan. 8 Ubyssey should
be made aware of the changes,
Pelman said. "It must be emphasized that students living off campus
cannot be enumerated at Gage.
They'll have to be enumerated in
their own polling district."
Students living off campus who
do not know their polling district or
want information on being
enumerated should phone the Vancouver Quadra returning office at
266-1394.
Curves strike eut screwballs
OTTAWA (CUP) — Prime Minister Joe Clark's
biorhythmic ups and downs might have resulted in a
jerk contributing to the sudden toppling of his government Dec. 13.
Clark's biorhythms were in a "double-critical"
phase that day and volunteer researchers of the Canadian Institute of Parapsychology think this could have
contributed to his downfall. (Researchers were investigating the correlation of biological cycles with
events on Parliament Hill.)
When the prime minister's name and date of birth
were fed into the institute's computer, the printout
showed both physical and intellectual cycles at the
critical zero-line — they passed from positive to
negative. His emotional cycle was already negative,
having passed the critical phase 48 hours earlier.
Institute director J. P. Rae says the critical or zero-
point for each cycle signifies awkwardness, perplexity,
incoherence, subnormal coordination, a certain
recklessness or, in the instance of the intellectual cycle,
indecision.
But the sudden collapse of parliament is not attributed solely to Clark's double-critical phase because
the biological cycles of other principal figures were
also at critical or negative conjunctures, according to
the institute.
Opposition leader Pierre Trudeau's chart showed his
intellectual and emotional cycles extremely negative
while his physical cycle was at a positive peak, indicating a bullish disposition.
NDP leader Ed Broadbent's chart put Dec. 13 on a
physically critical day. This was immediately preceded
by an intellectually critical day and followed by an
emotionally critical day. Altogether, a rare combination, very close to the triple-critical phase which occurs
just once in 58.2 years.
BACK TO THE GRINDSTONE SALE
FOR THE RUNNER       REG.   SALE     F0R THE OUTDOORSPERSON	
Saucony Trainer Shoes
45.00
39.99
Saucony Hornet Shoes
39.99
33.99
Saucony Doves
25.99
New Balance 320
45.00
34.99
New Balance 355
45.99
34.99
Adidas TRX
33.99
28.99
Etonic Streetfighter
47.99
41.99
Pony Sprints (limited sizing)
19.95
14.99
Pony California
27.95
17.99
Brooks Villanova
35.00
29.99
MARATHON rain suits
44.99
31.99
Wigwam Socks
2.50
1.99
REG. SALE
GORTEX jackets                              69.99 54.99
SNOWBIRD vests                           59.99 39.99
UBC jackets                                     43.99 33.99
VIVANT X-country ski package 114.99 99.99
SALE RUNS FROM
JAN. 15 - JAN. 19
9:00 am - 5:30 pm
■    ■    ■
FOR THE SWIMMER .
20% off ALL swimwear!
FOR THE TENNIS STAR .
20% off ALL tennis racquets!
Fred Perry Tennis Shoes
ABC
RECREATIONAL
EQUIPMENT
at 2 locations
2130 Western Parkway (UBC)
228-0626
or
29.99       21.99
865 W. Broadway
874-3329 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15) 1980
'Tween classes
TODAY
CCF
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION
General meeting, noon, SUB 113.
WUSC
General meeting, noon, Buch. 312.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION
Blues with  piano and sax,  noon,  SUB  Art
Gallery.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Wen Do class and general meeting sign-up,'
noon, SUB 130.
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
Regular meeting. 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
RUSSIAN CLUB
Music hour, noon, Buch. 1256.
WEDNESDAY
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION
Guernica   —   a slide  presentation with  Marc
Pessin, 8 p.m., SUB Art Gallery.
YOUNG PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
Organizational   meeting  for  general   election,
noon, SUB 115.
UBC BALLET CLUB
Classes resume this week,  noon,  SUB party
room.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion, noon. International House
top floor.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting and film, noon, SUB 207.
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION PROGRAM
Group meditation, noon, Buch. 217. Introductory lecture, noon or 8 p.m., Angus 306.
CCCM
Anglican-United'SCM   community meal,   5:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
VOC
Vote on constitution amendments, noon, Chem.
250.
THURSDAY
IH
German language night with food, drinks, 7:30
p.m., IH coffee place.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Organizational   meeting,    noon.    International
House.
IYS
Lecture by Dr. Hasham, noon, SUB 117.
NDP CLUB
Special meeting for those wishing to work on
election campaign, noon, SUB 119.
AMNESTY UBC
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 224.
AWARDS OFFICE
Awards office representative will be available to
discuss financial problems and possible sources
of aid, noon to 2:30 p.m., SUB Speakeasy.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr. Besavaba speaks on peviodontics, noon, IRC
1.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Doug Sanders to speak on Vancouver's early gay
movement, noon, SUB 111.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Sharing on personal evangelism, noon, Henn.
302.
AQUASOC
Pizza party, 7:30 p.m., SUB 207.
IVCF
Paul Stevens speaks on Why people don't
believe (And some reasons for faith), noon,
Chem. 250.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Free workshops in essay skills, noon, Brock Hall
room 301.
FRIDAY
HSSC
Annual beer and skits night, 7:30 p.m., SUB
ballroom.
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT
PROGRAM COMMITTEE
Square dance, 8:30 p.m.. International House
upper lounge.
NORRES
** MOVING AND T
SI TRANSFER LTD
MOVING AND r«
STORAGE       ^
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9896
Also Garages. Basements. Yards
CLEANUPS
Free Workshops
in Essay Skills
January 24 and 31
at Brock Hall 301
12:30-2:00 p.m.
Sponsored by
Women
Students' Office
PAYMENT OF FEES
■aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaeaaaaaaaaaaaai
THE   DEPARTMENT   OF   FINANCE,   THIRD   FLOOR
GENERAL    SERVICES    ADMINISTRATION    BLDG.
WISHES TO REMIND STUDENTS THAT THE SECOND
INSTALMENT IS DUE ON OR BEFORE:
FRIDAY,
JANUARY 18, 1980
CUSO has openings in
developing countries for
high level educators trained and experienced in:
-Curriculum development
-Rural crafts and related
arts
-Programmed learning for
adults
-Linguistics
-Climatology-geography
lecturing
-Youth   and   community
research,   organization
and development
-Primary in-service
teacher training.
For   further   information
please contact:
Donna Peaker,
CUSO. International House
U.B.C.
Office hours 9:00 to 1:00 daily
Phone 228-4886	
YOUR OFFICE WILL BE
THE OCEANS OF THE WORLD
WHEN YOU ARE A
MARITIME ENGINEER IN
THE CANADIAN FORCES.
You can engineer yourself into an exciting career
in the Maritime Command of the Canadian Forces.
The Command is now actively seeking graduates
in engineering, science and engineering
technology.
Maritime engineers are employed throughout
Canada and overseas, both at sea and on land
dealing with today's and tomorrow's technological
challenges. The spectrum of activity is wide and
jobs such as Dockyard Production Operations
Officer, Ship's Marine Engineer Officer or Ship's
Combat Systems Engineer Officer, Project
Development Officer, Engineering Lecturer at a
Canadian or foreign Engineering School, or
managing the Naval Engineering Test
Establishment are but a few positions.
Additionally, Maritime engineers are given the
opportunity to further enhance their engineering
knowledge through post-graduate academic
studies either in Canada or abroad.
Maritime engineering is a diverse and
interesting career, a career which offers the
challenges of today's engineering, the adventure
of working on a global basis and the satisfaction
and pride of serving one's country.
For more information, contact your nearest
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre, under
Recruiting in the Yellow Pages-
ASK US
ABOUTYOU
THE CANADIAN
r ARMED FORCES
MUSIC/UBC
PRESENTS
WEDNESDAY NOON-HOUR CONCERT
Lieder Recital
12:30 p.m. Recital Hall
Leslie Guinn, Baritone
Wallace Berry, Piano
music of: Schubert, Brahms, Schoenberg and Schumann
U.B.C. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1980-1981
These positions are open only to single men and
women. Successful applicants will be required to
live in the residences. Application forms and
detailed job descriptions are available at the
Ponderosa Housing Office and at the Front Desk of
each residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier and
W. H. Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January 7th to
January 18th, 1980, at the Front Desks of the
Residences or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
THE CLASSIFIEDS'
RATES: Campus - 3 lhw*v 1 day $1.60; additional Hrtes 36c.
Commercial - 3 tine*. 1 day #3.00; additional tine*
5Qc. Additional days 42.35 and tte.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline is tf:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office. Room241, S.U.B.. UBC, Van., B.C. VST 1W5
5 — Coming Events
DISCOVER FOR YOURSELF
Exams are funl
Assignments enjoyable!
ADVANCED READING
TECHNIQUES
a one day course
For information Brochure call
266-6119
JOBS!
Lake Tahoe, California!
Little exp. Fantastic Tips. Pay.
$1600-$3800. Summer. Thousands
needed. Casino's, Restaurants, Ranches, Cruisers, Rafting, etc. send
$4.96 for application/ info/ referrals.
LAKEWORLD 141. Box 60129. Sacto.
CA. 96860 U.S.A.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
FLOWER POWER HONEY here again. Stop
along University Blvd., get your supply today. 263-7080.
HOW TO BECOME A LAWYER in Canada.
Best selling guide (640 pages) now at campus bookstore or order direct from Acorn
Books Ltd., Box 1803, Edmonton, Alta.
T5J 2P2. Free reviews sent on request.
COMMUNITY SPORTS SPECIALS: Sherwood H12ROK Hockey sticks $4.95; grey
sweat pants $9.95; polyester hockey jerseys
$9.95; racquetball racquets $9.95; bicycle
panniers, $14.95; Wilson World Class tennis racquets $29.95 (strung); grey-colored
down jackets $34.95; Nike LDV Or Osaga
joggers $39.95; Waxless X-Country ski
package $79.50; and dozens of other well-
priced items at 3615 West Broadway,
733-1612.
11 — For Sale — Private
THE SPARK BOOKSTORE. 25 West Cor
dova (behind the Army & Navy) 681-7723. We
carry Marxist-Leninist books and periodicals
on the class struggle in Canada and around
the world. We have a limited number of
records and progressive novels in French and
English. Drop in to browse or debate.
Wed.-Fri. 6-9; Sat. 11-4.
REASONABLY PRICED, beautiful wedding
dress for sale. Size 5 or 7. Phone Mrs. Lang
327-7602.
15 — Found
35 — Lost
A  GOLD   BRACELET on Jan.   10.   Great
sentimental value.  Reward.  Please call
Maria at 929-3674.
80 — Tutoring
LOOKING FOR SOMEONE who can teach
me Korean. $5.00 one hour. 266-0980.
Batts.
85 — Typing
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 266-6641.
YEAR ROUND expert essay and theses
typing from legible work. Phone 738-6829
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
EXPERIENCED Public Stenographer.
Judith Filtness, 5670 Yew St. 9 to 5,
266-6814. Type anything.
TYPING IBM SELECTRIC CORRECTOR.
7 yrs. experience with University papers,
theses, equational, technical etc. 874-6364.
90 - Wanted
20 — Housing
25 — Instruction
30 - Jobs
EARN CASH putting up posters on your
campus. Send name, address & telephone
no. for details to Acorn Books Ltd., Box
1803, Edmonton, Alta. T5J 2P2.
WANTED. CALCULUS TEXT by Shanks
and Gambill for Math 101 immediately.
Phone 733-4193 GOS.
TENOR SOLOISTS
Required for Chalmers United Church,   12th and*
Hemlock,   Vancouver.    Excellent   opportunity   for
young singer. Phone 922-0419 for further information.
99 — Miscellaneous
LOOKING FOR HOME for spade, female
Siamese cat. 8 years old, fully litter-box
trained. Very affectionate. Callo 732-3690
after 6:00 p.m. Tuesday, January 15,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
'Report, don't edit'
I really appreciate and try to encourage The Ubyssey's viewpoint
on affairs at this university. When
done properly (i.e. well-researched)
and in good taste, it can serve a
valuable role in keeping students informed. It is with dismay, however,
that I read the Jan. 11 front page
story, "Board easy on
moonlighting profs".
I did not say nor do I believe that
the new policy ". . .is meaningless
in its present form." The policy, in
my opinion, is one that allows for
flexibility in defining "substantial"
outside professional activity by
faculty. It may very well be the
editorial position of The Ubyssey
that this policy is meaningless but it
is not mine.
In my own studies in labor relations, it is often times of great
benefit to students to hear first
hand accounts of labor disputes.
Such experiences can best be related
if the professor was directly involved. I am sure similar benefits of
faculty "real world" experiences
can be found in other cases. I would
therefore divorce myself from the
first paragraph in that Jan. 11
story.
Perhaps this unfortunate article
is a result of "editorializing" the interview. As the reporter said as he
left, the story would probably be
rewritten by the editors anyways.
After repeating and rewriting his
notes, I felt confident that the
reporter left the office with a good
idea about my opinion. The change
(from what I said to what was
printed) must have been done by an
editor's pen. My only question is if
the editors don't brief the reporters
as to exactly what they want and if
they (the editors) don't do the interviewing themselves, how can they
flush people's statements in the
same toilet as their editorials.
Glenn Wong
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
HAIRSTYLING
FOR MEN ft WOMEN
10% Discount
 for   all   students   on
hairstyling by Karin and Terry with
presentation of this ad. Offer expires April 5. 1980.
ken hipped
hair company ltd.
S736 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(next to the Lucky Dollar
in the Village)
DROP IN OR CALL 228-1471
FOR NEW C USED
OKS
THOUSANDS Of
• TEXTBOOKS
• PAPERBACK
• REVIEW NOTES
* MONARCH NOTES
* SCHAUMS OUTLINES
* COLES NOTES
* LARGEST SELECTION OF
REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
• WE TRADE USED
POCXE1 BOOKS
•f 7000 SCIENCE FICTION
BOOKS ALWAYS IN STOCK
CASH PAID FOR TEXTS, ETC.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10th Aw. 224-4144
HELP YOURSELF
FREE SELF-HELP
WORKSHOPS TO
INCREASE YOUR SKILLS
WORKSHOP 1—EFFECTIVE STUDY HABITS
Four one-hour sessions on developing
more efficient methods of study.
WORKSHOP 2—PERSONAL GROWTH
A small group workshop to help define personal goals, set plans to reach
them and practice new behaviours
with the support of other interested
persons.
WORKSHOP 3-CAREER EXPLORATION
Four one hour sessions to aid students in examining career choices.
WORKSHOP 4—JOB SEARCH TECHNIQUES
Five one hour sessions aimed at providing students with information and
skills beneficial in seeking employment.
All workshops commence the week of January 21.
Sign up now since enrollment is limited.
STUDENT COUNSELLING & RESOURCES CENTRE
PONDEROSA ANNEX "F"
INTRAMURALS
Registration Deadline Extended
until tommorrow Jan. 16 for
these Intramural Sports ....
lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUIIITTIIUIIIIIIIIllllllflllllllllllllllfllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllll
Men's
Hockey
Basketball
Volleyball
Bowling
Women's
Basketball
Hockey
Volleyball
Curling Bonspiel
Indoor Softball Tourney
Corec
Bowling &
Pizza Nite
(food & fun cheap)
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii
Don't Forget! COREC Volleyball every Thursday
7:30 - 9:30 War Memorial
everyone welcome (drop-in)
and splash with COREC Inner Tube Water Polo on Wed.
Jan. 16, 23 - Feb. 6, 13 - Mar. 5, 12. Aquatic Centre
Drop-in
[IIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltfllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllfllllll
COREC OUTDOOR PROGRAM
Snowshoe Hike to Mount Seymour - Sat. Jan. 26.
register by Jan. 23
room 210 War Memorial
Careers
TEACHER INTERVIEWS
SCHOOL DISTRICT 88 (TERRACE)
On campus interviews will be conducted, March 10 - 12, with graduating
teachers for positions in the Terrace District effective September 1,1980. Attempts will be made to correlate the interviews scheduled with the number of
vacancies expected in particular subject field and/or Grade levels. To obtain
an appointment, please submit, before January 31, a completed B.C.T.F.
Application form, copies of PRACTICUM REPORTS and a completed
personal resume. References and further reports may be submitted in
January or at the interview.
Mr. M. Bergsma,
Director of Instruction,
Box 460,
Terrace, B.C. V8G 4B5
Interested in
Management Consulting?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1980 graduates preferably with backgrounds in commerce,
science or engineering, for the management consulting
division of the Vancouver office. Submit an original or
photocopy of your personal resume (UCPA form is suitable) by January 31, 1980 to the Canada Employment
Centre on Campus, Brock Hall.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about February 12 regarding interviews. Additional information is available at the U.B.C. Canada Employment Office.
nee
citerhouse
COo
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
Third-year Commerce Accounting Option or First-
Year Licentiate in accounting students who are interested in summer employment with the Vancouver Office of Price Waterhouse & Co.: Please
mail copy of your U.C.P.A. form or personal
resume and most recent transcript of marks to:
Personnel Manager,
1075 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 3G1
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
GARDNER, McDONALD & CO. is looking
for third-year accounting option or first-year
licentiate in accounting students who are
interested in summer employment with our
Vancouver office.
Please mail your personal resume (UCPA
Form is suitable) and most recent transcript
to Mr. R. B. MacLise at:
Gardner. McDonald SCo.
Chartered Accountants
P.O. Box 49154. 595 Burrard St Vancouver. BC V7X 1K4
Montreal, Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton, Prince George, Vancouver Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 15,1980
mm ajpiijia^ijiH^M^ujijpiiii niiiiui iii ngiy JM..
SPORTS
\s
Bears batter
fading 'Birds
ONE ON ONE goes Thunderbird ice hockey player Rob Jones against
University of Alberta goalie in action Saturday. Goalie from colder climes
was hotter than hell, stoning 'Birds as Alberta swept pair of games in
— kevin finnegan photo
Canada West action. UBC will have to win two in Calgary on weekend if
team hopes to make playoffs come spring. Somehow that sounds depress-
ingly familiar for hockey teams in this town, doesn't it?
Cheerful Thunderbirds slip to third
Most players get a little depressed
when their team has lost 10 of its
last 11 games.
But not the Thunderbird basketball players, according to coach
Peter Mullins.
"You can't get upset when you
play very good basketball and get
beaten by better teams," said
Mullins.
"I don't think anybody's contemplating suicide yet."
The 'Birds dropped two games to
the University of Alberta Golden
Bears in Edmonton on the
weekend, but Mullins said the team
was due for a bad game after a string of surprising performances during Christmas. UBC lost close decisions to several of the top teams in
the country during the break.
"Winnipeg's going to the nationals, there's no doubt about
that, and we took them to overtime
twice," said Mullins.
The 'Birds had their shooting accuracy from the floor drop to 43 per
cent to Edmonton, where they lost
64-59 Friday and 76-67- Saturday.
UBC had been averaging 47 per
cent previously, and Mullins has
said they must hit at least 45 to win.
Centre Bob Forsyth had 20 points
for the 'Birds each night, while
John Doughty scored 21 Saturday.
CANADA WEST UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Men's basketball
standings
W    L Pts
Victoria Vikings
6   0    12
Alberta Bears
4   2     8
UBC 'Birds
3   3     6
Calgary D'saurs
3   3     6
L'bridge P'horns
2   4     4
Sask. Huskies
0   6     0
"I expect very good, close
games," he said. "We'll definitely
control the tempo."
To beat the Vikings, the 'Birds
will once again have to overcome
their major shortcoming — height.
Forsyth, at 6'5", is UBC's tallest
player and often gives away five inches to opposing centres. Mullins
admits this is a problem.
"We have only one real weakness
— offensive rebounds," he said. To
nullify this, UBC must have a good
shooting precentage, he said.
The Thunderette basketball team
also dropped a pair of games to
Alberta  on the  weekend,  losing
86-46 Friday and 68-49 Saturday.
Cathy Bultitude was high scorer
both nights with 17 points Friday
and 16 on Saturday.
Last Tuesday the Thunderettes
lost to Western Washington University 58-57 as Agnes Baker scored 22
points.
The Thunderettes will meet top-
ranked Victoria Vikings in two
league games this weekend. The
women's games start at 6:45 p.m.
and the men's at 8 p.m. Friday and
Saturday night in War Memorial
Gym. Admission is free to students
with a valid AMS card.
The Thunderbirds face another
tough series on the weekend, when
they host the University of Victoria
Vikings. Victoria was ranked
number one in the country until it
lost three games over Christmas,
and is now rated third. Mullins isn't
worried, though.
('Bird droppings)
FRIDAY
Women's basketball
UBC 46 Alberta 86
Men's basketball
UBC 89 Alberta 64
Men's ice hockey
UBC 3 Alberta 6
Men's swimming
UBC 61 Alberta 66
Women's swimming
UBC 83 Alberta 56
Men's gymnastics
UBC 112 Portland 133
SATURDAY
Men's ice hockey
UBC 5 Alberta 6
Women's basketball
UBC 49 Alberta 68
Men's basketball
UBC 67 Alberta 76
Men's rugby
UBC vs. Kats,
game postponed
Women's gymnastics
UBC tri-meet,
postponed
Men's swimming
UBC 57 Alberta 47
UBC 84 PLU 18
UBC 36 CWU 73
Women's swimming
UBC 94 Alberta 37
SUNDAY
Women's soccer
UBC vs. PoCo,
game postponed
MONDAY
Men's ice hockey
UBC 7 Czechoslovakia 4
UBC physical education student
Rick Hansen set a new record in
winning the Orange Bowl
wheelchair marathon in Miami
Saturday. Hansen utilized his new
racing model chair in the event for
the first time.
» * *
The Thunderette volleyball team
is getting just a little bit tired of the
University of Saskatchewan.
The Saskatchewan Huskiettes
edged UBC for the western title last
year in the final match of the final
tournament. In the first Canada
West tournament this year, it happened again.
And at the University of Calgary
invitational on the weekend, it happened yet again.
After a marathon two and a half
hour match in the finals, the
Thunderettes succumbed to .the
Huskiettes 17-15 in the fifth game
to finish as runner-up once more.
This weekend, both the men's
and women's team travel to the
island for the University of Victoria
invitational. Saskatchewan will not
be there.
* * *
UBC's swim teams won six of
seven dual meets on the weekend
but things will be tougher for the
next few weeks.
The swimmers meet Simon Fraser
University Friday at the aquatic
centre, and coach Jack Kelso is
blunt about his team's chances.
"They'll kill us. I'll be happy if
we win a few events," said Kelso.
Saturday the men's team will
travel to Tacoma to meet University
of Puget Sound and the University
of Oregon, both perennially strong
teams, and the following weekend
they host the University of
Washington.
By DAVE FRANCIS
The UBC Thunderbirds ice
hockey team failed to move closer
in the standings to the University of
Alberta as the league-leading Bears
swept a weekend doubleheader at
the winter sports centre.
On Friday, the Bears dropped the
'Birds 6-3 then overcame a heated
third period UBC rally Saturday to
edge the 'Birds 6-5.
UBC scorers in Friday's match
were Jim McLaughlin with a power-
play goal and Marty Matthews and
Hugh Cameron with singles each.
Jamie Orr, Jay Rumley and
Cameron contributed one assist
each.
Leading scorer for the Bears was
Jim Lomas with a hat trick, while
linemate Joel Elliot added a pair
and Dale Ross a single.
In Saturday's action, Rumley
answered two early Alberta goals
with a goal at the 12 minute mark of
the first period. Bill Holowaty added another at 16:53 to tie up the
period 2-2.
CANADA WEST UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Men's ice hockey standings
W
L
Pts.
Alberta Bears
13
4
26
Calgary D'saurs
13
4
26
UBC 'Birds
8
9
16
Sask. Huskies
6
11
12
In second period, the 'Birds failed to reply as the Bears pumped
three goals past UBC goaltender
Mike Parsons.
UBC renewed their offensive
drive in the final period, closing the
gap on Alberta's three-goal lead
with a power-play goal by
McLaughlin at 7:35 followed by a
single from Rumley at 10:18. The
Bears added the insurance goal at
the 13 minute mark, nullifying a
final goal by McLaughlin with 30
seconds left on the clock.
UBC tied Alberta 37-37 in shots
on goal Friday, but battered them
49-27 on Saturday.    ,
UBC coach Bert Halliwell said he
is now using the speed and mobility
of his forwards to greater advantage, moving the puck down the
middle with long passes instead of
working it off the boards as in the
past. "This will create more
breakaway opportunities for
quicker offensive drives," said
Hailliwell.
Halliwell said UBC has shortened
its injury list considerably thanks to
the Christmas break. Ted Fostey
will likely be sidelined for the
season pending a knee operation,
while other doubtful starters are
Rumley with a charlie horse and
Sam Bowman with knee problems.
Alberta coach Bill Moores said
injuries have also been a factor in
the quality of Bears play. "The loss
of Dan Arndt and Mike Broadfoot
has hurt us, but their replacements
have been outstanding," he said.
Moores added while the veteran
Bear players haven't played as well
in the first half of the season as the
second, the rookies have played
consistent hockey throughout.
"Elliot and Terry Lescisin were
both big surprises for newcomers,"
said Moores.
The Thunderbirds defeated the
Czechoslovakian under-19 team 7-4
in a Monday night game before
1,000 fans at the winter sports centre. Marty Matthews led UBC with
two goals, while Bill Trenaman,
Ted Cotter, Jim McLaughlin, Rob
Jones and Hugh Cameron added
singles to give the 'Birds their first
win in international competition
this year.
UBC will face off against the
University of Calgary this Friday
and Saturday.

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