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Array Tell us about the keg again, Paul SINCE 1918
PANTS OR NO
PANTS AT WRECK:
OUR GUIDE TO
UBC'S NATURAL
SPLENDOURS.
PAGE 6
SEPTEMBER 27,2010
• VOLUME 92, NUMBER VIII
• ROOM 24, STUDENT UNION BUILDING
• PUBLISHED MONDAY AND THURSDAY
• FEEDBACK@UBYSSEY.CA
h.    J
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BYSS
EY 2/UBYSSEY.CA/GAMES/2 010.0 9.27
SEPTEMBER 27, 2010
VOLUME XCII,  N°VIII
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@ubysseyca
NEWS EDITOR
ArshyMann: news@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sally Crampton : associate.news@ubysseyca
CULTURE EDITORS
Jonny Wakefield & Bryce Warnes:
culture@ubyssey ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Anna Zoria: associateculture@ubysseyca
SPORTS EDITOR
Ian Turner: sports@ubysseyca
FEATURES EDITOR
Trevor Record :features@ubyssey ca
PHOTO EDITOR
Geoff Lister: photos@ubysseyca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production@ubysseyca
COPY EDITOR
Kai Green: copy@ubysseyca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro: multimedia@ubysseyca
ASSOCIATE MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Stephanie Warren:
associate.multimedia@ubysseyca
VIDEO EDITOR
Matt Wetzler: video@ubysseyca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake: webmaster@ubysseyca
Room 24, Student Union Building
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CONTRIBUTORS
Rebecca Larder Catherine Guan
Elise Grieg Jon Chiang
Drake Fenton David Elop
Lee David Matthew Naylor
Micki Cowan Bijan Ahmadian
Chantelle Colleypriest
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspapei of
the University of Biitish Columbia. It is published
eveiy Monday and Thuisday by The Ubyssey Publications Society. We aie an autonomous, democratically mn student organization, and all students are
encouraged to participate.
Editorials aie chosen and written by the Ubyssey staff. They aie the expressed opinion of the
staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views of
The Ubyssey Publications Society 01 the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appear
ng in The Ubyssey is the property of The Ubyssey
Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs
and aitwoik contained herein cannot be reproduced
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Letteis to the editoi must be undei 300 woids
Please include your phone number student number
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Number 0040878022
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GAMES & COMICS
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66. Goes out with
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67. Broad valley
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three of these
1. Dutch name of The Hague
16. Wander
2. Pearl Mosque city
17. Calculus calculation
3. Lecherous look
18. Other, in Oaxaca
4. Cause light to pass through
19. Come up
5. Tale
20. Gather
6. Intelligence
22. Last letter of the Greek
7. Dynamic beginning
alphabet
8. Teach publicly
24. Bond, for one
9. Grammarian's topic
25. Eye issue
10. Direct
29. Photographic tone
11. Altdorf's canton
32. Acting part
12. Small batteries
34. Fellow
13. Caustic stuff
35. Indigo
21. Clean air org.
36. Prevail
23. Happenings
37. Mandlikova of tennis
26. Tantalizes
38. Billy       had a hitsona with
27. From birth
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28. Gazes fixedly
39. Acclaim
29. Mariner
40. Boris Godunov, for one
30. Tolerate
41. Corker
31. Ice ax
42. Writers of verse
32. Having very little kick
43. Celebration
33. Crude carrier
44. City near Provo
36. Annul
45. Green land
46. Tear
46. Thorny flowers
48. Suckle
47. Adjective for rods and cones
49. Melts together
49. Evergreen tree
51. Ad word
50. Negates
53. Brain wave
52. Into the breeze
54. Arrest
56. Essential oil
55. Unit of force
59. "...countrymen, lend me
56.        Lingus
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57.  19th letter of the Greek
61. Forever's partner
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62. Bridge positions
58. Sugar amt.
63. Swerve sharply
60. Feel bad about
C0MICMASTER, BY MARIA CIRSTEA
Submit your comics to
our website at ubyssey.
ca /volunteer/submit-
a-comic.
VIRGINIE MENARD |
production@ubyssey.ca
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PROOFREAD THEUBYSSEY
SUNDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS.
U THEUBYSSEY.
.ca 2010.09.2 7/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
EDITOR ARSHY MANN»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SALLY CRAMPTON»associate.news@ubyssey.ca
K naan waves the flag at UBC
First appearance after dropping out of SFU show
REBECCA LARDER
Contributor
"Sometimes this job is just too
cool," gushed Arts Dean Gage
Averill, as he introduced K'naan
to the packed Chan Centre on
Friday.
The Somali native, who is
most famous for writing the
2010 World Cup anthem "Wav-
in' Flag," kicked off the 2010 Terry Project Global Speaker Series
in UBC's Chan Centre. During
his talk, the hip-hop artist answered audience questions and
performed several songs, keeping his life stories to a minimum.
"I'm not a very good speaker,
that's one of the reasons why I
make music," he said. "Probably
most of you are familiar with my
story, growing up in Somalia."
Question topics ranged from
the singer's political beliefs to
his music preferences and life
on tour. Leadership is one ofthe
major themes of the Terry Project, but K'naan seemed hesitant
to describe himself as a leader,
instead suggesting, "Leaders are
not self-titled."
He was also anxious to avoid
lecturing on political or philosophical issues, explaining,
"I'm not a very clever guy." When
asked about his education, he
said that he sometimes wishes
he had been able to go through
the "communal experience" of
attending university—as well as
getting to "meet hot girls all the
time," he jokingly added.
Allen Sens, chair ofthe International Relations program and
co-founder ofthe Terry Project,
explained that the Global Speaker Series is meant to "...explore
global issues from the perspective of sciences, social sciences,
humanities and the creative and
the performing arts."
K'naan's journey from Somali
refugee to international recording artist is a "story [that] inspires
many," said Averill. "There is no
argumenthis music is directed towards issues of social justice....
his is a wonderful voice to have
in the world of popular music."
UBC students and staff greeted
K'naan with warm enthusiasm,
in contrast to the anger of some
of his SFU fans after he didn't appear at a scheduled charity concert last Tuesday. His booking
agent had cancelled the event after the organizers ofthe concert at
SFU had failed to come through
with over half of the agreed fee,
leading to a backlash of online
criticism for the artist, whose success is closely tied to his image as
a campaigner for social justice.
"No one in their right mind
could accuse me of not having
done charitable work. Yet it is
impossible to be on a tour and
play shows for free," K'naan said
in one tweet defending himself.
According to K'naan's management, the concert fell through
K'naan and guitarist Kierscey Rand. JON CHIANG PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
due to a number of failed negotiations with the student organization running the event, notably the quality ofthe organizer's
production.
"This is not the school that
hates me," K'naan said during
his appearance at UBC.
"I'm a PR disaster...! don't care,
I say whatever shit comes into
my head."
On Twitter, K'naan was similarly unapologetic.
"I explain shit not because I
have to, but because I enjoy open
dialogue. I enjoy informing people of my truths....and in the end,
if you're a hateful, spiteful penis-face then I don't care about
your view."
At the conclusion of the talk,
fans lined up for autographs and
bought "K'naan fedoras" and CDs.
Students seemed impressed with
K'naan's humble attitude. "[The
talk] wasn't a sob story about how
bad Somalia was," one spectator
said. Another student said that
K'naan was "very inspiring because he was so honest." *U
Piatt elected new AUS President
Trasolini (left) and Piatt (right) share a moment after the election results. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
SALLY CRAMPTON
associate.news@ubyssey.ca
After seven months of uncertainty, Brian Piatt was elected
as the new Arts Undergraduate
Society president Friday night,
beating interim President Ryan
Trasolini by 140 votes.
Around 500 people out of approximately 12,000 Arts students voted in the week-long
elections.
Piatt's election marks the
end of a months-long saga for
the Arts presidency that began
when Piatt and Trasolini tied
in March. Elections Administrator Matthew Naylor broke
the tie in favour of Piatt. Student
Court, however, deemed the entire election invalid, and ordered a by-election for September. Trasolini was then voted in
by AUS Council as the interim
president.
Piatt said that his victory was
a step in the right direction for
the AUS.
"The first thing I want to do
is bring a sense of seriousness
and professionalism back to the
AUS, which I don't think it's had
for a long time, and which it desperately needs," he said.
"We need to figure something
out, we need to start thinking
of ourselves as the biggest undergraduate society on campus
again and we need to impress
people again with everything
we do. The AUS has underper-
formed for a long time."
While Piatt's main concern
is to improve the governance
of the society, he intends to increase the AUS's involvement
with its clubs.
"The biggest thing I want to
say is that the AUS will be different this year. Come to everything we're doing, it'll be
great," he said. "I'm going to
bring changes to how council
is run. [It] needs to be stronger. Another big idea I have is
to have club presidents rather
than reps—I don't think reps
work very well."
He added "I'm also going to
bring all the clubs together. One
of the things I spoke about was
getting the AUS to do a careers
workshop, with different sections
for different subjects, as opposed
to parties. The AUS would bring
different clubs into different sections—but that's something we
need to discuss further."
When asked whether he will
stay involved with the AUS, Trasolini felt he would. "I'm sure in
some way I will. I just didn't really have the time to reallyput
effort into my campaign." til
NEWS BRIEFS
FORGED TRANSIT PASSES EARNS
MAN JAIL TIME
A Burnaby man arrested for selling forged transit passes in Surrey
was sentenced to two and a half
years in prison this Tuesday. Matthew Stuthard, 26, plead guilty to
two counts of forgery and fraud
The crime had the potential to create a $250,000 loss of Translink
revenue per year.
UBC PROFESSOR FINDS WORLD'S
SMALLEST GENOME
UBC Botany professor Patrick
Keeling led a research team to
sequence a parasite genome
that is 20 per cent smaller than
the world's former smallest genome. E. Intestinalis is a sister
species of the larger E. Cuniculi, a
parasitic fungus that, while usually found in rabbits, can be fatal to
humans. The difference between
the two lies in the shorter ends of
the DNAthreads that make up the
genome. Keeling's find provides
nsight into how genomes evolve
and survive in harsh conditions
WIEMAN CONFIRMED FOR THE
WHITE HOUSE
UBC professor and Nobel Laureate Carl Wieman has been confirmed by the US Senate as President Obama's Associate Director
for Science. Wieman has headed
UBC's Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative since 2007 and
will be the White House's point for
post-secondary education. He has
been praised by the President as
an "exceptional individual." Wieman is currently on a leave of absence from UBC
CANADA HAS SECOND-HIGHEST
RATE OF PSE SPENDING IN WORLD
(THE GATEWAY)
Canada is second only to the US
in how much of its GDP is spent
on post-secondary education
In a study released on Sept. 7,
the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development found
that Canadians spend 2.6 per cent
of their GDP on post-secondary
education, while Americans contribute 3.1 per cent.
Canada, along with Denmark
and Finland, contributes the most
public funds to universities and
colleges compared to other countries studied.
AVERAGE TUITION FEES ROSE FOUR
PER CENT: STATSCAN (CUP)
The average Canadian full-time student will pay $5138 in tuition fees
this year, a four per cent increase
from last year, according to a Statistics Canada report released on
Sept. 16.
The 2010-11 increase is up from
the 3.6 per cent spike in 2009-10
and is higher than the 1.8 per cent
rate of inflation calculated by the
Consumer Price Index between
July 2009 and July 2010.
The highest average undergraduate tuition and the largest increase
in fees were found in Ontario, at
a $6307 price tag: an increase of
5.4 per cent from 2009-10. Ontario graduate students also saw the
biggest spike in fees compared to
the rest of the country—their tuition went up 10.6 per cent to an
average of $6917. 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2010.09.27
Innocence Project works to free wrongly accused
ELISE GRIEG
Contributor
UBC Law and Journalism students are taking the law into
their own hands, helping the
wrongfully convicted of BC
gain a last chance to clear their
name.
The UBC Innocence Project
teams up students with experienced criminal lawyers to attempt to find and free people
who have been falsely convicted of a crime.
Founded in 2007 with financial support from the Leon Ju-
dah Blackmore Foundation, it
is the first program of its kind
in western Canada—although
there are hundreds of similar
projects worldwide.
On a worldwide basis, innocence projects have successfully
exonerated 258 people convicted of crimes they didn't commit. With this project, UBC students get a real chance at making a difference.
Liza Volpiana, a second-year
Law student, is one of twelve
students involved in the project this year. In addition to helping students develop skills they
couldn't learn in a classroom,
it provides a previously inaccessible support for the incarcerated in BC.
"Since the only other Innocence Projects are in Ontario,
it really doesn't give people that
are incarcerated in BC equal opportunities," said Volpiana. "I
don't know what other organization there would be for them."
"I think it's good education,
and it's also a gap in the legal
system in terms of clients that
have no other resources," said
program Director Tamara Levy.
Levy said that the program
has a dual goal.
"One is to educate [Law and
Journalism students] about the
problems of wrongful convictions, how to prevent them, and
how to expose them. And then a
second, equally important goal,
is to assist those that maintain
their innocence," she said.
The second part of the goal
can be tedious business.
"Most of the cases we have
are murder cases," said Levy.
"We have one case in the other
room that is 15 boxes of material. We have cases here that are
going into their fourth year of
review and hundreds of hours
[of work]."
The process of getting an innocent person exonerated is not
a fast one. After years of review
of case files by the students, the
file can be sent to the Minister
of Justice, and another fewyears
go by as they look through the
same evidence.
Entering its fourth year, the
program has not yet established
a case to the point where they
are able turn it over to the Minister of Justice, but they believe
that this is possible at some
point in the future.
"[Exonerating someone is]
such a long process," said Volpiana. "I think I might be a part
of it, but I don't think that within my eight months on the project a case will actually come to
that point. But I think I could definitely be a part of it." tl
UBC Law student Liza Volpiana. GEOFF LISTER PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
University of Ottawa
Study Law in the National Capital
Obtain a uOttawa JD degree in either English or French with a concentration in
Social Justice •     Law and Technology
International Law •     Environmental Law
Or take advantage of our many joint programs,* including
JD/LLL {NationalProgram) with uOttawa's Civil Law Section
JD/LLL {Programme de droit canadien) with uOttawa's Civil Law Section
JD/MBA with uOttawa's Telfer School of Management
Canadian & American Dual JD with Michigan State University College of Law
or with American University Washington College of Law
JD/MA with Carleton University's Norman Paterson School of International Affairs
*You may be eligible for financial aid through the HENNICK LEADERSHIP PROGRAM.
We also offer LLM and PhD programs.
mn
u Ottawa
L'Univcrsite canadicnnc
Canada's university
Application deadline: November 1, 2010
For more information:
www.commonlaw.uOttawa.ca
o
Have a problem
and don't know
where to start?
Visit the
urSa
or^\ho\ds
o^ice
Office of the
Ombudsperson for Students
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Graduate Studies
Interested in science, engineering, health sciences
or medicine? So are we!
Your next
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E£M
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uOttawa at University of British Columbia
Visit us at the Graduate and Professional Schools Fair on
September 29 and 30,2010, in the concourse (main level)
ofthe Student Union Building (SUB), Vancouver Campus.
»   uOttawa.ca 2010.09.27/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/5
amS Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
Facebook: ^^ Twitter:
UBC Alma Mater Society -fy       AMSExecutive
NEW SUB ^_
PROJECT
New SUB Project
Design Workshops
You're invited to participate in the different design workshops
taking place on Tues. Sept. 28 and Wed. Sept. 29.
Tuesday: 9:00-11:00am Food & Retail,
1:00-3:00pm Green Spaces, 3:00-5:O0pm
Medium & Large Public Spaces
Wednesday: 9:00-11:00am
Art/Performance/Media, 1:00-3:00pm
Bookable Rooms & Club Space, 3:00-
5:00pm AMS Spaces.
For more information go to www.mynewsub.com
On November 10th, buy your tickets to stay at the
I UBC Whistler Lodge from Dec.1 -Jan.4 only.
| See our website: www.ubcwhistlerlodge.com for new and improved
| ticket purchase details 604.822.5851 or 877.932.6604
...••^as^^Pu-Li.
Russian Lessons (Russia, 111 min.)
When war erupted between Russia and Georgia in 2008, filmmakers Olga
Konskaya and Andrei Nckrasov shot both sides of the conflict and swapped
their footage to reveal that the first casualty of war is, of course, truth. A stunning act of journalistic courage and a powerful indictment of the brutality of
modern warfare. <RUSSl>
Thu. Sep 30, 9:00pm, Cinematheque
Sun. Oct 3, 1:30pm, Vancity Theatre
GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY
^THEUBYSSEY.ca
*4
-5
The Autobiography of Nicolae
Ceausescu (Romania, 187 min.)
Completely compiled from official
Romanian state propaganda, Andrei
Ujica's masterful third film in a loose
trilogy is a galloping, globetrotting
reinvention of found-footage filmmaking, showing Nicolae Ceausescu as
the Great Dictator wanted himself to
be presented. The parades in North
Korea alone are worth the price of
admission. <AUT0B>
Wed. Oct 6, 2:15pm, Granville 7
Mon. Oct 11, 8:30pm, Granville 7
Carlos (Franc ^Germany, 330 min.}
"Arguably the central event of this
year's [Cannes] festival."—Film
Comment. L.dgar Ramirez channels
Brando via Che in Olivier Assayas'
celebrated five-hour-plus globetrotting
biopic of the notorious terrorist Carlos
the Jackal—it's a historically essential and wholly entertaining big-screen
spectacle that never stops moving.
Special event pricing. -jCARLOu
Sat. Oct 9,1:00pm, Park
Mon. Oct 11, 5:30pm, Park
VIFF
SEP 3D - DCT IS.  2D1D
VANCOUVER  INTERNATIONAL
FILM  FESTIVAL
VISA
O ROGERS
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Secrets of the Tribe (Brazil, 94 min.)
Academics prove far more savage than
the Amazon tribe they are studying
in Jose Padilha's briskly intelligent
documentary. Kar from being objective observers clinically detached from
their subjects, anthropologists are as
subject to the primitive demands of
desire, greed, and treachery as the
Stone Age Yanomami people.   <secre>
Thu. Sep 30, 2:50pm, Granville 7
Tue. Oct 5, 6:40pm, Granville 7
Wed. Oct 6, 10:45am, Cinematheque
Bhutto (USA, 115 min.)
Duane baughman and Johnny O'Hara's
in-depth look at a family often called
"the Kennedys of Pakistan" is both
timely and revealing. "As much a history of modern Pakistan as a portrait of
the political dynasty that periodically led
the country over two decades, Bhutto
offers a complex... perspective on its
titular   family."—Hollywood   Reporter
<BHITT>
Fri. Oct 1, 6:00pm, Granville 7
Sat. Oct 2, 11:30am, Granville 7
Repeaters (Canada, 95 min.)
Three addicts in a rehab clinic come to
discover that they are living the same
day over and over again. Carl Bessai's
film uses this story conceit to explore
the paradoxes of addiction: the film is
a philosophical meditation in thriller
format. <repea>
Sat. Oct 9, 1:15pm, Granville 7
Thu. Oct 14, 6:30pm, Park
Nostalgia for the Light
(Chile, 90 min.)
A profoundly beautiful and poetic film
that draws parallels between the nature
of time, perception, memory—the very
stuff of the cosmos itself. "[Patricio
Guzman |, approaches the tragedy of
the thousands of Chileans who disappeared during the dictatorship of
Augusto Pinochet through the lens of a
giant telescope trained on the universe...
A remarkable new documentary."
—Hollywood Reporter <N0STA>
Mon. Oct 11, 6:45pm, Granville 7
Wed. Oct 13, 4:30pm, Vancity Theatre
Mammalian (Canada, 64 min.)
Frank Wolf and his buddy Taku brave
a 2,000 km Arctic canoe journey from
Ycllowknife to Rankin Inlet, revealing the harshness and the beauty of
Canada's largest wilderness area, and
the troublii3g changes rapidly sweeping the North. Co-featured with Ciy
Rock (Canada, 29 min.) <MAMMA>
Wed. Oct 6, 12:00pm, Granville 7
Mon. Oct 11, 6:15pm, Granville 7
Wed. Oct 13, 1:30pm, Cinematheque
CASH SALES NOW OPEN!
208-PAGE SOUVENIR
PROGRAM GUIDE NOW
AVAILABLE FOR SALE!
INFORMATION
VIFF.ORG
Film Infolinc: 604.683.FILM
Find a Program Guide
location atVIFF.ORG
BOX OFFICE
Visa Advance Box Office
Vancouver International Film Centre.
1181 Seymour St. (Noon-7pm)
Visa Charge-By-Phone Line:
604.685.8297 (Noon-7pm)
VIFF.ORG (24hrs)
TICKETS
Adult S12
Weekly Matinee 510
Senior $10
Passes 8 Discount ticket
packages available 6/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.09.27
CULTURE
EDITORS BRYCE WARNES & JONNY WAKEFIELD »culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE ANNA ZORIA»associate.culture@ubyssey.ca
EVERYTHING
YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT
WRECK BEACH
"Nude isn't lewd, but gawking is rude,"
is the motto of many Wreck Beach frequenters who enjoy sunning and swimming au naturel.
The sandy shores of Wreck, located
almost 500 steps down a cliff, are hidden from buildings, streets and all other burdensome reminders of a bustling
human civilization. The beach welcomes
and accepts all bare bodies, bar none, but
has no tolerance for prurient intentions.
The regulars, mostly naturists, are confident that the nude lifestyle is healthy
and boosts self-esteem.
"Studies have proven youngsters raised
as naturists have greater respect and
tolerance for their own bodies, those of
others, for the aged, for the infirm and
that there is far less unwed pregnancies among naturist young than textile
young," asserts Judy Williams, the
chairwoman of the Wreck Beach
Preservation Society (WBPS), a group of
naturists who advocate for the protection of the beach.
But you don't need to strip down to have
fun; clothed visitors are equally welcome
on the beach. During the warmer months
ofthe year, Wreck Beach transforms into a
lively pastiche of nudists, innovative vendors, city residents, curious tourists and
the inevitable gawkers who might just
make the mistake of bringing a camera.
The interesting history and culture of the
beach is inextricably tied with the WBPS—
a libertine bunch with an interest in protecting the beach and promoting body acceptance in Vancouver.
From this guide, you may learn a smidgen or two about the place and its people. You may even dare to venture down
to see it for yourself. Bring a blanket
and an open mind, but leave your camera at home.
By Grace Qiao
Photo by Geoff Lister
BUYING ON THE BEACH
Norman, who has been a Wreck Beach
vendor for 18 years, has seen at least a
thousand people trying to make a buck
or two by selling things—anything—on
the beach, from sarongs to jewelry to
souvenir t-shirts. New and veteran "nudist foodists" have become a time-honoured tradition on the beach. "Mostpeople don't last long, usually two to three
years, five to six years, then they move
on. It's a tricky business for vendors," he
said. "You have to be dedicated, you have
to watch the weather. It's a part time income, not enough for subsistence."
When Norman started out as a vendor on Wreck Beach, in the early 90s
the exotic meats on his menu included buffalo, ostrich, caribou and even
imported kangaroo. "Around the time
mad cow became big news, Metro Vancouver [changed] the health rules,"
said Norman who, like many other
food vendors, is now limited to selling
more conventional foods like hot dogs.
Licenses are required to sell on the
beach, and police patrol regularly in the
summer, inspecting permits.
Lazing around on the beach, you may
be (pleasantly or unpleasantly) surprised
by the occasional dubious solicitor who
sells specially baked goods, spiked freeze
pops, and other substances that your
mother probably wouldn't approve of.
Some pitches are quite memorable: "Why
sit on the sand when you can float on it?
Magic mushrooms!" But there is rarely
pressure to buy, and many regulars frown
upon drug use on the beach.
A brief telling of a long tale: since the late 70s, an ad hoc
group of naturists (hippies, some would say) have constantly fought against developments that would harm
the privacy, view and ecological balance of the beach
and nearby cliff. Today, the group is known as the WBPS.
One of their biggest battles and victories was against
UBC's Campus & Community Planning in the debate over
the construction of new residence towers around Marine
Drive.
Although it would have meant more housing for stu-'
dents, itposed consequences for the beach. Williams sums
up the WBPS's position on the issue: "[the proposed towers would have] been only meters from the edge of the
cliff ensuring a lack of respect for adjacent parkland and
an almost certain slide into the sea because ofthe disturbance ofthe upper layers of a perched aquifer topography
ofthe Point Grey cliff's."
Joe Stott, the Director of Campus & Community Planning, counters that the finished "towers were reduced in
height [and] the building excavation is set well back from
the cliff edge." He also said there was reasonably shallow
excavation, which had no proven effect on the cliff.
The standoff resulted in a compromise: only three of
the four proposed towers were built.
While somewhat controversial, the WBPS has amassed
a considerable amount of clout in decisions made by the
university. Not only have their petitions brought many
building projects to a standstill, including a proposal by
the Vancouver Airport Fuel Facilities Corporation to barge
millions of gallons of jet fuel off the shore ofthe beach in
1989, but they are still fighting to counter threats that will
alter or harm the beach and its surroundings.
LAWS AND ETIQUETTE
Wreck Beach is policed by the UBC
RCMP in conjunction with the Metro Vancouver Parks Board. It can be
a challenge.
"During the busy times of the year-
May to September—[we] put together a
team of four to five officers whose sole
responsibility during the summers is
to do preventative patrols and enforcement," said RCMP Staff Sergeant Kevin Kenna. They handle complaints the
same way they would any other call,
but the limited cellphone coverage and
difficulty locating individuals on the
beach are an added challenge.
Though it's not uncommon, camping overnight on the beach is illegal. It would be unwise to assume
that the RCMP won't catch you just
because they have to trek down the
stairs to get to you first. Sergeant Kenna reminds students to be aware of
the curfew, "sundown to 8am is no-
beach time."
Federal and provincial laws, as
' well as park bylaws, are in effect for
alcohol and other substances. This
isn't to say that rules don't get broken
from time to time; the responsibility and consequences are your own.
Destruction of forest and driftwood
is illegal, as are fires.
On the first day of every year, along with the other beaches in
Vancouver, Wreck Beach welcomes Polar Bear Swimmers to test
its icy waters for some bringing-in-the-New-Year-cheer skinny-dipping. For the past fewyears, hundreds of participants have graced
the beach in their birthday suits to attempt to break the Guinness'
Book of World Records' Simultaneous North American Skinny-
dip, sponsored by the American Association for Nude Recreation.
If you're on campus in the summer, it would be worth your
time to check out an annual Wreck Beach Day celebration with
volleyball, body-painting, and sandcastle building activities in
July. This day is also the WBPS's Annual Body Acceptance Day—
beachgoers will be encouraged to display comfort in their own
skins by exploring the pleasures of nekkid beaching.
In addition, there is annual "Bare Buns Run" in August. Iron-
illy participants win a t-shirt. "       ^^_^_
GETTING TO WRECK
Wreck Beach is a 6.5km stretch of beach located at the westernmost point of Vancouver, cosied up right against the cliffs of
dense forest growth. Easily accessible from the UBC campus,
simply look for the "Trail 6" sign by the intersection of Northwest Marine Drive and University Boulevard. The C20 Translink shuttle bus will take you right to it.
Be prepared to trot down around 480 steps of stairs to reach
the beach (and another 480 back up). There are some portable
toilets by the Trail, but pee before you go!
As a personal recommendation, make sure to catch a sunset
with a clear sky—always met with such ruckus and applause
that it could almost fool one into thinking that the event didn't
1 len every single day. tl 2010.09.27/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/7
From beaches to bars
Jon & Roy at the Chan
r
I
*
It sometimes snows in Victoria PHOTO COURTESY OF JON AND ROY
JOE PEACE
Contributor
Not many bands can claim
they've held on to their roots in
the same way that Jon and Roy
have. Once a duet, now a quartet, Jon and Roy who hail from
Victoria, have recorded three
albums and recently wrapped
up an extensive national tour-
but they still manage to hold on
to the homegrown sound they
set out with.
The band hit the Chan Centre's Telus Theatre on Thursday
spreading their folksy laid-back
style to the UBC campus for a
CBC Radio 2 Live Session, before
crossing the water for a homecoming show last Saturday.
The show demonstrated not
only their live presence, but
also the band's amazing song-
writing and lyrical ability. The
crowd was enchanted the moment Jon and Roy stepped onto
the stage. Foot-tapping and
head-nodding followed. Highlights included "To the Beach,"
and, from their latest album,
"Homes," and "Boon Elm," as
well as "Another Noon," which
featured a truly awesome percussion break. All ofthe songs
received huge responses from
the audience.
It's bands like Jon & Roy that
make you feel as if you're collectively part of something bigger than the general performer-
audience setup and that maybe
the gap can be bridged—at least
for the duration of the concert.
The Ubyssey caught up with
percussionist Roy Vizer as the
band made its way to Halifax,
Nova Scotia, last week.
Ubyssey: You guys seem like
more ofthe sort to jam on beaches with a few friends than to be
touring the country. How did all
this success come about?
Roy Vizer: I don't know, itwas
a slow progression, I guess.
From the beaches to the bars,
and then from the bars to the
bigger venues. And then there
was a little bit of interest in
our music, so we just kind of
went with it.
U: So out of all the places you've
played across the country, which
would you call your favourite?
RV: Well, for me, I guess it would
be in front of the Victoria Parliament Building this last Canada Day.
U: And that would be your favourite show you've played?
RV: Well, you know last night we
were talking about how much
we really enjoyed playing Tofi-
no. And we always have great
shows in Ottawa, in The Black
Sheep just outside Ottawa.
U: It's been said that your inspiration is very diverse. What kind
of sources didyou draw upon for
your latest album?
RV: It's definitely very diverse.
Jon [lead vocals and guitar] listens to a lot of African finger-
picking music, we all listen to
a lot of hip-hop, classic folk and
blues. I listen to a lot of Cuban
music. We all love reggae music. So I don't know, I guess we
all listen to stuff [which] we try
and play into what we do.
U: And how was the title of the
album, Homes, inspired?
RV: I suppose it's kind of left up
to the listener's interpretation. I
guess it means something for everyone else.
U: This being your third album,
how would you say it compares
to your previous releases?
RV: We had more guest musicians and more time. Also quite
a bit more studio time to work
with. We had better equipment.
We kind of had a more layered approach to recording our music.
U: How do you feel Victoria and
Vancouver Island influenced
your style and sound?
RV: We actually get asked this
question a lot. It's just the beautiful surroundings that we live
in. So we spend a lot of time enjoying it and somehow this feeds
into the music. Victoria's not like
a big bustling city, so we kind of
have a little bit more time to reflect. I can't exactly put my finger
on it, but it definitely has an influence on our music.
U: So what do you guys have
planned for the next few months?
Tours? New releases? Any
surprises?
RV: Right now we're just kind of
focusing on this really great holiday show. We're just kind of in
the process of finding out what's
happening in December, and this
is going to be the firstyear where
we take the holiday show over to
Vancouver as well as Victoria. So
we're really focusing on that. I
think we're just going to focus on
the music for a little bit, because
we've been traveling around quite
a bit, for like, three, four months,
and when you do that so much
you don't have too much time to
work on new material. So that's
what we're goingto do and it's all
pretty exciting.
^1
ONLINE
EXCLUSIVES
Olio film reviews, Michael Bernard
Fitzgerald and more @
ubyssey. ca/culture.
LAND   USE   PLAN
AMENDMENTS PROCESS
UBC is proposing changes to its Land Use Plan, which are necessary to
address issues the university community identified as obstacles to UBC's
mission and vision during the Vancouver Campus Plan Review process.
Participate in our consultation events to learn more about each issue,
proposed amendments and to provide your feedback.
UPCOMING PUBLIC CONSULTATION EVENTS
LAND USE PLAN E-CONSULTATION: SEPTEMBER 27 - OCTOBER 15
■ Visit planning.ubc.ca to take part in our e-consultation process.
LAND USE PLAN WORKSHOPS: OCTOBER 13 AND 14
(PLEASE ATTEND ONLY ONE)
• Wednesday, October 13:11 a.m. - 2 p.m., SUB Ballroom,
6138 Student Union Blvd., UBC
• Wednesday, Oct 13: 6 p.m. - 9 p.m., Tapestry, Wesbrook Village,
3338 Wesbrook Mall, UBC
■ Thursday, Oct 14: 6 p.m. - 9 p.m., West Point Grey United Church,
4595 West 8th Avenue, Vancouver
Please RSVP to Stefani Lu, stefani.lu@ubc.ca, and let us know which workshop
you'll be attending. For more information, please visit planning.ubc.ca.
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CENTRE DE DEMANDE D ADMISSION
AUX UNIVERSITES DE LONTARIO
170 Research Lane
Guelph ON N1G5E2
www.ouac.on.ca
Agenda for Tuesdays staff meeting
Noon, SUB 24
1. Introductions
2. New members
3. Whale-naming contest
4. WPNCUP update
Justin McElroy |
coordinating@ubyssey.ca
5. NASH fundraising
6. Coordinator elections
7. Retreat Update
8. New Business
U THEUBYSSEY.
ca 8/UBYSSEY.CA/S PORTS/2010.09.27
SPORTS
EDITOR IAN TURNER»sports@ubysseyca
41-6: Regina rams Thunderbirds
DRAKE FENTON
Contributor
On Friday night, UBC faced off
against the University of Regina Rams, losing 41-6, moving
the T-Birds to 1-3 on the season.
Coming into the matchup, the
Rams were the owners of Canada West's No. 1 ranked offensive. They did nothing to hurt
that statistic.
In the first quarter, 'Birds
quarterback Billy Greene, under
pressure from the Rams' pass
rush, hurried a throw that was
easily intercepted. Shortly thereafter, Regina's running back
Adrian Charles punched in a 12-
yard rush for the game's opening touchdown. 10-0, Regina.
Greene and Charles's performances ran in contrast to each
other in determining how the
game would unfold. Greene
threw four interceptions.
Charles rushed for 193 yards,
averaging 9.6 yards per carry.
Turnovers and big plays were
daggers in UBC's back all night.
Early in the second quarter,
Charles broke through the first
line of UBC defenders. When he
reached the second level, using
his breakneck speed, he out-ran
the 'Birds' defensive backs. By
the time Charles ran out of gas,
at about UBC's 20 yard line, it
seemed undeniable that the two
'Birds players mere inches from
him would take him down.
Miraculously, they both
missed, and Charles sauntered
into the endzone to cap off a
Regina's Connor Haas is chased by former SFU defensive standout Mark Baily. JON CHIANG PH0T0/THE UBYSSEY
90-yard run. It was that kind
of night
"You can't expect to lose the
turnover battle 0-7 or whatever it
was and expect to do well," said
T-Bird head coach Shawn Olson.
Five minutes into the fourth
quarter, Regina lined up to
punt the ball from deep within
their territory. UBC got into a
punt block formation. Whether
Regina's punter audibled the
play or the Rams coach anticipated pressure from UBC and
accordingly called a fake is unknown. What is known is that ten
seconds later, Regina's Matt Yau-
sie was celebrating in the UBC
endzone after a 73-yard touchdown pass.
While UBC's offense struggled all night, only entering
the red zone once, the defence
played relatively well, however. They managed to limit one
ofthe strongest passing attacks
in the Canada West to only 186
yards through the air.
"I was pretty happy with the
effort of our players...Our defence didn't back down one bit
against a good offence," Olson
said, til
SCOREBOARD
1
UBC varsity game, football versus Regina, was televised this
past weekend.
6
Losses UBC varsity teams
had in their regular seasons
this weekend, compared to
two wins and one tie.
10
Rebounds by UBC's Kris Young
against Japan's national women's basketball team.
13
Points by which Japan's national basketball team beat UBC's
women in Taiwan, 68-55.
35
Man-hours to prepare the football stadium for Friday night's
match.
90
Yards run by Regina's Adrian
Charles for his first touchdown,
the longest run of the game.
Thinking of graduate studies?
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Wednesday, October 6
5-6:30 pm
Program begins at 5:30 pm
SFU Vancouver
515 West Hastings Street
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GRADUATE  PROGRAMS INFO
www. sf u .ca/academ ic
Cover the games happening at UBC! Write for
sports! Use a plethora of exclamation marks!
Know your limit, play within it.
ian turner | sports@ubyssey.ca
U THEUBYSSEYc 2010.09.27/ UBYSSEY.CA/S PORTS/9
Hockey preseason starts up
Rookie Hillary Talbot defending against Carleton. DAVID ELOP/THE UBYSSEY
CHANTEL COLLEYPRIEST
Contributor
Following a slow first period
on Friday night, the men's ice
hockey team got their season
rolling with a 4-1 win over the
SAIT Trojans.
"We came out a little off: six
months without playing a game.
After the first intermission we
started to pick it up, felt a lot better out there coming into third,"
said forward Bill Smith.
And pick it up they did: in the
second, after Thunderbird Dalton Pajak was given a penalty for holding, 'Birds forward Scott Wasden scored
short-handed.
With less than a minute left
on the clock in the second period, the Trojans struck back
as defenseman Clayton Goodall
scored. Tied 1-1 with the clock
ticking, fans who started making their way out to beat the rush
atthe concession stand missed
forward Justin McCrae's literally last-second goal.
Off a pass from defenseman
Craig Lineker, McCrae got the
puck between Alberta's pipes,
giving UBC a 2-1 lead going into
the third.
"For this season... we really wanted to get our defensive
game a lot better so we've been
working a lot in practice, and it
showed tonight, only allowing
one goal," forward Max Gras-
si said.
With 11:21 minutes left in
the third, a goal by 'Birds forward Marc Desloges sealed the
'Birds lead, but for comfort,
team captain Matthew Schneider scored UBC's fourth goal
with 2:56 left to play.
"Desloges, Schneider and
RueL.we expected things from
them...combined they have
11 years of experience," head
coach Milan Dragicevic said.
"We really just want to focus
on ourselves, to make sure our
structure was in place, make
sure our systems were in place...
I thought we did that."
WOMEN SECURE BRONZE
UBC's women's hockey team
hosted a four-team tournament
this past weekend.
Heading into the bronze medal
match against Toronto, they were
the last-place team. Defenseman
Emily Grainger set up the game's
first goal. After Grainger fired the
puck at U of T's net, forward Tati-
ana Rafter was able to move the
puck into the netting. UBC managed to win the game 2-1, even
though they were outshot 24-18.
"It was an opportunity to see
players in a lot of different positions. The team is having fun
building [sic] and the positives
are that we've got some players
on the team that can handle the
puck and can shoot," said women's head coach Nancy Wilson.
"Now we just have to get everybody familiar with the systems
and with each other." vl
— with files from UBC Athletics
Zach Kalthoff stopping Trinity Western. MICHAEL THIBAULT FILE PHOTO
UBC's last man back
LEE DAVID
Contributor
When watching soccer, many
people see the position of a
goalkeeper as somewhat lonesome — because we often see
goalies, hands on their hips,
watching and standing in solitude, while their teammates up
front are in attack. But UBC's
starting goalkeeper, rookie
Zach Kalthoff, begs to differ.
"Bossy" is how he describes
his position, because he's continually instructing his fellow
defensemen.
This energetic 21-year-old has
had a lot of experience in commandeering his defencemen.
At 6 feet tall and 185 pounds,
Kalthoff has played for Southampton, England and for FC Kai-
serslautern, Germany.
Two years ago, Kalthoff hit a
stumbling block. He had to undergo a couple of knee surgeries.
But with the surgeries a success,
UBC men's soccer head coach
Mike Mosher believes Kalthoff
is now the "complete package."
"He is a very experienced player at this level," says Mosher.
"He is a good communicator
with players in front of him. He
guides his defenders well and
prevents scoring opportunities
from opponents."
But the complete package still
faces some pedestrian challenges. As any other student-athlete,
especially a freshman, Kalthoff
will face a struggle when attempting to successfully balance his academic and athletic
goals. Recognizing this, Kalthoff
said, "I will only focus on two
things—school and soccer." He
is enrolled in the faculty of Human Kinetics.
UBC's strong academic reputation, Kalthoff said, was a leading reason why he came to study
here. "I really like the campus
and UBC is an excellent school
with a great team," he said.
Twice in the last five years, the
T-Birds were Canada's national
champions. In the past 26 seasons, UBC has finished 10 times
wearing the national crown.
With a number of people who
have European playing experience or were in the Vancouver
Whitecap's residency program
on his team, Mosher has high
expecations.
"I am very optimistic because
we have a lot of talented players
this season, and I expect a lot of
competition for a spot among
players."
With a strong core in front of
him, Kaltoff, too, has high expectations. "I have no doubt we'll
win the CIS," he said, tl
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IAN TURNER
sp orts@ubyssey. ca
tlT lEUBYSSEYc 10/UBYSSEY.CA/ADVERTISEMENT/2010.09.27
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OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
THE WAR ON FUN MAY BE UNWINNABLE
Fellow fun-loathers: it's under dark circumstances that we call out to you today. For eight long
years, it has been our shared mission to eliminate all avenues of unsanctioned fun and steam-
blow-offery on this fair campus. However, in light
of September's excessive, detestable hard-partying, it is beginning to appear as though our efforts have been in vain.
From the Caligulian fraternity parties spilling
into violence against our tireless, overworked policemen, to the pointless emergency care of back-
flipping Ski and Board Club members, the extreme
excesses ofthe mouth-breathing student vermin
over the last month have been well publicized.
But it's the untold story that ofthe loathsome
rank-and-file student not engaging in directly
punishable or hospitalizable offense, that disheartens us the most. Engaging in what can only
be characterized as tomfoolery ofthe highest order, they continue to imbibe drink across campus, be it in their precious student "union" building, residences, or on our fair streets and beaches. It's enough to make a tax-evading millionaire
living on an unincorporated university campus
break down and cry.
It's not as though we've been without our victories. We assumed that by destroying weekly
beer gardens with clever uses of selective "special occasion licenses," a glorious stake would be
put in the heart of on-campus revelry once and
for all. And the financial circumstances that led
to the cancellation of Arts County Fair were truly a blessing. But students continue to drink,
and outside of unlicensed events and establishments, as though they weren't aware that imbibing drinks in places other than box-socials was
socially unhealthy. Even unburdening the campus of the looming menace of Koerner's did little
to stop the deluge of drink and consequent bile.
Our principles remain unchanged. We will
continue to look upon alcohol-imbuers, wine-
and-cheese hob-nobbers and those that enable
them with the same degree of contempt we've
always maintained. But our methods and expectations may have to be adjusted, for it is beginning to appear as though the War on Fun maybe
unwinnable. vl
TERRIBLE TRANSFER TRAVAILS
Last week, we wrote that at President Stephen
Toope's town hall, a student came with a common complaint. She said that when she'd transferred in from another school, her credits didn't
come with her.
"They're more likely to not have the time for
you and brush you off," she said about university administrators. Toope acknowledged that he's
heard of this complaint before and that sometimes "it's hard to evaluate programs sometimes
at other institutions."
UBC's bloated bureaucracy is one of the reasons
for this problem, as we noted. But there might
be something else at play here: our attitude towards smaller schools.
This university may be ranked as one of the
three best universities in Canada, but when it
comes to undergraduate teaching and engagement as measured by the National Survey on
Student Engagement (NSSE), we're consistently at the bottom of the pile, while regional rivals
SFU and UVic are close to the top.
Although many students receive a better education at other institutions for 100- and 200-lev-
el courses, we make it difficult for them to receive credit for courses that they've completed.
It's ironic, because the university actively promotes the concept of students "going global" for a
year on exchange. But anyone who's gone abroad
knows that transferring over credits is difficult,
even with universities that we have official partnerships with.
It appears hubris has infected the UBC system.
Whether this is the consequence of overworked
administrators, a sense of superiority from professors about their syllabi, or a desire to make
sure that students are prepared for their classes,
many students end up wasting time and money
retaking courses. We're encouraged by Toope's
comments, if only because acknowledgment is
the first step in solving any problem, wf
OMK VAmaMT" law ZMoUZ&S
£ATTLer the M&NsraoJS
forces
ANNETASTAD COMIC/THE UBYSSEY
COLUMNISTS
Running for President a risk worth taking
BIJAN AHMADIAN
AMS President
When I made the decision to run for
President last year, I knew I would be
putting on hold not only my passion
for dance, but also my studies in Law
and my MBA. It felt like a high-risk decision, but the work I get to do now has
made the decision one ofthe most rewarding risks I have ever taken.
Every week I oversee the implementation of about forty projects within
our 2010-11 Strategic Plan. A significant project is building a new Student
Union Building, 255,000 square feet
of sustainable student-run space by
the grassy knoll.
The project was truly kicked off in
2008 when students voted for a fee increase to build their new space. But
many feared that the project was going to fail because nearly two years of
intense negotiations between UBC and
AMS had not produced an agreement.
The stalemates had strained the
relationship between AMS and UBC.
The question of whether we would
ever have a new building was front
and centre every day.
I took office on February 12th with
a mandate to save the building. And I
set the aggressive deadline (the end of
April) for signing the agreement with
UBC. My deadline put strong pressure on both sides but everyone was
very committed to getting there. We
worked round the clock while the city
was buzzing with the Olympics and
while the campus was going through
final exams; both sides were working
even during the Canada-US gold-medal men's hockey game while following
the scores! Eventually, we managed to
break the impasse.
April 30th was a jubilant date for the
AMS and this university. The conclusion of the agreements put students
back in the history books as the builders of this campus. We built the first
student union building (now Brock
Hall), we built the current Student
Union Building and now we are raising the bar again by building one of
the most environmentally sustainable buildings on campus. On that
day, students got the building they
deserved and voted for.
But my push for the highest standard of performance has not stopped.
For the first time, the AMS has mapped
out our goals in a strategic plan. Among
many projects, we are renegotiating
the U-Pass agreement to make sure
the program stays affordable and provides good service quality. The Health
and Dental plan is also up for renewal
and we are investigating the optimal
options to provide the best benefits at
the best price. We are also lobbying
for a better student financial aid system both federally and provincially, as
well as a rapid transit line along the
Broadway corridor all the way to UBC.
And those are the kind of accomplishments and projects that have
made it worthwhile to take all the
risks that came with running for President. It is a good feeling when our
work brings value to the student experience at the end of the day. tl
Bijan Ahmadian is the AMS President.
His column will run once a month.
Student loan reform benefits all groups
MATTHEW NAYLOR
Columnist
After two years of wasted time, the
AMS is finally lobbying on something
that will deliver results for students.
For two long and disastrous years, the
AMS has been pushing for lower tuition, something that will, in this political climate, never happen. They've
finally gotten their act together and
started to work on something that has
the potential to deliver results—student loan reform.
BC's student loan program is the
worst in the country. It has rotten criteria for evaluating need (ie. if your
parents are land-rich and cash-poor,
you're screwed), charges too much interest (at prime rate plus 2.5 per cent,
it's the worst in the country) and still
manages to lose money.
It's not like the BC Liberals aren't
aware of this—at their 2008 policy convention, they adopted a resolution on education that, amongst
other things, called for changes in
needs assessment, interest rates, and
how the province deals with private
institutions.
When the arguments for student
loan reform are laid out, they are convincing enough. However, with the
combined support ofthe AMS and the
University, there is no room for the
province to play one party off against
other.
Stakeholders don't disagree and reform should save money if it's done
right. For the government, the University and the students, it's that rare situation where you have a win-win-win.
Another sea change for the AMS
is belied by this action. The fact that
the AMS is working with the University to push reform is a massive step
in the right direction. We do not need
to be at loggerheads with the administration all the time—in many circumstances, especially when dealing with
the government, our interests are the
same. Working with the administration allows students to influence administration lobbying, and make our
shared priorities the most prominent.
Many student organizations stand
firm by their principles; lower tuition
or bust, as it were. I don't think that
abrogating principles is the way to
go, but rather, accepting that one cannot realize a desired result is a great
leap forward.
I would propose an alternate principle—seize every opportunity, no matter how small, half-measured, or insufficient to bring about any small improvement for students.
This may be Real Politik. It may
be cynical. But it delivers results. "Si 12/UBYSSEY.CA/OURCAMPUS/2010.09.27
OUR CAMPUS
DAVID ELOP PHOTO/THE_UBYSS^
111 LLB
EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN AUSTRALIA
Have you considered completing your Teacher Education qualification in Australia?
Ranked in the top 4% of universities worldwide (Times QS World Ranking)
Over 2500 Canadian teacher education students have graduated from Griffith.
In 2010 Griffith was the number one Australian education destination for Canadian students.
Campuses located on the Gold Coast and Brisbane, the capital of Queensland.
Commencement dates for Primary/Junior programs: January and July 2011.
Commencement date for Secondary programs: January 2011.
INFORMATION SESSION
CAREER FAIR
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
University of British Columbia
Date:            Thursday, 30 September
Fune:            4:00pm - 5:00pm
Location:      U B C Robson Sq ua re.
Room C 225
Graduate & Profession School Fair
Date:            Wednesday, 29 September
Thursday, 30 September
Time:              1 0:00am - 3:00pm
Location:     Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Associate Professor Denis Jones
Telephone:    + 61 (0)7 555 29067
Email:           d.pjones(£>gr if fith.edu.au
www.griffith.edu.au/masterofteaching
CRICOS00233E

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