UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 21, 1982

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128371.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128371.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128371-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128371-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128371-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128371-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128371-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128371-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128371-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128371.ris

Full Text

 Campus bank 'seams' students
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
When it comes to handling student loans, at least one bank thinks
profitability is preferable to providing a valuable service to
students.
As of this year, the Bank of Montreal has decided it will no longer
process student loans at its campus
branch because the service is not
financially   attractive.    Bank   of
Montreal is UBC's only on-campus
bank.
The move by the bank to centralize all student loans to its
Pender and Granville branch
downtown is "strictly economics,"
branch manager Stuart Clark said
Monday.
"It's a well known fact that
Canada student loans (program) is
not   one  of the   most   profitable
sources of income for banks," he
said.
Although the branch set up temporary booths to handle student
loan authorization forms last year,
student customers this year will not
get the same consideration.
Booths last year were just a "stop
gap" measure which signalled the
bank's decision to centralize all student loans, said Clark.
I sTIC   MDI «>#E I
Vol. LXV, No. 3
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 21,1982
228-2301
In addition, the Bank of Montreal announced that students who
want their authorization forms processed through the bank must have
been customers for at least six months to receive any money.
Clark defended the moves, saying
both were justified. "I think the
bank is quite right as far as profitability is concerned."
The bad point is "local servicing
(for students), the good point is
profitability," he said.
But James Hollis, Alma Mater
Society finance director, charged
the bank is no longer interested in
the student market.
"The Bank of Montreal doesn't
want student loans," he said.
"They have closed several campus
branches (across the country)." The
University of Victoria branch closed this summer he said.
Hollis called the bank's reasons
for centralizing loan processing and
imposing restrictions 'a scam."
"It's the same scam they pulled
on us last year."
A random survey of banks near
campus    showed   most   have
significantly less restrictive
guidelines for processing student
loan forms. The Canadian Imperial
Bank of Commerce's university
boulevard branch requires a student
to be a customer for at least three
months before receiving loan
money, said manager Wayne
McAlpine.
Toronto Dominion has announced it will limit bank money
allocated to student loans to a 10
per cent increase from last year.
Although he did not want to
speculate on what banks might
decide in the future about processing student loans, Clark said banks
are not happy with the return they
get from the federal government on
the loans.
Following the TD statement, the
Royal Bank said that "with restrictions recently announced by some
leaders, we do not wish to be involuntarily placed in the position of
being the one of a few national lending institutions granting these
loans, thus bearing a greater proportion of the associated costs."
Fred is born
-alison ho«ns photo
BEWILDEREP STUPENT blankly wonders if book thieves have found way to steal words and leave book.
Maybe it's money saving scheme by Sedgewick library who can buy just as many books if they save on the contents. One things sure, poor lad will have to think for himself now.
By PAT MACLEOD
The tables are littered with sheets
of Letraset, glue sticks and computer printout. It is 8 p.m. Sunday
night and in computer science 360,
UBC's second student newspaper is
being born.
Christened Fred, because Fred
doesn't sound like the name of a
paper, the first issue will come out
Wednesday. The paper will publish
every two weeks for the rest of the
year.
"A lot of people think we're an
engineering paper, but we're not.
We're totally independent of the
Engineering Undergraduate Society," said Rob Lazenby, Fred's production editor.
Participation by different faculties will diversify the content and
tone of the paper, Lazenby said.
But Lazenby acknowledges that the
three key people with editorial control are all engineers, including himself, former EUS president Lance
Balcom, and Debbie Duggan,
geological engineering 2.
"The people that organized it
wanted to be in control. But if
anyone comes in and puts in a lot of
work, of course their opinion will
be heard," Lazenby said.
McGeer leave extension lauded
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
Universities, science and communications
minister Pat McGeer was granted an extension
of his leave of absence from UBC Friday.
McGeer said the extension of his leave (which
allows him to maintain his position as head of
the psychiatry division of neurological sciences)
was necessary to maintain funding for a
neurological research project at UBC.
"It has nothing to do with me personally,"
McGeer said. "It has to do with the programs I
manage. Obviously my resigning (from the
university) essentially destroys a functioning
research team."
But Dr. Edith McGeer, acting head of the
department, differed slightly with her husband.
She said that while the project's application
for funding would not necessarily be turned
down without Pat McGeer's name on it, it
would stand a much greater chance of receiving
the grant if both of them apply.
"While both of us have PhDs, his MD is very
important in terms of the clinical application of
our research," she said. The national research
council which funds the project, requires that
applicants be on the faculty of a medical
school," she said.
Their research project receives approximately
$150,000 in funding from the council. The project explores the causes of senile dementia, Hun
tington's disease and Parkinson's disease and
employs five full time researchers plus the
McGeers. Edith McGeer claimed their research
is unique in Canada.
University regulations require that faculty
members on leave of absence who hold public
office resign their post after seven years or two
consecutive elections.
Pat McGeer, a minister in the Social Credit
government since 1975, requested that the board
of governors at UBC make an exception in his
case. That request was granted on administration president Doug Kenny's recommendation.
Both the dean of medicine and the acting head
of the department of psychiatry favored the extension.
The board also sought the approval of the
faculty association which consented, stipulating
only that the extension be for a single term of
the legislature.
"Our concern is only that normal procedure
should be followed," faculty association executive officer .Andrew Brockett said. The faculty position was that since the extension has been
recommended through the normal channels no
objections would be raised, he said.
Faculty board representative Hugh Greenwood denied the suggestion that McGeer's
research work infringed on his job as a cabinet
minister.
"Sure, if he was taking his lab time out of his
government time there would be a problem. But
he works in the lab evenings and weekends.
That's how he gets his relaxation," Greenwood
said.
See page 8: TENURE
McGEER
still a UBC prof
Each faculty is being asked to
submit a section or page of club
news for which it would be responsible, Lazenby said.
"I'd like to call Fred a cooperative newsletter that encompasses all
faculties. The type of comments
coming in should be more on a faculty level (than The Ubyssey).
We're bi-weekly so we can't go out
for news for every issue that The
Ubyssey will already have covered," he said.
Participating faculties so far include science and nursing, and in
the future possibly agriculture, forestry, home economics and commerce.
The arts undergrad society came
to the first meeting, Lazenby said,
but they are waiting to see what
Fred looks like.
"Everyone's going to be watching us to make sure we're idiots.
"Our policy is definitely anti-sexism, anti-racism, unless it's an obvious parody or stereotype,"
Lazenby said. "There is going to be
the occasional rowdy joke."
Fred columnist and electrical engineering representative Bill Richardson said Fred is designed to
cover what "The Ubyssey categorically refuses to print — advance analysis of club events."
"The idea has been around for 15
to 20 years. We almost started this
time last year but we weren't organized enough," Richardson said. He
added the engineers started the paper, not another faculty, because
"Let's face it, the engineers do half
the stuff on campus."
Richardson said an introductory
practice edition published last week
which criticized The Ubyssey for
serving as "a platform for left-wing
radical groups and arts students
wanting to gain publicity and vent
their frustrations" was written earlier in the summer. The style has
been toned down, he said.
"We're trying to be friendly. The
more we saw what people really
needed, the more we saw we were
not competing with The Ubyssey. I
think we can complement each
other," Richardson said.
But if the two papers aren't competing for readers, they are competing for advertisers.
"I think there's room for two papers on this campus. But it means
your advertising office (the Alma
Mater Society publications office) is
going to have to work a little harder" Balcom said Sept. 10.
AMS Publications manager Sue
Cadeney,  who  is  responsible  for
See page 2: FRED Page 2
THE    U BY S S EY
Tuesday, September 21, 1982
Fred short ads
From page 1
Ubyssey advertising, is uncertain
Fred will be able to obtain enough
advertising, even though it costs less
to produce.
"All I can say is with the experience of the two summer papers,
(The Summer Ubyssey and The
Conventioner) there could be difficulties. The (economic) times are an
indication that there's not a lot of
money. Advertisers are going to be
sceptical about going into something new," she said.
But Fred hopes to get advertising
from undergraduate clubs that normally don't advertise in The Ubyssey   because   it's   too   expensive.
Fred also plans to go to student
council Wednesday with a request
for AMS advertising, finance director James Hollis said.
"At this time I am opposing it
(the request) because there are very
limited funds for ads and our primary charge is to support the established paper," Hollis said.
"Even if Fred charged half as
much as The Ubyssey, it would not
be as good a bargain because the
circulation is less and it is not professionally composed," he said.
*t*A«JF«
CORKY'S
'^YLlf"'
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
Tired  of  shopping,   peeling,
chopping, cooking, packing a
lunch and cleaning up?
Purchase   a   monthly   meal
pass to either Totem Park or
Place Vanier Dining Rooms.
For further information ring:
TOTEM DINING ROOM
228-6828
PLACE VANIER
DINING ROOM
228-2652
Notice to
All Evacuated
inhabitants of
AUS Lockers
As you have no doubt realized,
your locks have been chopped and
yogr belongings confiscated, as we
promised.
If you want to retrieve your worldly
goods, they will be in Buch 107 till
Sept. 24 at which point they will be
given to the Lost and Found and
the AUS will disclaim all responsibility for them.
NOMINATIONS
are now open for
the position of
A.M.S.
Director of
Administration
Nomination papers should be picked
up from Terry Jackson in SUB 238
and returned to her by 4:30 p.m.
Thursday, September 23rd.
This position is open to any member of the A.M. S.
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
Faculty Of Arts
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO THE
FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) One representative from the combined major,
honours, graduate, and diploma students in each
of the departments and schools of the Faculty of
Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of First and Second Year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the
meetings of the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department
Offices, the Dean of Arts' Office, the Arts Faculty Adviser's
Office, and the Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the
Registrar of the University not later than 4:00 p.m., FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 24, 1982. Tuesday, September 21, 1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Gov't delays hit needy students
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
Delays and indecision continue to
plague students awaiting financial
aid from the provincial government.
The universities ministry told the
UBC awards office Monday documents should have arrived for students who applied by the July 2
deadline.
But student awards director Byron Hender said some students
haven't received the forms which
allow them to cash their loans.
But missing loans are just one
part of the confusion that has left
many students' financial situation
uncertain as tuition and housing fee
deadlines approach.
University ministry program director Dean Goard said the cabinet
has yet to allocate funds for the
grant portion of the financial aid
package.
The grant allocation is just one of
the issues, along with government
employee relations, natural resources, and the election, under review by the cabinet, Goard said.
Goard said the cabinet is looking
at two alternatives for allocating
grants. He said funds will either be
increased by reducing the universities' operating budget or the current allocation will be rationed
among applicants.
The awards office is receiving a
large number of enquiries about
grants, Hender said.
"They (students) aren't too upset
now but they will be when they find
out their grant's been cut," he said.
Hender said many students may
be forced to drop out of school if
grants are cut or may miss the
chance to get jobs under the university's work study program.
A formula for rationing grant
money has not been determined but
Goard said academic standing
would not be the criterion. The
ministry will consult with the universities, he said.
Meanwhile, the deadline for fee
payments is Friday. Hender said
that students can have fees for both
tuition and housing deferred but
only if the student applied for financial assistance prior to July 2.
"There are an increasing number
of students who want fees
deferred," Hender said. "If everything was done right the finance department will consider a deferral."
Students not applying before Friday will be assessed a further fee for
late payment of fees, Hender said.
As of Monday, the awards office
had received 5,777 applications for
assistance compared to 4,258 a year
ago — a 36 per cent increase.
Jobs left unclaimed
As many as 400 part time jobs
could be created for financially
strapped students under an improved work study program, Canada
Employment Centre manager Dave
Bernard said Monday.
But with 800 applicants already
"identified" for work study
assistance, the $250,000 from the
university and $160,000 from the
provincial government won't be
enough.
Only students who need student
aid supplemented or who didn't
earn enough to qualify for B.C.
Student Assistance program funding are eligible to qualify for the
program information, said awards
officer Sheila Summers.
Under the program, most
students work in career-related jobs
which can pay up to $2,500 depending on the financial needs of the
student.
Bernard said about 500 jobs are
posted in the Canada employment
centre now. University departments, and non-academic areas
submitted 700 job proposals which
together with 200 library jobs
means authorized students will have
900 potential jobs to choose from.
So far, the awards office has
authorized 250 students to select
work study jobs, Bernard said. But
he added that only  100 students
Local peace
network formed
By SARAH COX
Delegates from seven Vancouver
high schools, colleges and universities formed a peace education network at a weekend conference.
The network plans to distribute
information about the arms race
and disarmament throughout the
education system and help form
peace groups in schools.
Twenty-six people attended the
conference held at Whistler, B.C.
Kinoku Laskey, a Hiroshima survivor who spoke at the conference,
said the conference was important
because small groups of people
working together for disarmament
are more effective than public
demonstrations.
"Speaking to large groups
doesn't reach the people," she said.
"Small groups of people pass on
the message. The people here will
see my side of it and I hope they will
learn something."
Steve Haavik, a student at
Kwantlen College, said the conference was "interesting" and "informative."
Get clubbed by
Greeks, trots,
rockers and more
This Thursday and Friday mark
UBC's annual club presentation
day. On the first and second floors
of SUB, displays will be set up by
most of the clubs on campus. These
displays will show students what
UBC can offer them socially as well
as academically.
Due to the large numbers of applications not all organizations
could be accommodated in this-
year's presentation of activities.
Also, many of the more well-known
groups have been placed upstairs to
give smaller clubs located there
more exposure.
See page 5 for club directory.
"I see the primary duty of PEN
to provide information people
can't get through the media, to
educate people about the dangers of
nuclear war, and to let them know
there is something they can do," he
said.
Lois Barber, a teacher at Prince
of Wales high school, said the conference presented important information and gave people a chance to
clarify their own positions through
discussion with others.
"Teachers for peace action,
which is just forming, is a group of
public and private school teachers
who feel it is time to educate
ourselves about nuclear weapons,
and, as educators, to educate
others," she said. "The conference
has provided an opportunity to join
forces and discuss how we will work
together as different people involved in education."
In addition to defining the function of PEN, participants decided
that rotating monthly meetings will
be held, an administrator and coordinator were unanimously agreed
upon.
"It has been a very productive
conference," said Farah Shroff, a
grade 12 student at Prince of Wales
high school. "We've discussed a lot
that has made it possible to put a
structure in place and make a viable
organization possible."
UBC student Gary Marchant, an
organizer of the conference, said he
was delighted with the results.
"Our next move is to go to the
school boards and get PEN formally endorsed," said Marchant. "We
want to get information about the
arms race and disarmament into the
high school curriculum. Now that
we have the structure of PEN, more
people will join. Eventually, I can
see PEN spreading to other parts of
B.C. and across Canada."
A newsletter will be started at the
first PEN meeting and a resource
centre set up. at UBC, Marchant adr
ded.
contacted the office for work as of
last week.
Awards director Byron Hender
said that many jobs won't be filled
because a student's qualifications
won't match those required for the
job.
The awards office has been
swamped with applications, said
Summer, but applications are still
being accepted in the awards office.
Students not eligible for the program are facing a tight part time job
market said Bernard. Listings from
off campus employers are down
and as the economy worsens more
students will be chasing fewer jobs
he said.
The poor part time job market
follows a summer of high
unemployment for students.
Bernard said that 1,142 students
obtained jobs through the CEC
compared to 1,729 the previous
summer.
Jobs were for shorter periods of
time and paid lower wages Bernard
said.
"Construction, tourism, and
clerical work supplied little or no
employment," he added. "Those
are three areas of major concern to
us."
Increased enrolment also put
pressure on part time jobs as
students substitute education for
unemployment.
— rick katz photo
ORDINARY STUDENTS go about daily business unaware they are about
to be gobbled up by killer vines. Fatal flora is an escapee from UBC biology
department which has been raking in extra funds in service of NATO
Mutual effort needed for peace
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Peace efforts in the Middle East
must be "equally Arab and Israeli"
if they are to be successful, an
Egyptian ambassador said Friday.
"The region is undergoing a tremendous period of internal anarchy
and chaos," Egypt's ambassador to
Canada, Tahsin Beshir, told 100
people in Buchanan 205. Beshir's
comments were made before news
of the Israeli involvement in the
Lebanese massacre of as many as
1,000 Palestian refugees was made
public Saturday.
"Peace for Egyptians, Israelis,
Jordanians and Palestinians is feasible, desirable, and unavoidable,"
Beshir said.
"To pursue the peace policy is
the best policy in an area of turmoil," he said, commenting on the
Camp David accords between
Egypt, Israel and the United States.
Palestinians and Israelis "feel a
dilemma," Beshir said, because
each side thinks it is right.
"The Palestinians (feel they)
have been deceived, particularly in
the Arab world and in their (quest
Faculty on strike
Students at the University of Windsor have found themselves out
of the classroom on an unexpected "holiday."
Five months of bargaining between faculty and administration fell
through Friday after an all-night bargaining session filed to provide
an agreement.
The faculty was asking for an annual 13 per cent salary increase
over two years. The university's wage offer was 12.7 per cent, said
faculty association president Donald Laing. The faculty was also
seeking improved job security and increased holidays, which were
the significant fetor drividing the two sides.
Other faculty demands included a month's salary for each year of
service to a maximum of 18 months for any faculty member laid off,
access to research for laid off professors, and representation on the
board of governors.
Last week the faculty began a work slowdown, refusing to perform non-academic tasks, which meant curtailing "the discretionary
administrative or committee services to the community," said Laing.
for) the right to
self-determination," he said. "The
West Bank and the Gaza is only
one-fifth of their claim to
Palestine." Current negotiations
between Egypt, Israel, Jordan and
the U.S. consider the West Bank
and the Gaza Strip along the Israeli-
Jordanian border as comprising
most of a Palestinian homeland.
"The Palestinians must accept
that Israel is here to stay."
And occupying Arab territory is
not in Israel's best interest, he said.
"In occupying, they defeat the purpose of creating a Jewish state, not
an Arab-Jewish state."
Although Beshir dealt mainly
with the Middle East peace process
between Egypt and Israel, he also
commented on Israel's invasion of
western Lebanon.
The Israelis "are creating a military holocaust in Lebanon," Beshir
said. "One tragedy after another is
unfolding in Lebanon. Israel is not
the arbiter of different factions in
Lebanon," he added, referring to
Israel's support for right-wing
Christian groups.
Asked about Israel's decision to
stay in Lebanon after president
Bashir Gemayel's assassination,
Beshir said the peace efforts will
continue regardless. "We will not
be jaded." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21, 1982
McGeer was correct
U/OgLD      ACC0RDIW6,    TO     fi\C(*.eeK
What? The Ubyssey write an editorial supporting
Pat McGeer? The Ubyssey says that our minister who
art in Victoria should have his leave extended? When
our bastard cousins in Pacific Press commercial news
hell have already damned him for abuse? You must be
joking.
With all that material available for a hatchet job on
our favorite scapegoat, we just wouldn't be ourselves.
There are so many angles. There is McGeer saying
he doesn't believe in tenure, then asking that a rule be
broken so that he won't have to relinquish it.
There is the fact that the board of governors at UBC
has been asked to rule on the academic future of a
man who is responsible for their own funding.
There is the fact that McGeer is responsible for appointing (and reappointing) eight of those 15 board
members.
But there are good reasons for the board to extend
his leave of absence. An important research project
wouldn't necessarily be lost as McGeer claims. But
there is a good chance it would be.
But besides that, there are good reasons for flexibility in the regulation requiring professors on extended
leave to resign.
First, the regulation is designed to prevent abuse. If
it can be shown that the professor is not abusing his
privilege then an exception should be made.
Secondly, the regulation deters academics from entering politics.
Pat McGeer is a perfect example. Even his harshest
critics agree that universities in B.C. would be worse
off if he wasn't in the Social Credit cabinet.
But of course there's a dig. We would rather have a
new government and a new universities minister. The
government responsible for cuts in university funding
when skilled workers could help us out of this economic mess has its priorities confused.
We think that Pat McGeer is such a good neurological researcher that he should be doing it full time.
You knew we couldn't resist, didn't you Pat?
Soft talk
The man was a true diplomat. He talked softly and
carried no stick.
He spoke as diplomats are supposed to do. In
restrained but optimistic tones Tahsin Beshir, Egypt's
ambassador to Canada, talked about the importance
of achieving peace with Israel, despite that country's
actions in Lebanon.
Within 24 hours the Israelis, aware of the Christian
Phalangists' brutal track record, had turned a blind
eyes, and made themselves accomplices in the atrocity
of the Palestinian refugee massacres.
Of that there can be no doubt. Does Israel seriously
expect the world to believe that while the massacre
took place, their solidiers didn't know what was happening? Are the sounds of gunfire and the screams of
people being butchered that hard to hear?
One wonders if his excellency, the honorable ambassador to Canada, would still prefer to talk softly.
foR   THIS , *-*J£    W6GD
. eDUCAieO   PROFESSlOML-iJ
fu©>
,-\*V.», ,
&*'   it':
'$"■$<&
UBC lesbians and gays fight homophobia
By BOB SUMMERBELL
There is no doubt that this letter
will make certain groups or individuals on campus uncomfortable, but the issue is real, and we
are a reality.
A large reason for the following
is to confirm and restate the reality
of our existence: We are the Gays
and Lesbians of UBC. At times
during the year, and particularly
during clubs days (this Thursday
and Friday), one hears whisperings
and gigglings, someone asking a
friend, "Are those people for
real?!" This is superficially a mere
insult, but when the question is
assessed, the message comes down
to one of the basic fights against
homophobia (the irrational hatred
of homosexuals).
Morever, this brings out a main
reason for our existence, (i.e.) to
show that we are real people,
basically no different than anybody
else. Not martians, not devils, not
hedonists, not whatever the social
myths say; just people with one
single difference: sexual preference.
People of "liberal" or
"apolitical" stance often question
why there is need of a gay/lesbian
equality movement. Implicit to this
is the belief that gay men and lesbians can and should simply live
However, preference is presently
more than simple sexuality, it is an
entire way of being complete not
only with the desired love, friendship, and sexual expression, but
also with discrimination, prejudice,
and fear; even hatred, segregation,
and violence sometimes infringe on
our lives. Thus, people become
political in choosing to follow their
gay or lesbian desires as they begin
to face the prejudice they have been
hearing all of their lives, even to the
degree of turning such bigotry
teward themselves.
If this mention of politics seems
outrageous or frightening, it is not
meant to be. Our everyday lives as
gays and lesbians are more or less as
inspired or uninspired as anybody
else's, but we are typically more
sensitive to the issues facing us. We
very routinely face threats of social
rejection because of our dispositions. Occasionally even violent
ones. Politics comes into being here
by one standing up for one's rights,
even on interpersonal levels. Fortunately, actual anti-gay violence is
relatively rare, but the basis for
such in ignorance is quite common.
Our straight friends are immense-
This is akin to a person in any given
group feeling secure with their position in that group or the position of
the group itself.
In short, discrimination and prejudice stem from insecurity. We as
gays and lesbians touch off this insecurity in the sexual realm by being
living proof that homosexuality exists.
Groups like the Gays and Lesbians of UBC come in at this
point by providing focal point for
countering such misinformation.
By simply being here, we make a
statement. Our events go a step further by making us socially normal
people. As well, the really openly
gay members of our club take it on
themselves to conduct interpersonal
educational campaigns when appropriate, by being truly strong and
honest. We are strong (when
necessary), and we are numerous.
Of the many of us on campus, only
a small number choose to be involved.
But consider that in any random
group of ten people, one is likely to
have a homosexual preference. This
could easily be your own sister or
brother, your bus driver, the person
sitting beside you in the cafeteria,
or even yourself. Statistically (ac-
perspectives
cording to Kinsey Research Institute generalized findings), there
should be about 2500-3000 gays and
lesbians on this campus. Assess
your attitudes, and if you feel uncomfortable or disgusted, you are
likely misinformed. You are temporarily excused, as being uninformed is understandable.
Even we as gays and lesbians felt
similar disgust before we learned
about ourselves. This phenomena
of "self-oppression" remains our
worst enemy and is due to cultural
myths and the fears surrounding
them. We maintain an office in
SUB 239 and we welcome discussion for anybody(!) interested. We
also have resources, contacts, and
meetings to assist in all this.
In closing, remember that we are
real; merely human beings com-
prable to the next Jane or John in
your Biology 102 class, just trying
to stay happy. With self-
knowledge, we are happy in no
small sense, and with a breakdown
of your preconceptions, you can be
happy right beside us. 1 recommend
self and peer-pressure assessment as
a beginning to understanding.
Bob Summerbell is vice president
of the Gays and Lesbians of UBC.
Letters
Mighty senate survives
their lives quietly and not make an
issue of their sexuality.
"Sexuality," the critics say, "is a
private matter between two people,
and others need not have it
'flaunted' in front of them." This is
often heard by gays and lesbians,
and actually, it is an almost justified
comment when interperted in a
slightly different than intended
way. In an ideal world of true
equality, sexual preference would
be a quietly accepted fact, and expressions of love and attraction between two people regardless of
gender would not be considered
'flaunting' anything at all.
ly important to us, as genuine
friends are to anybody. They are far
and above more secure with
themselves than are our foes. This is
important here because it points to
a general root of-discrimination —
that which must be seen in order to
begin the fight against homophobia
and other prejudicial attitudes.
Straight people who are comfortable with their sexual identity, who
see no need to constantly prove
their masculinity, femininity, or
hetrosexuality, to themselves or
Others, are the ones who best see the
reality of homosexuality as a valid
sexual and emotional expression.
Greetings to all of you who don't
know that senate is the highest
academic body on campus and that
it does have student members:
Also you probably don't know
that we've held our first meeting of
the academic year, Wednesday,
September 15. Listed below are
some items of student interest.
New student awards were approved by senate totalling at least
$14,000 annually. Among these was
the lost and found bursaries made
possible by the sale of unclaimed
goods from the campus lost and
found, in consultation with the
Women Students' office, (available
to all students). In addition, the
commerce undergraduate society
and the nursing undergraduate
society established bursaries.
An ad hoc committee was struck
to enquire into minimum breadth
requirements for undergraduate
programs to ensure students are exposed to a broad range of academic
subjects.
A proposal that the division of
orthopaedics in the department of
surgery be changed to the department of orthopaedics in the faculty
of medicine was approved although
concerns were expressed by student
senators as to cost and number of
students   involved   (especially   in
times of economic recession). This
now must be approved by the board
of governors which is responsible
for UBC's finances.
Commerce student Barry
Coulson has resigned and anyone
interested in the position can contact the commerce undergraduate
society or the student senate office
(SUB 250 or the club's day booth).
The next student senate caucus
meeting is September 27th at 7:15 in
SUB 260. The next senate meeting is
on October 13th at 8:00 p.m. in the
board and senate chambers at the
old administration building.
Sharon Provost
Michael Shephard
Stephen Henderson
student senators
THE UBYSSEY
September 21, 1982
The Ubyssey is published every Tuesday and Friday
through the university year by the Alma Mater Society
of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in SUB 241k, with
the advertising office next door. Editorial department
228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Famous neurological surgeon Jane Bartlett anxiously perused the unconscious face of Muriel
Draaisma. She fett that emergency surgery was called for, and sent Big Nurse Craig Brooks to
prepare the operating theatre. Charles Campbell and Keiley Jo Burke wept softly as their
comrad was wheeled away. Shaffin Shariff, misunderstanding the situation, started passing
out cigars, but Arnold Hestrom acted fast, and took him aside before violence broke out. Pat
Mcleod, pushing her good humour cart full of plants, books, and Eric Eggertsons, tried to
cheer the morbid crowd, but to no avail. Cub reporter Robbie Robertson thought he smelled a
story, and started asking questions of a very personal nature about Muriel's drinking habits,
but Philip Keuber brusquely informed him that she didn't come from that kind of family. The
hours dragged on like minutes, and finally the assisting surgeon, Peter Berlin, came out with
the joyous news. Steve Wisenthal, Sarah Cox, and Victor Wong held their breath (each their
own, not each other's), until they'd been assured that she'd been saved, and would make
such a full recovery that she would stay for production to the bitter end on Thursday. Chris
Wong looked on in horror as Brian Jones, overwhelmed with relief, passionately hugged
Doug Schmidt, and was promptly decked by said. A truce was called and everyone retired tc
buy candied fruit and chocolate for the convalescent.   Alison Hoens said hello. Tuesday, September 21,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
CLUB'S DAYS '82
Thursday - Friday
This Thursday and Friday,
September 23 and 24, 100 UBC
clubs and service organizations
take over SUB in an attempt to
involve UBC students.
Here is a listing of booths and
tables as of Monday afternoon.
Booth and table maps will be
posted in prominent locations
around SUB.
Clip and save.
FIRST FLOOR
0 Rowing Club
1 Sports Car Club
2 IFC (fraternity)
3 Canoe Club
4 Chess Club
5 Bridge Club
6 Liberals
7 Conservatives
8 NDP
9 Social Credit
10 Trotskyists
11 Western Canada Concept
12 International Socialists
13 Libertarian
14 Filmsoc
15 Debating Society
15A Ubyssey (newspaper)
SOUTH CONCOURSE
16 Senate and AMS
17 CITR (radio)
18 CAUSE
19 Amnesty
20 Gays and Lesbians
21 Council for Exceptional
Children
22 Peace & Disarmament
23 First Year Students/ Student
Leadership
24 Pro-Life
25 Newman Club
26 Maranatha Christian
NORTH CONCOURSE
27 Friday Night Fellowship
28 Campus Crusade for Christ
29 Baptists
30 Navigators
31 Lutherans
32 Co-operative ChristianCampus
Ministry
33 Christian Science Organization
34 Charismatic Christian
Fellowship
35 Adventists
36 Chinese Christian Fellowship
37 Amateur Radio
38 Hillel House
SECOND FLOOR
1 Rockers Co-op
2 Broadcasters (video)
3 Fencing
BALLROOM — SOUTH WALL
5 Mussoc
6 Rovers
7 Kiwanis
8 Intramurals
9 Wargamers
10 Astronomy
PARTYROOM
12 Ballet
BALLROOM — OUTSIDE WALL
13 Wado Ryu
14 Karate
15 Shito Ryu
16 Aikido
17 Kendo
18 Windsurfing
19 Curling
20 French
21 Ski
22 Cycling
WE MISSED YOUR BODY!
Co-Ed Fitness to Music — 100% Pure Fun
CLASSES HAVE STARTED NOW! Monday through Thursday in
SUB Ballroom. Classes run 3:45-4:46 p.m. and NOW 4:46-5:46
p.m. as well (New Class!)
FEES —$1 per class, just drop-in anytime you feel like it!
For more information phone 504-7483
tHfs
"No body has it Fitter"
hair studio inc.
Make an appointment today
and give your head a rest.
5784 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
In UBC Village next to Bank of Commerce
224-9116
23 VOC
24 Sailing
25 Pottery
26 Computer Science
BALLROOM — CENTRE
27 CVC
28 Tae Kwan Do
29 Kung Fu
30 Tai Chi
31 CSA
32 Geophysics
33 English Students
34 Pre-Dental
35 Japan
36 Pugwash
37 Sci-fi
38 Pre-med
39 East Indian
40 Students Int. Meditation
41 World University Services
42 Underwater Hockey
43 AIESEC
44 Water Polo
45 Commerce
46 Aqua Soc
207/209
47 Photo Soc
205
48-50 T.B.A.
DEMONSTRATION AREAS
1. Dance Club — partyroom south
2. Ballet Club — partyroom north
3. All Martial Arts Clubs — ballroom
stage
4. Mussoc/Campus Cavaliers —
ballroom south
5. Fencing Club — second floor
lobby
6. Sports Car club/Motorcycle Club/
VOC — SUB plaza
-"r
THE DINER
Serving U.B.C.  and West Point Grey
for the last 24 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices  -   including
Roast Eleef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 8:30 Dm.
Closed Sundays St Public Holidays
For the early ones,   we start serving
breakfast from 8:00 a. m.
4556 W.  10th Ave.   - 224 1912
CLUB'S DAY
ALL DAY
Thursday, Sept. 23rd
Friday, Sept. 24th
Both Floors of SUB
JOIN A CLUB!
Shotokan Karate
TSUTOMU OHSHIMA
SHIHAN
PRACTICE TIMES:
Monday & Thursday
7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.
- Gym E
Saturday
10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
— Gym B
Thunderbird Sports Complex
- UBC KARATE CLUB
See us on Clubs Day in SUB
Ballroom, or drop by and watch
a practice. Beginners we/come.
"The ultimate aim of the art of
Karate lies not in victory or
defeat, but in the perfection of
the characters of its
participants."
— Gichin Funakoshi
The Arts Undergraduate
Society officially announces
The opening of nominations for the following
positions:
Two Arts Representatives on Council
Treasurer
Intramurals Coordinator
Social Coordinator
Nominations will close OCTOBER 4
Elections to be held OCTOBER 13
Nomination forms are available from the
Arts Undergraduate Office
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1982 AUTUMN LECTURES
Sir Rex Richards
Sir Rex Richards is vice-chancellor and a professor of physical chemistry at the University of Oxford, England. He is considered one of the world's outstanding physical chemists. Professor
Richards is known for his major research contributions to the study of nuclear magnetic
resonance, and its use as an investigative and diagnostic procedure that produces images of the
human body.
HIGH RESOLUTION NMR IN ANIMALS AND HUMANS
Thursday, September 23    In Lecture Hall 5, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre, at 4:00 p.m. (Chemistry, Physics & The Biomem-
brane Discussion Group Seminar)
NMR-A NEW WINDOW ON THE HUMAN BODY: MEDICAL APPLICATIONS
Saturday, September 25     In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre, at 8:15 p.m. (A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE: THE FUTURE ROLES IN UNIVERSITIES
Tuesday, September 28       In Lecture Hall 6, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre, at 12:30 p.m.
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21, 1982
TODAY
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC DIRECTORATE
General meeting, noon, room 32. War Memorial
Gym.
THE OFFICE OF INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS
Career-related, non-paid intemehipa available for
senior Arta students. Writing, public relations
planning, museum work. Sign up 8:30 a.m.-5:30
p.m. through Dec. 1, Brock hall 213.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Into table and movie: If You Love This Planet,
noon, SUB foyer.
MUSSOC (MUSICAL THEATRE SOCIETY)
Meeting to organize for clubs day, open houae,
auditions, etc. 12:30, 1:30, 2:30, club room, old
auditorium.
CYCLING CLUB
Painting posters and organizing for clubs day,
noon, cages, SUB lower floor.
THE OFFICE OF INTERNSHIP PROGRAMS
Career-related, non-paid internships available for
senior Arts students. Writing, public relations
planning, museum work. Sign up 8:30 a.m,-5:30
p.m. through Dec. 1, Brock hall 213.
WEDNESDAY
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Steering committee meeting, all welcome, noon,
Angus 214,
COMMITTEE ON LECTURES -
HEWITT BOSTOCK MEMORIAL LECTURESHIP
Lecturer Michael J. Wise, head of Geography,
London School of Economics, Univ. of London;
Modernizing Britain: Challenges and Opportunities, noon, Buchanan penthouse.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Organizational meeting, new members welcome,
noon, SUB 213.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Free introductory squere dance, 8 p.m., Mclnnes
lounge. Gage.
THURSDAY
AMS
Club days, all through SUB, all day.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Free introductory square dance, 8 p.m.. Place
Vanier ballroom.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
General meeting cancelled.
CITR UBC RADIO
Meeting for those interested in joining the news
and/or sports departments. 1 p.m., SUB 233.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Stammtisch, 7:30 p.m., licensed, Gate 4, International House.
FACULTY OF LAW
Public lecture, S. C. Covat, UBC dept. of
Philosophy: "Abortion and fundamental rights:
the Pro-Choice position,"  Noon, Law 101.
CITR-UBC RADIO
Meeting for thoee interested in joining the news
or sports departments. 1 p.m., SUB 233.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
General meeting, all welcome, noon. Brock hall
301.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Orientation: wine and cheese. 7 p.m.. Graduate
student centre.
INTRAMURAL REFEREE CLUB
Finn general meeting certified and noncertified
referees welcome, 1:30-2:30 p.m. War Memorial
gym,   Rm. 32-
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall ballet, jazz and dancercise
classes, first dance workshop, sale of T-shirts
and legwermers. For more info., SUB 216E, or
the club's day booth.
FRIDAY
AMS
Clubs days, all through SUB, all day.
UBYSSEY
Newswriting seminar for anyone, especially new
recruits, 3:30, SUB 241k, B.C. Election coverage
to be discusaed afterwarda.
CANADA WEST UNIVERSITIES
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Soccer:   Thunderbirds   vs.   Saskatchewan,   2
p.m., Wolfson field.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Bzzr Garden: Get Bombed for Peace II, 8:30-1
a.m., Grad centre ballroom.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for faH ballet, jazz and dancercise
classes beginning Sept. 27. For more info stop
by the dubs day booth or come to SUB 216e.
NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY CLUB
Bzzr Garden (a New Democratic Party) 7:30
p.m.-12a.m., SUB 212.
SATURDAY
CANADA WEST UNIVERSITIES
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Soccer game: Thunderbirds vs. Alberta, 2 p.m.,
Wolfson field.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Back to school dance, licensed. Co-sponsored
by the African Association, 8 p.m.. International
House.
The New Designer,
Original or Original Design
(depending on your
preferences)
ARTS T-SHIRT
is available in brown, blue or
white colours with V or Crew
Neck in all sizes. The price is
only $6.00 and in can be
bought in
BUCH. 107
FM 102
Newt, Sports. At UBC:
Tuesday, Wednesday. Thursday
8 a.m. Wakeup Report
8:40 a.m. At UBC
9 a.m. Breakfast Report
12:40 p.m. At UBC
1 p.m. Lunch Report
3:30 p.m. News Break
4 p.m. At UBC
4:30 p.m. Sports Break
6 p.m. Dinner Report and Insight
Friday
8 a.m. Wakeup Report
8:40 a.m. At UBC
9 a.m. Breakfast Report
12:40 p.m. At UBC
1 p.m. Lunch Report
3:30 p.m. News Break
Get off to a good
Start at CORKY'S.
CORKY'S
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
COME
WITH US
THOMPSON RIVER RAFTING
Sat-SunSept25&26 $135.00
CYCLE TOUR OF THE
BEAUTIFUL GALIANO ISLAND
Sat. Sept25 $10.00
SAIL THE GULF ISLAND
Sat-SunOct2-3 $160.00
Registration
WMG Rm 203 A - NOW
Organization Meetings for all outings
12:30 Thurs. Sept 23 WMG 211
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Entertaining   Mr. Sloane
by Joe Orton
SEPTEMBER 24 - OCTOBER 2
(Previews Sept. 22 * 23)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Directed by Stanley Weese
with Duncan Fraser & Gillian Neumann
(STUDENT SEASON TICKETS - 4 Plays for $12)
Available For All Performances
Sept. 22 - Oct. 2
Nov. 17 - 27
Jan. 12 - 22
Mar. 2 - 12
BOX OFFICE
ENTERTAINING MR. SLOANE (Orton)
THE TROJAN WOMEN (Euripides)
SIX CHARACTERS IN SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR (Pirandello)
THE TICKET-OF-LEAVE MAN (Taylor)
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Support Your Campus Theatre
ROOM 207
News writing seminar
Want to learn to write good? Intimidated by hacks who
think they already can? Come hear Bill Tieleman, former
Ubyssey staffer, former Canadian University Press Ottawa
bureau chief, current drinker of ten cent coffee in the grad
students lounge. He'll break you into the dangerous and exciting world of news writing.
Friday, 3:30 p.m. - SUB 24lk
SUBFILMS presents
Thurs. & Fri. 7:00
YOUNG
FRANKENSTEIN
Thurs. & Fri. 9:30
LIVE AT
SUNSET STRIP
$1.00 SUB AUDITORIUM
Sat. & Sun. 7:00 & 9:30
SHARKEY'S
MACHINE
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room241, S.U.B.. UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
TOUR TIME
at Main & Sedgewick
LIBRARIES
EVERY DAY THIS WEEK
10:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m.
Meet in Main Library Entrance
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCE
CLASSES: Wednesdays 7:30-10:30 pm.
Beginning and Intermediate levels. Campus
and Community Members Welcome. UBC
International House Information Marcia
Snider 738-1246, Richard Spratley 228-3682
(Days)
11 — For Sale — Private
1966 CHEV Belair. Good cond, no rust,
6 cyl, auto, 19 mpg. City 224-6325.
1978 HONDA Express. 49cc. 6900 km. $375.
1961 Honda Passport, 70cc, $560. 10,000
km. Len 325-2581.
1976 FORD Grenada, 4 dr, c. tested, good
body, mechanically sound, reliable, 92,000
mi. $1500 obo. Phone Steve 224-5857.
FOR SALE. Norco Magnum, SE 350 obo
Peavey, T15 w amp/case. $350. 224-3073.
Jeff.
16 — Found	
FOUND:   Gold   framed   metal   prescription
i in case. Call 228-2181 loc. 216.
35 — Lost
REWARD $60. For the return of my cat
1 year old. All black-white spot on
Lost 8th Sept. around the Law Bu
Call 224-7720 or 682-8073.
Male
belly.
Iding.
40 — Messages
HEY GUY'S. Lefs make the 150th our best
year to date. Schlong.
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of Barbering and Hairstyl-
ing. Student hairstyle, $8.50. Body wave,
$17 and up. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
EDGAR CAYCE
Cayce style deep trance
readings. Any question in the
world. Booking now for DON
DAUGHTRY'S September visit
to Vancouver. Call Pat Wood,
228-9865.	
86 - Typing
20 — Housing
NEAR UNIVERSITY - 2 bedroom suite for
rent. Asking $525.00 including utilities.
Phone 738-6435 between 10 a.m.-4 p.m.,
at 2409 Collingwood St., 2 blocks off
Alma.
ON CAMPUS. Room and board. 2800. At
5725 Agronomy. 224-9620.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts resumes, theses.
IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates. Rose,
731-9857.
"WORO PROCESSING specialists for
theses, term papers, resumes, reports, correspondence, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
TIRED OF TYPING? Rent time on a word
processor — any size manuscript — fast —
cheap — and easy. For further information
phone Tom at 224-1061.
PAPERS, thesis, etc. W/Electronic
typewriter. Rate: $1.25/dble spaced page.
732-3647.
99 — Miscellaneous
30 — Jobs
NUTRITION & HEALTH. Major international
company has local openings for outgoing
people, part-time work, full time income.
Call 531-4383.
TOUCH FOOTBALL REFS. needed for Oct.
9th Tournament at $8/game. Leave name &
number at 732-5596.
36 — Lost
HELPI Brown leather briefcase missing from
Armory Bookstore. Sept. 16. Inititals
J.G.K. on one side. Reward. No questions
asked. 686-5690.
ST. MARK'S
CHURCH, Kitsilano
Anglican-Episcopal
1805 Larch St.,
731-3811
SUNDA Y CELEBRA TIONS
8:00 a.m. HOLY EUCHARIST
10:30 a.m. SUNG MASS
Contemporary Catholic
Worship Tuesday, September 21,1982
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Kenny trips off to China
Five years ago The Ubyssey sent
administration president Doug Kenny to China. This time he went for
real.
In a fake story the vilest rag east
of Peking claimed Kenny went to
China for an all expense paid trip to
the People's Republic. Kenny finally left Friday. Now he's travelling
courtesy of the education ministries
of China and Japan, where he is
making a 10-day tour of universities.
Most of the costs for the trip by
Kenny and former education dean
Roy Bentley will be paid by the
Chinese and Japanese governments,
UBC information officer Al Hunter
said Monday. The rest will be paid
personally by Kenny and Bentley.
Kenny will visit three Chinese
universities to promote student and
faculty exchanges. UBC currently
hosts one Korean and 12 Chinese
visiting professors. The university
also has exchange agreements with
several Japanese universities.
"I expect UBC will play a significant role in the development of inter-university cooperation that will
see an expanded exchange program
involving Canadian and Asian
scholars and graduate students,"
Kenny said before leaving.
While in Japan Kenny and Bentley will attend a meeting of the Pa-
UBC CURLING CLUB
2 Draws Available
WEDNESDAY, 5:15-7:15
THRUSDAY, 9:30-11:30
Deadline for Application 6:00 p.m., Fri., Oct.
1.
Box No. 27, AMS Office or at our Booth on
Clubs Days, Sept. 23, 24 in SUB.
INTRAMURAL
REFEREES CLUB
FIRST MEETING:
Thurs., 23 Sept., 1:30, WMG 32
Refs Needed for Soccer, Hockey,
BasketbaU and Volleyball
$5.00-$7.50/GAME
CLINICS OFFERED
For More Info
See Larry,
WMG203A
228-2203
COMMUNITY SPORTS
STUDENT SPECIALS
20% OFF ALL COOPERALL
PROTECTIVE PADDING
Micron Ice Skates  $139.50
Di Trani Ski Vests  $79.50
Pioneer Sleeping Bags
(Warm to -10° c)  $79.50
Wilson NFL Footballs  $69.50
Hunter 3 Man Tents  $44.95
Canterbury Rugby Pants  $29.95
World Class Tennis Racquets .. $24.95
Dunlop Maxply Badminton
Racquet Frames  $19.95
Cooper Soccer Balls  $19.95
All Purpose Joggers  $17.95
Showerproof Rain Jackets  $16.95
Jelinek Squash Racquets  $14.95
Promark Racquetball Racquets $12.95
Polyester Hockey Jerseys  $11.95
Sports Bags from  $7.95
THESE AND MANY OTHER
OUTSTANDING BUYS NOW
AVAILABLE AT
3615 W. Broadway    7331612
cific Circle Consortium, a group of
representatives from Pacific Rim
countries promoting international
and inter-cultural understanding in
the Pacific Rim.
Kenny appointed Bentley as his
advisor on the faculty and student
exchange programs that exist between UBC and Asian universities.
USED COMPUTER
Buy-Sell-Trade-Consignment
Call 738-3641
KEY COMPUTER
Sale and Service Ltd.
2391 Burrard St.
theEXCELSIOK^^t
... a restaurant of distinction
jyuncbhj ^'Xiutlu     $' ' am
:   featuiincj:      Jbhtcutl    J-icjiit    — W&m
4544 < W. ictft cThsz    -    '-Lt tLW, tL ^Ua of HCBC
We've
moved!
Susan and Phillip, formerly
of Groomers Hairworld,
2620 Sasamat Street, are
pleased to announce that
* as of Sept 3,1982, they
* will be joining the team at:
Susan and Phillip would like to take this opportunity to
say "thank you" to each and every one of their clients and
look forward to seeing you soon at their new location.
2529 Alma Street      T^/l   TOO!
at Broadway ZZh^Z^JjZ
Hours:
9:00-7:30-Monday-Friday
9:00-5:30 on Saturday
WEST POINT CYCLE wh,™ *„.« * „ot .
cliche. AU bikes fully relub-
presentS ed and adjusted.
NISHIKI
Bicycles of Distinction
The Nishiki Landau for commuting and touring. Chromoly
frame, all alloy components.
Reg. $375.
NOW ....
340
.00
TWO WEEKS ONLY
A Question of Protection . . .
GET THE BEST!
Reg. $64.95.
NOW	
ti
54
Custom Fit By Helmet Experts
WEST POINT CYCLES
3771 W. 10th Ave. at Alma - 224-3836
"Sales tailored to YOUR needs"
95
Show your AMS
Card for 10%
Discount on all
Regular Priced Parts
and Accessories Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 21, 1982
Promising season opened
By ALISON MOENS
Some say Saturday was the last
day of summer. It was also the first
day of the season for what some
have called UBC's most successful
team.
The women's field hockey team
sweated through Saturday afternoon to a 4-0 win over Vancouver
league rivals, the Burnaby Mohawks.
"This year's team is stronger
than last year's due to greater experience and versatility," said
coach Gail Wilson. "The result is
increased adaptability and a better
potential to counteract the opposition's systems."
The team is using tactics practised in previous play, including the
August 1 Orca festival in West Vancouver and Thursday's 1-0 exhibition win over the Vancouver Doves.
Despite the win, and the increased strength of this year's team, Wil
son is only "cautiously optimistic"
about the season. Last year the
'Birds handed over their Canadian
title to the University of Toronto,
and placed a disappointing third behind the University of Victoria.
But that experience has been fortified this year by the addition of
all-Canadian Dana Sinclair, sister
Robyn and former Doves player
Helen Olynik.
"If everyone stays healthy we
should at least make the nationals.
But our major concern is if there
will be strong enough competition
along the way," Wilson said.
Originally hesitant about entering
the team in the first half of the Vancouver league season because of intercollegiate commitments, Wilson
is positive about joining now because "it provides regular games."
The Vancouver league season is
split into two halves, fall and spring, for the first time this year.
Wilson is also replacing outgoing
president Nancy Greig in the Vancouver Women's Field Hockey Association. Admittedly press ganged
into the job, Wilson said she
"didn't really want or seek it (the
job) but is pleased about the opportunity to work with such supportive
members." The Vancouver league
is also important to the develop
ment of local hockey, Wilson said,
adding that UBC is sponsoring the
high school festival of hockey October 2 and 3.
On the same weekend, UBC also
plays host to the third annual Early
Bird Invitational tournament which
pits Simon Fraser University, UVic,
and the two top Vancouver league
teams against each other.
This weekend the 'Birds fly to
Calgary for their first Canada West
game. They will be minus goalkeeper Alison Palmer who is travelling in Britain with the national
team.
The junior varsity team, headed
to win Vancouver's second division,
travels to Washington this weekend
under coach Brian Groos.
SPORTS
F'ball wins
By PHILIP KUEBER
Awesome. It's a buzzword that
seems to describe any team that
convincingly dominates and
devastates its opponents. And it
also appears to be a word tailor-
made for the UBC Thunderbird
football team.
The T-Birds made dogmeat of the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies 37-7 Saturday in a game
where "everything worked" according to head coach Frank Smith.
When Smith said "everything" ht
was undoubtedly referring to both
offense and defense.
Offensively, quarterback Jay
Gard connected on 11 of 21 passes
for 128 yards, including a pair of
touchdowns. On the receiving end
was slotback Laurent Deslauriers
and wide receiver Ken Munro.
Their catches were for 24 and 15
yards respectively.
Munro also booted a club record
for field goals from distances of
23, 24, 26 and 37 yards. He added
two singles and three converts to account for 23 of UBC's points. Peter
Leclaire rounded out the scoring
with a touchdown from five yards
out.
Running Back Glen Steele removed any notions that he has a
"sophomore jinx" as he rushed for
an impressive 198 yards on 27 car-
Tenure 'good'
From page 1
McGeer has co-authored approximately 90 papers while in the
cabinet and spends 20 to 30 hours
per week in the lab. He receives no
salary for his work.
Student representative on the
board, Dave Dale, said that their
decision is hardly surprising. "It's a
difficult situation to be biting the
hand that feeds you," Dale said.
"I guess it's ultimately a question
of what will benefit the university.
If he resigns (from cabinet) the
universities might suffer," Dale
said, adding there is nobody in the
Social Credit government he would
want to see replace McGeer in his
universities portfolio.
Greenwood said there were good
reasons to grant the extension. He
wasn't concerned about suggestions
the board had a conflict of interest
in extending the leave of the person
responsible for university budgets.
Opposition leader Dave Barrett
had charged that the board faced a
gross conflict of interest in making
the decision on McGeer's leave.
McGeer was also criticized in student council August 25 when council passed a resolution to the effect
that regulations on leave of absence
should not be broken.
ries. Steele is now the Canadian
Inter-collegiate Athletic Union
rushing leader.
Offense, however, was not the
only knight in shining armor.
UBC's defense allowed the Huskies
a mere 14 yards total offense,
among which the Huskies lost a net
48 yards rushing.
The defense also enjoyed its
third consecutive game in which it
has not yielded a touchdown.
Saskatchewan's only points came
on two Paul Hickie field goals, and
a single point. UBC's defense has
now allowed a league - low 34
points to be scored against them in
four games.
The defensive line, led by Jason
Riley, sacked the Huskie quarterback 12 times. Six sacks were by
Riley alone, as he chased the Huskie
signal callers all afternoon.
The T-Birds now are a league
leading 4-0, and have played each
team in their conference once. UBC
has beaten Calgary 37-17, Alberta
32-4, and Manitoba 37-6.
In the latest national standings,
UBC is ranked number one.
— tilison hoona photo
EYES RIGHT: from the left it's Jean Mustard (hiding someone we can't identify). Cry Lockwood, goalie Alison
Palmer, Ann Crofts and Wendy Westermark preparing to defend the net against a penalty corner by the Vancouver Doves. They succeeded and ended up winning the exhibition game 1-0. No wonder they're all smiling or
are those mouth guards we see?
(   'Bird droppings  J
FOOTBALL
UBC travels to Eastern
Washington University in Cheney
this weekend for an exhibition
match against the Eagles.
The Eagles play in the National
College Athletic Association division 2. American rules will be used
for the match.
The Eagles will play the Simon
Fraser University Clansmen in October. UBC athletic department officials say this will provide a
reasonable comparison of UBC and
SFU before the two teams meet in
November's Shrum bowl.
SOCCER
The UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team starts its season this weekend
with a match against the University
of Saskatchewan on Wolfson field
at 2 p.m.
The University of Alberta is here
on Saturday to play the 'Birds, also
at 2 p.m. UBC's soccer team is
coached by Joe Johnson.
VOLLEYBALL
Try-out camp continues this week
for the men's volleyball team. Practise times are 4:30 p.m. Monday
and Thursday and 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday.
The Thunderbirds, coached by
Dale Ohman, are looking forward
to a good season this year as UBC is
hosting the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union national
championships in March.
The season starts in November.
Ken Hippert Hair
We Offer Student Discount
15%
OFF
ANY
SERVICE
Expires Oct. 15, 1982
With presentation of ad
by Terry, Karin, Debbie
For appointment 5736 University Blvd.
228-1471 (Next to LuckyDollar Store)
*            *   mi
fmM&tir*
■jjHSB*]ffftMPBP»jq.BByi^wsw«    -**385Be-s9S
"Hello, Mom? I can't make it
I     home for dinner. The revolu
tion has started and I've got
VBnjVjH   .-**
to help set up barricades,"
It    ' w
JSBil aft   ^
says    Ubyssey   hell-raiser
Moral  Dogma. Yes. student
revolt is just around the cor
^^HgHiP           s&if^XSP
3-F" /
ner, and student newspapers
are the place to be. Come up
to SUB 241k and help Dogma
|     smash   the   state.   Molotov
¥^ f
|      cocktails    and    typewriters
^n
I     provided free of charge.
HILLEL HIGHLIGHTS
TUESDAY, SEPT. 21
12-1:30 — Special Gourmet Lunch by Renee and
Susan.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 22
12:00-2:00 - Shefa Vegetarian Lunch.
6:00 — Dinner with special guest Isaac Moss.
A Jewish Community Fund and
Council Meeting will follow.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 23
12:00-2:00 - Shefa Lunch
Yom Kippur Services at V.S.T. Chapel
Sunday — 5:45 p.m.
Monday — 9:45 p.m.
Hillel is located behind Brock Hall.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128371/manifest

Comment

Related Items