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The Ubyssey Nov 9, 1965

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Full Text

 1965
\
Canadians:
WE UBYSSEY
Non
illiGritimus
carborundum
N. XLVIII, No.  23
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1965
CA   4-3916
'27-SEAT MINORITY
Liberals lame again
!*?*?&
r>c>
"2^
A&\
TOTEM POLL SIGN Monday signified presence of federal
polling booth in Brock Hall for 69 registered voters. Pretty
J'     punster is Pat Bolton, education III.
mi
Hulll'l  lit
I,H»H| III
»rmi
Pollsters wrong
on majority call
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey Associate Editor
Canada's  Liberal party  may  have  run
critical problem yet — the Canadian voter.
into  its  most
The disappointed Liberals
Monday night were returned
to power with a minority government for the second time
in two years.
As The Ubyssey went to
press early this morning the
Liberals — who called the federal election asking the Canadian people to give them a majority government — had apparently been returned with
127 seats — the same number
they had held before.
TORIES UP
The Progressive Conservative party will once again be
the government's official opposition. The Tories won 99
seats, seven more than in the
last parliament.
Perhaps the only party with
reason for jubilation is the New
Democratic party which elected 21, up three, and now holds
the balance of power in the
265-seat parliament.
Creditistes slipped from 13
to nine seats, all elected in
Quebec, while Social Credit increased i t s parliamentary
membership from four to five.
The Liberal minority proved
every pollster in the country
wrong. Such high-rated pro-
gnosticators as the Gallup Poll
and the Southam newspaper
chain had predicted 140-150
seats for the Liberals.
Two independents won seats
while four ridings  had yet to
be decided at press time.
Prime Minister Lester Pearson, in a statement late last
night, said he was disappointed
by the refusal of the Canadian
people to give his party a
working majority.
Replying to the question of
leadership which political ana-
lysists across the nation claim
will now loom large as a critical issue within both the Liberal and Conservative parties,
Pearson said: "I am still prime
minister and we'll leave it at
that for the time being."
UNNECESSARY ELECTION
Opposition party leaders
agreed that the main problem
now is to co-operate toward an
effective functioning of parliament.
However, a 11 opposition
leaders criticized the Pearson
government for calling an election which turned out to be
unnecessary and left parliament in much the same position
as it was before.
New Democratic Party leader Tommy Douglas, who soundly defeated former UBC student Dick Hayes to hold his
Burnaby-Coquitlam riding, rejected any possibility that his
party  might form  a  coalition
(Continued  on  Page   2)
SEE: ELECTION
I STRONG WINDS
BLOWHARD-EST
Visitors  brave  gusty council
By CAROL ANNE BAKER
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Sitting in on council meetings is becoming more popular
| at UBC.
Eight students sat in the
visitors' gallery for their own
interest, just to see how council worked.
"I came primarily out of
curiosity in order to compare
the functioning of the AMS
and the Students' Representative Council of the University
of New Brunswick where I
was on exchange last year,"
mid Janice Rae, arts IV.
"It reminds  me of a  little
|kid's birthday party — everyone running around the table.
Jl doing their best to see who
'blowhard-est' to put out
tie candles." she said.
"You'd think they'd all go
to the bathroom before," said
Linda Morrison, Home Ec. IV,
as councillors walked in and
out.
"Mr. Hender's legs look
sexy on the table top," Janice
Rae added.
"I would like to commend
the UBC council for a serious
aproach to their very serious
business.
"Although they have a slight
tendency' to procrastinate,
they are fine representatives
of the student body," said
Peter Shapiro, arts III, Dal-
housie University (one of
three out of town students
visiting council Monday
night).
"The meeting was a reporter's   nightmare,"   said   Dan
HENDER
. nice legs
Murray, arts III, another
Eastern visitor.
"I am impressed by their
sincere interest in all the
facets of university life and
the fact that they are so obviously well in formed — above
all, by their efficiency when
they stop trying to get all the
candles out at a 'blow'," said
Bonnie Bentley, arts III, Bishop's University, Lennoxville,
Que.
"There sure weren't many
students in the audience except us," the visitors remarked.
All visitors are welcome at
Monday night council meetings Meetings are held at 7
p.m. Monday night in the
Brock  Council  chambers.
LESTER PEARSON
... no majority
JOHN  DIEFENBAKER
. . . no joy
Council calls
for no' vote
in referendum
By   DOUG   HALVERSON
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Student council reiterated
their support of the payment
of second term fees Monday
night.
AMS president Byron Hender outlined council's publicity campaign for a 'no' vote on
Wednesday's referendum.
(The referendum will ask
students if they favor the withholding  of  second   term  fees.)
The program consists mainly of the distribution of 6,000
propaganda sheets giving the
council position on fee withholding.
Council is concerned that
students might vote to withhold their fees and not know
what the consequences could
be.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: COUNCIL
/ Page  2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November   9, Iff
Tuesday,
HOT
KHOURY
By JACK KHOURY
When Dr. Roswell Johnson
of Brown University, Providence Rhode Island, disclosed
recently he has prescribed
birth-control pills for "a very,
very small" number of girls
(over 21 and intending to be
married), he didn't realize his
action  was  revolutionary.
From "a very, very small"
number, prescriptions may increase to "very small," to
"small," to "a few," and then
to "quite a few."
The last step may very well
be to "almost all," depending
on whether our sexual morality will remain as it is or
continue in the direction it
has been going up to now
(i. e. down).
In fact, I feel quite certain
our future morality will make
it necessary for birth control
pills to be widely used.
• •      •
However, once birth control
pills become accepted, we'll
be in for new kinds of problems.
Since pharmaceutical companies will produce them,
they will use strong effective
marketing campaigns to sell
their product.
'This means we'll be subjected to the same kind treatment we're now receiving
from  many producers.
TV commercials may run
something  like  this:
"In a recent national survey, students from the University of B.C. participated in
an experiment to determine
how Nofetus compared with
other  known brands."
"Tell us about it, Penny,"
the interviewer will ask a
sexy  co-ed.
• •      •
"Well,   about   nine   months
ago, Barb and I took part in
an experiment to see how different brands compared. In
my bottle, I had Nofetus. And
in Barb's bottle, there were
pills   of  another   company.
"Anyway, when the results
came out, my group had 35
per cent fewer babies than
all other groups."
Other commercials may use
the folio w-the-crowd approach.
"Are you having less sex
but   more   babies?"
"Do most leading pills
leave you  cold?
"Then why not switch to
ConSpermOva? More people
do."
• •      •
No series of commercials
is complete without the explanatory type.
Here, a cross-sectional diagram of the female body will
be used, with arrows showing how the pill works its
way into the system, and how
it stops the frustrated male
sperm from getting to the
ovum.
Of course, most companies
eventually resort to running
contests to boost sales.
The contestant who has the
least babies from using their
product under the most fertile
conditions will win.
First prize? A lifetime supply of Nofetus and three years'
supply of baby food.
Night school
student dies
on West Mall
A 32-year old night school
student collapsed and died on
the West Mall near the Fraser
River parking lot Monday
night.
RCMP said the man was
walking toward the Buchanan
building at 7:10 with a friend
when he collapsed.
His name was withheld
pending notification of next
of kin.
The friend called the university patrol and RCMP but
attempts to revive him were
unsuccessful.
RCMP said an autopsy has
been ordered.
Students  face
mischief  charge
James Ruggles Macdonell,
Arts IV and Simon Fraser
student Frank LaSette will
appear in magistrate's court
today on a charge of public
mischief.
Police said two men slipped the elaborate security
arrangements in the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre Friday and
disconnected the sound system in the ceiling loft, 80
feat above the stage where
Conservative leader John
Diefenbaker spoke into a battery of microphones.
A number of paper darts
and balloons were dropped
on the audience before police
broke open the door to the
loft and pulled the two men
out.
COUNCIL
(Continued from Page 1)
Undergraduate presidents
were given sheets of information which they are to read to
classes in their faculties today.
The student council avoided
taking any action on an alternative means of protest.
It received, but did not discuss, a suggestion passed at
the Education Action Program
committee meeting Nov. 5.
The EAP motion said students should pay their fees to
AMS trust fund, which could
only be released by a general
student  referendum.
It also suggested council negotiate with the Board of Governors for the return of the
tuition fee level to the 1964-65
level.
ELECTION
(Continued from Page 1)
government with the Liberals.
"We can no longer be considered a splinter party but
lather a pair of crutches which
can hold up Pearson in the
months ahead."
QUADRA TIGHT
Conservative leader John
Diefenbaker placed Canada
above the aspirations of individual political parties saying all
parties must co-operate in passing important legislation.
Vancouver Quadra, the riding which includes UBC, was
won by Liberal Grant Deachman in one of the closest contests  in the election.
He edged Conservative Howard Green by less than 300
votes.
DYING  CHEAP
BURYING ISN'T
Dry bones cost more
By   SUE   GRANSBY
If you want to be buried
dry, you have to pay more.
This was one of the facts
pointed out in a discussion
Monday noon on the High
Cost   of  Dying.
Representatives of Forest
Lawn Mortuary and Memorial
Park, R. A. Aldred and M. S.
Ferguson, addressed 70 students in Bu. 104.
Aldred told of one family
who, after deciding on a
wooden casket for their deceased relative, changed their
minds in favor of a far more
expensive steel one which is
air-tight   and   water-tight.
The reason was that the
family, although poor, wanted
to respect the deceased's fear
of being buried in a wet
grave."
"How much do you care?
How much respect do you
have for the deceased?" Aldred asked.
"Most people care enough
to pay a reasonable price for
a nice service," he said. This
reasonable price varies according to the financial status
of the family or individual
arranging the service.
He said that reputable funeral directors do not pressure
people into paying more than
they  can  afford for extras.
Minimum cost of a service
is $285.00.
Cemetery   and   internment
costs add an extra $147.
The minimum service is
always offered but the majority of the public demands
more.
If the minimum service was
usually accepted, he said "I
wouldn't stay in business too
long."
Costs vary according to demands and the competition
between funeral homes, he
said.
International CUS cards
create cut-rate world
The Canadian Union of Students is offering an international student identity card entitling the holder to worldwide discounts.
They're useful to have if you plan to travel—discounts
range from 50 per cent for unguided tours and off-Broadway
theatre productions in New York to 25 per cent reductions
for train rides in Israel.
They're available for two dollars at AMS office.
we want
engineers
especially
impatient,
ambitious,
resourceful
ones
If you're an engineer who's raring to tackle a tough, practical project
in a dynamic industry . . . we'd better get together. At Columbia
Cellulose, graduate engineers are assigned to planned programmes
with important, specific objectives. Your efforts in design, process
development, construction or research, right from the start, can bear
heavily on our continued development. The pulp and paper industry
is in a state of constant flux, growing at a fantastic rate, devouring
established methods of technology almost daily. Our future success
will be largely determined by people like yourself - engineers determined to develop new and better ways of doing a hundred jobs in
the manufacturing process. Maybe you'd like to play a part in changing
our industry, and possibly the idea of living in British Columbia
appeals to you. If so, come and talk with us when we visit your university on November 22 to 26.
Your employment office can arrange an appointment. Why not set
a time today?
e
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE COMPANY, LIMITED
HEAD OFFICE: VANCOUVER,  BRITISH COLUMBIA
DIVISIONS: RESEARCH  AND DEVELOPMENT   •   PR INCE RU PERT PULP DIVISION   •   PRINCE RU PERT SAWMILL DIVISION
CELGAR  PULP DIVISION    .    CELGAR LUMBER DIVISION    •    CELGAR WOODS DIVISION    •    TERRACE WOODS   DIVISION
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THE        UBYSSEY
Page 3
PERSIAN DELIGHT graced Iranian display at International
House fall fair in armory Saturday. Gadget at left is a
hookah, an oriental bubble pipe.
BY UBC GRAD
$117,755 willed
to psychologists
A member of UBC's first graduating class has left the
university $117,755 to expand the department of psychology.
President   John   Macdonald and expand our research and
said Monday the money is a
bequest from Dr. Gladys C.
Schwesinger who died in Victoria July 12, 1964.
Dr. Schwesinger asked in her
will that the bequest be used
"for the establishment and
maintenance of a modern department of psychology including as many of the various
fields of psychology as pos-
ible."
The UBC Alumni Association
received a separate $24,000 to
perpetuate its records and
work,
Macdonald said, "The gift of
Gladys C. Schwesinger for
strengthening the department
of psychology at UBC is unusually helpful.
"It is always difficult to
make rapid advances through
the normal appropriations to
the university."
Dr. Douglas Kenny, head of
the psychology department
said, "This generous legacy will
help   enormously   to   develop
instructional activities.
"It is also hoped that Dr.
Schwesinger can be memorialized by way of establishing an
annual conference in her name
to which outstanding scholars
can be invited to present and
discuss the current psychological research interests."
UBC Alumni President Roderick W. Macdonald said the
first use of their bequest would
be to produce a history of the
Alumni Association.
Dr. Schwesinger went to the
United States in 1919 and spent
most of her life there.
She was a consultant, teacher
and an author of books and
many articles in the field of
psychology.
She did extensive work in
juvenile delinquency and in
aiding postwar immigrants to
come to the United States.
Dr. Schwesinger retired to
Victoria from Ventura, California in April, 1963.
American draft-man to tell
if Uncle Sam needs you
The U.S. draft comes to UBC Wednesday.
Supervisor of the selective service system in the state
of Washington, Capt. R. T. Chastek, speaks at noon in
civil engineering 201.
He will outline American draft policy toward Canadian university graduates working in the United States.
The talk is sponsored by the engineering undergraduate society, and is open to all students.
U of A student council
after governors' chairs
EDMONTON (CUP) — University of Alberta's students
council wants student representation on the university's
Board of Governors.
In a nine to six vote the
council accepted in principle
a brief to the provincial government advocating that 25 per
cent of the board be composed
of student representatives.
The Alberta government is
now drafting changes in the
University Act. According to
the campus newspaper, The
Gateway, it is believed the
faculty will receive representation on the new Board of
Governors.
Barry Kirkham, chairman of
the Council's committee on
university government,   said:
"We don't expect to run the
show, but we do expect our
ideas to be heard before vital
decisions are taken."
He added that student participation in board decisions
would limit the necessity for
protest marches even if their
viewpoint was not accepted by
the board.
One councillor wondered
whether students should have
a say when they were attending university for only a short
time.
Kirkham said, however, that
any elected representative is
transitory and that students
were now making decisions affecting future students.
An editorial in The Gateway agreed that faculty and
students "are being governed
more and more by the computers and directives" of the
administration, and should express their ideas on the board,
but called the 25 per cent
figure  irresponsible.
University officials have refused to comment on the students' union demand.
Dr. Walter H. Johns, university president, says the administration will not discuss the
students' propoal until the
plans for the revision of the
University Act are complete.
Hender hits back:
critic "inexcusable
Alma Mater Society president Byron Hender Monday
lashed back at Ed Lavalle, the western regional chairman of
the Canadian Union of Students.
Lavalle    criticized    Hender
Friday as being alienated from
key issues, and "bending to the
wishes of the administration."
Hender said the behavior exhibited by Lavalle in walking
out of the meeting with the
Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada last month,
was  inexcusable.
"Whether or not Lavalle
agreed with my including the
'Great Pumpkin' faction in the
meeting of the student delegation with AUCC heads, is
not important," he said.
"The important thing is that
he left that meeting."
"One can hardly expect to
accomplish anything by getting
up and leaving."
Replying to Lavalle's charge
that he is a small 'c' conservative, Hender said: "I think we
as a student community can be
expected to be more advanced
than the public at large, but if
we get too far ahead of the
mainstream of thinking, wc
won't get the support necessary
for our goals."
Come,
give us a taste
of your quality.
—Hamlet, Act II
Challenging career opportunities—where talents and
temperaments of all types are put to work in a productive
environment—are found throughout our company's diversified operations.
At your Placement Office you'll find copies of "Alcan
—a Growth Company". Browse through it. It tells you
about Alcan, and the opportunities Alcan offers the
enterprising university graduate.
Further information dealing with your specific interests can be discussed during a personal interview.
Mr. T. L. Gibson and Mr. J. J. Lawless will conduct
on-campus interviews
NOVEMBER 22, 23, 24, 25, 1965
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING • MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING • ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
HONOURS CHEMISTRY • HONOURS MATHEMATICS
HONOURS PHYSICS • COMMERCE (ACCOUNTING)
^ai _c
ALCAN
V
Aluminum Company of Canada, Ltd. mutYsstY
Published   Tuesday,   Thursdays   and   Fridays   throughout   the   university
year  by  the  Alma  Mater  Society,  University  of  B.C.   Editorial   opinions
expressed are  those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
.Loc.  26.  Member Canadian University Press.  Founding  member.  Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1965
"Nobody shoots at a dead duck"
-W. A. C.  Bennett, Nov. 5, 1965
xxss^sr
Silly, silly
We got quite a kick of Premier Bennett's speech
downtown Friday night.
Besides asserting once again this great province's
determination not to be pushed around by the boys in
Ottawa, Mr. Bennett had a b"t to say on education.
He said that the B.C. government already pays
more per student than is recommended by the Bladen-
Commission report. And he said he doubted any newly-
elected federal government would speedily implement
any plan of advanced aid to universities.
Which to us only backs up statements we made
Friday.
There is almost certainly going to be another of those
$50 fee increases next year. The administration is going
to find Mr. Bennett proud of his accomplishments in
education to date, (so no more), and the new federal
goverenment in no hurry to do anything.
Which puts the touch on Joe and Jane Student,
again.
Which puts the touch on Joe and Jane, that is,
unless they can find means to put their case against
rising fees — if they have such a case — to the administration in such a way that the latter will fight harder to
keep more doors to opportunity from closing.
Perhaps by a hold-the-line policy until Bladen aid
arrives, or until they find a way of strongly putting their
case to the senior governments.
Monday, AMS head Byron Hender requested of
President John Macdonald an answer to the AMS brief
of last August on fees. This is a positive sign.
But to supply your council with an even more positive sign we urge you to support Wednesday's referendum.
Consider it token support of a silly referendum
Consider it direction for your council.
But consider it.
They were...
concerned
1914-1918. 1939-1945. 1950-53.
Attend Remembrance Day services: Thursday, 10:45
a.m., War Memorial Gym.
HELLO L\ND0N?.
NOW, WHERE
IN
THE
By IAN CAMERON
It seems that owning a
hearse is the new rage. For
all hearse owners, I offer the
following suggestions.
To begin with, move those
mattresses out of the back
and replace them with a plywood coffin.
Then you can pull up alongside a bus or car at a stop
light and watch the expressions on the faces as the coffin
shivers, trembles, and falls
apart to reveal a couple necking.
I also advocate   going
into drive-ins
and    asking
for:   '"O n e
ham burger,
one    cheese
burger,   two
cokes,    (or
what ever    cameron
you want) and ten pounds of
dry ice for the guy in the back.
He's getting kinda high."
Arriving at a toll booth
gives you the opportunity to
borrow a forearm and wrist
from the bio-medical lab, and
proffering it, with a quarter
in the hand, sticking out from
your coat sleeve.
When the toll taker takes
the quarter, he gets the hand
as well, as you ride off in
all directions.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
rfODEO NUT
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
An open letter lo the Men's
Athletic Committee.
Gentlemen:
Regarding your terse rejection of my request to have
rodeo included as an MAC
activity, I am concerned.
I am concerned about the
potentially devastating implications of this overt failure to
appreciate a strong interest
of what is, in your priority system, a less sophisticated subculture.
The Advfeiv
110KALMAN
Tine. Spirit of the QmpuA
WHAT WILL HAPPEN TO BYRON? FINDOUT NEXT WEE*!
I challenge your right to
rank athletic activities by your
priority system.
Student attendance at intercollegiate athletic events is a
tangible manifestation of the
prevailing attitude regarding
hero-worship at this university.
We prefer participation in
our own chosen activities to
mass idolatrous prostration
before a personified jockstrap.
I suggest that you recognize
your responsibility to the ob-
Moralman   joins
Ubyssey regulars
Yes indeedy, we did not forget about that sample poll
taken two years ago on what
people liked and didn't like
about The Ubyssey.
Two major complaints UBC's
highly enlightened intellectual
community had with Canada's
greatest college rag, were that
we ran neither comics nor
cross-word puzzles.
Today, The Ubyssey rectifies
half our failing. We begin the
adventures of Moralman, The
Spirit of the Campus.
His first adventure concerns
an attempted assassination of
an AMS president called Byron Hender.
Any resemblance between
characters in the cartoon and
persons living or dead is purely co-incidental.
vious orientation of 16,000
people by allocating your budget to maximize mass participation .
In sum, your rejection of my
request is incompatible with
the principle of universal
accessibility.
DON WISE,
Arte III.
SEX NUTS
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Since Miss Diane Neufeld's
graceful form jerked across
the pages of The Ubyssey
(Thursday, Oct, 7), such stimulation was generated in this
quarter that the gentlemen of
South House, Matthews Hall
Residence, McMaster University, have felt obliged to recognize her grace and potency
in the formation of Canada's
first Diane Neufeld Fanny
Club.
Congratulations, our Momma Bare, November '65!
STEPHEN M. BECKOW,
GRAHAM   J.   ORR,
RICHARD J. McCANN
TERENCE R. JONES,
GEOFFREY F.  PEARCE,
DAVID D. LYNN.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News Ron Rlter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City     Al    Donald
Photo    _    Norm   Betts
•porta    Ed Clark
Ass't Nsws   Dan  Mullen
Richard   Blair   Robbi   West
Ass't City         Danny Stoffman
Page Friday   John  Kelsey
Managing      Ian Cameron
Features   Mike Bolton
CUP Don  Hull
All these turned in yards of
copy Monday: Stu Gray, Gordon
McLaughlin, Pat; Hrushowy, Terri
Brown, Kathy Hyde, Rosemary
Hyman, Anne Slipper, Angus
Rlcker, Sue Gransby, Philippa
Steel, and Barbara Cook who did
'Tween Classes. Linda Morrison
went to the council meeting with
Doug Hatverson and Carol-Anne
Baker. Tuesday, November 9, 1965
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Watch beards, BCIT!
Next it's jeans
The following two articles,
a news report and an editorial,
are reprinted from The Link,
student newspaper of the B.C.
Institute of Technology, Burnaby, B.C.
They discuss the issue of
beards, based on a dispute between so'me hairy students and
principal Edward Roper.
A rift began to develop last
week between the administration and certain members of
the student body over the
right of students to wear
beards.
In an interview with Mr.
Roper, Principal of the Institute, the following points
were brought but:
• No edict has been or
will be brought down. No disciplinary action will be taken
against any student who
chooses to wear a beard.
• Several bearded students were approached by
members of the administration and it was recommended
that they shave off their
beards.
Generally, Industry has indicated it is not interested in
hiring bearded students.
Mr. Roper indicated that the
Institute is continually on
show to prospective employers, and stressed the role the
administration is playing in
attempting to help place the
graduates in permanent position and to get the first year
students summer employment.
He pointed out that such efforts could be seriously impaired by an unchecked outgrowth of foliage, and for
this reason the students in
question were asked to shave.
Mr. Roper said that the ad-
UNBEARDED UBC STUDENT
BEARDED UBC STUDENT
ministration remains flexible
on the issue, but that industry has made its stand clear.
He gaid anyone who wishes
to wear a beard will not be
forced to remove it, but would
impede the administration in
student placement and would
probably have difficulty in
finding a job.
•
It has come to the attention
of the student newspaper that
the topic of beards has come
up in meetings of the administration.
An immature beard is admittedly a rather ratty looking component, and it is conceivable, I suppose, that our
appearance-conscious administration is concerned that
this could be the "thin edge of
the wedge" leading to the
dreaded sweatshirt and jeans
disease which currently
blights UBC.
There is, however, another
facet to this enigma.
Is the growing of a beard
a privilege, to be extended or
curtailed, at the whims of
the administration?
Or is it a native right, and
as such, up to the individual
himself?
The students here have been
instructed as to where and
when they may or may not
smoke, and how they are to
dress.
If a new edict is allowed to
pass unprotested, what is next
on the agenda?
Think on it, students —
clean-shaven or landscaped—
perhaps, to mix a pair of
metaphors, the thin edge of
the wedge is a "double-edged
blade".
Union Carbide Canada Limited
Interviews for 1966 graduates
Monday November 15
Tuesday November 16
Wednesday November 17
Thursday -November 18
Friday November  19
Complete Descriptions of Positions at the
Placement Office.
Our Representatives: G. W. HATFIELD and G. E. BROWN
Today Montreal
Next week Marrakesh
A milling career opens new worlds
Someone told him the Canadian mining
industry couldn't get enough mining engineers, geologists, mineralogists. He
looked into it and discovered there were
five good jobs for every graduate in
mining and mineralogy.
Mining engineering was his choice.
Between university sessions he saw
mines and mining methods first hand -
and got paid for it. Later.the company
he joined indulged his desire to travel.
He did exploration work in the Canadian
Shield and the Peace, met a girl at a
convention in Helsinki and married her
in CapeTown.They have a house in Vancouver near the company's head office,
and the family will put down roots there.
A mining career opened a whole new
way of life for him. He's a man on the
move and he likes it.
Find out more about a career in mining.
The opportunities are broad and rewarding. Direct your enquiries to :
PLACER DEVELOPMENT, LIMITED
Burrard Building, Vancouver, B.C.
PL-5-4
Have you considered
the opportunities of a career
with The Mutual Life?
A copy of the Company's informative booklet
"Career Opportunities" is available at your
Placement Office.
Our representative will be present on
TUES., NOV. 16 and WED., NOV. 17
and would be pleased to discuss with you the
many rewarding opportunities with The Mutual
Life. To arrange an interview please contact
your Student Placement Officer.
The Mutual Life
ASSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA
HEAD OFFICE: WATERLOO, ONTARIO/ESTABLISHED 1869 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November   9,   1965
—norm   betts  photo
CAMP LOOK from Caldwell,
Idaho, made UBC field
hockey scene Saturday when
Idaho College player Susi
Johnson donned out-size
sweatsuit borrowed from
Idaho basketball team.
'Unique group
plays under
Milk Wood
Under Milk Wood will go
over in the auditorium 8:30 tonight.
The play by Welsh poet Dylan Thomas will be performed
by the Kaleidoscope Players
from Selma, Alabama.
It is sponsored by the Special Events committee.
Special Events chairman
Murray Farr described the
group as unique.
The four actors, led by University of Pennsylvania graduate Bill Fagan, have been on
tour for six years.
"Fagan went down to Alabama to work for civil rights
about 10 years ago," said Farr.
"He's had fiery crosses
burned on his front lawn and
he's one of the three people in
Alabama who subscribes to
The Realist."
Tickets for the performance
are on sale in the AMS office.
Prices are $1 and $2 for students.
THE WORP
Fall fair effort
furry, toadlike
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
served  curried  lamb,  China  demonstrated  the
and Canada presented the worps.
India
traditional tea ceremony
.It was International House's
twelfth annual fall fair in the
armory Friday and Saturday,
with exhibits from 14 countries. *
Among them was a Canadian display, featuring the
worp, a toadlike furry creature
ranging in size from two
inches to the two-foot high
giant worp.
About 2,500 wandered
through the armory during the
two-day fair.
"The purpose of the fair is
to promote international understanding between the foreign students and the Canadian people," said Norman
Chiu, treasurer for the fair.
The Greek exhibit served
varieties of Greek coffee,
brewed to taste.
Featured at the fair were six
floor shows and a fashion show.
"It's very hard to do a fashion show without buying any
clothes," said show organizer
Savithri Shanker. "We didn't
have any budget; most of the
clothes belonged to people we
knew."
The show centred on the
theme East Meets West, presenting variations on the traditional dress of the Philippines,
China, India, Tibet, Malaysia
and Japan.
Entertainers at the half-hour
floor shows were students recruited through various undergraduate associations, along
with some professional ethnic
groups who volunteered their
services.
UNAN signs
vanguard of
WUS drive
By STUART GRAY
World University Service is
after your money.
The UBC branch of WUS
has launched a long-range
drive to raise funds for a hospital clinic at the University
of Nicaragua in Central America.
Signs asking "What is
UNAN?" and "Where is
UNAN?" (Universidad Nacion-
al de Nicaragua) have blossomed on campus in the past
two weeks.
WUS public relations officer
Christopher Finch said the
signs are the vanguard of the
UBC campaign, which marks
"the first year we're taking
sole responsibility for a project."
Finch said the project at
UNAN is particularly worthwhile.
"The material needs of
UNAN, which has 2,600 students, are numerous.
"Little has been done in the
field of student health, and
equipment in the laboratories
is old fashioned and insuffi
cient.
The actual drive for money
will begin in January, he said.
Finch said his campaign is
part of the annual WUS International Program of Action.
FORMAL AMD
SEMI-FORMAL
Rental and Soles
TUXEDOS - WHITE DINNER
JACKETS - TAU - MORNING
COATS       -        ACCESSORIES
Complete Six* Rang*
McCUISH
STUDENT  RATES
FORMAL WEAR
ITO.
MON.-SAT.-9-.30 to S:M
2046 W. 41st
PH. 263-3610
Coke pulls pavilion plug
on Expo Pepsi generation
MONTREAL (CUP) — The Coca-Cola company has
pulled out of its $600,000 deal with Expo '67 to cover
most of the cost of the proposed youth pavillion.
A spokesman for the company said that plans drawn
up by the Youth Advisory Committee for the pavillion
were "just incompatible with the needs of our company."
The pavillion was to represent a cross-section of the
world's youth at work and at play.
It is believed a dispute between Coke and Expo '67
about monopoly rights on drinks sold in the pavillion was
a factor in the company's decision to withdraw funds.
All officials of Coke International refused comment
when asked about the decision.
CANADIAN UNION OF STUDENTS
LIFE INSURANCE PLAN
For your convenience . . .
A representative will be in Room 258 Brock Extension,
each Tuesday and Thursday from 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Take advantage of this opportunity to enquire about
your own student plan.
Would you like to join us?
We're Canada's largest manufacturer of telecommunication
equipment and cables, both power and communications.
Sales in 1964 exceeded $315,000,000 — an increase
of 33% in three years.
Our plants are located at Montreal, Lachine, Ottawa, Belleville,
Toronto and London, and our sales and distribution
houses stretch from coast to coast.
Our International Operations Division is developing
world-wide markets.
We do our own research and development in the largest and
most modern laboratory in Canada
— more than 700 people work in R. & D.
Of our 19,000 employees, over 1100 are university graduates:
they comprise more than 60% of middle management
and more than 90% of top management.
Although more than half the 1966 grads we hire will be for
technical assignments, the balance will be from a
wide range of non-technical degrees and disciplines.
Our starting salaries are substantial. Your performance will be
evaluated at regular intervals and increases will be
based on these evaluations.
To encourage your professional growth we have liberal tuition
refund plans, scholarships and bursaries for our employees.
We provide excellent employee protection in the form
of sickness benefits, life insurance, company-subsidized
medical plans and non-contributory pensions.
If you'd like to work for an all-Canadian Company that is a
leader in its field and is daily breaking ground with
new and exciting projects, ask your Placement Officer for an
appointment with our recruiters.
They'll be on campus in two weeks.
a
Northern Electric
COMPANY LIMITED
6065-11R Tuesday, November 9, 1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
%
—norm   betts   photo
PAINSTAKING PAINTER Lynn Hunniford, education II,
touches up shoddy shack behind Brock as part of Varsity
Outdoor Club's weekend fix-up campaign.
Scholarships asked
for debating teams
If football players get scholarships, debators should too, says
a member of UBC's debating
team.
"University debating is as
competitive in an academic
sense as football and basketball
are in the physical," said Jim
Taylor, law I. "If scholarships
are to be given for these sports,
they should be given for debating as well."
He said a debator's contribution to the university is more
significant than the football
player's .
One half of UBC's Canadian
champion   team   debates   Vic
toria College, noon Friday in
Brock Hall while the other half
is in Victoria.
Subject will be Nationalism
is a Necessity.
In Brock, for the affirmative,
will be Taylor and David Amor,
arts I.
Wolfram Raymer, arts III,
and Richard Watts, arts II,
argue the negative in Victoria.
The contest is the final of the
B.C. division of the McGoun
cup competition.
The winning team will fight
it out in January with teams
from the three other western
provinces for the McGoun cup.
Western Canada's Largest
Formal Wear Rentals
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
Full  Dress Shirts  &   Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue Blazers
Directors' Coats        10% UBC  Discount
OVER 2300 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608 Granville (at 10th)  4691 Kingsway (Bby.)
RE 3-6727 (by Sears)   HE 5-1160
howie bateman and
the new CJOR present
GLENN
YARBROUGH
THE SWINGLE SINGERS
AND THE HILARIOUS NEW COMEDIAN — BIFF ROSE
FRI., NOV. 12 - Q.E. THEATRE
PRICES:   2.00,   2.50,  3.00,  3.50,  4.00  on  sal.  at  th.  Vancouver  Ticket
Center,   630   Hamilton   Street,   MU   3-3255;   All   Eaton  Store!   (Where you
may chorgc them). Kerrisdale Travel Service, 2292 West 41st Ave.
PROFITS JUMP
Treasure van's
sa
les
soar nere
h
Treasure van has made a comeback after a flop two
years ago.
The five-day sale held last
week at International House
collected a total of $6,854.49.
Daphne Kelgard, World University Service treasurer at
UBC estimated the sales of the
1963-64 treasure van to be
about $1,500.
There was no treasure van
last year.
"This year it was a very successful sale and we are pleased
with it," she said.
The local committee keeps
five per cent of the takings.
"This year, we budgeted
$230 and we made $342," said
Miss Kelgard. "We kept our
budget low."
"We should rank third or
fourth out of forty universities
in Canada."
The profits are used by the
WUS national office in Toronto
to help universities around the
world in self-help projects.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
CUSO  volunteer
talks  on  India
A member of Canada's
peace corps talks about her
two years in India at UBC
Friday.
Judy Ramson, associate
secretary of Canadian University Students Overseas
taught school and assisted in
the leprosy clinic in a small
village in Southern India.
She was later CUSO coordinator in New Delhi.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
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with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
THIS   IS   THE   ONLY
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Clinton's quality clothing keeps its
fashionable good looks long after
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shapeless and discarded. Enjoy the
exclusive style features and better
quality combined with personalized
service as offered by the leader in fine
clothing and accessories for men.
Clinton's
MEN'S WEAR
742 Granville
MU  1 5625
GSA  NEWS
Bridge:
Duplicate Bridge is being played every Tuesday at
7:30 p.m. in the Lower Lounge of the Center. Everyone is welcome. Come along and challenge last week's
winners: Dr. and Mrs. H. Warren.
GW
HBBRI
OM
When Glenn Yarbrough sings, the room vibrates with pulsating excitement. This new
album is a superb displayof his ability to sing
any kind of song and make it seem as if it
were composed just for him. It's a complete
evening's entertainment with twelve different
numbers including the title song plus "Ring
of Bright Water," "An Island of the Mind,"
"Down in the Jungle," "Sometimes,"
"Never Let Her Go"and "Half a World Away"
Sit back in the best seat in the house and
treat yourself to a RCA MOTOR #
really great ShOW.     <«£ The most trusted name in sound   ~.'> Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November   9,   1965
'ANTI-AMERICAN"
Teach-ins banned
at King's College
HALIFAX (CUP)—The president of the University of
King's College has proclaimed a ban on teach-ins at his
campus.
CHORSOC
Practice Wednesday 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. in Bu. 104. Transportation available. Check in
clubroom.
In a statement issued to Halifax newspapers, Dr. H. D.
Smith said: "There will be no
further teach-ins on the premises of King's College pending
further study of the purposes
of such gatherings."
The move followed a teach-in
on higher education at which
university officials were hissed
several times when they expressed disagreement with the
idea of free tuition.
Of the Oct. 9 University of
Toronto teach-in, which was
piped into King's auditorium,
Smith said he was "unhappy
about a certain element, sometimes rowdy, sometimes psue-
do intellectual, whose main
purpose seems to be to conduct
a vindictive and vituperative
attack on the United States
and her foreign policy."
He said he was 'critical of
students, and any professors
who may join them, who seek
to destroy goodwill with our
neighbors to the south.
"The only responsibility evident among these agitators is to
be against everything that suggests the status quo in our governments and in our society,"
Smith said.
Robbie Shaw, student union
president at Dalhousie University which issues degrees for
King's students, said Smith
might have been apprehensive
about alienating American
contributions to King's.
Joseph Williams, Dalhousie's
CUS chairman, accused Smith
of "showing the same intolerance that he accuses the left-
wing of having."
John Cleveland, president of
the King's student council, has
presented a motion condemning
the ban and calling for an immediate retraction.
Dr. Henry Hicks, president
of Dalhousie University and a
former premier of Nova Scotia
stated his general opposition to
the move.
He said: "Even if I felt more
strongly opposed to the views
expressed in recent teach-in's
than Smith, I don't feel that
banning or curbing them is
realistic."
Free fees
promised
sometime
TORONTO (CUP) — Finance
Minister Walter Gordon says
free tuition for university students will come—but "it won't
be overnight."
He was speaking at a recent
open meeting of the University
of Toronto Liberal club.
The Liberal scholarship proposal will be ready for the 1966
academic year, Gordon said.
"This is not merely- a promise, it is an undertaking," he
said.
The Liberals have promised
annual $1,000 scholarships for
10,000 deserving students.
A Liberal government will
consider splitting the $10 million, half for bursaj-ies and half
scholarships, Gordon said. The
change has been suggested by
university administrators.
Many of ithe 250 present hissed and booed when the finance minister mentioned the
government's student aid program.
Fine-free  days
for  late  books
For students with overdue
public library books — ten
years or ten days — now's
the time to own up.
A two-day moratorium on
fines has been declared to
mark the Vancouver library's
Open House, Nov. 15-19.
Fine-free days are Nov.
12-13.
Moratorium does not include charges for lost books,
damaged books, and nonresident fees.
VARIETY   RENTALS
(ARNOLD'S PAWNSHOP)
986 Granville Phone  MU   5-7517
Rent a Guitar from $4.00 per  month
Rent a Transistor Tape Recorder $5.00  per  month
Rent a Guitar Amplifier from  $4.00  per  month
STUDENTS . . . Take advantage of this Special  Offer
RENTAL CAN   BE  APPLIED  TO   PURCHASE
DISCOVER FOR YOURSELF
WHY DEAN'S IS THE MOST
POPULAR MEETING PLACE FOR
DISCRIMINATING STUDENTSI
TRY OUR TAKE HOME SERVICE
Deans Restaurant and Dining Room
4544 West 10th Phone 224-6919
PH RATE RES
Sponsors the Playboys Saturday from 8:30 to 12 mid. in
Brock Hall. Tickets from Phra-
teres members or at door.
10% OFF CORSAGES
To All UBC Students
ORDER   EARLY
VOGUE   FLOWER  SHOP
2197 W Broadway   736-7344
COMMERCE
- ENGINEERING
-SCIENCE
Shell Canada Limited
WILL BE ON CAMPUS
TO INTERVIEW STUDENTS FOR
Regular Employment Nov. 15, 16, 17, 1965
Summer Employment Nov. 18, 1965
INTERESTED DEPARTMENTS
SUMMERS
Exploration
Producing
Manufacturing
REGULAR
Exploration
Gas
Producing
Manufacturing
Marketing
Accounting and Finance
Specific information can be obtained from our posters and your
Placement Office.
Don't wait for the breaks
Go after them—
that's how success begins!
At Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd., success begins with a 5 year training program of challenging work assignments designed to develop
specialist and management skills. Your success may well begin in an
interview with the representative of this all Canadian company
employing over 20,000 people.
Challenging positions are available in their steel, steel fabrication, gas
turbine and transportation industries as well as in their engineering
laboratories. These positions are open to graduates and post-graduates in all branches of ENGINEERING, BUSINESS, HONOUR MATHEMATICS, and PHYSICS. How about you ?
When you join Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd., you will start on a
satisfying and rewarding career. It could take you, if you wish, to
locations in Halifax .Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver and other urban
centres across Canada. You can be sure the opportunities will be there
for the taking.
On November 18 and 19 the Company representative will be on
campus. Ask your Student Placement Director to arrange an interview
for you.
Hawker Siddeley Canada Ltd.
7 King Street East, Toronto Tuesday, November 9, 1965
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
—norm   betts  photo
DIANA TIMMS
, . return to Japan
woman to the
orient
By MUSA LINCKE
Diana Timms arrived in
Yokahama the day before the
Olympics, armed with a rudimentary knowledge of Japanese and courage.
The first moments of real
anxiety came soon. Communications broke down between
Diana and a taxi driver and
she spent some tense moments
switching trains, lugging luggage, and transferring tickets.
Spending a week in Tokyo is
like looking at one painting
in the Louvre, she says.
Tokyo is a complex of many
"cities". Each area has its
characteristic atmosphere —
like Shinjieku, a throbbing concentration of jazz cellars, laughing students, and folk singers. Or Asakusa, filled with
theatres, fine restaurants and
nightclubs.
One never feels alone in
Tokyo. Where ever you go
there are throngs of people,
responsive, receptive and welcoming  all  foreigners.
Diana says, "the Japanese
are the most interested and
interesting people I have ever
met. They are certainly not
restrained when it comes to
making you feel at home. They
are a frank and honest people."
There is no chance of getting
lost in Tokyo. Try looking be-
wildered and immediately
someone is at your side to
assist with directions, even to
the point of taking you right
to your destination.
Continually Diana was approached by people wanting
to practice their English with
her.
She still corresponds with
some of the students she met
and travelled with; they write
in Japanese and Diana responds in English.
A little apprehensive, Diana
then boarded a boat for the
lake district of Fujiyama.
But she found hitch-hiking
the best and easiest way to
travel in Japan, although she
saw very few hitch-hikers
along the way — and no girls
at all.
About food, there are certain
things to know. A western
breakfast, according to Japanese innkeepers, means the
presence of an egg.
Throughout the larger cities
there are Tempura stands,
equivalent to' our White Spots.
These serve deep fried sea
food, small fishes, and vegetables dipped in sauce.
"For awhile I lived on 100
Yen a day (30 cents) cooking
my own meals in the Youth
Hostel, but shopping was a
little haphazard as I couldn't
read what I was buying,"
Diana said.
She wanted to concoct exotic
meals on a 5 Yen metered
bunsen burner but gave up and
went back to buying meals.
"Hong Kong can be described in one word — bustling."
Said Diana, "I didn't try hitchhiking here."
Like Hong Kong, Singapore
is   a   shoppers  paradise   wide
to page 12
see: more orient
someday
EDITORS: Musa Lincke
Joan Godsell
ASSOCIATE: John Kelsey Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November   9,   1965
insert sox
and spin
By JACK KHOURY
"You must be new here,"
said the attractive redhead
as I unloaded my overloaded
laundry basket into the
washing machine.
"How'd you guess?"
"Easy. Only a beginner
would mix those colored
socks with a white wash.
That makes all your clothes
colored.
"You'd do better to put
those in another machine,"
she pointed at my bright red
socks.
I put a quarter into the slot
and turned the knob.
Nothing happened.
I gave the machine a kick,
banged on it and turned the
knob again. Still no action.
Desperate, I appealed to
the redhead.
She looked at the machine
and then closed the door. It
whirred and started.
"You forgot to close the
door."
Looking around, I saw the
washing instructions on the
wall: add detergent during
the wash cycle, and bleach
during the rinse cycle.
The whirring of my machine changed in tone as the
"Wash" light turned red. I
filled a cup with detergent
and dumped it through the
hole next to the coin slot.
The suds that formed
didn't seem to be rich
enough, so I added another
two cups then went to the
table where several girls
were reading magazines.
I was just about to turn
to The Male Mystique in
Chatelaine when I glanced
at my washer.
The soap was overflowing
through the hole and dropping into a trough on the
floor. Three cups of detergent were too much.
I stuffed  a  rag into  the
soap hole. Relieved, I walked over to read the notices
on the bulletin board.  One
umeh a
for night people
Laundromat versus Khoury
large poster read, "This
Laundromat is open seven
days a week, •with someone
here most of the time, and
anytime you need assistance,
holler for Geo."
When my washer stopped,
I opened the door and began
to load the wash into a basket. Somehow, all the whites
were pinks.
I felt like hollering for
Geo and suing him for letting the washers use dirty,
pink water.
The redhead pointed to
one sock and said, "That's
what did it. You forgot to
take this one out."
I was just about to leave
the laundromat with my pink
wash when two boys entered.
He went to one washer,
loaded his wash, then looked
confused.
"Where the hell do I put
my quarter?" he screamed at
his companion.
Smugly, I showed them
where the coin slot was and
said: "You must be new
here."
"How'd you guess?" they
asked surprised.
"Well, for one thing,
you're mixing your -white
wash with your colored ones.
Now if you do that, your
wash will turn out like this,"
I pointed at my laundry.
I slunk home.
Want  to  know  where  to
go?
To buy cigarettes at four
a.m;., that is.
Or a bromo at midnight.
Or cocktail sausages after
sunset.
There aren't many all-
night restaurants, but try
these:
e Pappy's breakfast house,
Davie off Granville,
e Dinty's on Denman.
e Peter Pan, Granville off
Helmcken.
e Sportsman   cafe,   Duns-
muir near Seymour,
e Joe's   and   Floe's,   Nan-
aimo at Broadway,
e Love's Skillet, Granville
off Smythe.
• Mt. Shasta and Blue
Eagle Cafes on Hastings
near Main.
• Knight and Day, Broadway and Heather.
• Rendez-vous, Broadway
at Hemlock.
These all sell cigarettes,
too.
A violent urge for a cigarette before dawn when your
roommate just snaffled your
last pack, can also be sated
at:
• Gordon Bros, at Alma
and Tenth.
• Most any old hotel.
If you  need  a  late  drug
store in a hurry, try:
• Bakers' at Granville and
Smythe — stays open
until about 12. *
• Viaduct Drugs ftt Geor- ;
gia and Main — until ;
one. !
• All the  drug  stores  on  ]
Hastings   between   Car-
rail and Main—until 12  ;
or one.
If crowded super-markets j
drive you up the wall, re- j
plenish your food supply at :
at the late, late stores:
• Fourth at Blenheim.
• On Davie at Bute or
Granville.
• Broadway at Macdonald
or Vine.
And these are delicatessens:
• Robson at Hornby.
• Granville at Nelson.
The library closes at ten
p.m., but don't dispair.
You can always buy the
Readers' Digest and other
literary masterpieces at late
newstands — the ones on
Hastings in the Skid Road
area are open until midnight.
Or try the Book Barrel on
Granville at Smythe. It has
millions and millions of
books — and you can
browse until midnight.
*y>a*i,',v?%Ver*>, -  ~^»v •
"t;
"■#•"'?
CUS   brings   home   bacon
Bargains for the fee-paying set!
At least 29 stores in the
Point Grey area are offering
UBC students a discount of
10 to 25 per cent on all purchases.
See your Canadian Union
of Students office, Brock Extension 258 for a complete
list of stores.
(This is one CUS service
you might take advantage
of.)
if
Notice to Students
Holding
Pre-Sale
BIRD CALLS"
Tickets
Pleose present your tickets
to the Publicotions Office.
THIS WEEK
for the supply of
directories will soon be
exhausted.
You can't beat
the taste of
Player's
Player's... the best-tasting cigarettes. Tuesday, November 9, 1965
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
WHAT
TO DO
when your churn
paddle sticks
Do you constantly mislay
your car?
Tie a bright pennant to the
radio aerial.
Guaranteed seeable for miles.
(You could, of course, paint
your car in day-glo stripes . . .)
• •      •
If you own a shedding shaggy dog, don't forget to vacuum
him now and then.
Dogs love it.
And so does the dark-suited
set.
For moulting pussycats, try
upholstery shampoo.
It won't kill the cat and it
doesn't even make him violently ill.
• •      •
Of Course We Always . . .
• soak dirty pots immediately.
• sprinkle the oven lavishly
with salt or soda every
time it catches fire.
• use colorless nail polish
for emergency glue.
• add a couple of drops of
lemon juice to whipping
cream when it doesn't
want to whip.
• •      •
Are you tired of missing your
early morning lectures due to
a slack alarm clock?
Well here's your chance to
greet the morning with a ring-
a-ding-ding.
Place your alarm clock on a
tin plate, last thing before you
go to bed.
Guaranteed most alarming.
• •      •
If your pet bee constantly
stings and bites and does all
sorts of other obnoxious things
to you, try applying a slice of
onion to the bee sting — it
should stop the pain and swelling.
If it doesn't, kill your bee
dead.
• *     •
Want to polish up your
jewelry?
Borrow your roommate's
toothbrush and her tooth paste
or tooth powder.
Place tooth paste on toothbrush and start polishing.
NEVER use your own toothbrush — jewelry dirt drives
your taste buds crazy.
• •     •
Hot pans and no pot holders
your problem?
Vanilla relieves the pain
from those kitchen burns (apply it; don't drink it).
• •     •
Do your poached eggs come
out looking like scrambled ones
gone swimming?
Add vinegar to a pan of shallow water. Eggs don't spread or
stick.
• •     •
If you've got kids, ease
baby's teething with a piece of
raw rhubarb. Tastes better than
those rubber teething rings.
• •     •
When dark clothes look as
if they had been wed to a chenille spread, try a damp sponge
to remove the lint. It removes,
not just moves, the annoying
fuzz.
toWM A
who dominates?
By JOHN KELSEY
Society's going to hell in a
hairnet.
Ever since woman simpered
her way out of the kitchen,
wiggled into trousers, wallets
and cars and openly ran rampant over the world — black
shrew's tongues waving in circles over their fuzzy heads,
listerened cackles gushing
from twisted pink lips and
through the hallowed corridors once solely man's —
we've been whirling a-go-go
to decadence, decay and death.
It all stems from giving
them the vote, and allowing
once-sensible polygamy to become a viper's game of monogamous one-upmanship, with
man hovering in the background.
Somewhere, somehow, women got the erroneous idea
they were good for something
besides cooking and making
babies.
Now, the shrew of the sub
urbs tells her man exactly
what to do with his life, and
beats hell out of him if he
doesn't.
The bitch of business orders
man to knuckle down, quite
manfully, and whimpers in
her feminine shroud when
given the lip she deserves.
Modern man has a duty to
civilization — fail, he will
burn, rot, burn.
He must insert these screaming vixen who would frillify
the world and emasculate us
all into their proper roles:
barefoot, pregnant, in the
kitchen.
He must beat them into
submission, showing no quarter, allowing no favor.
And when he has successfully subjugated one, he must
start on another.
There's nothing more gratifying than several women in
their servile places.
Nothing more appalling
than one who gets out of it.
—dennis gans photo
KELSEY AND CAMPBELL
. . . down, I say!
... women c/o, natch
By KIM CAMPBELL
What's all this garbage
about women trying to dominate the world?
Women ought to and women
do. The old platitude about a
women behind every man is
no joke. But now is the time
for women to srtop letting
men take the credit for what
we are accomplishing.
For millions of years women have catered to the male
ego, only to produce a breed
of male with utter delusions
of grandeur and, get this, the
notion that women are the
weaker sex.
Not that women have always
objected. Occasionally it has
been to the decided advantage of women to appear weak
and helpless.
However, since it is becoming more and more difficult
to maintain this illusion, perhaps women ought to scrap it
entirely and avoid hypocrisy.
Women are not only as good
as men in most fields they ara
better.     We    must    concede
men's superiority in a few
areas. For example, men are
said to make better chefs than
women.
If more men could be induced to stand over hot stoves,
push vacuums and wash dishes
it would enable women to
devote themselves to the important business of running
the world for which they are
so well suited.
In fact, women have a moral
duty to save the world from
the terrible mess that men
have made of it. Women have
waited patiently for the right
time to assert themselves
openly. Opposition such as
emanates from the nit-wit
above proves the time is now.
Not that men haven't tried
to do their best. But if they
can't keep things straight
after a million years, how long
do we wait? After all fellas,
"Namo dat quod non habat,"
"you can't give what you
haven't got." Rise women, let's
tidy up the world and start
running it properly.
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1206 Granville
presenting
Don Crawford
Nightly
It's Not Far
To The
HIDE A WA Y!
PMSCRirrioN
EYEGLASSES
1695
Includes
rnuM *
All Doctor's Eyeglass Prescriptions rilled. Only first
quality materials used. All
work performed by qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE  OPTICAL
Ml Granville MU 3-tSfl
■s* Money Back OuarantMM
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Fall Symposium
Applications  are  available  in the AMS Office
Subject:    "Commitment and Beyond"
Place:    Rosario Beach, Anacortes, Washington
Time:    November 12, 13, 14.
Cost:    $6.50 all inclusive.
Deadline:    November 10th.
Students Court (Constitutional Hearing)
Date: November 18, 1965
Time:_.12:30_p.m.
Place: Council Chamber, Brock Hall
Please be advised that the Students' Court will hold
a hearing on the constitutional validity of Students'
Council's practice of hiring student officers for employment.
Any parties interested in appearing upon the hearing
must notify the Court of their intention to do so by
Tuesday, Novemebr 16 at 4:30 p.m. Clerk of the Court,
Box 54, Brock Hall.
SPECIAL
EVENTS
presents
TONIGHT
Under Milkwood
by
Dylan Thomas
performed by
The Kaleidoscope Players
on North American Tour
Tickets: A.M.S. $1.00 and $1.50
Auditorium 8:30 p.m.
Noon Today
Bud and Travis
BROCK - 25c
Proceeds for new A.M.S. sound system Page, 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November  9,  1965
GREEN JADE MUSH
Mix together four c u p s
seedless grapes, one cup sour
cream and V$ cup brown
sugar in a great huge bowl.
Refrigerate for at least
two hours — overnight is
even better.
To impress your six to
eight guests, serve in sherbet
— Martha
SANTA'S DELIGHT
Fill clear glass tumblers
half-way with red tomato
juice and freeze solid.
Fill to the top with chilled
green creme de menthe.
Float a sprig of holly with
'berries on top — presto!
it's Christmas.
— Rabbit
HO-DAD FRIED RICE
Chop up some of each
vegetable you've got — if
you haven't any, fetch a
green pepper, some mushrooms, an onion, a tomato
— and heave it all into a
dish.
Pour in a couple of spoonfuls of cooking oil.
Throw in one-third cup
non-minute rice for each
eater, and twice as much
water less a little bit. Salt
it, knowingly sprinkle in any
other spices you have, mix
and get a lidded frying pan
big enough to accommodate
everything. A big ugly plate
makes a good lid.)
If you didn't have any oil,
melt a gob of margarine in
the pan before you put the
stuff in, but in any case incarcerate the whole bowlful and leave it on a hot
stove.
Scrape it off the bottom
and mash it around every
couple of minutes, start
tasting after ten of happy
bubbling.
Ho-dad turns a dirty grey
color, which doesn't matter,
and which you could have
made golden brown if you'd
used consomme instead of
water.
When the rice doesn't
have hard, sandy centers,
it's done.
— Rabbit
MORE ORIENT
from page 9
open 24 hours a day. At night,
the side streets turn into all
night bazaars. Under glaring
lights any imaginable item can
be found for sale.
From Singapore Diana took
a 13-hour motorcycle ride to
Kuala Lumpur.
Malaya is lush green vegetation and swaying palm trees
rimming white sandy beaches.
Another scene of sharp contrasts — the ox-drawn cart
vies with the sportscar for
road space.
Arriving in Bangkok after
a 30-hour train ride with sheet-
swathed, cigar-smoking natives, she found accomodations
with two Thai girls in their
'apartment', a shack open to the
lane where they cooked. After days of nothing but Thai
food, the girls brought Diana
a can of Campbell's chicken
noodle soup.
It remained untouched by
the girls, who regarded the
exotic food suspiciously.
Summing up her trip, Diana
says, "The Orient forces you
to leave behind your preconceived ideas." And she's preparing for her next visit already, learning Japanese properly.
WOMEN ARE
WITH IT
We scored.
Who interviewed Mrs.
Sherwood Lett two weeks
before she was announced
as the recipient of the Great
Trekker Award?
We did.
ucmeh^
CARFFRS
IN TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT
Procter & Gamble has openings in
PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT   PRODUCT RESEARCH    QUALITY CONTROL
PROCESS DEVELOPMENT    PACKAGE DEVELOPMENT
for Bachelor and Master graduates in Chemical Engineering  and Honours
Chemistry, and Bachelors in Mechanical Engineering.
A full outline of the opportunities in these fields is given in our Technical
brochures available at the Placement Office.
INTERVIEWS
Monday, November 22
Tuesday, November 23
The Procter & Gamble Company
of Canada, Limited
Hamilton, Ontario.
Point Claire, P.Q.
UNIVERSITY    TEXT    BOOKS
Non-Fiction  Paper Backs
New and Used
BETTER BUY BOOKS
1393 W. 10th Ave. - 224-4144
The modern way to see is with
CONTACT LENSES
Have them expertly fitted at a
reasonable price by
LAWRENCE CALVERT
MU 3-1816 705 Birks Bldg.
BAY
Take Her, She's
Mine
James Stewart, Sandra Dee,
plus
Young Blood Hawk
James Franiscus
Suzanne Pleshette
STARTS FRIDAY
Lili
Leslie Carron - Mel Ferrer
Song of Bernodette
Jennifer Jones Lee J. Cobb
Students 75c
DELTA
Hot. 10. 12. 13
Mutiny in Outer
Space
plus
The Human Duplicators
plus
The Bowery Boys
Meet The Monster
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your  friends
is  al the
[Do-Nut Dinerl
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try our delicious T-bone
Steak $1.35
Ifs Really Good!
Full course meals
within tout  income
Student Meal Tickets
Available
Pantalones
kif Jben Utanuel
Ladies'
SLACKS
For All
Occasions
SOLVE
YOUR
PERSONAL
FITTING
PROBLEMS
GIVE US
JUST
HOURS
TO
CUSTOM-TAILOR
Your Slocks at a
Reasonable Price!
654 Seymour St.
MU 1.8621 '
November 10th
"ON A DAY OFF"
Association of Grad Students in Community
and Regional Planning
Lassere 102 — 12:30
FAMOUS ARTISTS LIMITED I
Q"KNJLIZABiTH    ONE pflff. ONLY! TU.   c
THEATRE This Sat. at 8:30
"THE MAN for WHOM the PIANO was UNBRED"
ERROL
GARNER
PIANIST - COMPOSER
with BASS and PERCUSSION
ACCOMPANIMENT
"On* of th* bast pianists around!" . ..
Tim*.
"A GARNER performance tingles with Excitment!" . . .
N.Y. Times. His improvisations are among the wonders of
contemporary music! Garner has been called "America's
most authentic musical voice I"
SPECIAL OFFER to UBC STUDENTS
Upon presentation of student cards at the box office in
the Hudson's Bay Co. main floor, students can purchase
two tickets for the price of one! This applies to tickets in
any price category. Prices are: $4.50, $4.00, $3.25, $2.50,
$1.75- Tuesday, November 9, 1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
THUNDERBIRD'S forward Morris Douglas (in white) soars
towards ceiling as he battles UBC Grad for rebound. Birds
won 72-46 Friday night over Grads. UBC's Bob Barazzuol
(number 32) led all scorers with 19 points.
Bronco busting Birds
lose in style to Yanks
By ED CLARK
Ubyssey Sports Editor
SANTA CLARA — University of B.C. Thunderbirds lost
a football game here Saturday
but they gave the University
of Santa Clara Broncs a moral
and physical beating at Buck
Shaw Staduim.
UBC lost its fifth game of
the season 25-13 to Santa
Clara's Broncos, tenth ranked
small college in the U.S.
Broncos, 25-point favorites
who have lost only one game
in seven this season were morally and physically beaten by
the rougher, stronger and
tougher UBC squad which
severly pounded Santa Clara
into the turf in the second
half.
Broncos, scoring all their
points in the first half, took
advantage of a mental lapse
in the defensive secondary to
score two touchdowns on the
long bomb and sink the Birds.
Santa Clara opened scoring
with seven minutes left in
first quarter, when end Tony
Orlandini was left unprotected by UBC's Glen Brandt and
grabbed a 62-yard aerial strike
from quarterback Ray Cal-
cagno for the touchdown.
Greg O'Neil kicked his only
convert in four attempts.
UBC, playing in balmy 80
degree weather before 9,200
fans, the largest in UBC's
away game football history,
showed its best offensive form
of the season marching 57
yards in seven plays for a
touchdown four minutes later.
Aldo Venier burst over the
right side from the one yard
line behind blocks from Kevin
Murphy and George Brajcich.
Brandt converted.
Aided by two UBC roughing
penalties. Broncos took the
lead again with nine minutes
left in the second quarter
when halfback Gary Filizette
went over from the one.
Five minutes later halfback
Bob Miranda scored on a 34-
yard screen pass assisted by a
roughing  penalty   on   UBC's
rugged linebacker John Reyk-
dal.
Then came the bomb that
made the difference with just
over a minute to play in the
half.
Orlandini got behind Chip
Barrett at the UBC 15 and
caught a 52-yard pass from
Calcagno for the major.
UBC came on like Bronco
busters in the second half and
corralled the Santa Clara machine to a standstill but a
standout performance by the
Thunderbirds' defence couldn't be equalled by its offence.
UBC   finished   its   scoririg
SPORTS
Editor: Ed Clark
_   S   F   t   C   '   A  L   -
RAINCOATS
C RO Y D O N
$29.95
go  of  this
Clearance
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH   WOOLLENS
549   Granville     MU   1-4649
midway through the third
quarter with Barrett sprinting
left end for 14-yards and pay-
dirt. Brandt's convert was
blocked.
UBC penetrated deep into
Bronco's territory twice in the
latter stages of the game but
the offence failed to make the
yardage on successive fourth
down plays.
Santa Clara, which highly
underestimated the aggressiveness and strength of the
Canadians, left the field at the
games end feeling the pains
and bruises, morally and
physically.
UBC cross country team
places third in Spokane
Led by Bob Tapping and Tony Horn, UBC's six-man
cross country team finished third in the Inland Empire
Championships at Spokane, Saturday. Washington State
University  was   first,   second  place  went   to   Whitworth
Cross Country — I. Armstrong, Law; 2. Karmel, ZBT;
JS   Inglis   Eng.; 4. Smiley, ZBT; 5. Holme, Architect.
Volleyball — 1. P.E.; 2. Eng. 11; 3. Alpha Delta;
4. Fiji 5. Newman.
Basketball — UBC Jayvees 55, Victoria 53; UBC
Thunderbirds 72, Grads 46.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHfDUU - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 pjn.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*   Special student admission:  15 cents. ,.  ,   ,„
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov. 19 & m,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled
ADMISSION: Afternoons   —    Students .35*    Adults .60*
Evenings   —   Students .50*   Adults .75*
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:  The  Centre  will be  closed  all day  Christmas Day
and Good Friday. „„„,„«
For further information:  Call 224-3205  or 228-3197
PIMM'S
NQ 5 has a
Canadian
Whisky
both are absolutely delicious!
Two things about Pimm's: easy to serve, and a taste you'll enjoy. Just pour into a tall glass
and add ice and fill up with your favourite light mix. You can add a slice of cucumber,
a piece of lemon, or a sprig of mint to make the traditional Pimm's, famous throughout
the world. But don't bother unless you're in the mood. A new generation is rediscovering
Pimm's . . . and enjoying every moment of it.
DRINK  rl/Vl/Vl b — simply because you'll enjoy the taste of it.
H. CORBY DISTILLERY LIMITED, CORliYVILLE, CAN.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia. ■■**«* 14
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November  9,  1965
•   I.
\ A
>'•-
,V;.
. vi
,»:*.{-ti';i:4«i»:;;i
*     SEP m,. ■—.    ,"?l:S,,ip-' «
—norm betts photo
FIELD HOCKEY jamboree behind Brock on weekend saw UBC Golds sweep four games to
finish at top of 21 team women's tournament. Above UBC's Kathie Patterson, Gail
Gilvear and Donna Kirkham (left to right in dark uniforms) clash with Portland State
forwards in game Saturday which Golds won  1-0.
SOCCER BIRD'S goalie Bruce Ballam appears dejected
after Columbus forward Bob Smith scored only goal of
game Sunday at Callister Park as UBC lost 1-0.
Columbus edges
Birds
soccer
UBC's soccer Thunderbirds had their seven game
unbeaten string snapped in Pacific Coast League play
Sunday.
The second-place T-Birds went down 1-0 to Columbus
in sandy, slippery Calister Park.
UBC had won four straight
Coast League and three exhibition games before Sunday's
encounter, and played good
defense most of the way Sunday. But Bob Smith drove a
shot over Bird goalie Bruce
Ballam late in the first half to
spoil UBC's perfect record.
Jim Berry who played an
aggressive checking game at
fullback led the stingy Thunderbird defense, and Ballam
played a strong game in goal.
The loss left UBC in sole
possession pf second place!,
three points behind league
leading
UBC gets its chance to close
the gap Thursday when they
host Firefighters at Varsity
Stadium at 2 p.m.
rFor Sale
Varsity Outdoor Club
SKI CABIN
on Mt. Seymour
Suitable for Large Group.
One-half mile from tows.
U Interested Contact Mr.
Bruce Ward at YU 8-5742
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
WHITE   DINNER  JACKETS
TAILS, TUXEDOS
MASQUERADE     COSTUMES
Special Student
Rotes
4397 W.  10th AVE.
CA 44034
Loopers lick
downtowners
The Locarno Football
League all stars swept over
and around the outclassed
Downtown Athletics to a
12-0 victory Saturday at the
Locarno Bowl.
The all stars scored on a
40 yard pass and run play
from Eagle Hunt to Billie
Ray Hoss, and on another
pass from Hunt to Willie
McGeorge.
Between scores, the all
stars toyed with the Athletics   defense.
B.C. HYDRO
& POWER AUTHORITY
requires
ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL and
CIVIL ENGINEERS
for its expanding activities
There are excellent opportunities for graduates to obtain
a variety of training and experience in many locations
throughout the Province, leading to promotions and
increased salaries commensurate with responsibility.
Please consult your bulletin board and our brochure
"Engineering the Future" for background information
and description of B.C. Hydro's diverse activities and
engineering career opportunities.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS: Nov. 8, 9, 10 & 12
We are looking forward to discussing your career plans
with you and in exploring how your interests and talents
could be best utilized in this rapidly expanding organization. Please arrange an appointment time through the
Student Services Office.
A Career
in
Iron Ore!
IRON ORE COMPANY OF CANADA
AND
QUEBEC NORTH SHORE AND LABRADOR RAILWAY
SEPT-ILES, P.Q. - SCHEFFERVILLE, P.Q. - LABRADOR CITY, NFL0.
Career opportunities are offered in
►   GEOLOGY
i.$Sm..«&
*v MINING ENGINEERING
,► GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
► CIVIL ENGINEERING
!► MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
► ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
► METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
PERSONNEL.  DEPARTMENT,
IRON  ORE  COMPANY OF  CANADA,
SEPT-ILES, P.Q.
Our representatives will be pleased to meet with you when they visit your campus on
November 16,17 Tuesday, November 9,  1965
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 15
IN RUGBY
Rugger Birds
sink  rowers
By DOUG MOSER
UBC's Thunderbird rugby squad sank the Rowing Club
16-9 before 200 fans in their first game at Varsity Stadium
Saturday.
Although hurt by the loss of Keith Watson in the opening moments, the Birds seemed to be running away with
the game. However, the strong and well-disciplined Rowing
Club pack soon had the Birds in trouble.
Behind 9-8 late in the game, it was the tackling, youth
and vigor, and the fine kicking of Mike Judd that finally
got Birds back on top.
Judd's penalty goal from 45-yards out with 15 minutes
left put Birds ahead 11-9. They added another converted try
in the dying minutes to clinch the win.
In other action Saturday, UBC Braves lost 8-3 to Ex-
Brits in front of a constant heckling crowd at Wolfson field.
When the heckling turned to personal abuse, the Braves
retrieved their fighting spirit, but, although they spent the
last 20 minutes on their opponent's goal line, they failed to
score.
On the brighter side, Totems ran riot over Ex-Brits
for a 31-0 victory at Wolfson Saturday.
Denny Bolton and Ron Hornby each scored two tries
while Ian Anderson made a strong case for first division
status converting five of six Totem tries and a penalty goal
for a game total of 13 points.
Youthful Tomahawks were unable to turn their speed
to advantage against a heavier Rowing Club II apck, losing
14-0.
OPINION
By   ROBERT   BANNO
Jim Carphin is well-known
as a big, fast pass-catching
pro football player.
But he is also a scholar and
when he speaks, people stop
to listen.
The B.C. Lion's star tight
end and secpnd year UBC law
student thinks we belong in
a league with Washington,
Oregon State and other big
U.S. colleges.
•      •      •
"It's a natural," he said,
"especially when you consider UBC's location and size."
And he says that B.C. has
the raw high school talent
to offer these NCAA giants
good  competition.
"I know that I myself, Pat
Claridge (also a Lion end) and
Barney Therrien (now with
Edmonton Eskimos) would
have rather played for UBC
than go down to Washington.
"The only reason B.C. athletes go to U.S. colleges is
the lure of athletic scholarships," he said.
Carphin  played   his high
CA N A DA
EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEWS
Our representatives will be visiting the campus
22nd, 23rd, 24th and 25th November
to interview graduating,  post-graduate  and  undergraduate  students  for
positions in 1966.
REGULAR EMPLOYMENT: Preferred Disciplines:
Mechanical  Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Electrical  Engineering
Engineering  Physics
Civil  Engineering
Industrial  Engineering
Chemistry
Commerce
Business Administration
Arts
Mathematics-Statistics
for openings as:
Development Engineer
Design  Engineer
Maintenance Engineer
Process Engineer
Planning  Engineer
Industrial  Engineer
Technical Service  Representative
Development Physicist
Technical   Analyst   (Research   Centre)
Process Chemist
Analytical  Chemist
Financial & Control Personnel
(at the plants or at Head Office)
Marketing   Research   Representative
Market Analyst
Programmer-Analyst
Statistician
Locations: Montreal, Shawinigan, P.Q.
Maitland,  Kingston, Whitby, North Bay  and  Sarnia, Ontario
MER EMPLOYMENT:  Preferred
Disc
iplines:
1
year
2
years
3 years
from
.degree
from
degree
from degree
Chemical  Engineering
X
X
X
Mechanical  Engineering
X
X
Electrical  Engineering
X
X
Engineering  Physics
X
Industrial Engineering
X
Commerce
X
X
Chemistry
X
X
X
for openings as:
(a) Assistants to   Design,   Process and   Development   Engineers
and
(b) Vacation  relief in  Production,  General  Plant Office and
the Laboratories.
An appointment to see our representatives can be made through your Placement Office where information booklets, application forms and   1966 position
descriptions are also available.
DU PONT OF CANADA LIMITED
PERSONNEL DIVISION, P.O. BOX 660. MONTREAL, P.Q.
Policy must change
CARPHIN
got an ear?
school football at Lord Byng,
and played some junior football with Blue Bombers and
Meralomas. In 1957, fresh out
of high school, he decided to
try out with Olympia Junior
College.
"They told me they'd give
me a scholarship if I made
one of the first 22 spots".
He did.
In 1959, University of Washington coach Jim Owens,
caught wind of young, ham-
minded Carphin and lured
him to the home of the Huskies. While at Seattle, Carphin helped the perennial
West Coast powerhouse to a
Rose Bowl victory.
He so impressed Wayne
Robinson, the ill-fated B.C.
Lion coach, that in 1961 Carphin was made a rookie first-
stringer.
He has been with the Lions
ever since.
• •      •
Carphin   said   that   unless
UBC starts offering scholarships, it will find its position
usuraped by up-start Simon
Fraser Academy.
He said students feel prouder of their school if they
have athletic teams worth
cheering for.
"After we won the Rose
Bowl, alumni contributions at
UW skyrocketed," he said.
He finds the lack of support for varsity teams at UBC
appalling but understandable.
• •      •
"It's degrading to play
small U.S. schools of two or
three thousand and get beaten", he said.
"If UBC produces better
teams, I'm sure the students
will respond."
Next week, Carphin will
outline the operation of the
scholarship system and its advantages and disadvantages.
FORD
MOTOR   COMPANY
OF CANADA, LIMITED
invites
YOU
to meet its
representative
on campus
November 15 and 16,
1965
Graduating Students in
Engineering & Commerce
Learn what FORD can
offer YOU
Arrangements for Interviews can be made and further
information obtained at:
Placement Office, Student Services Office, West Mall Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November   9,   1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Lions' Cap meets Mac
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Herb Capozzi and classics
head Malcolm McGregor debate on Athletic scholarships
Wednesday noon in Angus 110.
Fireside: Contemporary Bible
Criticism,    Faith    Lutheran
Church, Nov. 14, 5:30 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Bud and Travis benefit noon
today in Brock.
Also Dylan Thomas' Under
Milk Wood. The Kaleidoscope
Players, Auditorium 8:30 tonight. Tickets AMS office ojr
door, $1.00 and $1.50.
STUDENT COMMITTEE TO
END WAR IN VIET NAM
Debate: Prof. Wilmott vs. Dr.
Brown.   Resolve:. Negotiations
are a hoax.  Friday noon, Bu.
102.
CLUB CREDITISTE
Meeting Tuesday   noon  Bu.
204.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Rally Navigator's school with
speaker Jeremy Greenfield,
Wednesday noon, Chem. 250.
•      •      •
WUS
WUS is WUS Weekend. All
invited, Nov. 12-14 at International House. Register Bu. 257,
$4.00.
SPECIAL EVENTS
CBP presents: A Concert of
Contemporary Jazz conducted
by Dave Robbins. Friday, Nov.
12 Main Ballroom Hotel Vancouver. Free tickets at AMS
office or Special Events.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Rev. Reg Layzell speaks on
Miracles, Wednesday noon, Bu.
202.
CUSO
Lecture  by  returned  CUSO
volunteer noon Wednesday in
Aggie 100.
NEWMAN CLUB
Dr. William Robbins on
Relativism in club lounge St.
Mark's College tonight 7:30.
DIAMOND      RINGS
SYMMETRY     .    .   FROM $100
FIRBANKS
599  Seymour  -  Brentwood
and Park Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
MARKETING CLUB
Mr. A. Andrews and Marketing and its Functions noon today in Angus 407.
• •      •
PRE-DENTS SOC
Dr. Anderson on Periodontics
noon today, Bu. 204.
• •      •
BRIDGE AND CHESS CLUB
Game session. Duncan Sut-
tles will give exhibition in
Brock T.V. room Wednesday,
7:30-11:00 p.m.
• ¥      ¥
WUS
Meeting in Brock Council
Chambers noon today.
• •      •
VARSITY DEMOLAY
General meeting noon today
in Bu. 216.
• •      •
COMMUNITY AND
REGIONAL PLANNING
Free film Wednesday noon
in Laserre 102. All welcome.
PHYS. SOC.
IBM talk and film Wednesday noon in Hebb theatre.
• •      •
DEBATING UNION
Resolved that prostitution
should be legalized. Wednesday
noon in Bu. 217. Everyone welcome.
• •      •
ONTOLOGICAL  SOCIETY
Your True Purpose by Michael Cecil Wednesday noon in
Bu. 221.
• •      •
VCF
Meeting Friday noon in Angus 100. Rev. J. Hadley and
What is Jesus Christ Saying.
• •      •
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
General meeting noon Monday in Bu. 205.
• •      •
PRE-MED SOC.
Dr. Pat McGeer Wednesday
noon in Wes. 201.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications  Office:  Brock   Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost It Found
11
POUND ADS Inserted free. Publics,-
tlona office. Brock Hall. Local 2«,
214-8241.
LOST — SATURDAY NIGHT ON
Campus, Gold Waltham Watch,
engraved R. Kocher. 988-7003.
Reward.   Sentimental value.
LOST MEN'S BLACK WALLET IN
Buchanan phone booth Thurs.
Contact  Glyn  224-9974   Thanks.
FOUND: ENGLISH 366 TEX T.
Phone   Ann.   AM   1-2706.
FOUND -SHAKESPEARE'S MID-
summer Night's Dream, Thursday
— call at Ubyssey Adv. office —
Brock Hall.
FOUND LADY'S GREY UMBREL-
la in case — Ubyssey Adv. office
—   Brock   Hall.
LOST: BU. 314 NOV. 3 POEMS IN
English. Phone Rick Campbell
224-9758.
DOST THICK GOLD BAR BROACH
Auditorium Library or Buchanan.
Would finder please phone 224-
4483.    Reward.
LOST ONE PAIR BROWN FRAlVb-
ed glasses with gold ornament,
no case. May have lost them
hitchhiking from University Friday afternoon 3:30 p.m. — Please
call CA 4-3649  after 6 p.m.
YOU FINK WHO TOOK MY CLIP-
board from Angus 110. 11:30 Monday can trade the Notes for a
case of ale (keep the board, Fink.)
Phone   738-4552.
Special Motic
13
TWO ROBUST NAVAL OFFICER
Cadets, one with dashing beard,
will entertain and amuse two
young ladies, one with CAR, at
Barnacle Ball, Nov. 13. Interested
call   224-9888,   John,   Room   3.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
left the note about the green M.G.
scraping the white V.W. Tues.,
Nov. 2 please phone Wayne 321-
8517.
COMMERCE! ACCOUNTING CLUB
urges you to vote Chubby Gung,
Commerce King Nov. 10, Angus
407.
THE ORGANIZATION TS HERE!
Biggest sound in Vancouver. Totem Park, Friday, Nov. 12. Oh
Goody.	
Transportation
14
SAFE ACCIDENT FREE W. VAN.
Carpool needs one driver. Phone
Sam   after   6:00   p.m.,   922-7489.
Wanted
15
SCHWEITZER SKI TRIP!! BUCH.
100. Monday noon, Nov. 15. Important Meeting for those who
have paid. Be prepared to pay
balance.
AUTOMOTIVE   ft MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1957 PLYMOUTH 2 TONE, NEW
paint job, almost new engine, YU
5-1146  after 6:00 p.m.
1957 TR 3. EXCELLENT MECHAN-
ical condition. $800. Phone 261-
1063 anytime.
•55 DODGE 2 DR. SEDAN 6 CYL.
std. Brakes relined $125 or near
offer.   Phone   224-6062.
1962 AUSTIN 850 EXCELLENT
condition, radio, $725. Ph. 736-5375.
1957 PLYMOUTH 4-DOOR SEDAN.
Bank possessed. Fair condition—
Good radio J135' or best offer.
Phone  Roy   at   263-6264   after  6:00.
1960    VW   DELUXE,    excel,   cond.,
$875. TR 9-3649.
MUST SELL, '61 RENAULT GOR-
DINI, good cond., $450. Phone
Brian Bruser, 224-9001.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters tc Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up.   Also    Typewriter • repairs    at
.50   percent  savings.   Poison   Typewriters,   2140   W.   4th.   Phone   RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
NORTH SHORE STUDENTS! LET
a Professional Stenographer type
your essays. Very reasonable rates.
Phone 926-1382 or bring your work
to 4327 Erwin Drive, West Vancouver.
THESES, ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
views, Ardale Griffiths Limited,
70th and Granville. Phone 263-4530.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
•1
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and West Van.
PS:   New  outlet   coining   close  to
U.B.C.
COMMISSION AGENT TO SELL
Charter and Group Bus Trips —
phone M.U 1-7545,  Mr.  Parke.
INSTRUCTION
WANTED    PHYSICS    308    TUTOR
Phone  HE   3-4372.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—THE MOST USE-
ful book on the campus. Student
telephone directory. Now available. Limited number. Buy Your's
Today—Only 75c. 	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you have a good
driving history you qualify for
Allstate Insurance's good driver
rates.   Call   Ted.   Elliott,   224-6707.
BALD AND CHAINS! 15-45 LBS.
from $7.95 AM 6-2869 after 6 p.m.
KLASSEN'S USED FURNITURE
Mart takes pleasure in announcing
a greatly enlarged store to serve
you. Also beer bottle depot at rear
of store. (25c per doz.) Across
the street from Peter's Ice Cream.
3207   West   Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
"VOX AMPLIFIERS, CLASSICAL
Guitars, Gretch & Guild & La-
bella Nylon Strings. Ward Music
Ltd. 412 West Hastings MU 2-
5288.
Rooms
81
CLOSE TO GATES — SLEEPING
room for 2 male students. Pvt.
Ent., shower, phone, etc. Use of
rec. room. Available Nov. 14 CA
4-3648  after  5.
Room 8c Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD PRIVATE
Home. Excellent food quiet room
of your own 2735 West 14th. Phone
738-4552.   $80.
ROOM OR ROOM AND BOARD
available for male student, 3428
Point  Grey Road.   RE   3-3795.
Bring your optical prescription
to us and save!
GloSSeS  Single vision from       9.95
Bifocals from         12.95
PRESCRIPTION
Sun Glosses   from     11.88
Contact Lenses   49.50
OPT1CJU  DEPT.
ONI LOCATION ONLY
677 Grsnville. opposite The lay. Mwm 6*1-6174
1 Hour Free Parking at Rile Park
Oafudh^  ffljudjian. JsdbwMpL
cordially invites International Students to
Jh(L QnisLhncdtionjaL SiudsmJtX, Supp&L
on  Saturday,  November  13th,  1965
at six-thirty p.m.
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Oliver
6170 Blenheim Street
R.S.V.P.
731-4561
733-8249
224-6764
Speaker: Rev. J. I. Richardson
Topic: "Preparation for Dialogue"
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post graduate students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held
with Geology and Geophysics students in 2nd, 3rd, 4th
and  post  graduate  years.   (Assuming  4th year to  be
graduating year.)
On November 17, 18 and 19
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
COPPER CLIFF, ONT. THOMPSON, MAN.

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