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The Ubyssey Mar 26, 1985

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 47 Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 26, 1985
228-2301
Bruce Curtis sits
in a New Jersey
jail counting
down a 20 year
sentence for a
crime he says
was an accident.
By DAVID OLIE
Reprinted from
the Dalhousie Gazette
Canadian University Press
'Nice guy' meets tragedy
illustration rick janson
£veryone says
Bruce is a hell of nice guy. He's a bit quiet,
perhaps, but bright, well-spoken, friendly
and a damn fine writer. He's tall, dark-haired
and clean shaven, and wears plastic-rimmed
glasses. Just an ordinary person, much like
anyone else.
Bruce was admitted to Dalhousie Uni-
versityt's science program in 1982, after
graduating from the exclusive
King's-Edgehill prep school in nearby Windsor, Nova Scotia. But he never got there. Instead, he was plunged into a tragedy in July
of that year, a tragedy from which he has yet
to emerge.
Bruce Curtis grew up on his parent's 300
hectare farm on Mt. Hanley, in Nova
Scotia's luscious Annapolis Valley. His
father, Jim Curtis, is an armed forces captain. Though academically gifted, Bruce was
socially awkward; he preferred to spend his
time studying nature in the woods around his
home and writing in his journal. His friend,
Scott Franz, would later call him a
"deadbeat."
Seeing his potential, Bruce's parents
managed to put together money to send him
to King's-Edgehill, one of the most
prestigious private schools in the Atlantic.
There Bruce befriended Scott Franz, a young
man from Loch Arbour, New Jersey. Few
could understand what brought them
together, apart from interests in games and
computers, because otherwise the two were
very different.
The key to the difference lay in Franz's
home. He had grown up there with his
mother, Rosemary, 10 older brothers and
sisters, and his stepfather, Alfred Podgis.
And Alfred Podgis, a letter carrier, was a
man completely out of control.
He was an avid collector of baseball cards,
over $20,000 worth. He also collected guns,
at least a dozen. Podgis was known to the
police and the community as an extremely
violent man. Over the years local police logged 147 visits to the Podgis home to act on
complaints.
The ramshackle house was pockmarked
with bullet holes from AJf Podgis' shooting
sprees. He had assaulted two of Scott's sisters
with heavy objects, attacks which put each of
them in hospital.
But the worst was reserved for his wife
Rosemary. He broke her arms on two
separate occasions, and once pushed her
down a flight of stairs, breaking her back. All
the children left this house of horrors as early
as they could.
Rosemary Podgis didn't leave. But in an
effort to spare her youngest son Scott from
the constant abuse of his stepfather,
Rosemary saved every cent she could from
her clerical job to send him to
King's-Edgehill. He gained a reprieve, but
nothing changed at the Podgis home.
It is June 1982. Bruce Curtis has just
graduated near the top of his King's Edgehill
class. His parents, like most parents, want to
give him some sort of present. But they don't
know what it will be.
For months now, Scott Franz has been
asking Bruce to visit him in New Jersey. Scott
describes his home as an ocean-front mansion with servants and Great Danes. Bruce
has never travelled alone before, and decides
he wants to go. His parents have some
misgivings, but finally buy him a one-way
plane ticket; Scott says he has plans to drive
back to the Maritimes in early July and will
bring Bruce back with him.
Bruce's plane arrives in Newark, New
Jersey on June 29, two hours late. Alf Podgis
is waiting with his stepson, and is in a towering rage; the delay has caused him to miss a
meeting with a fellow baseball card enthusiast. His rage will continue all week, and
the two young men live in constant fear.
They seldom come home, except to sleep.
They especially avoid the upstairs, which is
Alf's domain. When they come back to the
house on the rainy night of July 3, they find
the doors locked, and shelter in the porch as
they listen to Alf Podgis beat his wife. She
lets them in after he goes to bed.
The next morning Scott ventures upstairs
to get some money. His stepfather fires a gun
at him.
Given this insane environment, why didn't
Bruce Curtis simply leave? Apart from his
understandable confusion and his lack of a
return ticket, Bruce seems to have been
motivated by a sincere desire to help his
friend.
Bruce is like that. While home from school
in the summer of 1981, Bruce met a young
woman he knew from junior high school. She
was deeply depressed, and hinted at committing suicide. He talked her out of it at the
time, but he couldn't stop her months later
when he was back in Windsor.
The tragedy affected all of Middleton, but
few so much as Bruce. He went into a
depressed state, and wrote long, sombre
passages in his journal.
In New Jersey he found another friend in
trouble. He admits now that in staying he
made "the greatest mistake of my life."
On the evening of July 4, Scott Franz is
still shaken up by the events of the morning.
He decides he needs protection, so he buys a
box of cartridges and loads two lever action
carbine he finds in his stepfather's van, one
for himself and one for Bruce. Bruce has
never before handled firearms.
That night
they slip into the house and sleep side by side
on the living room sofa, the loaded and cocked guns between them. They plan to leave for
the Maritimes the next day.
Around eight o'clock in the morning,
while his mother is cooking breakfast, Scott
heads upstairs, gun in hand, to take a
shower. Bruce is still dozing on the sofa. He
awakes to the sound of gunfire from upstairs;
Scott Franz has just shot Alfred Podgis to
death.
Bruce panics, grabs the gun beside him,
and runs for the back door. In a hallway he
nearly collides with another running figure. It
is Rosemary Podgis. The gun discharges and
Mrs. Podgis falls to the floor with a wound
running from the right side of her abdomen
to her left hip. She dies minutes later. Bruce
goes into hysterics.
Bruce Curtis has stuck by this story of the
shootings since the day he was arrested. Scott
Franz is another case. His original sworn
statement was identical to Bruce's. Before he
went to trial, however, Scott made a deal
with prosecutor Paul Chaiet: if he would
plead guilty to murder, change his story and
testify against Bruce, he would get a reduced
sentence.
At Bruce's trial, therefore, Scott testified
that Bruce deliberately shot and killed Mrs.
Podgis. Since then he has gone back to his
original version. Of course, Scott did not actually witness the shooting of his mother.
Franz, who hears the shot and the screams
downstairs, goes down to the hallway, still
carrying his gun, and finds his mother dead.
He later says he considered killing Curtis on
the spot, but thought better of it.
Instead, he enlists Bruce's help in cleaning
up the house and removing the bodies. "It's
not right to leave my mother lying like that,"
he says. Bruce, by now beyond reason,
agrees.
The bodies are loaded into the van, and the
pair set off for Scott's sister's home in Texas,
dumping the bodies and the guns in Pennsylvania on the way.
They are arrested in Texas on July 11, and
are charged with murder.
Under New Jersey law, flight from the
scene of a crime is taken as evidence of a guilty mind. Psychiatrist Dr. Harry Brunt, who
examined Curtis after his arrest, says the law
is wrong.
He says Curtis was displaying pure panic
reaction, in which his only instinct was to get
away from the scene and avoid the situation
altogether, as if it had never happened.
Anyone could react the same way, he says.
The trial of Bruce Curtis is March 1983 is
nearly as bizarre as the killings themselves.
Defense lawyer Michael Scottland calls it "a
legal lynching." New Jersey Superior Court
judge John Arnone, also known as "never-
come-home-again-Arnone," is presiding: he
has the reputation of being the toughest
judge in the state. Because Scott Franz, the
star prosecution witness, did not actually see
his mother's death, much of Bruce's trial
centres around the murder of Alf Podgis, a
crime with which Bruce is not charged.
See page 4: BOOKS Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 26, 1985
rams
Tims!
ATHLETIC COUNCIL REFERENDUM
MARCH 27,28,29
This advertisement is intended to make students aware of the current problems facing Athletics   (Remember
that Athletics includes Intramural    and Intercollegiate Athletics and Recreation UBC) on this campus, how we
got there, and what the proposed solution is.
HISTORY
In the 1950's, the Men's and Women's Athletic Committees were created by
the University to coordinate athletics at UBC.
In 1968, students voted in favour of a $5.00 Student Athletic Fee as part of a
Student Athletic Plan. This plan included a committment from the University
not to increase the Fee without a referendum and not to change the terms of
reference of the Men's or Women's Athletic Committees without approval of
AMS Students' Council.
In 1976, students voted to increase the Fee to $7.00.
In 1979, students voted to create a $1.50 Intramural Fee.
In 1982, students voted to increase the Intramural Fee to $4.50.
Last year, under the pressure of a 5% cut in provincial funding, the University cut the Athletic budget by 10%.
This year, 331/3,7ocut is being contemplated. At the same time, teams have
been cut, Recreation UBC programs have been cut, and our equipment and
facilities have become grossly inadequate.
THE UNIVERSITY SOLUTION
In response to the underfunding of Athletics, the University proposed a
special $32.00 fee to be earmarked for Athletics.
This raised many questions. One was "Does this violate the '1968 Agreement'?" This is the one everyone immediately seized upon. However, as
Students Council investigated the matter, it became apparent that the problem
was much more complex and that the answer to the first question has to be
answered in the context of many additional questions such as:
How do we ensure student priorities are met?
How do we solve our equipment and facility problems?
THE PROPOSED SOLUTION
A primary consideration is the future of Athletics. It affects most students
on campus (drop-in users of the facilities and participants in Intramural and
Intercollegiate Athletics and Recreation UBC). Students Council feels that
protecting the future of Intramural and Intercollegiate Athletics and Recreation UBC, and guaranteeing student input into the resolution of future problems are paramount. The proposed solution creates a management structure
which will have broad powers. The students will be giving it the power to assess
Athletic Fees and the University will be giving it control over Athletic programs and budgets, as well as substantial powers over the use and development
of facilities. In addition, the University Athletics Council will have a sound financial base, not just of student fees, but also with a financial commitment
from the University. In recognition of the broad powers being given the "University Athletic Council" — especially the power to levy Student Fees — Students Council has insisted on appointing 50% of the representatives so as to
guarantee that the best interests of the students will be considered.
WHY SHOULD YOU VOTE YES?
Students Council recognizes that the proposed solution ends the 1968 Agreement and that it appears the University is forcing the hands of the students.
We do not agree with the fee. Unfortunately, students will be paying it one
way or another! Even if Students Council were successful in upholding the
1968 Agreement, the University could introduce a new fee not prohibited by
the Agreement or increase tuition fees.
By negotiating a Council with these characteristics, we can guarantee that
student priorities will be met. Students Council believes the proposed University Athletic Council, with its strong student representation, control over Athletics, and a sound financial base, is the best solution to both the immediate
problems facing Athletics and potential future problems. As your elected representatives, we strongly encourage you to get out and vote YES March 27, 28
and 29.
THE REFERENDUM QUESTION
WHEREAS the students of the University of British Columbia (UBC) voted
by referenda to have levied against them a $7.00 Student Athletic Fee and a
$4.50 Intramural Fee, and
WHEREAS it is desirable to create a broader management structure to run
Athletic programs, including Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics, and
Recreation U.B.C:
BE IT RESOLVED THAT
"The Alma Mater Society of UBC (AMS) return to the University the power
to levy Athletic fees subject to an agreement between the AMS and UBC which
will include the following provisions:
(a) creation of a University Athletic Council possessing the following
characteristics:
1. 50% of the representatives to be appointed by the AMS,
2. control  over  Intercollegiate  and   Intramural  Athletics   and   Recreation
U.B.C. program budgets,
3. power to recommend the use and development of present and future
athletic and recreation facilities, and
4. power to recommend to the UBC Board of Governors changes in athletic
fees.
(b) a commitment from the University to fund the indirect cost of running
athletic and recreational facilities and a portion of the University Athletic
Council Budget."
YES    □
NO    □
Day Polls: Wednesday, March 27 to Friday, March 29 as follows:
10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
WHERE TO VOTE
Angus
Law
SUB
Buchanan
MacMillan
Woodward Library
CEME
Scarfe
Hebb
Computer Science
Sedgewick Library
War Memorial Gym
(Poll time and location subject to availability of Poll Clerks)
BRING YOUR AMS CARD
rams
VOTE YES
TO A NEW UNIVERSITY ATHLETIC COUNCIL Tuesday, March 26, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
AMS not addressing fee issue
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
The Alma Mater Society council
is hedging their bets by sanctioning
an illegal levy imposed on all full-
time students by the board of governors, a former AMS president
charged.
Bruce Armstrong, also an ex-
student board representative, said
the university double-crossed the
students by going ahead with the
$32 athletic fee increase without
asking students. He said calling a
referendum to approve what the
board had done is like shutting the
barn door after the horses have left.
The referendum asks students to
return to the university from the
AMS the power to levy athletic fees
as long as there is a university
athletic council with 50 per cent
AMS representation which controls
intercollegiate, intramural, and
recreation budgets. The council
would have the power to recommend the use and development of
present and future athletic facilities,
and to recommend athletic fee
changes to the board of governors.
Ten per cent, or 2,800 students
must vote yes for this to happen.
"The AMS should have taken a
stronger stand," said Armstrong.
He said the referendum, being held
this Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, does not ask the obvious
because the AMS wants to avoid a
confrontation with the board.
AMS finance director Jaimie Collins said he is opposed to raising
athletic fees because the board is
violating a 1968 agreement with the
AMS. He said the AMS will seek an
injunction against the board if the
referendum fails, adding he agrees
the referendum is not clearlv worded.
"Students are not sure about
what they are being asked," he
said.
When asked why the referendum
does not address the $32 levy he
said: "Ask AMS director of administration Simon Seshadri."
Collins said he understands the
referendum suggests a 'yes' vote
means support of athletics and intramurals and a 'no' vote means
"you don't want to pay the propos
ed $32 to support athletics and that
you want the AMS to sue the
university."
Collins said the AMS is trying to
keep all the options open. "We're
trying to get the best of a bad deal,"
he said.
"The referendum is specifically
engineered not to address the fee increase. The referendum deals with
the only area which students have
competence in, that of deciding on
the university athletic council,"
said Duncan Stewart, AMS external
affairs coordinator.
Stewart said the referendum is a
sign of "good faith" on the part of
the AMS "to get credibility with the
board" to facilitate negotiations.
He added the AMS is not being
wimpy as compared to any other
student council. "We tried the
board's way just so as to appear ac
commodating and if it fails then we
sue their pants off."
Administration director Seshadri
said the referendum does not address the fee increase because "the
fees have been assessed and will be
collected."
Seshadri said council did not address that real issue because they
"felt it wouldn't get them anywhere
with the board."
Students criticize fee referendum
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Student reaction to the upcoming
referendum on management of the
new athletic fee ranges from confusion with its wording to dissatisfaction with student council's role.
The Alma Mater Society referendum this Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday is council's response to the
$32 athletic fee levy UBC's board of
governors imposed on all full-time
students at UBC despite student opposition.
The levy breaks a 1968 agreement
between the AMS and board of
governors in which the board agrees
athletic fees will only be raised by
referendum in the future.
But the referendum neglects to
mention the unprecedented $32 increase and asks students to vote on
allowing the AMS to "return to the
university the power to levy athletic
fees subject to an agreement."
Ruth MacDougall, agriculture 3,
said she would vote 'no' to a referendum asking if she wanted a $32
increase. She added the wording
does not address the issue, "instead
it is asking for a vote on whether or
Sikh studies begin
By ANGUS FRASER
By September 1986, UBC will
have a chair of Sikh studies based in
the Asian centre.
Award dates
change at UBC
The application dates for UBC
undergraduate scholarships and
bursaries are changing sizeably this
year, UBC's awards director said
Monday.
Byron Hender said deadlines for
undergraduate scholarships are
changed from July 1 to May 15 and
the deadline for general bursaries is
changed from July 1 to Oct. 1.
"The changes won't adversely affect anyone," Hender said.
He said students should be aware
of the changes to the scholarship
deadline because they will be printed in the calendar and printed in
material UBC is sending to high
school principals, counsellors and
administrators.
The date for privately funded
scholarships was changed so students would know earlier if they
will receive an award, Hender said,
adding the reason the date was July
1 before is because UBC formerly
required provincial scholarship results with applications. These results are often unavailable until
August.
"Shifting the deadlines will also
spread out our office's workload
and help avoid a mid-summer
peak," Hender said.
He said setting back the bursary
deadline should not affect students
at all because these awards will still
be awarded in November or December. In the past students who applied for UBC bursaries in July
later made money that covered their
expenses and no longer required
bursaries, which confused the
award's office process, he said.
On Saturday Mar. 16 the Ottawa-
based Federation of Sikh Societies
of Canada and the university signed a formal agreement at the faculty
club to set up the Sikh centre. Sikh
Federation president Mohinder
Gosal said: It took the Sikhs almost
a century to reach at these portals
and gain entry to this temple of
knowledge. "We today open a new
chapter in the multicultural
textbook in Canada."
Funds for the chair have been
raised partly by the Sikh community, which hopes the multiculturalism ministry under Jack Murta will
also give money. Sikh centre professor Ashok Aklujkar said the
community has raised $300,000 and
expects Ottawa to match that total.
He added the federal government
has yet to reply, but Aklujkar said
he foresees no real problems gaining the funds.
The chair is to be headed by a
distinguished academic who has yet
to be appointed, he said. The chair
will be solely concerned with Punjabi language, literature and
history. Most Sikhs originate in the
Punjab province in northern India.
There will be two full year
courses and several half year
courses, said Aklujkar.
There are 80,000 Sikhs in B.C.,
60,000 of them in Vancouver.
Sikhism is a monotheistic religion
adapted from Islam and Hinduism
and founded in the 15th century.
"This chair will provide a great
opportunity to learn more about
our language and culture," said
UBC student Kamaljit Kaur. She
added she thinks it will provide
more of an understanding between
older and younger Sikhs.
With 80 per cent of the East Indian community in Vancouver
speaking Punjabi, it makes good
sense to have Punjabi studies at
UBC, she said.
n A the AMS will retain some management of the money."
The wording is so unclear most
students don't understand what it's
asking, she said.
"The AMS is selling out to the
board of governors.'' She added the
AMS has a legal responsibility to
represent students' rights and "they
are not addressing students'
rights."
Kathy Collins, graduate studies,
said she doesn't want to see athletic
fees increase but the notice of refer
endum does not address that issue.
"I don't know what they (the
AMS council) are doing, the referendum is a de facto acknowledgment of the levy," she said.
Horacio de la Cueva, Teaching
Assistants Union president, said the
referendum is misleading students
by not addressing the issue which
the board of governors raised.
"The AMS should take them to
court. It is expensive but worth it.
The board does not have a leg to
stand on."
He said the AMS is asking students to give the AMS a mandate to
negotiate a fifty-fifty management
structure with the university to
manage the total fee. "What guarantee do we have the 50 per cent
control will come through?"
De la Cueva said the fee referendum reminds him of Native Indians signing an agreement with
whites, having it violated, and signing another one. "Those businessmen (on the board) are breaking an
agreement they signed years ago
with the AMS," he added.
— Charlie fidelman photo
COUPLE GIGGLES WITH excitement while sitting in new SUB expansion. Construction finished last week, only
five months later than originally planned. Rumor has it coffee prices are cheapest on campus.
Tabloid surpasses ministries in giving loan details
The provincial government's new
16-page tabloid delivered to B.C.
homes has more information on the
new student loan remittance program than anyone in the education
or universities ministries has.
An article in B.C. Government
News quotes education minister
Jack Heinrich and universities
minister Pat McGeer saying the new
$1 million program will give scaled
remittance payments to students
successfully completing a university, college or institute programs.
Heinrich says remittance programs will be scaled according to a
student's marks and how tough the
program traditionally is. Students
with higher marks will receive more
money, he said.
The two ministers also said
students from the interior will
receive a higher remittance payment.
UBC's awards office director
said the tabloid article says more
about the program than provincial
officials have told him since the
Mar. 14 provincial budget. And
Hender said he doesn't know
whether to believe it all.
He added if the government implements this program awards officers   will   have   to   be   involved
because awards officers never send
transcript marks onto the education
ministry. This ministry administers
the loan program jointly with the
universitie's ministry.
Jack Finnbogasn, College-
Institute Educator's Association,
president, said the program is being
handled sloppily. The government
entered the $1 million program in
the budget twice, he charged, once
in the universities ministry budget
and once in the education ministry
budget.
"It's a bit sleazy on their part,
trying to grab double credit for it,"
he said. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 26, 1985
Books, letters, money still flowing in for Bruce Curtis
From page 1
Prosecutor Chaiet knows his case
is weak. He therefore begins to spin
an elaborate web of intrigue, portraying Curtis as the evil mastermind behind a pair of "thrill killings." Curtis's quiet, withdrawn
personality is seen as a cover for a
violent psychotic mind.
To cap this argument, Scott
Franz is called to the stand. Chaiet
wants him to "interpret" Curtis'
journal, especially the passages
from around the time of the suicide
of his Middleton friend.
The court goes into a voire dire
session, in which the jury is removed and the judge determines if evidence is admissable. Franz's "interpretations" are so outlandish that
Arnone rules against the jury hearing them.
But the local press is still in the
courtroom; in the U.S. this is legal
during a voire dire. Franz' sensational "testimony" is reported, the
jury is not sequestered and there
can be no doubt that they read or
heard about it. Scottland moves
for a mistrial. He is refused.
Finally, in his summation to the
jury, Arnone fails to fully explain
Oops!
On a number of occasions this
year The Ubyssey has used the
name "Anna Banana." We used it
in staff advertisements and under
captions to photos.
But Anna Banana lives. She is an
artist in East Vancouver and we used her name and her photo without
her express or implicit permission.
We apologize profusely.
We apologize for running her
photo and for implying that Anna
Banana, an independent artist, has
a connection with The Ubyssey,
which she doesn't. In fact, we
didn't know Anna existed but we
now we do.
No, no, she has no connection
with the vilest rag west of Bianca
and the only seat of depravity on
campus.
two options the jury has: to acquit
Curtis if the killing was an accident,
or to find him guilty of simple manslaughter.
Chaiet wants a conviction for
murder. The jury finds Bruce Curtis
guilty of aggravated manslaughter.
An unplanned killing caused by
recklessness and irresponsibility.
The maximum sentence for this
crime is 20 years, with 10 years before parole. On April 22, 1983, Arnone gives this sentence to Curtis. It
is the first time anyone has received
this sentence for this crime. A week
earlier, Arnone gave Scott Franz
the same sentence for murder. It is
10 years less than the maximum
term, and five years less than the
minimum for parole.
To cap the case, Curtis is sent to
Bordentown Youth Correction
Centre, an old, rundown, overcrowded racial tinderbox, while
Franz goes to Yardville, a modern
reform institution.
On June 6, 1984, Michael Scottland presented an eight-point appeal to the New Jersey Supreme
Court, to get his client's conviction
overturned.
His arguments were rejected in
half an hour. He is now working to
win a writ of habeas corpus, to at
least get Curtis transferred to a better prison. An appeal to the U.S.
Supreme Court is also a possibility.
Meanwhile the family, friends
and supporters of Bruce Curtis continue to work on his behalf. Candlelight vigils were held for him across
Canada on the eve of his 21st birthday.
Books, letters and most importantly, money, continued to pour in
to him and his defense fund. His
parents have already spent more
than $60,000 on his defense.
Local English professor and
writer Jennifer Wade, a Curtis supporter, is not optimistic about the
chances of doing something meaningful for Bruce. Speaking about
the possibility of his being transferred to a Canadian prison, she
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says, "It's a foggy Friday if that
would be successful."
Wade is especially bitter about
the attitude of the federal and provincial governments to the case. She
says their inaction is part of "the
mood of cosying up to the United
States. We really had a better
chance under Trudeau. . .
(premier) Buchanan could so easily
talk to the governor of New
Jersey."
External affairs minister Joe
Clark recently said there is nothing
more the Canadian government can
do for Bruce Curtis.
Cast adrift by his government, if
not by his friends, Curtis serves his
time in Bordentown. Ironically, he
is a valued member of the prison
population.
He teaches basic English skills to
other inmates, 80 per cent of whom
are illiterate. In his off hours he
takes correspondence courses, at
present art history and Latin. He
also answers the volumes of mail he
gets from relatives and well-wishers,
and writes of his loneliness and despair in short stories.
CENTRE
Copy Card
Available Now!!
$10.00 Value
No More Coins
Needed.
Student Union
Building
228-4388
SIDEWALK SEMINAR
Wed., Thurs., 3-5 p.m.
In Front of SUB
Napoleon devastated Europe in pursuit of his dream of   a united Europe
under the crown of France. Napoleon combined pomp, pageantry, and
patriotism with the policy making function of the nation.
Hitler devastated Europe in pursuit of his dream of a united Europe under
the command of the "Master Race." Hitler combined pomp, pageantry, and
patriotism with the policy making function of the nation.
In Iran a religious leader is devastating the middle East with his dream of a
return to an earlier order. Again, the youth of Iran are being sacrificed to the
dreams of a leader who combines the pomp, pageantry, and patriotism of his
nation with the policy making power of that nation.
Four successive presidents defied the world, the American people, and the
Congress to devastate Vietnam over a degree of public opposition never
before seen in America. The president combines pomp, pageantry, and
patriotism with the polciy making power of the nation.
The French were helpless before Napoleon. The Germans were helpless
before Hitler. The Japanese were helpless before Tojo just as the Americans
are helpless before President Reagan.
The combination of pomp, pageantry, and patriotism with that of policy is
impossible to resist.
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Accepted Tuesday, March 26, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Summit only 'public relations'
By BRENT LEDGER
The NDP MP for Vancouver-
Kingsway delivered a stinging attack Friday on Canadian prime
minister Brian Mulroney's attempt
to cosy up to U.S. president Ronald
Reagan and the U.S. government.
Ian Waddell told 30 people in
Buchanan D121 that the recent
"Shamrock Summit," between
Mulroney and Reagan was nothing
more than a "public relations exercise."
All of the treaties signed in
Quebec  City were hastily  written
and of little benefit to Canada, he
said.
Saying that "we don't want to be
Reagan's poodle," Waddell warned
that "we have to struggle to keep
this country independent."
He said closer relations with the
U.S. are an economic gamble,
because there are no guarantees that
closer relations will promote U.S.
investment in Canada. Such investment, he said, is influenced more by
economic factors such as interest
rates than by political summitry.
"There is even some thought,"
said Waddell, "that the U.S.
economy is a declining economy."
He said the American economy is so
tied to defense spending that the
bubble could burst at any moment.
The world's expanding economies
are those of the Pacific Rim —
Japan, Singapore, South Korea, he
said.
And freer trade has hidden
ramifications, said Waddell. It
could hinder our ability to set our
own social policy, especially in
areas such as medicare and trade
unionism    where    the   U.S.    had
India oppresses Sikhs
By PATTI FLATHER
The Hindu-Sikh conflict in India
is not a conflict between religious
groups, but a political conflict created by the Indian government, the
World Sikh Organization — Canada president said Saturday.
Gian Singh Sandhu told 60 people in IRC 1 that the only solution is
the creation of an independent Sikh
state, Khalistan.
The Indian government betrayed
the Sikh population by breaking
promises to give Sikhs a special
place in an India independent of
Britain.
"Sikhs have continuously been
betrayed," said Sandhu, a business
management teacher at Cariboo
College.
He said the Sikhs joined hands
with the Indian National Congress
party working to end British colonial rule. He said the British offered
Sfkhs an independent state in 1946
— like they offered to Indian Moslems — but that Sikhs wanted to remain in India.
But in the 1950 Indian constitution article 25 described Sikhs as
part and parcel of the Hindu majority, and gave them no special
rights in the Punjab province,
where most Sikhs are concentrated,
he said.
And in 1953 the Indian government deliberately said the country's
north would not be divided along
linguistic lines even though this had
been agreed upon since 1921, Sandhu said.
The problem culminated with the
June 1984 attack on the Sikh
Golden Temple in Amritsar, he
said, adding Canadians have only
heard one side because the government controls the information flow.
"Even today the province of
Punjab is sealed.  The media has
tried to do a fair job but their hands
are tied."
Sandhu questioned information
concerning the army attack, saying
the official death figure of 491
Sikhs was far too low. And he asked why, if the Sikh leader Bhindranwale, killed in the attack, was such
a violent extremist, he was not
charged with any crime when arrested in 1982.
Sandhu read the account of a
45-year-old Sikh woman whose hus
band and three sons were murdered
in front of her after Indian prime
minister Indira Gandhi was assassinated by Sikh bodyguards in October. She was raped by teenage
boys in front of one son.
"No one on the international
scene has had the courtesy to feel
sorry (for attacks on Sikhs)," Sandhu said. But said Sikhs are partly
to blame because they have not
communicated their point of view
See page 8: INDIA
Lewis praises UN,
Canadian activity
By MURRAY JOHNSON
The United Nations is a
remarkable forum to be applauded,
Canada's UN ambassador said Friday.
Stephen Lewis told more than
100 people in a standing room only
crowd in a Lassere lecture theatre
that the specialized agencies alone
justify the existence of the UN.
UNICEF has been active encouraging mothers to breast feed
their infants, immunizing children
and promoting oral rehydration
therapy which, Lewis estimates,
saves 400,000 children per year. The
UN Development Program, with a
budget of U.S. $700 million per
year, is involved in economic
reconstruction of Third World
countries, said Lewis.
The UN High Commission on
Refugees has recently been active in
Afghanistan, Ethiopia and Chad,
he added.
Lewis said he believes the structure of the UN is fundamentally
sound. He said all 159 nation states
exercise an equal voice and each of
Arts dean Will stays on
By VICTOR WONG
Robert Will is back as arts dean
until 1991 at least.
The board of governors reappointed Will Mar. 7, based on
recommendations from former
UBC president George Pedersen.
Will resigned as arts dean last July.
In a letter to arts faculty announcing the reappointment, Robert
Smith, acting president and former
vice-president academic, said both
he and Pedersen had been contacted by several colleagues who
wanted Will to continue as dean.
Following meetings with Pedersen,
Will agreed to sign on as arts dean
for a six-year term starting July 1,
1985.
Smith concluded his letter by saying, "I wish to record publicly my
deep appreciation to Dean Will for
his tireless efforts on behalf of the
university, and for his willingness to
continue to serve as dean in the present circumstances."
When contacted Monday, Smith
declined to comment, saying he did
not discuss matters such as appointments of deans. "The announcement in UBC Reports (which
reported the appointment Mar. 20)
is the extent of what I have to say
on the subject," he said.
Acting vice-president academic
Dan Birch said there was a great
deal of support from within the arts
faculty for Will's reappointment.
"There was also strong support
within the search committee for
him," he said.
Birch said the reappointment he
thought was "an interpretation of
confidence in his leadership by the
faculty." He denied the decision
had anything to do with Pedersen's
resignation Mar. 7. "In fact,
Pedersen himself encouraged dean
Will to accept the appointment,"
he said.
Robert Will became acting arts
dean in October, 1974, filling in for
Doug Kenny, who resigned to
become the administration president. He became permanent dean in
May, 1975.
Talking about his resignation in a
September Ubyssey interview, he
said, "I didn't set out to be an administrator. When I was a young
man, I decided to be a teacher, and
so I'm going back to teaching.
Careers have their seasons like
everything else, and I decided that
this season is over."
Will could not be reached for
comment Monday on his change of
mind.
these countries has one vote in the
general assembly.
"This has caused some apprehension on the part of the superpowers
but it presses them toward resolution," Lewis said.
Canada has the respect of many
nations for being outspoken and
dealing seriously with the arms race
and environmental problems, he
said.
Lewis said that Canada has been
a protagonist in establishing committees to deal with these issues. In
1983, Canada drafted a resolution
toward banning chemical warfare.
Recently, Canada has been pushing
for a comprehensive nuclear testing
ban.
Canada helped to pass a resolution on international drug trafficking, said Lewis, and a convention
on torture. While enforcement remains difficult, these international
laws aid in "building moral suasion
on those countries which do not
follow the prescription of the
covenants," Lewis said.
Canada acts as an independent
nation in the general assembly, he
said. Lewis claimed Canada voted
against the United States one third
of time. While the U.S. has
withdrawn from the United Nations
Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organization, and Great
Britain has given notification of
withdrawal, Canada remains as an
active member, willing to work
from within to solve "some real
problems facing UNESCO."
"In all, it is possible-for Canada
See page 8: UN
markedly different atttitudes  and
legislation.
Despite these potential problems,
the goal of closer American-
Canadian relations has prompted
the Conservatives to eliminate the
useful Foreign Investment Review
Agency purely "as a symbol to the
U.S." and to go along with the conversion of the Distance Early Warning line into a Northern Warning
System.
Waddell charged that this conversion is tied in with the American
Strategic Defence Initiative aiming
to develop space weapons.
Waddell also criticized the Tory
government's decision to end the
subsidy to homeowners who convert from oil to gas heating. Bill
C-24, which ends the subsidy, will
only benefit big business, notably
the multinational oil companies,
said Waddell.
— Charlie fidelman photo
JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH never looked better than this sprightly
Lutheran campus chaplain. Ray Schultz paraded around UBC Monday
handing out "Bach bucks." The Lutheran Campus Centre is co-sponsoring
several events for the 3COth anniversary of composer Bach's birth.
Workstudy program still in smoko
A new summer workstudy program announced
by the tabor ministry in the March 14 provincial
budget is still surrounded by fog.
Rick McCandless, education rnjnmrv student
support services director, said Mondav his department will administer the labor ministry's $300,000
program but he has received no details regarding
it. '       ' .     '■ r
"I'm making inquiries about the requirements
(for the program)," McCandless said, adding he
thought it would be similar to the winter
workstudy program which employs students at
universities, colleges and institutes to do campus
work related to their studies.
He added these institutions should soon know
what percentage of the $300,000 budget will be
allocated to I hem. The summer breakdown will be
similar to the percentage breakdown for the
5200,000 winter program, he said.
But UBC's awards office director Byron
Hender said he thought the program will be entirely different than the winter program and will
not be administered by his office like the winter
program is.
"If it is a similar program my office still hasn't
been notified of it," he said.
This program will be a summer employment
program and not a student aid program at all,
Henders thinks.
He said it's unfortunate the program has been
given the same name as the winter program if the
program is different. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 26, 1985
Larger issue lost
You cannot mend a fence half-way or you will have to rebuild it later. If the Alma Mater Society wants an acceptable
outcome to the athletic fee controversy they will have to take
stronger action and fight the proposed fee.
The athletics fee was the last negotiable stronghold of the
student body which has disappeared overnight by way of tuition fees . . . differential fees. . .
With the athletic fee increase the board has completely ignored precedent and the 1968 agreement which is a legal
agreement for some people — the AMS lawyer — but not for
the board. The board is showing complete contempt for the
legality and of course for students.
We cannot trust them to restrict their levying to educational matters like tuition, and 'athletics' after this dangerous
precedent.
The Ubyssey sought student comment in SUB concourse
on the referendum which begins Wednesday, and could not
find anyone who supported the AMS council's present action, seeking a say in the fee's administration.
The students thought they were being walked on.
Students said they wanted a solution — the fee's removal —
or a complete break with the administration on the issue.
The AMS' present stance is based on real, practical
reasoning — the council wants some say in the fee's use —
but it fails to address the larger issue.
The board does not have our interests foremost in mind.
They are appointed to run the university within the provincial
government's guidelines. They fit us in where they can, after
everything else.
Let's not pretend; we've been overrun. Let's not collaborate now because it has happened.
Letters
Wait! Believe in Jesus!
Have you ever been frustrated?
Or, perhaps, "down in the
dumps"? Do you ever wonder why
life is so tough, at times? Well, the
cure for all these is plain and simple,
pie.
You can be rid of these feelings
with ease just by doing one thing:
believe in Jesus! Wait! Hold On!
Before you get turned off, please
listen to what I have to say.
I'd just like to tell you the good
news. Do you know when at times
you find a bargain at a department
store and you just can't wait to tell
your friends.
Well I feel the same way. No . . .
this is not a religious proposition;
this is merely an appeal of common sense. I mean if you were being
dragged into quick sand, and a guy
(or woman for those who insist on
equality when it comes to the
gender) jumped in and saved you
from its claws of death, died in your
place, wouldn't you remember
him/her for his/her bravery?
Well Jesus, the Son of God died
for us (John 3:16 - "For God so
loved the world, that He gave His
only begotten Son, that whoever
believes in Him should not perish,
but have eternal life").
Now you're probably thinking,
THE UBYSSEY
March 26, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year Dy
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
It was a slow night at College Printers. Robert Beynon phoned, Charlie Fidelman typed, Monte Stewart and Patti Flather fought over pencils, Angus Fraser,
Victor Wong, Murray Johnson, Brent Ledger, Sarah Millin, Renate Boerner and Steve Janus were there in spirit but not in body, James Young just barely made it
in and Betsy Goldberg wrote the masthead.
"Why did He die for us? . . . we
didn't drown in quick sand, yet,"
and "What's this eternal life He's
talking about?"
First of all, we are drowning in
our own sins. Do you ever get this
overbearing conscience in you when
you do something that's not right
and it bugs you for ages?
With the Lord, we are forgiven
(through repentance) these sins, and
are free from any guilty feelings
that we might have.
You see, when Jesus died, he
took all our sins from us, and suffered for us, being beaten and
humiliated and crucified just so we
could be forgiven and saved from
our sins we committed past, present
and future.
Secondly, He promised a better
life, with guidance when we are on
earth and company day by day providing strength and encouragement.
He also promised us eternal life in
His kingdom up in heaven.
Have you ever been with someone you loved a lot or enjoy the
company of and wished never to
part with him or her? Well the same
thing goes for walking in step with
God.
Perhaps you may be thinking (1
hope) now, "How can I get this,
and what's the gimmick?" Well all
you have to do is believe (Acts 16:31
- "Believe in the Lord Jesus, and
you shall be saved, you and your
household").
What's the gimmick? There's no
gimmick. Believe in Him and walk
with Him every step in your life letting Him guide you, so He can
make you the person He wants you
to be.
Remember, he will never forsake
you or leave you (Hebrews 13:5,
Jesus said, "I will never leave you
or desert you").
How can you get started? Just
ask Him into your life. Just say this
prayer, "Lord Jesus, I need You.
Thank You for dying on the cross
for my sins. I open the door of my
life and receive You as my Saviour
and Lord. Thank You for forgiving
my sins and giving me eternal life.
Take control of the throne of my
life. Make me the kind of person
You want me to be."
That's it! He's in your life now,
and you can be sure of it. Or if
you're not sure, talk to one of the
people that approach you with the
four spiritual laws.
They are also spreading the
Word. And if that fails, then go to
any church and talk to a true Christian on how to get started.
Go ahead . . . what have you got
to lose, but a new life to gain! But if
you dont't feel compelled, now,
that's okay; think about this over
the summer, and 1 hope you'll agree
with me.
Good luck on the finals and have
a great summer. May God go with
>ou! Richard Wong
science 1
Thanks for fund
donation, grads
To the 1985 grad class council;
On behalf of the Alma Mater
Society and the organizers of our
AMS special bursary fund, 1 wish to
thank you for your donation of
$1,000 to the fund.
In view of the increasing financial
burdens being placed upon UBC
students, the presence of adequate
student aid is becoming a major
determinant of whether individuals
can attend university.
I am sure that future bursary recipients will be especially grateful for
both your foresight and your
generosity.
Don Holubitsky
board of governors student member Tuesday, March 26, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Pat McGeer's logic nonsensical
By VICTOR WONG
Pat McGeer has a fixed idea
about universities. He thinks
they're too big.
It was okay to be big before. That
was because we had a baby boom
during the fifties and sixties, and all
those babies grew up and became
university students, filling the
universities to over-capacity during
the seventies and causing them to
expand. But the baby boomers are
gone now, their generation having
graduated, and the university
system is bloated.
(freestyle)
So, says McGeer, it's time for
universities to go on a diet. No
more useless disciplines in this
system, no more unpopular classes.
Those are out. Only really popular
classes, or faculties which give B.C.
economically useful people, will be
allowed to survive. No more low-
average students — standards have
to be higher.
This way, McGeer figures, the
B.C. government can save money
because it doesn't have to give
universities so much money since
they're going to be smaller. And in
return, the province gets better-
trained graduates, because the instructors can give more time to
fewer students.
McGeer may have a point in
thinking that some faculties are
useless — after all, who needs a
creative-writing graduate? And the
universities certainly cannot plead
innocent to charges of wasteful
spending; not all of them anyway.
But if we were to follow McGeer's
logic then the universities ministry's
other policies don't make sense.
When a university realizes it's not
going to get as much money as
before, it means the money's got to
be found somewhere else. Usually
this means tuition fees are going to
to go up.
If you're a forestry student who's
a genius in this area, but come from
a low-income family, you're going
to need some financial aid.
The most accessible is the B.C.
government's student loan program
— but there's been little or no increase in this program. What's
more, it's an all-loan program —
the student is going to walk out of a
university with a massive debt along
with his diploma. When you consider how hard it is for graduates to
get   a  job,   you   realize   that   the
graduate's been put in one hell of a
quandary.
And what about high school
students who want to have a post-
secondary education, but can't or
won't go to university? These
numbers are bound to increase as
universities shrink, so what do you
do with them?
Well, you could put them in community colleges, so it's reasonable
to expect that enrolment in community colleges will increase. But
the budgets for colleges are not increasing — they have the same
budget problems as our universities.
The final problem is the question
of what is useful and what is not. A
small class teaching people about
mining is in as much danger of being cut as, say, a class in rehabilitation medicine, simply because few
people are enrolled in it.
Some disciplines can be perceived
to have little or no use whatsoever,
in spite of their popularity.
McGeer, of course, says he won't
make specific guidelines for judgment, but there's little doubt there
are some occasions when an administration has to consult the
ministry on the usefulness of a certain discipline.
There is also a danger in making
universities smaller because of a
drop in university-age people.
McGeer thinks such a boom is
unlikely to happen again.
But we don't know that for sure.
The baby-boomers might be interested in producing another
boom. If that should happen, our
current problems with education
are going to multiply unless the
education and universities
ministries change their present tack.
If Pat McGeer is serious in his
logic about universities, he had better review the logic behind his
ministry's other responsibilities.
I don't think he wants to make
things uncomfortable for post-
secondary students (who, for the
most part, are of voting age) but the
Letters
Vote no, resist precedent
At their meeting of March 7, the
board of governors imposed a $32
athletic fee levy on all full-time
students registered at UBC, effective 1985-86.
This represents an outrageous increase from the present $13.50 collected for athletics, and particularly
so when no explanation of how the
money will be spent has been forthcoming.
Indeed, this decision was imposed upon the students of UBC
without any kind of advance notice,
without any attempt at student input, without any apparent justification or planning, and without the
legal requirements of a referendum
of the students affected. All of this
is totally without precedent on this
campus.
Now the Alma Mater Society
council is conducting a referendum
(to be held Wednesday through Fri
day this week) in an attempt to
sanction this illegal levy by asking
students to "return to the University the power to levy Athletic fees
Passage of this referendum
would legalize the university's actions in imposing this levy, and so
would insure that students will indeed pay the levy next September.
This is a very dangerous precedent.
The council of the Graduate Student Society, at their meeting last
Thursday, voted to oppose this
referendum. I urge every student to
resist this encroachment upon their
rights. Vote no on the AMS referendum! Phil Bennett
Graduate Student Societv President
Athletic fee 'immoral'
For the past four years at UBC, I
have watched the price of all Alma
Mater Society-run enterprises increase to abysmally high levels solely so that these businesses would
show a profit. For example, the
profits from the Pit (where beer is
now more expensive than at comparable bars downtown) and the
games room alone total $200,000.
Ubyssey should give peace
advertisement free space
Your March 22 editorial
"Dumb" was certainly aptly
named. The Alma Mater Society's refusal to provide $200 for
a full page ad in The Ubyssey
may have been petty, but one
wonders why The Ubyssey is
charging for such an ad in the
first place.
If The Ubyssey feels so
strongly about the Walk for
Peace then why doesn't it just
give them the space for free?
After all, "what is $200 to help
advertise the walk to
students?"
Or why doesn't the Students
for Peace and Mutual Disarmament get a passably literate
individual to write an article on
the walk for The Ubyssey, explaining its background and
providing details of this year's
walk?
Come to think of it, can't
The Ubyssey spare a writer for
one issue from its crusade
against budget cuts, so that an
article for the walk could be
written?
For that matter, why doesn't
The Ubyssey just devote a
whole issue to the topic? I
know it's been done before,
but surely if there is one subject for which it's worth risking
repetition, it's the nuclear arms
debate.
Sze-Kwok Wai
arts 1
Today, when it is time for the
AMS to use some of those profits
and fight this illegal and immoral
athletic fee increase, it appears that
the AMS would rather protect its
money than us, its members.
Rather than suing the board of
governors, a potentially expensive,
but nonetheless correct, decision,
the AMS is trying to pass a referendum which will, by example, allow
the board to impose any fee increase it desires, regardless of its legality.
Every other ruling body at this
university has chosen money over
student interests and it is unimaginable that our only real, elected representatives are asking us for permission to do the same. It is time
for the AMS to forget the Hollis
legacy with its holy grail profits and
support us with the money it has
taken from us.
There is a saying that speaks of
the benefits of a stitch in time, and
damn it AMS this is the time to put
an end to the idea that students'
loan money is an open piggy bank
for the university administration.
Regardless of the referendum result, the AMS should sue the board
and show that finally, someone is
acting concretely to protect our legitimate financial concerns.
Gord Crawford
psychology 4
fact that he is indicates some of his
opinions are not in sync with reality.
Victor Wong is an unusual and
perennial Ubyssey staffer keeping
an eve on McGeer.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 26, 1985
Morgentaler critcizes law
WATERLOO (CUP) —
Canada's foremost abortionist said
he was not always willing to risk his
career as a doctor to provide safe
abortions for women.
"If I help you, I could go to jail
for the rest of my life. I could lose
my license. I'm married, I have two
children, I just can't do this for
you," Dr. Henry Morgentaler said
he told women who came to him in
the 1960s looking for an abortion.
But Morgentaler said he changed
his mind after a woman he had
refused to help nearly died at the
hands of a "back-alley butcher."
He said he could not wait until the
abortion law changed.
"It was my duty to help these
women."
Speaking to more than 2,000 people at the University of Waterloo
Mar.    18   amid   heavy   security,
Morgentaler refuses to perform
Canadian law governing abortion is
"unfair, undemocratic and
dangerous to the health of
women." The law, amended in
1968, prohibits anyone from per
forming abortions without the approval of a therapeutic abortion
committee at an accredited
hospital.
Canada has the second highest
rate of second trimester abortions
— those done during the three to six
months pregnancy stage — in the
world, because of the committees'
delays, Morgentaler said, adding
that chances of major complications increase by 20 per cent with
each week an abortion is delayed.
Morgentaler refused to perform
abortions after the fifth month of
pregnancy because he says the fetus
is then a human being. At that
point, the fetus has developed a
neo-cortex — a part of the brain
that Morgentaler says marks the
difference between a potential
human life and a human being.
Morgentaler's philosophy contrasts sharply with that of the "pro-
life" lobby, which claims human
life begins at conception. He accused the "other side" of employing
violent rhetoric and inciting those
against choice to take violent action
India violates civil rights
From page 5
adequately to people in Canada and
elsewhere, adding this is the main
task for the 200,000 Sikh-Canadians.
He said when four American
nuns were murdered in El Salvador
the whole world noticed, but that
same notice is lacking when a Sikh
religious leader is killed.
Sikhs living in Canada have justifiable reasons for being concerned
with events in India, Sandhu said,
because their relatives are being persecuted, and basic human rights are
violated.
"You as a Canadian, if you have
any love for human rights, you will
speak out," he said.
The solution is to have a separate
nation for Sikhs, Sandhu said, with
equal rights for non-Sikhs as well,
and no caste system. He said the
World Sikh Organization is committed to working for this peacefully.
UBC's Sikh Students Association
sponsored the speech.
UN betters humanity
From page S
to make considerable contributions
to the betterment of humankind,"
Lewis said.
This speech was sponsored by the
United Nations Association of
Canada and the UBC Centre for
Human Settlement. Stephen Lewis
has spent the last nine days crossing
Canada, speaking about Canada's
role in the UN.
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against the abortionists and their
supporters.
"These people say they are pro-
life, yet they threaten all the time to
kill me."
An arsonist gutted the Toronto
women's bookstore last year in an
attempt to destroy Morgentaler's
clinic, upstairs in the same building.
In the U.S., more than 30 abortion
clinics have been bombed.
About 300 protesters
demonstrated against abortion outside the hall during Morgentaler's
lecture. Security officers frisked
people going into the hall and apprehended one man for throwing an
egg during the protest.
AMS SPEAKERS presents
DR. HENRY
MORGENTALER
from Toronto
Fri., April 12, 7 p.m.
(Door 6 p.m.)
SUB BALLROOM
Advance Tickets $5.00 at
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Morgentaler wili
on April 13.
speak at UBC
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Report says Tories should tie transfer funds
OTTAWA (CUP) — Post-secondary institutions in British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario and
Newfoundland could be heading
for financial disaster if the federal
government accepts the recommendations of a recently released
report.
The report, made public by secretary of state Walter McLean March
14, said the federal government
should only increase its transfer
payments for higher education to
the provinces by the amount that
the provinces increase their funding.
The report said such a measure
would encourage the provinces to
boost their spending on post-secondary institutions, but points out
that four provinces — B.C.,
Manitoba, Ontario and Newfoundland — have steadily reduced the
amount they have paid in education
operating grants since 1977.
The 50-page document noted
that, on average, the federal government makes up 80 per cent of
Rally for Meares coming
Native Indian leaders will try to
speak to save Meares Island at a
Macmillan Bloedel shareholders
meeting Thursday while conservationists and Natives protest outside.
Native leaders George Watts and
Simon Lucas will try to convince
the meeting in the Hotel Vancouver
Thursday morning not to log the
island off Vancouver Island's west
coast because Native people have
aboriginal title to it.
And Natives, environmental
groups, and "ordinary people" will
begin an outside protest at 9 a.m.,
not 10 a.m. as originally publicized,
said Heather Macleod, a Society for
the Promotion of Environmental
Conservation spokesperson.
MacLeod said the demonstration
aims to influence undecided
shareholders to support a logging
moratorium on Meares. Macmillan
Bloedel wants to put a logging road
right through a Meares watershed,
she said.
"When that's done the island's
destroyed."
Macleod said the road would go
through riverways, which would
then carry silt to mudflats which
provide a home for rich
aquaculture. Salmon streams would
be destroyed and erosion would increase, making reforestation difficult, she added.
The right to log Meares Island is
still before the courts as Nuu-Chah-
Nulth Indians say logging cannot
proceed before their claim to
aboriginal title is settled. Unlike
other Canadian provinces, B.C.
signed few treaties transferring
Native land to the crown.
core financing for higher education,
while at least half of all provincial
governments rely almost solely on
federal funds to finance universities
and colleges.
"The provinces would now have
a powerful incentive to move towards the Gross National Product
rate in increasing their grants to
universities and colleges, since every
dollar of their increase would, in
the average case, trigger an 80 per
cent contribution from the federal
government," the report said.
The report said since 1977 B.C.
has reduced its share of provincial
education funds by more than 25
per cent, Manitoba has put in more
than 22 per cent less, Ontario has
decreased its portion by 15 per cent
and Newfoundland has done so by
more than 23 per cent.
In particular, the report noted
that  B.C.  will  make a profit  of
about $20 million on transfer payments for education this year, receiving $482 million but only passing on $462 million of it to universities and colleges. Ontario now
only assumes 11 per cent of the direct costs of running its post-
secondary institutions.
Donald Savage, executive secre
tary of the Canadian Association of
University Teachers, said he is skeptical of the "powerful incentive"
for the provinces, which he says is
the same as the federal government
threatening to stop pumping so
much money into higher education.
"We want to see real incentives,
not threats," he said.
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NOTICE OF REFERENDUM
WHEREAS the students of the University of British Columbia (UBC) voted by referenda to have
levied against them a $7.00 Student Athletic Fee and a $4.50 Intramural Fee, and
WHEREAS it is desirable to create a broader management structure to run Athletic programs, including Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics, and Recreation U.B.C:
BE IT RESOL VED THA T
"The Alma Mater Society of UBC (AMS) return to the University the power to levy Athletic fees subject to an agreement between the AMS and UBC which will include the following provisions:
(a) creation of a University Athletic Council possessing the following characteristics:
1. 50% of the representatives to be appointed by the AMS,
2. control over Intercollegiate and Intramural Athletics and Recreation U.B.C. program budgets,
3. power to recommend the use and development of present and future athletic and recreation facilities,
and
4. power to recommend to the UBC Board of Governors changes in athletic fees.
(b) a commitment from the University to fund the indirect cost of running athletic and recreational
facilities and a portion of the University Athletic Council Budget. "
YES    □
NO    □
Day Polls: Wednesday, March 27 to Friday, March 29 as follows:
10 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Angus Scarfe
Buchanan Sedgewick Library
CEME SUB
Computer Science Woodward Library
Law Hebb
MacMillan War Memorial Gym
(Poll time and location subject to availability of Poll Clerks)
BRING YOUR A.M.S. CARD
\ Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 26, 1985
Uj/A
(fitf&f<
TODAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, noon, SUB 211.
JEWISH MESSIANIC BIBLE STUDY
8ib4e study, non, Buch 0202.
AMS ART GALLERY
Art education — printmaking, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., all
week. AMS An gallery, SUB.
UBC 389 SCULPTURE STUDENTS
"Earth Works," presentation of sculptures, 9
a.m -4 p.m., Geology 126.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, noon, SUB 211
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, all welcome, 7 p m.. Aquatic centre.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Film: "Joy of Bach," noon, SUB auditorium.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Ticket sales for March 30 graduation dinner and
dance, 11:30 a.m. - noon, Buchanan near advisor's office.
WEDNESDAY
IS MA I LI A STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Badminton, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Osborne gym A.
THE UBYSSEY
Important staff meeting, noon, SUB 241K.
UBC SPORTSCAR CLUB
Elections for executives and pre-Westwood
seminar, 2 p.m., SUB 205.
UBC 389 SCULPTURE STUDENTS
"Earth   Works,"   presentation   of   sculpture,   9
a.m.-4 p.m., Geology 126.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES' DEPARTMENT
"Zen as FAS (Self, World, and History,) with Dr.
Abe from the University of Hawaii, noon, Asian
centre 604.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Public meeting with Dale Maranda, "The
Oneness of Man and God," noon, Buch B317.
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE AND
TRAVEL CLUB-UBC
"Europe — Tips for the Independent Traveller,"
presentation, noon, SUB 205.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Time out, newcomers welcome. 4:30 p.m.,
Gallery lounge.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Jerry Evenrud speaks on "Great Music is Bach,"
noon, VST Epiphany Chapel, and chamber
music in SUB concourse.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Elections for executive, noon, Kenny 2007.
THURSDAY
ROYAL COMMONWEALTH SOCIETY
Dr. John Munro on "Recent Developments in
the Pacific Commonwealth with a Focus on
Asia," 7 p.m., Asian centre auditorium.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
Jerry Evenrud speaks on "Great Music is Bach,"
noon, VST Epiphany Chapel, and chamber
music in SUB concourse.
PLENTY CANADA
Executive director speaks and shows slides on
self-help projects in Lesotho, Guatemala and the
Caribbean, noon, Buch A203.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Communitas volunteers speak on their year of
work and travel in India, noon, St. Mark's College music room.
UBC 389 SCULPTURE STUDENTS
"Earth Works, presentation of sculpture, 9
a.m.-4 p.m., and Friday, Geology 126.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB. SOCIALIST
EDUCATION SOCIETY, LATIN AMERICA
SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Speaker and film: "Todos Santos Chuchumatan
— Life in a Mayan Indian Village in Guatemala,"
noon, Buch A100.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Meetilng re final dinner, 1:30 p.m., International
House.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Speaker   on   hazardous   waste   management,
noon, Geography 212.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Last   general   meeting   this   term,   will   discuss
Whistler, summer events, and next year, noon,
Hennings 302.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES DEPARTMENT
Dr. Abe from the University of Hawaii speaks on
"Dogen's Identity of Practice and Attainment in
Zen," 2:30 p.m., Buch D250.
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UBC AMATEUR RADIO SOCIETY
General meeting election of new executive,
noon, Brock extension 358.
COMMERCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Jean Chretien speaks on "Business and Government, the Liberal Perspective," noon, Hebb
Theatre.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Executive meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Rally with guest speakers arid music, noon, SUB
plaza.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Ticket sales for March 30 graduation dinner and
dance, 11:30 a.m.-noon, Buchanan near
advisor's office.
FRIDAY
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Ticket sales for March 30 graduation dinner and
dance, 11:30 a.m.-noon, Buchanan near
advisor's office.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bzzr garden. 3:30-7 p.m., SUB 205.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Meeting regarding final dinner, noon, International House.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Bzzr garden, t-shirt silkscreening, elections, 4:30
p.m.-?, SUB 206,
3\
The Bookstore
will be
CLOSED FOR
INVENTORY
on APRIL 1st & 2nd
We'll be open again to
serve you, Wed. April 3rd
BOOKSTORE
228-4741 ■■
JJ
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ONE-WAY   PLANE   TICKET   to   Toronto,
leaving April 30th, 879-0749 after 6 p.m.
WANTED:  One-way air ticket to Winnipeg
April 26, 27 or 28. Call Cathy, 733-6990.
ONE-WAY  air  ticket  to  Toronto   April  27,
call Cathy, 733-6990.
30 - JOBS
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40 — Messages
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35 - Lost
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aftern. March 20. Aquatic Cen./SUB. Contains $50-$100. Belongs to single
unemployed father. Please return. Call
224-1993.
65 - SCANDALS
GUF, what a way to break into Spring.
Get ready for a major kidnapping, anytime,
anywhere! IIYCPK.
MOTORCYCLE '83 Suzuki GS450T, under
warranty, like new, excellent condition,
3,100 km. $1,200. Gloria, 253-5362.
15 — Found
CALCULATOR found in B-Lot parking in
December, '84. To identify call 266-2306.
20 - HOUSING
FURNISHED ROOM in shared house, one
block from UBC gates, util., phone,
cable/pay TV, W/D, $225. 228-1242, Rob.
25 - INSTRUCTION
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National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
OCTOBER 5, 1985 LSAT
on September 13. 14, 15/1985.
For information call free
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112-800-387-3742.
PIANO LESSONS by Judy Alexander, graduate of Julliard School of Music. Near Cam-
bie & 38th. 731-8323.
70 - SERVICES
GREEK ISLAND GETAWAY June 29 Aug
2. 35 days of fun in the sun. visit London,
Athens, 5 Greek Islands and the Turkish
coast, incl. Airfare, all accom., 8 nights in
London, & much more for $2025 Cdn. See
TRAVEL CUTS or call Tour Hosts Pat,
738-9252 or Mike 224-1242.
YOUR DEADLINE approaches but draft
No. 47 is still not quite right? Don't despair1
Experienced editor will polish term papers,
theses, etc. Other services also available.
Contact Footnotes Information & Research
Service, 430-5751.
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essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U & del.
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WORD PROCESSING (MICOM). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail. Fast
professional service. Jeeva, 876-5333.
WORDPOWER - Editing 8- word processing professionals. Thesis, term paper,
resume & form letter specialists. Student
rates. 3737 W. 10th (at Alma). 222-2661.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type, theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evgs/wkends. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, mscpts., resumes, theses.
IBM Selec. II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9857.
WORD WEAVERS - Word processing,
stud, rates, fast turnaround, Bilingual.
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TYPING: Professional presentations for
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YOUR WORDS professionally typed - to
go. Judith Filtness, 3206 W. 38th Ave.,
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85 - TYPING
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224-1342 (24 hours).
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES. Spelling, grammar expertise. Days, nights,
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PROFESSIONAL TYPING. 25 yrs. experience. Reasonable, accurate, fast. Phone
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TYPING & W/P: Term papers, theses,
mscpt., essays, incl. reports, tech. equa.,
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TYPING—fast,  accurate.   Reasonable rates.
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NITELINE SERVICES word processing.
Theses typing, resumes, etc. Stud, rates.
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all areas of academic typing. New electronic, 985-4929/985-5157.
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FAST, ACCURATE TYPING professionally
finished with daisy-wheel typewriter. Call
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WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
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Days, eves., weekends. 985-8890.
YEAR AROUND EXPERT essay, theses
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Student rates. 261-6102
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reports, letters, resumes. Days,
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PROFESSIONAL    TYPING.    $1.25/pg.',
double-spaced. Kim, 876-7630. t
FAST,   ACCURATE   TYPING    SERVICE,
editing   included.   Reasonable  rates.   Call
Rachel, 731-1970.
TYPING:    Essays,    theses,    term   papers,
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90 — Wanted
IDENTICAL
TWINS
Required for Innovative
Research in
Bio-Psychological
Research
For information contact
Dr. H. Klonoff
No. 7-2255 Wesbrook Mall
Psych Unit
228-7301 Tuesday, March 26, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 26, 1985
Joe vows to return and lead 'Birds
By MONTE STEWART
Joe Johnson did not take kindly
to Tom Tomson's suggestion last
Thursday night.
Tomson, the master of
ceremonies at the annual men's Big
Block award banquet, suggested
Johnson would be resigning. Tom
told the audience of varsity athletes
and alumni that Johnson had been
hired by the now defunct Vancouver Whitecaps as an "official
auctioneer."
Johnson guided the men's soccer
'Birds to a Canada West and Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union
Championship this past season.
Moments later, while accepting a
coaching achievement award, the
veteran coach told the audience that
he expected UBC to repeat as national champions in the fall.
"Reports of my retirement are
certainly premature", said
Johnson.
Actually, Johnson was not per
turbed with Tomson — who was
repeating a joke that he had made
about several other UBC coaches.
Johnson
"I'll be back"
He was more incensed with the lack
of support that the athletic department has shown the soccer club this
season.
"I was very pleased with the support we received," said Johnson,
"which, I'm sorry to say, did not
come from here."
When the 'Birds went to Ottawa
for the national championship in
November, they had to rent a single
van for 16 players. The team also
stayed in a mediocre motel in the
Ottawa suburbs, a lengthy distance
from Carleton University, where
the game was being played.
And the team had to fly to Ottawa only one day before the most
important game of the season.
The UBC football team has
always travelled to Vancouver International Airport by chartered
bus. The soccer players must make
their own arrangements. The football players have also had the use of
a chartered bus in the visiting city.
The football 'Birds also stay in
the best hotels in away cities.
When the football 'Birds ventured to Halifax for the Atlantic Bowl
two years ago, they left three days
early, stopping over in Toronto.
After thrashing St. Francis Xavier
54-1 in the national semi-final on a
Saturday the 'Birds stayed in Halifax until the following Wednesday
and then ventured back to Toronto
for the Vanier Cup game to be played the following Saturday.
The soccer 'Birds qualified for
the national championship contest
by defeating McGill Redmen 1-0 in
Montreal Nov. 4. They then returned to Vancouver.
"It's a good thing that you
weren't in Montreal with us," one
player told this reporter while in Ottawa. "The hotel was a dump and
there was no hot water."
Players also feel athletic directors
Rick Noonan and Bob Hindmarch
did not take steps to promote the
team sufficiently, concentrating on
hockey and football instead.
Meanwhile, Frank Ivele (who
scored the winning shootout goal in
the 'Birds 3-2 win over Carleton in
the national final) has signed with
Columbus of the new semi-pro
Pacific Rim Soccer Leage.
Apply wlffliiii
UBC has decided to hire a full-
time men's basketball coach. In the
past, the men's hoop chief received
only a part-time salary.
Bob Molinski resigned after the
1982-83 season helm because the
university refused to hire him full-
time. He found it too difficult to
combine his teaching position at
Argyle Secondary with his coaching
job in Point Grey.
Current UBC coach Bill Edwards
resumed his own position in the
North Delta system, combining
both teaching and coaching.
However, he has no idea whether he
will be rehired as the full-time UBC
coach.
Canadian Olympians lose
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER TEAM hopes to rise up and win another
national crown with coach Joe Johnson.
By STEVE JANUSZ
It was billed as the rematch of the
Olympic men's volleyball semifinal.
Unfortunately for the Canadian
squad Saturday's outcome at UBC
was the same as last summer's
showdown in Los Angeles: U.S. 3.
Canada: 0.
Team U.S.A., the Olympic gold
medalist, swept Canada 15-11,
15-12, and 15-10 in the first meeting
in the five match cross-Canada exhibition series between the two
sides.
Although the scores were close,
the experienced American squad
had control of the encounters. The
world's number one ranked team
used strong defensive play and a
balanced power attack to stake out
early leads and then held off late
Canadian scoring rallies for the
wins.
"We were struggling at times,"
said rookie U.S.A. coach Tony
Crabb. "Canada has some big hitters and we had some trouble with
Paul Gratton and John Barrett . . .
Yet, a nice win . . ."
Crabb's counterpart, Paul
Brasson, in his first season as the
Canadian coach, saw some positive
aspects in his team's performance.
"We played very well in the first
and second games but the U.S.A.
has good technicians with more international experience than we do,"
said Brasson. "I think if we had our
entire team here we could've made
it closer, or won."
Paul Gratton, who flew in for
this tour from a Japanese semi-pro
league, picked up the Most
Valuable Player award for Canada.
The six year veteran of the national
side had 21 offensive kills in the
match.
American MVP honors went to
the highly regarded Karch Kiraly.
He had 17 spiking kills while teammate Dave Saunders led the balanced attack with 21 kills.
Prince   George    native    Randy
Wagner and the University of Victoria's Brian Gatzke, a rookie on
the team, saw limited action in the
match. The competitive season,
however, is still young.
"With my international experience, I think I'll be fairly effective in future matches," said
Wagner, a five year veteran.
Later this year, Canada will be
competing in the zone championships. At stake is a berth in the 1985
World Cup in Japan. A rematch
with the U.S.A. is a certainty along
this championship trail.
Parachuter wants to fall
By MONTE STEWART
While many collegiate sports
associations are trying to go up in
status, Maureen Gulleckson wants
to establish an organization which
goes all the way down.
Gulleckson is trying to establish a
collegiate skydiving conference.
"We need people who want to
skydive," says Gulleckson, a Simon
Fraser University student who
hopes to include UBC in the proposed parachuting organization.
An inter-collegiate skydiving circuit in the United States has recently gained considerable notoriety,
according to Gulleckson.
"Parachuting is very popular all
over the U.S.," says Gulleckson, a
twelfth place finisher at the most re
cent American championships. "I
couldn't see why it wouldn't be
popular here."
UBC has a very successful
skydiving club of its own but
Gulleckson has had difficulty con-
tactng members. "I spoke to their
secretary on the phone one day but
nobody got back to me."
Gulleckson proposes to establish
some form of an intercollegiate
skydiving circuit under the auspices
of the Canadian Sport Parachuting
Association. "We'll start this summer," she adds.
"Only two or three colleges have
to go to the CPSA," says
Gulleskson, "and they'll do the
rest" of the organizational work.
Vikette rowers quit in midstream at Burnaby Lake
By MONTE STEWART
The Thunderbird rowing club
might think twice about inviting the
University of Victoria women's
eight crew to the next UBC Spring
Invitational Regatta.
Despite winning the women's
varsity eight event last Saturday at
Burnaby Lake, the UVic women's
crew dropped out of Sunday's
rematch, forcing cancellation of the
race. The Vancouver Island rowers
complained that windy weather
conditions made the race unsafe.
UBC was winning at the time.
"I thought it was very unsportsmanlike for them to pull out of the
race," said UBC women's coach
Drew Harrison. "In 20 years of collegiate rowing, I've never seen
anything like it," added Harrison.
"Victoria chose not to race again
even though the unsafe conditions
passed quickly and the regatta continued smoothly."
Saturday UVic beat the UBC
women's squad by 12 seconds. UBC
edged UVic at Elk Lake two weeks
ago.
"It's too bad (the T-Birds) didn't
get to row against UVic as they were
ready to win," said Harrison.
The men's varsity eight finished
third on both days behind UVic and
the Vancouver Rowing Club.
UBC mentors share national stage
Six UBC men's coaches were
presented with national coaching
recognition awards last Thursday at the men's Big Block
dinner.
Joe Johnson was recognized
for his efforts in leading the
Thunderbird soccer team to a
national championship in
November while Jack Kelso
(women's swim coach of the
year( and Don Liebermann
(CIAU women's diving coach of
the year) were awarded for
leading the women's swimming
and diving teams to national
titles.
Track and field coaches
Lionel Pugh and Doug Clement
were deemed worthy because of
their participation in the Olympic coaching scheme.
Rowing coach Boris Klavora
was honored for his contribution
to the Canadian Olympic team
while Hardy Fink was awarded
for being selected as a co-winner
of the CIAU gymnastics coach
of the year.
Barry Legh was commended
for his role as national team
coach.
The Vikings have four Olympic
team members: Dean Crawford,
Kevin Neufeld, Tim Cristian, and
Paul Tessier. Crawford and
Neufeld were members of the gold
medal winning Canadian varsity
eight team at Los Angeles.
UBC men's coach Boris Klavora
praised the efforts of Stuart Bell,
Jim Andrew, Ian McKerlick, Martin Littlejohn, Trevor Cooper, and
Paul Van Donklaar, who is also a
member of the UBC ski team.
Still only one Upson winner
Both the men's and women's
rowing teams will compete at the
San Diego Crew Classic April 6.
Last year about 25,000 spectators
viewed the event — the most
prestigious on North America's
west coast.
"We accepted National Collegiate Athletic Association eligibility rules in order to compete in San
Diego," said Klavora. "A regatta
that big is something we need for
the competition and our athletes
should learn a lot."
Pat West became the second and
only winner of the Brian Upson
Trophy last Thursday at the Big
Block awards dinner.
West, who has completed his five
years of collegiate eligibility, with
the Thunderbird basketball team,
also won the award in 1984, the
year of its inception.
The award is named after the
coach of the West Vancouver high
sxhool basketball team who lost his
life to cancer after his team won the
1982 provincial championship.
It is now presented annually to a
varsity basketball player who
displays outstanding leadership and
ability during the past season.
UBC coach Bill Edwards and
teammate Erik Lockhart presented
the award to West. Lockhart was
captain of the West Van team that
won the provincial title in 1982.

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