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The Ubyssey Mar 11, 1983

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXV, No. 43
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, March 11,1983
228-2301
JL he store front looks nondescript. Its
only distinguishing feature are the words
"Help us protect your freedom of choice"
beneath the sign Red Hot Video, prominently displayed behind the bullet-proof plastic
window.
Inside, there are no indications that this is a
marketplace for pornography. Behind the counter
are shelves of videotapes and a smiling salesperson.
A middle-aged man casually walks in. Fumbling
for his wallet, he asks to see Red Hot's "Erotic
Theme Directory" and chooses a tape which depicts
"rape and gang-bang," according to the listing.
The tape is quickly and mechanically procured.
The man leaves, satisfied that his purchase will proved another evening's entertainment.
But the transaction may not be so easy in the
future. Consumers of videotapes may soon have difficulty obtaining films which convey images of explicit sex and violence because B.C.'s anti-
pornography groups are strengthening their tactics.
They have launched a two pronged assault aimed at
disrupting the business of Red Hot Video and similar
outlets.
The B.C. Federation of Women, a coalition of 36
women's groups, is currently stepping up its attack
and street action against Red Hot. The federation has
vowed to close down every Red Hot outlet in B.C. by
the end of this year. They are pressuring the stores in
several ways, organizing and educating women and
men about the issue and insisting on the enforcement
of laws governing pornography.
So far, three of original 13 stores have ceased
operations and three have changed their names. The
Port Coquitlam and Prince George outlets fell to
public pressure, while only the charred remains of a
Red Hot store in Surrey are left. A group calling
itself the Wimmin's Fire Brigade burnt it to the
ground in late November.
"We are trying to interfere with their business,"
says BCFW spokesperson Regina Lorek. "We are
applying to certain unions not to service them, such
as B.C. Telephone, and boycotting Sony, which supplies them with tapes."
The federation is planning rotational pickets to
give the outlets little notice before they're hit, says
Lorek. The BCFW is organizing a province-wide
picket tomorrow of all Red Hot stores in B.C. from 2
to 3 p.m., and plan to continue such action until the
stores are closed permanently.
The BCFW's anti-pornography committee is conducting an educational campaign to change public attitudes. They want to counter arguments used by
buyers and sellers of pornography and some civil
libertarians that removal of the tapes is censorship
and that feminists are prudes.
"We don't live in a free society where you can
print or read anything you want. Because (the anti-
pornography movement) threatens men, they are
screaming censorship. They can only argue on a
theoretical, abstract basis," she says. Pornography
restricts women's freedom of speech and distorts
their sexuality, Lorek adds.
"We fought long and hard to get reproductive
rights, birth control and information about our
bodies. Feminists are not anti-sex," she says.
The committee is compiling a tape to show the
public what Red Hot rents and distributes. Scenes
from Young and Abused, Prisoners of Paradise and
Water Power will be incorporated.
In Prisoners of Paradise, a shipwrecked American
sailor on a Pacific island is forced at gunpoint by
Nazi guards to rape and humiliate a woman prisoner.
Water Power shows an armed man verbally abusing
women and raping them orally and genitally.
The BCFW obtained tapes through Mark Robert,
the owner of Pacific Video in Richmond. In early
December, he voluntarily turned his entire collection
of 60 pornographic tapes to BCFW representatives.
"I have had a few personal friends raped. If by
getting rid of my tapes I can save one woman from
being raped, it will have been worth it," Roberts said
at the time.
Since then, committee members have screened the
videos for material to take to the police and to use in
their educational tape. "I never wanted to look at
porn before. But I've chosen to look at it directly, to
see why its dangerous and form an analysis," says
Lorek.
The demonstration tape will illustrate the connection between soft and hard-core pornography. "One
definitely leads to the other. Men are looking for
women in vulnerable positions and for more 'ex
citing
says.
Lorek realizes the permanent closure of Red Hot
stores will only force the sale of tapes underground.
But, she argues, it will make the material less accessible and more expensive. It will give women's groups
an effective strategy to apply to other porn outlets,
she says.
"We will have solved the problem of Red Hot
Video, not of pornography. We need to achieve'
specific goals first."
Women involved in the North Shore and Port Coquitlam women's centres have pursued the legal front
against Red Hot. Their activities, combined with
those of the BCFW, have a "pincer effect" says
Jancis Andrews of the North Shore centre.
Since April, they have pressured the attorney-
general's ministry and local crown counsels to lay
charges against the stores. They have written letters,
lobbied MPs and MLA's and approached city council members about the issue.
Their efforts, and other activities such as the
firebombing of three outlets on Nov. 22, led to police
raids on 12 video stores in early January. Hundreds
of tapes were seized in the raid. And in one home,
police confiscated a man's entire stock of 5,000
recorded and blank videotapes. They also found 21
electronic recorder machines.
After the raids, a Red Hot store in Victoria was
charged with three counts of obscenity. Each count
relates to an individual film offered at the store: The
Candy Stripers, The Filthy Rich and Bad Girls. The
Filthy Rich depicts sexual abuse of a servant, anal
sex, rape and bondage.
And on March 5, the Red Hot outlet on Vancouver's Main street was charged with 12 counts for
distributing obscene material. The charges are
against the company, not individual owners.
But some women's groups aren't impressed. They
charge the raids are attempts to pacify the anti-
pornography movement. Although Victoria was
chosen as the first site because it had the first
available court, women say the charges will not be effective.
"I don't think much will happen in Victoria. I'm
not impressed with the choice of tapes; they aren't
adequate for prosecution," says Jana Taylor of the
Port Coquitlam women's centre, noting Water
Power and Pretty Peaches, both violent films,
weren't used as counts against the Victoria store.
"The authorities had to do something to save face
and to keep people pacified," agrees Lorek. She says
the crown is not using the full extent of the law
against Red Hot.
See page 7: EFFORTS Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 11,1983
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
PERILS OF THE PILL
By SARAH COX
Women were ecstatic over the arrival of
the birth control pill in 1960. They finally
had control over their own sexuality.
"The pill was the dream," says student
health services director Dr. Percival-Smith.
"Without it, women were shackled." The
pill was an important aspect of the women's
movement in the early '60s he says. Since
then, a tremendous number of women have
taken the pill for great lengths of time."
Twenty years later, however, the rush to
go on the pill is slowing down. Women are
becoming fearful of limited and inadequate
testing of the pill. They are realizing
women's health was not a major concern of
doctors or drug companies.
"Now, in hindsight, there is a horrifying
picture of inadequate testing of drugs like
the pill," says Percival-Smith. Annette
Clough, Vancouver Women's Health Collective member, agrees. "The pill was only
tested on 135 Puerto Rican women before it
was marketed," she says. "Some of the
women died."
"We always discourage women from taking it. There are many studies showing the
health dangers to women on the pill."
The 10 year old health collective was
formed by women dissatisfied with answers
doctors gave to their questions about birth
control. They were tired of being told to go
onto the pill, says Clough.
A handful of bright rooms with couches
and posters contrast the collective to the
rushed atmosphere of a doctor's office. It
has resources on every aspect of women's
health and specializes in birth control
counselling.
The pill is the most common and
dangerous method of birth control, says
health collective member Isobel Kiborn.
"We're very cautious about any kind of
method that involves changing women's
hormones. There's very little information
on the effects. Doctors don't really know
exactly how the pill works."
"We think we know how it works," says
Percival-Smith, who once thought the pill
was the best method of birth control.
Ovulation is suppressed by a synthetic com-
|5§    w:i'  ""*  w*' "*': "*** ^f **     Hf
bination of the female hormones estrogen
and progesterone, he says.
He sits forward in his chair and confesses
he once thought is was a physician's duty to
protect women from unwanted pregnancies. "In the 30 years I've been practising
one of the things which I've really seen
change is my attitude toward women. Now
I don't tell women what to do — I educate
them."
Women on the pill are more likely to
develop potentially fatal blood clots, says
Percival Smith.
He dismisses the risks of developing
cancer from a combination of the pill and
smoking. "Smoking alone is far more
harmful than the pill." Other problems
which studies have shown to be associated
with the pill include: high blood pressure,
circulatory disorders, liver and cervical pro-
harmful than the pill." Other health
hazards which studies have shown to be
associated with the pill include: high blood
pressure, cirulatory disorders, liver and cervical problems, urinary tract infections and
increased risk of viral infections.
Side effects of the pill are not important
because they are not hazardous to women's
health, says Percival-Smith. "Side effects
are things which women don't like. They
are not risks." Weight gain, headaches,
depression and mood changes are common
side effects for women on the pill, he says.
He thinks for a moment and folds his
hands together, finally admitting he doesn't
take the side effects seriously enough. "If I
was a woman I might feel differently," he
acknowledges.
Doctors seldom take the time to talk to
women about the pill's hazards or other
methods of birth control, says Kiborn." It
doesn't take very much time to prescribe a
drug. We see a lot of women at the health '
collective whose questions have been
dismissed by their doctors."
Blake, a 23 year old Vancouver women,
was told to go on the pill by a doctor when
she was 15. "I walked in, he found out I
was there for birth control and he gave me
the pill — no discussion. Everybody was
going on the pill then. He just said 'You're
young, there's no problem,' and told me to
go off it in five or ten years."
Blake trusted her doctor's advice and
went on the pill. Gradually, her skin
discoloured and she became more and more
depressed.
"I had some really bad side effects," she
says. "I had dark blotches on my arms and
I got really depressed and really moody. I
got to a point where it was really ridiculous.
I went off it and about two months later I
was fine.
Doctor's are rarely concerned with the
health of women on the pill, says Kiborn. A
1974 edition of Physicians Desk Reference
tells doctors the pill might be carcinogenic.
"Close clinical surveillance of all women
taking oral contraceptives must be continued," says the book.
The edition also includes depression as an
established side effect of the pill.
Twenty-two year old Wietske also had a
doctor who was anxious to put her on the
pill. He prescribed it for her with no mention of health hazards or side effects.
Wietske says she took the pill because it
was the easiest method. The really
dangerous thing is that it's almost too
easy."
It is easy for women to take the pill,
which takes pressure off men.
"In a way, it's even more liberating for
the man," Wietske says. "The woman is
more permissive because she's not afraid of
becoming pregnant. It was almost a
burden. Lovemaking is centered on intercourse and you can have it whenever your
partner feels like it."
A year after she first took the pill, she
went to a lecture on the dangers of the pill.
"Then I started to think about what the pill
really did to my body. I felt bad having hormones in my body that didn't belong there.
"I decided to gooff it. I felt really good. I
told my boyfriend it was my decision. It was
my body."
Drug companies ignore risks to women
because they profit heavily from the pill
market, charges Kiborn. "They encourage
doctors to prescribe the pill through
tremendous amounts of money spent on
advertising and free samples."
Smith agrees. "Drug companies
marketing the pill have done very nicely.
They have made large sums of money."
A Canadian branch of Ortho Pharmaceutical Corporation advertised the safety of their birth control pills to doctors in
1965. It was a "product of proven reliability and safety," said dark lettering at the top
of the page.
But tiny letters at the bottom warned
doctors of potential health hazards, saying
24 months had been the maximum exposure
of women to that type of pill.
"Longer use of the drug and the possible
effects on organs of the body such as the
pituitary gland, ovaries, adrenal gland and
uterus must await observations from continuing studies," said the buried words.
Although drug companies knew the pill
was potentially dangerous they continued
to produce and market it in massive quantities. Today, even after a 25 percent drop
in pill sales from the early '70s, oral contraceptives in Canada are a $50 million a
year business.
Information about the pill is increasing,
and women are rejecting it for the barrier
methods of birth control, says Kiborn. But
drug companies have channelled their
energies into marketing the pill and little
progress has been made in updating barrier
methods. Out of a total of $155 million
spent world wide on all aspects of reproductive and contraceptive research in 1979,
less than two per cent went toward barrier
methods.
"Barrier methods suffered terribly
because of the pill," says Percival-Smith.
"Not nearly enough work was done on
them."
The safest and most effective barrier
method is the diaphram, says Smith. This is
the method of birth control he recommends.
In a comfortable room at the Women's
Health Collective, Kiborn gives birth control advice to a young woman. She grasps a
plastic model of a woman's reproductive
system in one hand and a diaphram in the
other.
Later, they walk into a room with large
pillows and dark walls for an unhurried session on inserting the diaphram. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 11,1983
Ranking kicks
By JACK TIELEMAN
A good analogy for a typical song
by the group Rank and File is the
effect of gulping down massive
quantitites of white lightning — it
goes down fast and gives you a
kick, but leaves you wanting more.
Rank and File demonstrated the
white lightning effect in their lively
concert at SUB ballroom March 4.
The band's style of music has
been dubbed country punk by such
respected publications as Rolling
Stone magazine. But this label is
not accurate. Despite the fact some
members of the band were once
travelling in punk circles with the
San Francisco band The Dils, Rank
and File is a pure country band.
The crowd was unsure of what to
expect when the concert began. But
after hearing such songs as Wabash
Cannonball and Klansmen, the
crowd was won over.
The band played a long set and
returned for two encores. Their incessant chanting brought Rank and
File back for a well deserved third
encore. But the band was short of
songs and had to repeat material.
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UBC, Student Union Building ■
B 604224-2344 =
NOTICE OF ELECTION
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Nominations for the positions of
FOUR (4) ARTS REPRESENTATIVES
ON STUDENT COUNCIL
are re-opened
March 6 to March 16, 1983
ELECTIONS WILL BE HELD
MARCH 21, 1983
An All Candidates Forum will be held
MARCH 18.
INSIDE UBC
EDITOR
The AMS is now accepting applications for the
position of Inside UBC Editor.
Inside   UBC   is  a   student   handbook/magazine
published annually by the AMS. It includes campus
information and interesting feature stories of the
University.
The AMS offers four months' paid employment for
this position. Applicants should submit a resume to
SUB 238 outlining their related experience in addition to their ideas of direction and goals for this
year's edition.
APPLICATIONS WILL BE ACCEPTED UNTIL
MARCH 25, 1983.
Warning: Health and Welfare Canada advises that danger to health increases with amount smoked - avoid inhaling.
Average per cigarette: 9 mg "tar", 0.8 mg nicotine. Friday, March 11,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
A coward's way of acting out.,
against what he perceives is the weakest thing in society
TBy PATTI FLATHER
he young, red-haired constable sits smoking in his office. He is continually interrupted and distracted by other business and each time he offers an explanation and apologizes. The discussion is informal.
"I think I would hear about more rapes if there were more," says endowment lands RCMP officer Michael Ryan.
Ryan says there were three sexual assaults reported at UBC last year, the
same number in 1981, and in 1980 only four. But according to Vancouver
Rape Relief, a community funded support group for rape victims, only one
in 10 sexual assaults is reported.
"The majority of women who call Rape Relief have decided they won't
call the police," says Regina Lorek, a Rape Relief counselor.
When Ryan is asked about the Rape Relief figures he offers his own opinion — "maybe one in three or one in five" assaults is reported.
The differing figures from Rape Relief and the RCMP illustrate wider
problems — those of definition and a woman's fear to report the crime to
the authorities.
But both the police and rape crisis groups agree on
this. Reported assaults are usually attacks by
strangers. The largest number of those assaults, not
reported to police, are made by aquaintances of the
victim.
Rape Relief believes it is a woman's decision on
what she calls rape or sexual assault and does not differentiate between the two. "We don't need to lie
about being raped," says Lorek in an angry and irritated voice.
Ryan says he feels "the difference in statistics is attributable to the different citeria used in the definition of rape." The criminal code does not make
distinctions despite amendments made in January.
There are now three categories of sexual assault to
replace the former distinction definitions of rape and
indecent assault.
The implications of the recent Criminal Code
amendments are not clear. Ryan says they would be
beneficial for policing. But it may be that non-violent
sexual assailants will receive lighter sentences,
predicted one lawyer at a recent seminar at the UBC
law faculty.
It is also harder for an accused assailent to claim
the victim consented. Under the code, a woman's
past sexual history is not allowed as evidence and her
testimony no longer needs coroboration.
Another result of code changes is that statistics will become less relevant
because the definition has changed. In any case, statistics don't destroy the
common myths which surround assault and rape.
There is the myth that if a woman does not go out alone at night she will
be safe. Assaults most often occur in the victim's or assailant's home or
vehicle. There is no prime-time for assault and rape; they can happen at any
tt®(2aiEta<e
time of the day or night. Rape Relief receives an average of two or three
calls every day.
The "typical" sexual assailant doesn't exist though most are between the
ages of 18 and 35, says Ellen Frank of Women Against Violence Against
Women. In a study of imprisoned rapists, "the only way they differed from
other prisoners is that they are quicker to express anger and they try to live
up to macho stereotypes," Frank says.
A third myth is that only violent rape by a stranger is assault. Rape occurs with spouses or lovers as well. In addition, physical coercion is not the
only means of coercion.
Because of these myths, it is hard to determine if sexual assault is increasing. But Rape relief Crisis Line calls have increased 30 per cent per year.
This may be because women are becoming less tolerant and more aware of
abuses.
Ryan suggested the number of rapes and assaults has remained the same.
While the debate continues on the numbers, many groups including
women's groups and even the police stress prevention.
Women's groups such as WAV AW and Rape
relief, in addition to helping victims through their
crisis line (Rape Relief also runs a shelter), educate
the public and push for law reforms.
Frank urged women to "defend their personal
space.
"If you're uncomfortable with a man, you should
make it clear. Often rapists assess the vulnerability of
the victim."
Ryan said part of the solution is "better education
of men and women" and "more concern in our community." But Ryan adds "Telling women not to go
into the woods doesn't work."
The UBC RCMP refers or introduces victims to
other victims to initiate formation of support groups,
Ryan says.
If a woman is threatened with sexual assault, there
are several measures she can take, he says. He suggests first talking to the person. If this doesn't work,
the woman should move towards other people
without alerting the assailant.
As a last result violence can be used — gouging the
eyes, kneeing the testicles, or using a ring or key as a
weapon, says Ryan.
There is no simple explanation of violence directed
specifically against women.
"I always ask why they rape and I've never gotten a real answer. It's a
coward's way of acting out against what he perceives is the weakest thing in
society," says Ryan.
Sexual assault is not a new phenomenon, but it has been hidden in clouded definitions and people's own perceptions. But destroying the myths and
taking action are two steps towards stopping sexual assault and rape.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Mai
Jazz artist makes
it in mans world
By CHRIS WONG
"/ quit school as soon as I was 15 years old
and went to a trade school where they taught
me to be a dishwasher. I thought I should
learn what to be in life, what part of society
needed me. So, I thought — washing dishes
or being a secretary — and finally much,
much later I found that I could play music
and make that kind of an exchange with
society.
— jazz composer, pianist and
vocalist Carta Bley.
"I've proven myself but my parents still try
to discourage me from this life and suggest
that I return home to teach music . . .
Discipline and hard work doesn 't have a sex
gender. I don't rely on my feminine sexuality
to get over.
— jazz trombonist Janice Robinson
Gaining recognition in the competitive,
male oriented world of jazz has been difficult
for women musicians. They have to prove
themselves as legitimate jazz artists as well as
overcome traditional attitudes and
stereotypes.
"I don't rely on my
feminine sexuality/'
But attitudes are slowly changing as people
realize women are equally competent in the
music field. One jazz singer who has benefitted from the changes is Kate Hammett-
Vaughan, an up-and-coming figure in Vancouver jazz circles.
"I feel like I've been fortunate," says
Hammett-Vaughan. "I'm living and working
in a fairly enlightened environment. I haven't
had to deal with a lot of the garbage that people in the past had to."
As a vocalist and woman in jazz, she is
continuing a long tradition started by such
legands as Billie Holliday, Ella Fitzgerald and
Bessie Smith. Their initiative and determina
tion paved the way for future woman jazz artists.
"There was a discrimination problem people had been fighting for years. It's only been
in the last 50 years that women have come to
the forefront," she says.
She notes that many well known women
contributors to jazz have been overlooked.
But she is encouraged by the receptive
responses she has received from male musicians.
"People were just
amazed that so many
women could do it."
"Most of the men I deal with are open
towards thinking of me as a musician, a
working partner."
Hammett-Vaughan is a member of two
unique Vancouvr jazz groups, Gettin' Off
Easy and Badazjazz. She and two other
female vocalists lead Gettin' Off Easy, while
Badazjazz features eight women vocalists.
"People were just amazed that so many
women could do it and have so much fun,"
Hammett-Vaughan says.
She speaks forcefully and with complete
sincerity. She conveys the sense that jazz is
not a competitive art form between musicians
or between men and women, but a chance to
enjoy oneself.
The formation of Badazjazz created a
close-knit community of jazz singers, she
says.
"We weren't aware there were other
women dealing with the same problems and
the same walls to get over."
And one of the problems Hammett-
Vaughan and vocalists like her are dealing
with is making enough to live on. "I'm really
poor," she says bluntly.
She is not exaggerating. Walking up the
steps of her home, one gets the feeling it is
the humble abode of a punk rocker, not one
of the city's finest jazz vocalists.
HAMMETT - VAUGHAN
hip vocalist in humble abode
— cary rodin pho
Feminist fights porr
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Jancis Andrews is determined to stop the
spread of video tapes which depict violence
against women. She has waged a year-long
legal war with Red Hot Video, but won't give
up.
A member of the North Shore women's
centre and Amnesty International, Andrews
views hard-core pornography as sexual agression aimed at women and children. "Violent
porn is misogyny. It uses videos or magazines
as its means of expression and therefore can
be seen as hate propaganda," she says, her
slight British accent giving her an air of
authority.
As for soft-core, Andrews calls it "con-
Book documents pro-life movement
By BRIAN JONES
In 1973 the U.S. supreme court voted in
favor of abortion on demand. For over a
decade pro-choice activists had been pushing
for liberalization of American abortion laws.
When they got it, their opposition began to
organize more enthusiastically than before to
outlaw abortion.
Enemies of Choice chronicles the struggle
of various pro-life organizations in the U.S.
But it is far more than a study of the pros and
cons of abortion. Rather than discussing'
various ethical arguments, author Andrew
Merton concentrates on organized anti-
abortionists' philosophy and tactics.
Enemies of Choice: The Right-To-Life
Movement and Its Threat to Abortion
By Andrew H. Merton
$6.95, 225 pp.
The book examines religious groups as
much as pro-life groups, since they are often
one and the same. The most immediate and
vocal opponent of abortion on demand was
the Catholic Church. Less than one month
after the supreme court ruling, American
bishops announced that "any Catholic involved in any phase of abortion would be
subject to immediate excommunication."
This ruling affected not only women, but
also doctors, nurses, counsellors and administrators.
Merton's criticism of the Church is extraordinarily harsh, almost vicious. The approach has its drawbacks. A practising
Catholic who ventures to read the book will
be immediately put off. But at times Merton succeeds in relating the hypocrisy and
ruthlessness of the Catholic Church hierar-.
chy. For example, he tells of a New England
woman whose child the Church refused to
baptise because she supported a pro-choice
activist.
By the late '70s, the Catholic Church was
assisted in its anti-choice work by Protestant
fundamentalists, whose influence and
popularity had risen dramatically.
The cooperation between the different
groups supports Merton's basic theme —
that abortion is a religious issue.
Their actions indicate they want other
Americans to conform to pro-life beliefs by
making abortion illegal.
This is most blatantly displayed in the anti-
choice movements' decision to become
"political action groups," which are part of
the American electoral process. Such groups
target certain politicians for defeat because
they are either pro-choice or do not openly
support the anti-choice movement. This type
of political activity has become more common and powerful with the rise of the New
Right and the election of Ronald Reagan.
The combination of the Protestant fundamentalists with the Republican party has
lessened the influence of the Catholic church
in the anti-choice movement. Pro-lifers are
now characterized by their conservative views
— by their desire for a "return" to sexual
morality, the sanctity of the family, the fear
of and reverence for God, and the return of
women to traditional roles as wives and
mothers.
Merton believes Pro-lifers are threatened
by women's demands for greater freedom.
Merton can be unnecessarily gruff and
condescending, and tends to assume the
reader will agree with him on what he sees as
an obvious point. He sometimes does not
treat the abortion issue as a complex one. For
Merton it is simple — abortion is not murder,
as pro-lifers claim, and it should be legal and
available.
tempt propaganda because it perpetuates the
myth that women are sex objects."
A front page headline, "Hard-core porn
store opens in North Van," caught her eye
last year. She had recently see Not A Love
Story, a national film board documentary on
pornography, and was angry that an outlet
selling obscene material was setting up shop
in her community so she wrote a letter of protest to the newspaper.
She and a friend rented a few Red Hot
films to see what the outlet sells and find
material to take to the police. In one of the
films they viewed, Expensive Taste, a rich
woman bored with her life pays a man to rape
a virgin.
They took the videos to the local RCMP,
who later seized five films from the North
Vancouver store. The police decided two —
Young and Abused and Expensive Taste —
contravened the Criminal Code's provisions
on obscenity. Andrews says they expected a
prosecution but no action has been taken yet.
The other three films were excused on the
grounds that the acting was poor quality and
the plots were unbelievable.
"These concepts of acting and story line
have nothing to do with the Criminal Code.
They just weren't interested," she says.
When Andrews and her friend demanded
to know why the crown counsel wasn't going
to prosecute, they were told it would be too
expensive and difficult to prove the tapes
were obscene. And they were assured by the
local crown counsel's secretary that Red Hot
would be asked to remove the two tapes considered illegal.
Frustrated by the authorities but determined to get the violent tapes off the shelves, Andrews and the North Shore women's centre
began to pressure the provincial attorney-
general. They complained to local ML As,
wrote letters, made numerous phone calls
and even sent telegrams. It was to no avail.
Attorney-general Allan Williams did not take
any action.
But they continued their efforts. They successfully lobbied city council members to
pass a resolution urging Williams to enforce
the law governing pornography. They began
to educate the public about the issue and
enlisted the support of other women's groups
working on the Red Hot problem.
A coalition of women's groups finally sent
a formal complaint to the B.C. ombudsman
office to protest the ministry's failure to enforce the code. They charged the attorney-
general has neglected "his mandate of pro- h11,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Women on the move in Grenada
By SARAH COX
The plane jerked to a halt beside a wooden
building on Grenada's tiny runway. The pro-
pellors whirled to a stop. A group of Canadian visitors quickly ducked through the
plane's doorway into the sweltering afternoon sun.
Airport workers clustered around a blaring
radio in front of the solitary building. Cheers
from a broadcast of the third anniversary
celebrations of Grenada's revolution blasted
into the air. The workers looked up and pulled themselves away from the broadcast,
disappearing into the building's darkness.
"Welcome to Grenada, Isle of Spice," said
a sign with peeling paint beside the runway.
Outside the airport people walked lightly
along a roadside decorated with colourful
banners. On the way to the hotel the
dilapidated Austin squealed around curves
which cut into the Carribean mountainside.
"Build the revolution," urged a billboard
next to a carob tree.
Grenada's revolution is now four years old
and thriving. Known as the Quiet Revolution, because only three people were killed, it
happened overnight when leaders of the
popular New Jewel Movement learned of
prime minister Eric Gairy's plans for the
group's imprisonment. The NJM acted immediately. They burned the barracks of
Gairy's small but repressive army and seized
the radio and police stations.
Opposition to Gairy's corrupt regime
seethed for years before the People's Revolutionary Government came to power March
13, 1979.
Half of Grenada's  100,000 people were
. store
tecting women and children from hate propaganda spread by Red Hot Video."
Andrews says the attempts to stop pornography aren't censorship because the law
states the tapes depicting violence against
women are obscene. "It's entrenched in the
law passed by parliament. Censorship is a red
herring put out by the pro-pornographers to
confuse the issue."
Andrews describes herself as a Christian
feminist. She believes her faith gives her the
strength, patience and determination to keep
fighting pornography and to overcome her
frustration with the legal establishment.
"The fight has been so dismaying,
especially in the beginning. It was mostly my
faith that kept me going," Andrews says.
Following the November firebombing of
three lower mainland Red Hot stores by the
Wimmin's Fire Brigade, and the police raids
in January, two stores were recently charged,
one in Victoria and another in Vancouver.
Andrews says she is pleased with those
charges but will continue to pressure
Williams to fulfill his mandate.
"Women's groups are organizing even
more to fight this stuff. We established an
anti-porn network where women's groups
can get together periodically to focus our attack. We're trying not to dissipate our
energies."
unemployed. Education was not subsidized
by the government and agricultural production vital to the economy was decaying.
For women in particular, conditions were
unbearable. Unemployment among women
was 12 per cent higher than the national
average, and many women were illiterate.
Anger and frustration with these
discriminating conditions led many women to
oppose Gairy's government and work for the
NJM.
"We sold the illegal party newspaper
under vegetables in our baskets in the
market," says a document from the National
Women's Organization. "We pushed the
same newspaper under house doors at night
along with pamphlets. We hid the printing
machine, we raised funds for the party, we
hid the leadership in moments of crisis."
"Women were tremendously oppressed
under Gairy's dictatorship," NWO president
Phyllis Coard tells the Canadians at their
hotel. It is late afternoon and the rich smell
of coffee and cocoa drift through the open
window from a neighbouring farm. Coard
leans back and smiles.
"Women were
tremendously
oppressed/'
Half of Grenada's homes were headed by
women who support their children by
themselves, says Coard. "In Grenada, people
usually marry after they have children."
This culture pattern developed when
Grenada was a British colony and marriage
between slaves was forbidden. Now it is
economically unfeasible for young people to
set up a home. A woman often continues to
live with her parents after she has children,
says Coard.
"Most women are very tough and self-
reliant as a result. They can't depend on
men."
Coard talks cheerfully about the changes
prime minister Maurice Bishop's government
has made to Grenada. "Since the revolution
there is no longer any job discrimination.
"There is a big spread of women into jobs
as professionals, road workers and labourers.
One woman is driving a bulldozer at the site
of the new airport. Gradually, women are
coming into these professions."
But a move to make 26 bus driver jobs in
the new public transit system exclusively for
women backfired, says Coard.
"Men voted overwhelmingly in favor,"
she says. "But we couldn't find one woman
to drive the buses. Traditionally, women
have not driven in Grenada."
The government is trying to change
people's attitudes about what women can do
through educational work, says Coard.
"Women will not come forward and play a
more dominant role in this society without
educating people."
Grenada's educational system advanced
rapidly after the revolution, says education
minister Jackie Creft. "Under Gairy's
regime, opportunities for education were
very elitist. Literacy for women was not a
priority."
Creft disappears behind a desk piled high
with papers. She pulls out a poster and holds
it up. "Education — a right not a privilege,"
it says.
Bishop's government is providing women
with equal opportunities for education. "We
have a free books and uniform programs to
provide for the poorest children," she says.
Creft speaks softly but confidently. When
rain begins to beat the greenery and flowers
outside her office window, she walks to the
window in flip-flops to silence the downpour.
The opportunity to be education minister
has been exhausting but exciting, says Creft.
Time is divided between office duties and
driving around the island to talk to teachers
and inspect the still overcrowded schools.
"Some of the primary schools are quite
dilapidated. I have to carry a pair of rubber
boots when I go to look at the toilets.'V
But Grenada's children are eager for
schooling opportunities despite crowded
classrooms and deficient plumbing.
Girls no longer stay at home to help their
mothers; they are as eager as the boys for
books and information.
"We have workers who encourage parents
wants to be labelled counter-revolutionary,"
she says.
Generally speaking, rapists are punished.
"Again, the reason is moral pressure. A man
who rapes a woman is really in for a hard
time in the community."
When Gairy was president, one-sixth of
Grenadian women were given hormone injection for birth control, even though the drug
was banned in North America. Coard is still
angry about that government initiated program. "They hadn't even done any testing.
They didn't do follow-ups on the women
who took it."
A women's right to choose to have an
abortion is accepted in Grenada. Abortion is
illegal, but it is easily available for women
who face unwanted pregnancies.
"Abortion is definitely not an issue,"
Coard says. "Everybody feels it should be
available to those who want it. Everyone
knows who the particular doctor is."
The PRG have drastically altered conditions for women in Grenada and are reinforcing these conditions through Grenada's legal
system, says Coard. Two major achievements
are the adoption of the principle of equal pay
for equal work and a maternity leave law.
"Every woman has the right to paid maternity leave," says attorney general Miles Fitz-
patrick. "There are criminal sanctions for
SCHOOL   CHILDREN
— aarah cox photo
equal   opportunities  for education
to send their children to school," says Creft.
"Many children, especially girls, stopped going to school because their parents couldn't
affort to send them under the Gairy regime."
Grenada's small size helped secure other
basic rights for women since the revolution.
Rape and assault are uncommon, says
Coard. "We are encouraging women's
groups to put moral pressure on men who
beat women. Everybody knows everybody
else and the sense of shame is very great. If
men act against this they are contravening the
basic principle of the revolution. Nobody
employees who don't grant leave — fine or
imprisonment."
Progress has been made despite a U.S.
government propoganda campaign to
destroy Grenada's valuable tourist industry,
says Fitzpatrick.
But Grenadians refuse to allow threats
from the U.S. stop them from working
toward free education, low unemployment,
and equality for women.
"We want to involve women and men all
around in a re-thinking of their roles in society," says Coard.
Efforts to stop pornography continue
From page 1
"They can shut the stores down on suspicion while they are being investigated," she says. But because pornography is a multi-
billion industry, the law isn't being totally utilized, she says.
Lorek says charging individual tapes is a long process and will
not be effective because owners aren't involved.
But Andrews says the North Shore women's centre is pleased
with the charges laid against the Vancouver store because Water
Power, which is particularly obscene, was singled out.
"We're watching with interest," she says.
Frustrated with the Attorney-General's failure to charge more
outlets in B.C., the North Shore and Port Coquitlam centres are
turning the pornography issue into one of human rights. They will
still pressure Allan Williams to enforce the code, but they have
decided to pursue the human rights angle to gain greater public
support.
The centres approached Charles Paris, chair of the B.C. human
rights commission, and ML A Emery Barnes (NDP-Vancouver
Centre) to recommend amendments to the B.C. human rights
code so that pornography will be considered hate propaganda
against women and children.
"It's hate propaganda because it's misogyny with video as its
medium. We're talking about a new form of social aggression,
not just Playboy bunnies," says Andrews.
The proposed amendments, ratified by the commission and
recommended to the legal authorities in its latest report, would
bring B.C.'s code into line with Saskatchewan's, which is much
stronger.
The commission issued a statement Feb. 1 expressing support
of the police action against Red Hot Video and concern "that too
many levels of society turn a blind eye to the public exploitations
of violence against women and children under the guise of
freedom of expression.
"Such visual and written material portrays and describes
women and children as sexual objects to be violently exploited at
will. It is derogatory and demeaning of certain classes of people
and therefore clearly contrary to the spirit (if not the letter) of the
B.C. human rights code," it reads.
Red Hot officials will not answer to the charges. They refuse to
talk to reporters while the case is in court.
If the legal angle is successful, along with BCFW's strengthened
street tactics, the innocent-looking Red Hot store and it's inconspicuous tapes may soon become a part of history. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, March 11,1983
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Remembering forgets facts
By MARK EPSTEIN
Chris Iverson concludes her article (Perspectives, March 1) with the
words "please remember Beirut." I
agree. From the selectivity of the information and misinformation in
the letter it is obvious that her
memory goes back further than
June 6, 1982, when Israel's army
entered Lebanon.
We should also remember the
decade which led to the event, a
decade which saw Syrian and PLO
forces completely destroy the
sovereignty of Lebanon; a decade
perspectives
which saw one hundred thousand
casualties inflicted on the Lebanese;
which sat the holy sites of Lebanese
Christians desecrated, and which
saw southern Lebanon turned into a
massive staging area for assaults by
the PLO on women and children in
northern Israel.
We should remember that when
Israelis entered Lebanon the local
population greeted them as saviours
... we saw this on our TV until the
anti-Israel propaganda took over
. . . and for the first time in a
decade they saw the possibility of
regaining sovereignty of their own
nation.
The article cites, without further
identification, an independant
group of international lawyers who
found the Begin government directly at fault. What is not stated is that
this was a self-annointed and self-
appointed committee without
status or standing with any credible
organization or state. Despite that,
Israel allowed them to freely enter
the country to solicit testimony
from whomever they wished. In no
rational sense could they be considered an authoritative investigative body.
On the other hand, and in direct
contrast to the total lack of any enquiry into events at Hama in Syria
where literally thousands of people
were slaughtered by the Syrian
government during this same summer of 1982, or by the Lebanese into their participation in the killings,
or by the PLO into the countless attacks on innocent women and
children by their forces, this selfsame Begin government conducted
a full judicial enquiry for which the
state has been lauded throughout
the free world as an example to all
of democracy in action.
It seems strange to me that at a
time when Soviet forces are
brutalizing the people of
Afganistan and repressing freedoms
throughout Eastern Europe, at a
time when a terrible slaughter is
taking place in India, when events
in Southeast Asia make the participation of the Americans in the
Vietnam War pale into significance,
Iverson can do no better than
to drag out a 35-year-old letter signed by a group of well-meaning but
naive academics, left-wingers and
outright supporters of the Labour
Party in Israel which was in a direct
political fight with the conservative
right-wing party led by Begin.
Iverson betrays his bias, which he
would no doubt like to mask as not
being anti-Israel but only anti-
Begin, when he ponderously asks
"why is Begin permitted to continue?" If she is indeed a student of
International Relations I would expect that she has heard that there
are   still   about   20   democracies
Where the hell did it go?
What the hell happened to the exercise circuit in the mezzanine of
war memorial gym? I'm both inquiring and complaining. The circuit was a great work-out for hundreds of students, at no cost.
One day last November it
evaporated in the concrete dust of
construction. Now the dust has
cleared but the circuit has not
returned. What really irks me is that
nobody has informed students as to
the status of the circuit.
The circuit was provided
gratuitously as a service to students.
Fine. But once that service was provided and students relied on it, then
the   body   setting   up   the  circuit
became obligated to inform
students as to the circuit's status
after its untimely and unexpected
demise.
Somebody out there must have
answers to the following questions:
• what is the status, present and
future, of the circuit?
• why did the construction in
War Memorial, which led to the
circuit's demise, take place during
the fall-winter terms instead of the
summer when fewer students would
have been inconvenienced?
• what about the $35 I forked
out for a locker in the gym in expectancy of the circuit's availability?
M. Tessler
law 1
left in the world. Israel is one of
them and no doubt it will surprise
Iverson to learn that Begin will undoubtedly continue just as long as
he heads a freely elected government, elected that is, by the citizens
of that country, Jewish, Christian,
Moslem, Druse, and others.
It is ironic that Iverson's article
appears in a column entitled
Perspectives, a quality which was
totally lacking in what she wrote.
Mark Epstein is an arts student
who obviously has very strong opinions. Perspectives is a column of
analysis, humor, wit or replies that
is open to members of the university
community. Submissions should be
typed triple space on a 70 character
line.
Modern myths
"Women's liberation" — a slogan of the '60s.
The myth of the '80s.
Women are a long way from being treated as equals. Simply
acknowledging that women should have the same basic human rights as
men is not equality. Entrenching this in laws, or constitutions, is not equality.
Equality is freedom.
Women want to be free to walk alone at night and feel safe from rapists.
Free from images that objectify them and incite violence toward them. Free
to choose motherhood rather than be forced into it.
A woman walks alone on a dark street. She glances nervously over her
shoulder at a fleeting shadow. Feeling vulnerable, her walk quickens. She
fears she will be grabbed from behind, forced to the ground, stripped, and
brutally raped.
An image flashes on the screen. A housewife smiles at her family and at
the dreamwhip pudding she has prepared for them. Her husband squeezes
her in approval. Like almost all women, she pleases others before herself.
The man at the pulpit tells the audience abortion is murder. "Murder,"
he says, raising his voice. The women feel intimidated and angry that a
man is telling them they must go through with a pregnancy, even if it is unwanted.
They do not have basic reproductive rights. They are not equal.
Women in the '80s do not have simple freedoms. They are not
"liberated." And they won't be until men relinquish some of their power.
Economic power, sexual power, and general domination.
We've come a long way, but we've still got a long way to go.
THE UBYSSEY
March 11, 1963
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday through
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and are not necessarily those of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press.
"Sisterhood is powerful," shouted the great matriachal goddess Sarah Cox through the
echoing jungle as she gaily danced with her Amazon sister Muriel Draaisma. Lisa Morry drew
her spear and pointed it at monkeys swining in the trees. Peter Berlin, Jack Tieleman and
Stephen Wisenthal chattered nervously when they saw the mighty women. "I feel threatened," whispered Robert Beynon to Robby Robertson, who quietly agreed. Behind a rock, the
chimpanzees, Neil Lucente, Chris Wong and Cary Rodin male bonded with cries of delight.
"Look over here, look over there," shouted Patti Flat her, strolling in on her elephant. All the
jungle animals turned to took. "Amazons are everywhere!" The animals panicked and fled.
Even lion king Shaffin Shariff shivered with fear. Big hippo Craig Brooks rose from the
swamp, took one look at the Amazons and sank into the steamy water with hardly a bubble.
Meanwhile, gorillas Arnold Hedstrom, Brian Jones, Glen Sanford and Keith Baldrey slipped
into quicksand. "Help us, help us, Sarah and Muriel," they squealed. But the mighty
Amazons turned away. "Sorry boys, we don't need you anymore."
Letters
* The crime is the same'
This letter is written in response
to one by Ian Dube (Luitjens Reaction) which appeared in the Ubyssey
March 4. In his letter Dube attacked
the Dutch government's attempted
extradition of Jacob Luitjens as
character assassination.
I was, frankly, astonished to read
that because Dube feels Luitjens to
be of high moral character and
because he is an excellent teacher we
should forget the past and decry his
exposure in the media.
The Dutch legal system, contrary
to what Dube seems to feel, is not
uncivilized. Trials in absentia are an
attempt to gather evidence before
the testimony of witnesses becomes
less reliable with time or the
witnesses die.
As much as Dube would like
to conclude that Luitjens was not
convicted on the basis of firm
evidence, we, as Canadians, must
conclude when the courts of
another democratic nation find
someone guilty of murder he is a
murderer, just as we would if he'd
been convicted in this country.
The fact that Jacob Luitjens is a
fine lecturer and an inspiration to
his students is irrelevant. Yesterday
or 40 years ago, the crime is the
same.
In spue of being an old man
nevci likely to pose a lethal threat to
anyone again, Luitjens must be
made to pay for his crimes in
Holland. He must be extradited,
not for reasons of vengeance, but to
deter the murder of people still living.
Thousands of Canadian servicemen did not die so that years
late, we should condone the actions
of those who would turn on their
own citizens under the cloak of
legitimacy lent by a fascist invader.
Probably the alarming aspect of
Dubes letter was his reference to
Jews and the recent slaughter of
Palestinians in Lebanon. Somehow
Dube seems to feel this is a case of
people in glass houses throwing
stones. That portions of the Israeli
population can find ways to justify
the massacre and exonerate those
responsible is indeed reprehensible,
but, should we decide to forget
about Luitjen's crimes, we are no
better ourselves.
It is true Dube points out,
that the media, which picks and
chooses it's victims has suddenly
made Luitjens' a cause celebre. This
is not unjust. It is only regretable
that it took so long.
Christopher Keller
botany 3
Marinated coup foiled
In a recent article that appeared
in The Ubyssey, the returning officer for the Graduate Student
Society, Sean Boyle, called the
graduate student executive elections
a travesty.
He voiced this complaint because
council had refused to accept his
motion that John Davies and Don
Holubitsky be elected by acclamation on the grounds that the opposing candidates, Jan Mennell and
Robert Gordon had not signed their
own nomination papers, but had instead authorized Godwin Eni, the
former graduate student council
president to sign on their behalf —
an action which Boyle termed a
"forgery". However, it should be
noted that there was nothing in the
society's rules for nomination procedures that disallows such an action.
During the course of the council
meeting, held on Thursday, March
3, the returning officer and John
Davies, in unison, attacked the
secretarial candidate in question
who attended the meeting, in an attempt to force and manipulate
council to disqualify her and Gordon's candidacies in the middle of
an election.
All of this, of course, took place
in the presence of a Ubyssey
reporter whom John Davies had invited in order to witness the
charade. But, in spite of all efforts
to eliminate the two candidates, the
council consistently rejected the
election officer's desire to see John
Davies and Don Holubitsky become
the new secretary and president of
the Graduate Student Society by
undemocratic means.
In the light of council's actions, I
hail their performance in preventing
the elections officer and John
Davies from subverting and mocking once again a workable
democratic system. In spite of all
the slander heaped against the
Graduate Student Society and some
of its members in recent months, 1
am glad to see that common sense
has not been seriously threatened.
Once again an attempted coup by
these two members of the society
has been foiled, a coup, which if
successful, would have not only
turned the elections into a real
travesty, but all graduate students
into mere marionettes of the
leaders.
J. Hernandez
grad studies Friday, March 11,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Good days and other sport
Thursday was a good day for the
UBC volleyballers at the National
Universities Volleyball tournament
in the War Memorial gym.
The opening day action saw the
UBC women win twice to clinch
first place in their group while the
men won one and lost one and are
almost certain to progress to the
play-offs which will start this afternoon.
The UBC women started the
day's proceedings with a fairly easy
three game victory over the University of New Brunswick. The score
was 15-11, 15-12 15-2. New
Brunswick fought hard for the first
two games, but after their big second game surge was beaten back
they ebbed away without much of a
struggle in the third.
The women's second match
against Laval was a real thriller.
The Quebecer's grabbed two
games, but the UBC fought back to
take a close third game and an even
closer fourth. It took an absolute
QUALITY
SERVICE \
AVAILABILITY
Active C
age to make the game winning fifteenth point as Laval clung on
tenaciously and service switched
constantly.
After that the momentum swung
as UBC wrapped up the match with
an easy fifth game. The scores were
12-15, 7-15, 15-12, 15-13, and 15-6.
The men were unfortunate
enough to draw the number one
ranked Manitoba in their first
game. They fought hard but eventually lost a wildly swinging battle
2-15, 15-5, 15-6, 12-15 and 6-15.
The 'Birds, however, bounced
back from this defeat and dismantled Dalhousie later in the afternoon.
The score was 15-5, 15-6, 15-5 and
that was enough to guarantee the
'Birds a playoff spot.
Women capture title
For the second consecutive year, the UBC women's curling squad has
captured the Canada West title, finishing the round-robin competition with
a perfect four and 0 won-loss record.
The 'Birds clinched the crown on Friday with an exciting 10-9 victory
over the University of Saskatchewan. UBC had defeated Saskatchewan in
an earlier game and easily knocked off the University of Lethbridge by 11-3
and 9-5 scores.
Unfortunately, there is no national collegiate championship in women's
curling but the UBC team of Susan Allan, Tracy Newlands, Dianne
Sawecki and Eleanor Gardner have the satisfaction of knowing they are the
"best in the west."
McGill
School of Nursing
B.A. and B.Sc. Graduates Unique Opportunity
Are you interested in pursuing a professional career
in Canada's rapidly developing health care delivery
system? A three-year program leading to a Master's
degree and preparation for licensure in Nursing is
offered to non-nurses graduated with high standing
from general arts or science programs. The program,
tailored to the individual's background, is designed
to prepare nurses for roles in family health care,
nursing research and administration.
For information, write:
McGill University, Master's Program in Nursing
3506 University Street, Montreal, PQ H3A 2A7
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(15 min. from Downtown, straight up Kingsway)
Tel.: 438-3321
Open Friday Night — Saturday until 5 pm
AMS COMMITTEE OPENINGS
Nominations are now open for appointments to the following positions:
— 5 members of the Student Administrative Commission;
— Assistant Director of Finance;
— Ombudsperson;
— AMS representatives to the following Presidential Advisory Committees:
• Child Care Services
• Concerns of the Handicapped
• Food Services Advisory
• International House Board of Directors
• Land Use
• Men's Athletic Committee
• Safety, Security and Fire Prevention
• Student Placement
• Student Services
• Traffic and Parking
• United Way Campaign
• Walter Gage Memorial Fund
• War Memorial Gymnasium Fund
• Women's Athletic Committee
• Youth Employment Program
• Capital Projects Acquisitions Committee
1 rep
1 rep
4 reps
1 rep
1 rep
3 reps
1 rep
1 rep
1 rep
4 reps
1 rep
1 rep
1 rep
1 rep
1 rep
1 rep
Nominations are also open for one active member of the society other than a member of Council or
SAC for appointment to the Budget Committee of the AMS.
Recommendations for appointments will be made to Students' Council by the Selection's Committee.
NOMINATIONS CLOSE MARCH 25, 1983
All students are encouraged to apply for these positions.
Nomination forms are available in SUB 238.
(SETA LITTLE
EXTRA
LV /./"  Now you're talkin taste. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
YitOflC
Rhthym and Blues All-Stan: these fellows
are really modest as you can tell by their title,
March 11-12, Town Pump.
Amos Garrett: a hot rocker, March 14-16,
Town Pump.
Under The Moss: lively Irish music, March
11, La Quena, 1111 Commercial.
Grupp   Centre-America:   Latin   American
music. La Quena.
Mike Taylor: jazz piano, March 11 and 18,
5:30 p.m., Arts Club, Granville Island Lounge.
Or. J. Band: some very tall musicians, March
17-18, Darby D. Dawes.
Phoenix Jazzers: dixieland, Ma i 11 and
15, Hot Jazz Club.
David Branter: bring your mitts, scarf, and
long underwear for cool jazz, March 16, Hot
Jazz Club.
Vancouver Chamber Choir: songs of
nature, March 11, 8:30 p.m., Ryerson
Church, 2196 West 45th, VTC/CBO.
Wildroot Orchestra: swinging sounds,
March 12, 8 p.m.. Commodore Ballroom,
VTC/CBO.
Kathleen Isaac/Thomas Schoen: chamber
music together with new exhibition
"sculpture," March 13, 1:30 p.m., Surrey Art
Gallery, 596-7461.
Gettin' Off Easy: three of Vancouver's finest
women jazz vocalists backed by a hot, sizzling, scorching band (they're nice guys too.)
March 13, 8 p.m.. Soft Rock Cafe.
Johnny Otis: a rhythm and blues revue,
March 15, 8 p.m.. Commodore Ballroom,
VTC/CBO.
Culture Club: a new quasi-reggae band led
by someone named Boy George, March 16, 8
p.m.. Commodore Ballroom, VTC/CBO.
Nat Adderley Quintet: one of the hippest
jazz cats ever to pick up a horn along with
some great sidemen, March 14, Commodore
Ballroom, VTC/CBO.
Sukay: music of the Andes, March 13, 8
p.m., Vancouver East Cultural Centre,
254-9578.
Robert Taub/Gina Bachauer: piano recital,
March 16, 12:30 p.m., recital hall.
UBC Choral Union: sure beats the GSS for
harmony, March 17 8 p.m., recital hall.
HoVL£6
Ridge Theatre 116th and Arbutus, 738-5112)
March 11-13: The Life And Times Of Rosie
The Riveter, 7:30 p.m.; Northern Lights,
8:45 p.m.; Union Maids, 10:30 p.m. March
14-15: The Lady Vanishes, 7:30 p.m.; North
By Northwest. 9:30 p.m. March 16-17:
Bread And Chocolate, 7:30 p.m.; La Cage
Aux Folles, 9:35 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5466) March 11-13: Portrait Of The
Artist As A Young Man. 7:30 p.m.;
Ulysses, 9:25 p.m. March 14-15: Take the
Money And Run, 7:30 p.m.; What's New
Pussycat?, 9:10 p.m. March 16-17:
Fahrenheit 461, 7:30 p.m.; ISM. 9:30 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and 7th, 872-2124)
March 16-17: Harold and Maude, 7:30 p.m.;
The Sunshine Boys, 9:15 p.m.
Pacific Cinematheque (1155 West Georgia,'
732-6119) March 11: The Householder. 7:30
p.m.; Shakespeare Wallah, 9:30 p.m.
March 12-13: The Lover's Exile, 7:30 p.m.; A
Story Of Floating weeds, 9:30 p.m. March
16: Padre Padrone, 7 p.m. March 17:
Beyond The Valley Of The Dolls, 8 p.m.
JExtubifc
Mat Harley: fur paintings and primed cars,
(he's not exactly one for the conventional).
Unit/Pitt Gallery, 163 West Pender, 681-6740.
Literary Storefront: Nova Scotia poet Greg
Cook doing something few people do these
days: reading, March 17, 8 p.m., 314 W. Cordova.
SFU Dancers: new choreography, March.
17-19, 8 p.m. and 12:30 p.m., March 19, SFU
Theatre, 291-3614.
Romantic Comedy: Bernard Slade seems to
think romance exists, check it out. Arts Club
Granville Island. Mon. - Fri. 8:30 p.m.. Sat.
6:30 and 9:30 p.m. Weds. 2 for 1 at 5:30 p.m.
A Musical Evening with Ruth Nichol and
Leon Bibb: Vancouver's first cabaret theatre.
Arts Club Revue Theatre, Granville Island.
Wed. - Fri. 8:30 p.m.. Sat. 6:30 and 9:30
p.m., Tues. 2 for 1 at 8:30 p.m.
Nurse Jane Goes to Hawaii: a farce by
Allan Stratton, Arts Club Seymour, opens
March 18.
Ticket Of Leave Man: another bourgeois©
Victorian melodrama, says Bobby Beynon,
Freddy Wood Theatre, 8 p.m., to March 12.
The Tempest: by Bill "I love the nightlife"
Shakespeare, Q.E. Theatre, Fri. - Sat. 8 p.m..
Sat. 2:30 p.m. Ends Sat.
Dylan Thomas Bach: written and performed,
by Leon Pownall, Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, opens March 11.
Timestep: part of the Du Maurier Festival '83,
Waterfront   Theatre,    opens   March   11,
669-3410.
Trumpets In The Morning: mixes serious
and humorous elements, Metro Theatre, 8:30
p.m.
Bedroom Force: by Alan anklebone (I mean
Ayckbourn), Studio 58, Tue. - Sat. 8 p.m.,
call 324-5227 for more info.
TODAY
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
Guest speaker, 5:30 p.m.. Geophysics 142.
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Important general meeting, last meeting of '82
academic year, elections for next year, discussion about summer events, treasurer's report,
2:30-4 p.m., SUB 216.
BIOCHEMISTRY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General  elections for executive  positions,  all
members please attend, especially second and
third year students, noon, IRC G53.
NEWMAN CLUB
Souper douper soup lunch; noon, St. Mark's
lunchroom.
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Seminar on student newspaper staff structure,
4:30 p.m., SUB 241k.
CITR
All candidates brewzcast (election speeches and
refreshments!, 3:30 p.m., SUB 233.
SAILING CLUB
Sailing film, noon, SUB concourse.
UNIVERSITY SINGERS
Spring concert: Haydn's Missa Sancti Nicolai
and other choral works from the 17th to 20th
century, 8 p.m.. Music building recital hall.
WARGAMING SOCIETY
Video-bzzr night, 6-12 p.m., SUB 212.
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
Anyone interested in gaining job experience or
just enjoying yourself through volunteering is encouraged to contact volunteer connections in
the student counselling centre — Brock 200. Call
228-3811 for info.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Meeting: nominations for '83-84 executive,
noon, SUB 205.
SPEAKEASY
Student health give info on allergies, noon, SUB
ground floor.
SATURDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Stu Cuthbert car rally, dinner afterwards, 6-7
p.m., Oakridge Beaver gas station.
NEWMAN CLUB
37th annual St. Paddy day talent nite, 8 p.m., St.
Mark's college. Phone 224-3311 for more info.
INTRAMURALS
Buchanan badminton grand Prix tournament of
Champions, Osborne gym A and B. Continues
Sunday.
SAILING CLUB
Ever been to sea Billy? days; offering a free sail in
our   boats;   specially   towards   non-sailors  so
everyone is welcome, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Jericho
beach. Also on Sunday.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Annual spring performance, everyone welcome,
free admission, 8 p.m., Asian Centre auditorium.
BRIDGE CLUB
Grand   tournament,   general   meeting,   trophy
prizes, $6/pair fee, 6 p.m., SUB 212.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Wine and cheese party, 9 p.m., address in office.
CHESS CLUB
Club championship, membership, CFC, BCCF
req'd., available at site, First trophy, 9:30 p.m.,
SUB 215.
FAMILY HOUSING FILM SERIES
Walt Disney's Bambi, 3 p.m., SUB auditorium.
RED HOT VIDEO
Province-wide protest against violent porn, 2 to 3
p.m., all Red Hot Video stores.
SUNDAY
ST. MARK'S COLLEGE
The third and final eession of Christian approach
to sexuality: Sex and Psychology, 7:30 p.m., St.'
Mark'a collage music room. Phone 224-3311 for
info.
CYCLING CLUB
Ride, non-members welcome, 9 a.m., between
SUB and aquatic centre.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Games. SFU, 10 p.m. U8C aquatic centre.
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday   ride   to   Gulf   islands,   8:30   a.m.,
Tsawwasaen Ferry terminal:
CHESS CLUB
Dub championahip con't., 10 a.m., SUB 215.
MONDAY
THEATRE DEPARTMENT
Senior BFA production: Agnes of God, free, 8
p.m.,   Dorothy   Somerset   studio.   Continues
Tuesday and Wednesday.
HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES
Musical recital of traditional Catalan Songs and
modern poems by Xavier Rivalta, noon. Music
room 338.
HILLEL HOUSE/NETWORK
Intertaith freedom rally for Anatoly Scarensky —
prisoner of conscience in ths USSR, 4 p.m.,
Robson squsrs.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Slid* show: Peru with Enrique Merkt, 7:30 p.m..
International Houss Gsts 4 lounge.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Public reading by Keith Maillard, free, noon.
Buch. penthouss.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
important meeting, nominations for executive,
noon, SUB 215.
Friday, March 11,1983
INTRAMURALS
McNulty team relays, Harry Logan track. $20 per
team. Continues to Friday.
FLOWERS
— nail lucent* photo
for the Queen
TUESDAY
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Chehar-shanbeg-sooh: Ancient traditional Persian festival on the eve of the last Wednesday of
year in Persian calendar (which ends March 21),
6-9 p.m., Ambleside park beach. West Vancouver.
CUSO UBC
Development education series — a weekly series
exploring international development issues —
this week's topic: Any Answers — shifting the
balance: Canada's role in the global community,
7:30 p.m.. International House upper lounge.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General meeting, 11:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus centre, conference room.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Hinduism, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Public reading by Audrey Thomas, free, noon,
Buchan penthouse.
PRACTICAL WRITING LECTURE SERIES
Final lecture, James Charles, vice-president administration, Shopper's Drug Mart, on Oral and
Written Expression Throughout a Career, all
welcome, noon, Computer Science 201.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everyone welcome to open
discussion on the Bah't faith, 1-2:30 p.m., SUB
207.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Women only pub night, 8 p.m., info in SUB 239.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon-2 p.m., SUB 111.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE CLUB
Literature table, drop by for Marxist literature
and discussion, 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m., SUB
concourse.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Native Indian speaker series — Varna Kirkness:
Supervisor of Native Indian Teacher Education
program on Cultural messages: do you receive
them?, noon, Scarge 100.
Native Indian films: Four short films, 1:30 - 3.30
p.m.. Hut 26 (behind Scarfe).
NEWMAN CLUB
Fantastic fabulous soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's
lunchroom.
WEDNESDAY
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Four short Native Indian films, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m.,
Hut 26 (behind Scarfe).
SUB information booth, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., SUB
lobby.
Marie Smalrface Ma rule on The World Council of
Indigenous People:  Global issues, noon - 1:30
p.m., Scarfe 209.
PACIFIC     REFORESTATION    WORKERS
ASSOCATION
Dance with the Enigmas and Beverly Sisters, $4,
8 p.m.. Oddfellows hall, Commercial and Gravely.
THURSDAY
NEWMAN CLUB
St. Patrick's day picnic and sports day, wear
something greenl, noon. Meet at Mark's college
music room.
FILM SOCIETY
General elections, noon, SUB 247.
CUSO UBC
Information session - slide show on CUSO in
Sierra Leone, recruitment information will be
available, 7:30 p.m.. International House upper
lounge.
PACIFIC REFORESTATION
WORKERS ASSOCIATION
A talk and slide show about reforestation industry: what kind of conditions you can expect,
noon, SUB 207/209.
FINE ARTS DEPARTMENT
Slide show Land Above the Clouds — Peru, synchronized with South American music. Produced by Juan Enrique Merkt, noon, Lasserre 102.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, everyone welcome to open
discussion on the Baha'i faith, 1-2:30 p.m., SUB
212A.
ISMAILI STUDENT ASSOCIATION
General meeting and general elections for '83-84,
noon, SUB 211.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Film: Islam, noon, Asian centre auditorium.
DEPARTMENT OF CREATIVE WRITING
Reading from Semetic poetry: Hebrew and
Arabic, noon, Buch. penthouse.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMENT
Janice Bulman, empowering ourselves through
collective action, noon, Computer Science 100.
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT UNION
Honorary chief Simon Baker on Coast Salish
tradition and culture, noon, Scarfe 100.
{id-ffaj-i&r
Spikel Setting. Serving. Volleying.
; Bumping.
This and more will continue today
and tomorrow as the Canadian Inter-
university athletic union continues its
annual volleyball championship in
UBC's very own War Memorial gym.
Drop by and watch the bouncing ball.
The athletics department wants to see
you there I
•
The quarter finals of the Hot Air
Show are at The Pit on Monday, March
14 starting at 8 p.m. The Enigmas, the
Beggars, M-86, Arctic Madness, and
the Beverley Sisters will perform.
The winners advance to the finals on
Monday, March 28.
Other quarter-final winners include
Redrum, Ground Zero, and Actionauts.
Come out and support your favorite
obscure local band.
THE CLASSIFIEDS—^
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 63c. Additional days, $3.80 and 58c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977.
m
5 — Coming Events
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
PIERRE JUNEAU
President, Canadian
Broadcasting Corporation
THE FUTURE OF NATIONAL
BROADCASTING
LECTURE HALL 2,
WOODWARD BUILDING
SATURDAY, MARCH 12
AT 8:15 p.m.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
VIC-20 Software 10% off all games. Phone
for catalogue. 738-9440.
WE RENT and sell colour TV's no min.
$25/month. Also microwave ovens.
732-7021.
70 — Services
FOR PROFESSIONAL SEWING, dress
making, alteration, etc. at reasonable
prices. Call btwn. 4-8 p.m. 224-0964.
80 — Tutoring
11
For Sale — Private
FOR SALE: 1980 Yamaha 100 Endore.
Street & dirt motorcycle. Pat Cook
222-9189.  $800o.b.o.
85 — Typing
25 — Instruction
EXPERIENCING year end stress? Can I
help you? Geraldine Fordyce, M.S. W., experienced counsellor and member of the
Chaplaincy. For appointment 325-8291. No
charge.
SIDESHOW '83, the 7th Annual Presentation
of Short Plays by UBC Creative Writing
Students, Friday, March 11 and Saturday,
March 12, at 3:00 and 8:00 p.m. in Hut
M-24 (West Mall & Univ. Blvd., UBC),
Free.
LEARN TO SAIL: Beginners Course or
Basic Coastal cruising. 30ft. cruiser/racer.
Hands on experience. Registering NOW
Feb. Mar. Apr., classes. Don't be left on
the beach. C.Y.A. Certificate 734-1675 after
7. Sailcraft Ltd.
30 - Jobs
IMPORTANT PUBLIC RALLIES
Closing Rally of tha First Congress of
the   Communist   Youth   Union   of
Canada (Marxist-Leninist)
Saturday, March 12-6 p.m.
6880 Main Street. Vancouver
CeM>rata the 20th Anniversery of the Founding
of The Internationalists
20   YEARS   OF   THE   GLORIOUS
STRUGGLE     IN     DEFENCE     OF
MARXISM-LENINISM, THE REVOLUTION & SOCIALISM
Sunday, March 13-3 p.m., 6880 Main Street,
Vencouver. Main speeker: Hanfial Bains, First
Secretary of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist)
COMMEMORATIVE   MEETING   ON
THE CENTENARY OF THE DEATH OF
KARL MARX
Monday, March 144 p.m.
5880 Main Street, Vancouver.
EVERYONE WELCOMEI For further information,
visit 182 W. Hastings Street, Tel. 681-6020
SET YOUR OWN HOURSI
People wanted who would like to
lose weight, feel great, and make
money too.
Call: 261-6323, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
681-5659 4 p.m.-7 p.m.
SECURE ALL HATCHESII Divel Divel Divel
with the SUB Theatre this week and see
DAS BOOT (german with english subtitles).
Sailing times are Thurs. and Sun. at 7:00
p.m. at 7:00 and Fri. and Sat. at 7:00 and
9:45. Ufejackets are not included.
CRUISE SHIP JOBSI $14-28,000. Caribbean, Hawaii, World. Call for Guide, Directory, Newsletter. 916-722-1111. Ext.
BrrtishColumbia.
40 — Messages
ST. MARY'S Ukrainian Catholic Young
Adults Club. Monthly meetings. For more
information please call either 255-0841 or
433-8627.
ACCIDENT: Anyone witnessing an accident
between 2 volvos at the intersection of
University Blvd. and Wesbrook on Tuesday, March 8 at 8:30 a.m. please phone
738-6279.
65 — Scandals
SIDESHOW '83, the 7th Annual Presentation
of Short Plays by UBC Creative Writing
Students, Fri., Mar. 11 & Sat., Mar. 12,3 &
8 p.m. Hut M-24 (West Mall & Univ. Blvd.).
Free.
JUDITH FILTNESS. PUBLIC STENOGRAPHER. Special student rates. 5670
Yew (Kerrisdale). Phone 266-6814.
NEW TO AREA. Adina Typing Service.
Student discounts. 4326 West 10th. Phone
222-2122.
FRANCINE'S TYPING SERVICES: Theses,
papers, etc.—reasonable rates. Please inquire 732-3647.
YEAR-ROUND expert typing, essays,
theses. Phone 738-6829 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
On King Edward bus route.
FAST, efficient typing, 41st and Marine Dr.
266-5053.
TYPIST in Burnaby. Legal experience.
Available for all types of assignments.
$1/pg. 525-0772.
TYPEWRITING: Minimal notice required.
UBC location. 24 hour phone-in, 224-6518.
EXPERT TYPING essays, term
papers, factums, letters, manuscripts,
resumes, theses. IBM Selectric II.
Reasonable rates. Rose, 731-9857.
U-WRITE WE TYPE 736-1208.
Word Processing Specialists for Theses,
Term Papers, Resumes, Reports, Correspondence, Days, Evenings, Weekends.
TYPING. Experienced $1.10/pg. for term
papers, theses, etc. Call Gordon 873-8032
after 10 a.m. Visa/MC accepted.
MICOM WORD PROCESSING: Thesis,
term papers, equation typing. Rate $10 on
hour. Jeeva, 876-5333.
TYPING: Fast, reliable service. Pick-up.
436-8976. Mrs. B. Munro, 5560 Tyne St.,
Vancouver, B.C. V5R 4L4.
NORTH SHORE STUDENTS: We can do
your typing or word processing professionally for at home prices. Call Jessie
922-0135. Friday, March 11,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
r
Queen gives guests Royal treatment
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
She was late, 15 minutes to be exact.
Inside UBC's Asian centre, where about
700 people waited anxiously for Her Majesty's arrival, anticipation peaked when she
didn't make her scheduled appearance -at
11:40 a.m.
Frequent gawks at the entrance became
common, as the clock on the right side of
the room struck 11:45 a.m. — and still no
sign of her.
Dressed in a dilly dally of suits and
dresses — more or less "lounge suits" that
the special invitations for the morning
demanded — the audience listened to
classical Indian music, which at first appeared to be merely the prelude of things to
come. Little did they know the music would
be the best part of the morning.
At 11:50 a.m., the woman in the third
row centre looked back at the two plain
clothes  detectives  near  the  middle  exit
doors, through which no one cquld have
possibly left the auditorium, and said:
"Are you formidable?"
At least they smiled at her.
At 11:53 a.m., came the word: two
minutes, the attendants gestured to one
another. Large portions of the audience
were told beforehand they were to stand
when the Queen made her entrance.
No one told them when they could sit
down.
She came in at 11:55 a.m. Attired in a
soft yellow skirt suit that had the unregal
look of polyester, she was all smiles,
and perfectly in the royal pose.
Prince Philip wasn't with her, but at least
25 members of the university community
were. At the end of the train were Alma
Mater Society president Mitch Hetman,
who came close cropped and looked as if
the scissors hadn't stopped trimming the
waving to subjects
locks, and soon-to-be-former UBC president Doug Kenny.
She walked through the room, listened to
the musicians for barely 30 seconds, and exited through the doors at the left side.
It took less than a minute for the crowd
to realize the moment they had dressed up
for, felt priveleged to be invited to, and for
which they had waited as much as an hour
for, had passed. But damned if they
wouldn't get their wasted morning's worth.
A rush to the nearest exit door began.
Everyone wanted more glimpses of the
Queen before she left the Asian centre
grounds.
"At least she had sunshine," said one
member, referring to the unexpected good
weather outside. "I'm not a monarchist at
heart," said another.
They were all monarchists at heart, really. And they had just received a taste of
royal treatment.
Visit costs UBC a Royal $7,000
Two thousand people crowded
sidewalks, stood on chairs and ladders, and climbed trees Wednesday
to watch Queen Elizabeth II walk
from the Museum of Anthropology
to the Asian centre.
The crowd outside the Asian centre and in the surrounding area was
already thick half an hour before
the Queen was scheduled to take
her short jaunt down West mall.
Dozens of redcoated RCMP, complete with brown broadrimmed
hats, kept the crowd behind yellow
ropes.
Motorcycle police kept buzzing
through the crowds on their Harley-
Davidsons, and occasionally a
helicopter flew overhead. Security
men lurked on rooftops. About 200
uniformed and plainclothed police
were in the area — two of whom
filmed the crowd.
The Queen watched native
dancers in the anthropology
museum before visiting the Asian
centre, where she listened to
Japanese drummers. As she walked
between the two buildings she was
greeted with enthusiastic cheering
and whistling.
After listening to the drummers
for about 10 minutes the Queen
departed in her motorcade for the
health sciences centre hospital. As
she walked to her car she was once
again greeted with loud applause.
"The Queen's visit shows the
university on parade, and a very im-
They came, they
saw, they tabled
Student council tabled a motion
Wednesday to restructure The
Ubyssey and finance the purchase
of typesetting and production
equipment.
The motion, introduced to council by black tie and tails bedecked
Ubyssey staffer Arnold Hedstrom,
asked council to approve in principle the incorporation of an
autonomous Ubyssey Publications
Society.
The Ubyssey is severely
hampered by the poor economy,
Hedstrom said, and the proposed
restructuring would allow for efficient and less expensive management of the paper.
Several councillors were concerned the proposal would give The
Ubyssey a monopoly over printing
at UBC. But Hedstrom pointed out
The Ubyssey Publications Society
would provide at cost printing services for all campus groups.
The proposal was tabled and
council then established a committee to examine The Ubyssey proposal in more detail and report back
This weekend UBC is becoming accessible to the masses.
The annual open house, this
year featuring the health sciences
area of campus, starts today at
10 a.m.
On display will be medicine,
dentistry, biochemistry, pharmacy, home economics,
rehabilitation medicine and the
acute care hospital.
The displays run today until 4
p.m., and continues Saturday
from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m., and
on Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4
p.m.
Open house is rotated every
three years between the arts and
sciences, applied sciences and
the health sciences area of campus.
Access to the aquatic centre,
Museum of Anthropology and
.botanical gardens is all free,    j
to council in two weeks.
"Nobody disagrees with
autonomy, we're all just scared to
do anything," said arts representative Gord Comer.
Council discussed the motion for
about an hour, during which the
debate often became mired in procedural confusion. After one particular suggestion was voted on,
several councillors asked chair and
AMS president Mitch Hetman what
exactly they had just approved.
*    *    *
Council approved a $50,000 plan
to improve lighting in SUB.
Lighting is inadequate in certain
areas of SUB, said administrative
commission member Tom Grady.
"The ballroom is inadequately lit
for conferences and exams," he
said.
Grady said the revenue from increased use of the ballroom will pay
for the initial expenditure in four
years. The new lighting system will
produce an effect somewhat like
sunlight, said Grady.
»    *    *
Council approved a program that
may help student find summer jobs.
The Job Link program intends to
solicit advertising from students
who will pay a small fee to have
their names, phone numbers and a
small description listed in a publication which will be mailed to prospective employers. Students will be
charged $1.75 to place ads.
— ian timbariaka photo
HELLO ARE YOU there? Ask RCMP types outside Museum of Anthropology Wednesday. "Is the Queen coming from your direction?" "I
thought she was coming from your way," was reply over highly
sophisticated communication system. Two later purchased megaphones
to ensure better communication, after shoe phones gave agents athletes
ear.
portant part of the university," administration president Doug Kenny
said Thursday.
But the parade did not come
cheap.
The short event cost UBC $7,000
for performers and other expenses,
said bursar William White.
But the UBC population nevertheless showed interest. "I don't see
why the Queen's visit should have
been so significant, but it was,"
psychology professor Bob Knox
said Thursday. Knox said he attended the event Wednesday.
Student Tracy Smith said she
went because she thought the
Queen was a good person. "I don't
know why I think she's a nice lady
. . . My mother likes her," Smith
said.
One man said he went to support
his Queen. "The country will end in
anarchy without a queen," he said.
CITR radio reporter David Firman said he was harassed by police
Tuesday night. Two officers came
to his home and asked him about a
possible demonstration Wednesday. Firman told them he knew
nothing about any such demonstration. "One cop said 'Maybe we
have false information'," Firman
told The Ubyssey Wednesday. "I
resisted the urge to reply to that."
Police also physically forced a
Ubyssey photographer to leave a
media area Wednesday while he was
photographing the Queen.
On Thursday, the Queen and
Prince Philip were special guests of
prime minister Trudeau, who
hosted a gala dinner at Vancouver's
Bayshore hotel.
The couple returns to England
today, after a month of touring in
the Caribbean, Mexico, the U.S.,
and western Canada.
The Queen last visited British
Columbia in 1971 to celebrate the
provincial centennial.
Jewish law 'encourages peace'
"If there is no peace there is
nothing . . . peace is more than any
one thing that we can have," said
the director of Hillel House Thurs
day,  quoting  an  ancient   Jewish
commentator's   interpretation   ol
peace.
Rabbi Daniel Siegel told 30 peo-
Forestry fools foul fish and Finn
A forestry student prank has soiled the clothing and
dignities of two engineering professors and their
students.
In two separate attacks last Thursday, forestry
students shouted the battle-cry "eat my rectum" and
sprayed fish fertilizer on engineers, said engineering
undergraduate society president Rich Day.
The prank was in retaliation for the kidnapping of
Omar, the forestry undergraduate society's pet car,
said Day.
Forestry students went to the civil and mechanical
engineering building and Macleod building to avenge
the kidnapping, said former FUS president Brian
Mcloud. "It was coincidental that they had fish fertilizer with them," he said.
The forestry students will have to pay the cleaning
bills, said Liam Finn, an engineering professor whose
classroom was attacked. "I would like to forget the
whole affair because students intend to pay for any
damage suffered," he said.
Engineering professor John Anderson said he was
not offended by the incident. "It doesn't bother me
although the students were quite unhappy. The most
offensive thing was the smell which lingered all day."
Experiments involving semi-conductors suffered
about $2,000 damage from the fish fertilizer, said
Day. The damage was not as extensive as that, said
electrical engineering faculty professors.
The prank will not create a stink between engineering and forestry students, Day said. "We are not going
to do something equally ridiculous. Our policy is to ignore them. But Omar may wind up somewhere interesting," he added.
pie in Computer Sciene 200 that
weapons which have the power to
reduce all combatants, non-
combatants and natural surroundings to ash should not be allowed.
Speaking at a lecture sponsored
by Educators For Nuclear Disarmament, he continually referred to
Jewish law and the importance it
places on the maintenance of peace.
Siegel said according to Jewish
law, anyone who has obtained symbols of success such as a house and
marriage should avoid war and stay
at home.
In such a situation, "a king
would have trouble raising an army
for an unpopular war," he said.
The exception to this rule is that
everyone is obliged to participate in
a war of self-defense makes the
definition unenforceable, Siegel
said. Page 12
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, March 11,1983
Drive
better
Ileal
REMEMBER. IF ITS ON SALE ANY WHERE ITS ON SALE AT A & B SOUND Q&
Your Total Entertainment Centre
MJME
Main Centre
556 Seymour St.
687-5837
Car Centre
2696 E. Hastings St.
254-1601

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