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The Ubyssey Nov 18, 1966

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Array McGILL EDITOR  FIRED, STAFF RESIGNS
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill students council early Thursday took
the ultimate step in its deep-seated
dispute with The McGill Daily.
Council fired editor-in-chief Sandy
Gage at 1 a.m., and the newspapers
entire staff resigned on the spot.
"I am not going to resign — you
will fire me," Gage told council after
it passed a motion demanding resignations from the paper's entire editorial iboard. And fire him they did.
The vote was 12 to four in favor of
dismissal, with one councillor abstaining.
Internal affairs vice-president Ian
McLean declined to vote on the issue,
saying: "Council doesn't have the
right nor the privilege to sit as a
judiciary body."
A tense debate raged for five hours
in front of an audience of about 400
students.
When the meeting broke up, council president Jim McCoubrey and
his secretary-treasurer telephoned
the paper's printers and told them
not to print Thursday's four-page
issue of the Daily.
The printer halted production, and
no Daily will be printed by the students union until a new staff is
found.
The paper's long-standing feud
with its students' council boiled over
Nov. 11 when the Daily published
an article claiming a McGill professor is conducting a research project
designed to aid the U.S. war effort
in Viet Nam.
The article resulted in an engineering undergraduate society resolution demanding the resignation of
the   paper's   managing   board.   The
engineers voted about 200 to four to
censure the paper.
The story in question was headlined: "Researcher aids Viet Nam
war," and alleged civil engineer professor Raymond Yong is working on
a method of determining soil solidity
from the air.
Such a project would permit U.S.
pilots to know whether they could
make emergency landings on unknown ground.
Two weeks ago, council took the
responsibility of appointing the
Daily's editor. It also refused to approve the paperjs, policy statement.
Grievance
committee
not called
OTTAWA (CUP) — "A Canadian University Press investigating commission should have
been called to investigate the
McGill daily's dispute with its
student council," CUS president Doug Ward said Thursday.
"I certainly stand by the investigation machinery," Ward
said, upon hearing that McGill student council dismissed
daily editor Sandy Gage without first calling a CUP commission to investigate the case.
This fall, CUS passed a resolution recognizing the CUP
body declaring that student
councils should not discipline
an editor or interfere with a
member paper, before a CUP
investigation team reports on
such disputes.
Ward called the investigation commission "a good interim procedure," and expressed
surprise there wasn't an immediate move by CUP to call
one in.
"I am disappointed that it
wasn't immediately considered
when there was talk that the
student council wasn't happy
with the student paper."
Meanwhile, the Georgian
will publish the orphaned four
page Thursday edition of its
crosstown rival.
Negotiations between ex-
daily editor Sandy Gage and
members of the Sir George
Williams managing board have
resulted in the decision to
publish the paper which McGill council president Jim Mc-
Couprey refused to allow
printed.
The paper, containing news
and editorial material on
Gage's firing is expected to be
distributed at both Sir George
Williams and McGill universities Friday.
Some editorial changes will
be made in it, but Georgian
spokesmen said the paper is
essentially the same one which
printers were told to stop producing early Thursday.
McCoubrey and the daily's
ex-managing editor John Skinner were reportedly assessing
how to put out a council sponsored edition of the daily late
Thursday afternoon.
LIFE IN A
CLIP JOINT
(SEE PAGE 17)
€-*+
~W
-F\
r     Ear toddy
goghn, tomow
Vol. XLVIII, No. 27
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER  18,  T966
224-3916
. --yy
--*
'_*-- .-"•'", "".if*,    "..     ','•"*■''   ■■'"■-?'<•' ;'A-%%J4'*t."'v ~^l~--
—kurt hilger photo
"I FLATLY DENY all rumors that my friend and I are after
the white knight's job. Our crusade is to straighten out
the crappy mess of higher education," says begowned
cowboy, Don Wise.
Operation
mud-hole
in the air
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
Highways Minister Phil Gaglardi told The Ubyssey
Thursday he doesn't know when the mud-clogged Marine
Drive project will be finished.
And he doesn't know when
the Sixteenth Avenue extension will be finished — or
started.
"There is no target date on
either of these projects," he
said in a telephone interview
from his Kamloops office.
"Everything depends on the
allotment of money."
Gaglardi said he knows
nothing of damage to students'
cars as reported in Thursday's
Ubyssey. The UBC sports car
club reported cars with cracked steering boxes, paint damage and ruined transmissions.
"The highways department
is not responsible for any damage to cars," Gaglardi said.
"If students want to avoid
the road, it's up to them."
Sir Ouvry Roberts, UBC's
traffic czar, said Thursday he
has received no reports of
damage, but he doesn't like
the Marine Drive situation.
"I used to travel that way
but I don't anymore because
of the unfortunate conditions,"
he said.
Sir Ouvry hopes something
can be done about the road.
"It would be a good idea
if people would write letters
to the government asking that
something be done."
Plans for Marine Drive include four new lanes converg-
PHIL GAGLARDI
. . . doesn't know
ing  into  two  lanes  past  Discovery Road.
When asked about possible
traffic problems, Gaglardi said
any problems would be dealt
with in due course.
"Engineers make the plans
for the roads and the Highways Department approves
them."
Gaglardi said the Sixteenth
Avenue extension will be
dealt with as soon as possible.
"We have to wait for the
money," he said.
"If you have money, you
can do anything—wear a fur
coat or drive a cadillac."
Mac opens door Thursday;
invites students, profs
The doors come open again next Thursday to UBC
president John Macdonald's office.
He has announced that he will meet students
without appointment all day Thursday, November 23.
Macdonald last opened his doors in the middle of
October when he met seven bureaucrat-types. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  18,   1966
—powell hargrave photo
"HAIL TO THEE, blithe spirit. Bird thou never wert ..." a
loser ? Ian Dixon and optimistic Coach Mullen demonstrate
T-Bird  technique  for   photog   from   a   downtown   paper.
Strong arm tactics
grab study space
Rumors of cliques and fist-fights for study space are
creeping about Sedgewick Library.
Ture Erickson, head of Sedge-
SUB mess fine mashed
AMS penalties invalid
The Student Union Building
has evaded a $30.50 fine originally laid for making a mess
on clubs day.
This fine along with those
of the Reserve Officers Training Program, World University Service, Inter-Frat Council and the rowing team were
ruled invalid by the AMS.
Peter Braund, AMS president, said the University Clubs
Committee's minutes were referred back to UCC for correction because the above
mentioned clubs are not under
their jurisdiction.
"The accusations that there
was an excessive mess and
that we failed to dismantle our
display are false," Braund
said.
He claimed later he cleaned
up the mess himself.
Mike Coleman, UCC president pointed out that if the
AMS does not approve their
minutes the money must be
taken from the UCC budget.
"This means that clubs in
general   get   stuck   which   I
STUDENTS!
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wick, said he has received reports of disciplinary problems
in the library.
"Discipline has always been
a problem," he said, "ibut the
solution lies with the students,
not us."
Although he has heard of the
cliques he has no documentary
proof.
"I am not interested in one
particular case," he said, "but
more with prevention.
"This problem is too deep for
the commissionaires," he added. "They would be powerless
in a group situation involving
hot tempers."
Erickson said the subject will
be brought up at the Tuesday
meeting of the Student Library
Committee.
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For information, see your Student Placement Office
think   is   unfair,"   said   Coleman.
"If this is an example of
what Braund considers to be
a job well done, the AMS is
in trouble."
Students were asked for an
opinion  on  fines.
"I  think  AMS   has  enough
trouble cleaning up its own
financial messes and it might
have started with the SUB
booth," said Brian Fogarty,
commerce 1.
"To penalize clubs for the
irresponsible action of a few
SUB people would be the
height of irresponsibility."
LIBRARY
QUESTIONNAIRE
TODAY
Problems with the library?
Fill in a questionnaire - available in the
university libraries and around campus.
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The handiest book on campus
UBC Student Telephone Directory
Get Yours Today
AVAILABLE AT THE  BOOKSTORE
AND PUBLICATIONS OFFICE,
BROCK HALL
ONLY 75 CENTS Friday,  November  18,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
—kurt hilger photo
IT'S LIKE THIS, Bag, I've been wandering around this campus all day. I've been lectured
at, sworn at, soap-boxed at, and tanked. It's a matter of survival, Bag. Either you or me.
Mounted artsmen crusade;
library first, then boondocks
By VAL THOM
The clatter of hooves sounded on the pavement in front
of the library Thursday as
three UBC arts students prepared to ride off to the Cariboo.
Don   Wise,   Dave   Zirnhelt,
and Doug Poelvoorde are off
to inform the voters of the
needs of higher education. The
Cariboo by-election was called
when a Socred incumbent resigned to make way for
attorney-general Robert Bonner.
SFA editor heads
fed yearbook group
We don't have one, but Simon Flraser Academy does.
A yearbook that is.
And editor Stan Wong, second year economics student,
has .been elected president of
the Canadian University Yearbook Association.
Wong, 19, edited last year's
Acadians
clean up on
co-op savings
Savings of up to 300 per
cent could be made if a co-op
laundry was set up in Acadia
Park residence for married
students.
James Slater, chairman of
the married students' housing
committee, said Thursday a
laundry co-op has been proposed for Acadia Park.
"For the last four years
there has been a co-op in Wesbrook Villa and the average
cost per family for one year
was  $9.60,"  said  Slater.
"If coin operated machines
had been placed there the
cost would have been $47.90,"
he said.
"The proposed co-op at
Acadia Park calls for 16
washers and three dryers. The
average annual cost per family would be $13.45."
Leslie Rohringer, housing
administrator, has agreed in
principle with the idea of a coop laundry in Acadia Park.
SFA yearbook which won an
honorable mention for color
photography at the recent annual conference of the association.
Wong's duties as president
include organising the next
annual yearbook conference
at SFA next October.
He will also co-ordinate the
association's centennial project— a 32-page color supplement depicting Canadian university contribution to society
in the last 100 years.
The supplement will be included in every university
yearbook in Canada.
So what
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
The peace-loving translucent fuschia blorgs made their
annual religious procession
through this city to the sacred river of Ognap today. Observers were unimpressed.
"This is a stunt to draw attention to the higher education issues," said Wise, arts 6.
"There are three issues involved; lower fees, upcountry
equalization grants, and the
need for an independent
grants commission."
"We want to make higher
education the decisive issue in
this campaign," he added.
"We want to make Bonner
commit himself on these issues.
"This will be shock treatment for the Cariboo."
Wise, Zirnhelt, arts 3, and
Poelvoorde, arts 2, who was
unable to ride Thursday will
travel throughout the Cariboo
by car and horseback for four
days, discussing education with
voters, candidates, and the
press.
They will distribute folders
that explain the education issues. On Saturday, they will
take part in two marches in
Williams   Lake   and   Quesnel.
All three are from Williams
Lake.
Students who watched the
demonstration were impressed
with the campaign and its objectives.
"I think it's a good thing,"
said  Ken  Steinberg, comm  3.
"These rural area issues are
not usually too large; this
should be quite a shock."
"I hope it works because I
think it's really worthwhile,"
commented Carol Waldman,
home ec 2.
IN LIBRARY
Co-eds report
indecent man
Four co-eds Wednesday reported a man indecently exposed himself to them in the main library stacks.
Head librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs said Thursday library
officials are investigating the
reports.
He said the man should seek
assistance at Wesbrook health
centre.
"This is a sickness and I appeal to the student involved
to seek assistance immediately," Stuart-Stubbs said.
The incidents all occurred
on level two of the main
stacks. (Level two is devoted
to books concerning natural
history, American folklore,
sociology and sports.)
The student was described
as medium in height, with
short dark hair and wearing
a standard UBC leather-arm
jacket.
He made approaches to four
girls, and returned to confront
one of them a second time.
The first girl to report the
incidents said she would have
no trouble identifying the
man.
Library staff embarked  on
BASIL STUART-STUBBS
. . . investigating
an exhaustive search of the
building as soon as the incident was reported, but failed
to find the offender.
SFA beds up
Kordt lectures Koerner-ly
on resistance in Nazi era
This year's Koerner lecturer will be Dr. Erick
Kordt, discussing The Nazi Era and the Resistance.
Kordt is a former member of the German Diplomatic corp, and a professor of modern history and
international law at Munich and Cologne universities.
He will speak Monday, Dec. 12, at noon in Bu. 104.
Anyone for a bed race?
Science students at Simon
Fraser Academy have challenged any organization or
group in the Lower Mainland
to push their beds.
The bed course is from the
top of Burnaby Mountain to
Vancouver  City   College.
Former president of the
UBC science undergraduate
society, Frank Flynn, told The
Ubyssey that until the science-
men got a formal invitation
they wouldn't participate.
The bed race will be run by
international bed running
rules. Bed date is Dec. 3, 1966.
The purpose is to publicize
Vancouver City College's request to obtain Langara as an
extension to their campus.
Those who hear the call of
the bed can contact science
president at SFA, Keith Farn-
worth.
v'__1_MiU.'
—kurt hilger photo
IT'S OKAY to have to stand around on the avenues. And
it's okay to tuck your leaves into the trailer. But when
you  have to stand on the avenue with  no  leaves  .  .  . THt UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorised
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
NOVEMBER 18, 1966
It's all potty
The RCMP narcotics squad arrested a B.C. Institute
of Technology student Wednesday for marijuana possession, making 23 the total of people absurdly pinched in
the past three weeks.
It's absurd to arrest marijuana smokers because the
law is wrong to consider pot smoking a crime.
Yet, the 23 people now out on bail each face probable six month sentences in Oakalla if current judicial
trends continue, and even though one city magistrate
last week expressed great surprise that none had previous criminal records.
Crime is things people do that harm other people,
or damage society. Beyond that, people have an undeniable right to do whatever they wish with their minds and
bodies.
Pot, says the Criminal Code of Canada, is an
addictive narcotic. The Code's narcotics section were
written because large-scale crime uses drugs to addict
people, then forces them to pay high prices in an illicit,
controlled market for the drug which r__aintain_i their
physical well-being.
The syndicate's prices force the addict into theft
ot prostitution to raise the money to support his habit.
If this happened to the pot smoker,, we would agree
with the Criminal Code, although we might advocate
the British solution of government prescription drugs
for addicts in lieu of jails and more crime.
We've seen people in Vancouver who are psychologically hung up on pot, just as some people are psychologically hung on fast oars, or the euphoria of good
jazz — all used to escape from grey reality.
But we've never seen anybody harmed through a
physical addiction.
We've never seen anybody steal to support a habit,
because — as the British Medical Association's magazine
Lancet, the U.S. army's surgeon-general, and the La
Guardia report of New York city have shown — the
silly weed isn't physically addictive.
Vancouver's estimated 3,000 pot users illicitly bring
it in from Mexico themselves, sell to each other at
cost, and feel no craving when there's none in town.
It's used much as the rest of society uses beer —
a thing to do with your friends while chatting or before
dinner — by a segment of society relatively harmless
to the rest of society.
That segment, at least in the UBC vicinity., is students, artists, writers, lawyers, businessmen, professors.
Laws are to protect society from menaces. People
sitting quietly smoking marijuana are not menaces —
they don't steal to support their smoking, they cannot
harm others with the drug since it is, we emphasize,
non-addictive.
If the law were not enforced, nobody would be the
worse off. and society would be better off — jails cost
society many thousands a year, and in the case of the
pot smoker, it's money that needn't be spent.
We urge a government study of the whole issue,
legal marijuana for those who want it, and an interim
stop to the current rash cf inane arrests.
In the meantime, we urge UBC's pot smokers — all
1,000 of them,, at the best estimate — to cool it, since a
mere pleasant diversion isn't worth a six month stretch.
Ferry good, Phil
Out on Marine Drive, the concrete mixers may. in a
year,, chug as far as the foot of Discove'ry with their
six  lane  spread.
But, says the highways department, Marine will
narrow again into the old two lane drag it's always been.
We've been had, children—all along we thought the
muddy widening was to make access to UBC better, to
eliminate the morning and evening cram.
But nobody going to UBC enters or gets off at
Discovery. No, children, the road is being widened so
paying customers can ride up to a planned B.C. ferries
terminal at the foot of Discovery.
Ire, rage, mud and broken axles — fooled by the
crafty Socreds again, we are.
There's nothing anybody at UBC can do about it.
Except fume. And vote. And urge your friends to vote.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Challenged
Editor, The Ubyssey:
On behalf of the Liberal
club I would like to challenge you and Gabor Mate
to a debate. The topic is "Resolved that political parties
are an effective vehicle of
social change," and we would
expect you to take the negative. The debate is to take
place Tuesday, Nov. 22, at
12:30 p.m. in Bu. 102.
Debators for the affirmative will be Allan Gould, past
president of the Liberal club,
and Mike Coleman, executive
member of the Liberal club.
Our purpose in calling the
debate is an attempt to explain and justify the rationale of campus political clubs.
We will anticipate your reply in the affirmative to debate the question in the negative and will look forward to
your learned and perceptive
comments on the subject.
SHAUN SULLIVAN
President
UBC liberal club
ed. note:
We accept. But we negative on rule three, and demand order of rebuttal reversed to affirmative, negative. Affirmative?
'Fascist fun
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It is beyond my humble
power of reasoning to contemplate the concern the red
guard has for their rival
group the blue guard. Don't
they appreciate an opposition? Surely they cannot be
that narrow minded.
I am president of this august body of thinking conservative students who have recognized the need to present
that side of the never ending
battle of ideas. We are disturbed by the constant radical brain washing on campus and have done something
to counter this. If it is fun
to be fascist is it more fun
to be a communist? We tend
to think not.
Our fine constitutioin was
duly passed by that constituted branch of the AMS, the
UCC on Oct. 19th. Perhaps
we have been too naive in
our assumptions. Does the
student council wish to incorporate this bureaucratic
function with their never-
ending fight for more red
tape?
Perhaps the radical AMS
establishment could inform a
now confused segment of the
student body of their intentions. We tend to feel that
opposition to basic philosophies   is  the   main   cause   in
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing     .        _           Richard Blair
News   _        ..        .    _    Carol Wilson
City                    Danny Staff man
Photo        Powell Hargrave
Page Friday   . _           Claudia Gwinn
Focus -. . . _ . Rosemary Hyman
Sports     Sue Gransby
Ass't News    _. _. .         Pat Hrushowy
Ass't City Tom Morris
CUP ...    Bert Hill
this problem of our existence.
Surely the red constabulary
does not begrudge our 45
members the meagre $27
grant alloted us by UCC. This
is after all quite a conservative grant.
ANDREW GATES
President, Blue Guard
'Mentally absent'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Does anybody know who
Peter Munshill, ed. 5, is (Letters to the Editor), Nov. 17)?
Obviously he was either
physically or mentally absent from UBC in 1965 for
his letter is rife with inaccuracy.
Some of the minor errors
include: (a) the motion w&s
of censure, not non-confidence; (b) it was established
at the time that the garment
in question was a pair of
Hawaiian swimming shorts,
not underwear; (c) the motion was passed unanimously.
Most important, the motion,
which was far too silly to
(More Letters, Page 5)
Val Thom horsely eyed Cariboo
riders. Norman Gidney, Maria
Giardini, Boni Lee, Murray McMillan, Charlotte line-story Haire
and Yuan-shl-kwei scanned, puce-
ly albeit effectively, the news.
Rod Wilczak went to International House for an interview arrtt
got lost in Nitobe Gardens. Angela
Ottho was with  him.
Cameras were wielded by John
Tilley, Derrek Webb, Al Harvey,
Chris   Blake  and   Don   Kydd. Friday,  November  18,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
distract the house from more
serious business was introduced by the tories. The New
Democrats are far too interested in serious matters to
propose such a ridiculous motion.
If Munshill really cannot
tell the difference between
the Conservatives and the
NDP, then his letter simply
provides additional statistical
evidence in favor of the oft-
confirmed proposition: Socreds are by definition mentally incompetent.
Besides, on the subject of
introducing silly motions, any
party which tries to put
through a bank charter with
Einar Gunderson as a director
has no right to talk about inane motions.
Munshill's overall charge
against mock parliament, that
it neglects all serious matters, is quite out of date.
Parties have realized the
need for model parliamentary
reform and have joined in a
co-operative program to create a new structure and subject matter for the old tenement of idiots and ignorami.
BRUCE MONTADOR
Treasurer. UBC NDP
'Complaining
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I read with lessening boredom the latest Jewish Socialist complaining about his
father's business, wrapping
it up into something about
Viet Nam. He was interviewed by Gabor Mate who is always amusing no matter what
kind of lunch he has had.
It is all rather innocuous at
this stage, but your paper is
putting things in about the
right tone for the time when
someone of a little backbone
will come along and sweep
the rubbish out.
Keep up the good work,
your paper is harmless but
useful.
J. BARKER
'Thanks, all'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
May we take this opportunity to express the appreciation of everyone at Children's Hospital to all concerned in the success of this
year's teacup football game.
It resulted in the splendid
sum of $1,767.53, the largest
amount yet, being donated to
the Children's Hospital.
The  teacup  game,   an an-
Fall Campus
RAINCOATS
CROYDON
UNITED  TAILORS
BRITISH    WOOLLENS
549 Granville      MU  1-4649
Wi'i-vivwV <" veronal affair of thirteen years'
standing, has raised a total of
$13,895.80 over that period
which has been put to good
use helping B.C.'s sick and
crippled youngsters. Last
year Children's admitted
3,371 patients from 174 B.C.
towns.
Our special thanks to the
engineering and forestry
undergraduates, and of
course the home ec and nursing undergraduates together
with coaches from the UBC
Thunderbird football team.
On behalf of the children
it will benefit, our sincere
gratitude.
(MRS.) JEAN GOULD
Public Relations Officer
'Mighty  Mouse'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I agree that the E.A.C.
(Education Action Committee) is doing a great job and
should continue in their efforts to rid us of the Mickey
Mouse image.
I was teaching a Grade 7
class on synonyms the other
day. Upon hearing this a forester friend of mine said
"Cinnamon, you say, belonging to the family Canlaceae,
bark being lightly . . ."
Although I quite agree education 205 (music) is a lot
harder than most of our subjects it is very easy; as compared to leaf collecting I,
basket weaving II, typing in
and yond throwing IV.
Can you imagine an engineering student going into a
grade 4 classroom? The result would be one of these:
(1) The engineer would call
Lets stort
a coffee break after 10 minutes to calm his nerves.
(2) By recess the kids
would be using four-letter
anglo-saxon words like pros.
(3) By lunch the engineer
would be hiding in a cupboard waiting for 3:00 and
hoping the kids wouldn't
notice him.
After all, students, who
taught you from grades 1-12,
through all your little
spasms of being ibabies, kids,
children, adolescents, and
then  bubble-gummers?   Huh?
The answer you must all
acknowledge is teacher.
Let's not have any more
mickey mouse, now it's all
for mighty mouse.
ED BETTERTON
education 2
Gibberish
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Regarding patrolmen hide
cars on campus:
After absorbing your story
on the mystery car, my mind
(Kvd^jirt
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
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recalled that Pyrot was eventually declared innocent of
the charges made by General Greatauk.
The silence of the parking
officials in understandable.
The car is a Hillman, not a
Sunbeam.
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Phone 224-7012
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Carrots, yet
STAR CITY (UNS) — Farmers in this town in the fertile
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allowed to grow carrots.
The Uptowner
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Theatre District
Serving Excellent Food
at Moderate Prices in a
Clean, Bright Atmosphere.
776 Granville St.
Outlaw the difficult days. Outlaw
troublesome pins, pads and belts
before you miss a single afternoon of modern dance, basketball, even swimming.
Go straight with Tampax tampons.
Worn internally they leave you
completely unencumbered.
Each Tampax tampon has its
own silken-smooth container-
applicator that protects the
tampon until ready for use and
assures correct insertion.
They are available in 3 trouble-
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Super and Junior —wherever
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THE      U B Y S'S'E Y
Friday, November  18,  1966
SFA 'miraculously' made
from dream to reality
The opening of Simon Fraser
Academy is still regarded by
many as miraculous.
In  his   first   report to   the
Thefts low
on campus,
says patrol
Students at UBC are an
honest lot.
Information released by the
patrol office Wednesday showed only 64 cases of theft totalling $2,708 during 1965-66.
Assistant patrol superintendent J. H. Kelly said: "Thefts
on the campus are surprisingly few."
Most often stolen are purses
and wallets, generally containing from $25 to $100. Electronic equipment and small
valuables in parked cars are
also prone to theft.
Other items stolen were hub
caps, fog lights, and wheelchairs from the health centre.
Kelly said five people were
apprenhended last year for
thefts. All were non-students,
all were from Vancouver, and
all-had previous criminal records.
He added that most pilfering is done by outsiders.
Kelly concluded: "We aTe
not the police body for the
campus — our department is
concerned with security, and
all investigations are made
with the intent of improving
security procedures."
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Senate and board of governors
Monday, SFA president Patrick McTaggart-Cowan said:
"It is hard for anyone to accept the fact that recommendations in 1963 could be translated so speedily into terms of
the actual buildings, faculty
and student body.
"Dream became reality in
such a short time that it has
been hard to catch our breath.
'"There was no place for
the timid man in the building
of Simon Fraser Academy,"
said McTaggart-Cowan.
He claimed costs arising
from the Academy's high rate
of   growth   are   not   inconse-
qential.
"The breaking in of new
buildings, the equipping of
new labs and the training of
new staff combine to make
our emergent costs very substantial," he said.
"Administrative costs at
present reflect both the trimester system and our youth.
"It is also important to bear
in mind that administrative
costs represent not only the
size of the operation but the
rate of growth. Our rate of
growth has been great."
1  4
You meet people . . . what change?    I
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... a weekly magazine ot
comment and reviews.
-^j^"*^ $;!',.t"&$w**:7s*v
iiiBm'v^'r'WppjWPfinr ~w
NOV. 18, 1966
ON THE COVER: Lynn
DeCew trips out a psychedelic collage.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants: judy bing
sue richter
today
Today — two UBC debating buffs challenge
the reasons for SFA's
refusal to join them in
academic  argument.
Today — Larry Kent
has finally made it to
the Lyric Th e a t r e ,
after engagements in
Europe and the States.
Read what Lanny Beck-
man thinks about Canadian brotherhood and
snobbery.
Today — for those of
you that read Hungarian
with a French accent,
Mate goes separatist.
Today — Hirt goes
symphonic and Popoff
views the SF Mime in
retrospect.
Today — The Professionals becomes an itemized experiment in the
heroic epic genre.
Today—tears are shed
for the victims of the
capitalist Yankee expansion program and Russell
is a harmless philosophic
old man.
Today — we have letters and reviews of reviews.
Today—The Great Society is a comic book
available at Duthie's. But
we know someone who
reads Batman in Italian.
Today — old editors
never fade away. They
just keep writing and
writing and . . .
Today—The Fine Arts
Gallery does more to
promote good will and
trade with the Far East.
Today — Lynn drew
the cover and we all
stood on our heads to
read "The Ubyssey" in
the top left hand corner.
Salon reds
not factual
INMATES OF THE ASYLUM of Charenton smile readily
for the pf camera. They appear in Peter Weiss' play at
the Freddy Wood Theatre Nov. 18 to 26.
Editor, Page Friday:
I  would  like  to refer  to
K. H. Christie's article
_ "Peril Yellow not Yankee"
in last Thursday's paper. I
not only agree with his
view, but would like to develop it further.
I feel sorry for all of you,
whose minds are so biased
and views so shortsighted.
You can think of the events
in Viet Nam only in terms
of U.S. imperialist aggression.
It is difficult to see how
a giant such as the U.S.,
which dominates and influences large areas and most
markets all over the world,
can be pursuing economic
interests in such a poor
jungle country.
Are imperialistic interests
much more than economic
interests? How can you
think of the Yankees being
imperialistically involved
Has SFA found the truth
ALEX BANDY. SFA debater:
In reply to your open letter to the UBC
debating union, we can not agree to your
objections to the "debating ethic."
Stated briefly, "the debating ethic" accepts
the basic premise that all points of view on a
particular issue should be aired. Further, if
the group within which the issue is being
discussed can provide no dissenters, then an
advocate should state the opposing case as
honestly as his personal persuasion allows
him.
You rhetorically ask in your letter whether
debating is "to toe oratory or service." I
would suggest that these two words do not
express alternatives but, rather, are compatible. Allowing the house to consider a
balanced argument and form a conclusion
therefrom is to provide more of a service
than will ibe achieved through the haranguing of a zealot.
The university community is the ideal
ground for the rational consideration of conflicting views. If the conflict is not naturally
present it should be injected. One who feels
that when his homogenous group reaches
unanimity the truth has been found should
toe shocked from his complacent conceit.
It is these talents of advocacy that a formal
debate tests. No one suggests that to espouse
a point of view in a debate is to "stand up
and be counted." On the contrary, it is to
force the consideration of issues on their
rational merits.
Unanimity is never constructive. It is the
potential end of every discussion but unless
coupled with truth it is a hollow conclusion.
If Truth has been found at Simon Fraser
Academy, then you are justified in your
stand and Diogenes would have envied you.
We are not, however, convinced of this
and would be willing to take this debate to
an open forum at your pleasure:
"Resolved that to espouse a point of view
without sincerity is to serve society."
We of the UBC Debating Union shall, of
course, be willing to debate either side.
BRIAN WALLACE
President
UBC Debating Union
•    •
or are they chicken?
pf 2wo
By DAVE CURSONS
Simon Fraser Academy once again was
absent from the annual McGoun Cup debating competition.
Their reply to an invitation from UBC's
debating union, published in The Ubyssey,
gives some vague indication of why SFA
declined to participate.
A careful and serious study of the weighty
but somewhat shallow reply yields a single
word of description for the academy's attitude: CHICKEN!
McGoun Cup rules require that each team
divide itself into negative and affirmative
halves on any resolution.
Under this procedure team members often
find themselves in the uncomfortable position of devil's advocate or at least of expressing views with which they themselves do
not agree.
This, of course, is the fun of formal debating.
The youngsters at SFA simply can't
stomach the traditional basis upon which
formal debating is founded.
They apparently have the impression that
the debating rostrum is a place from which
one spews forth personal opinions on arguments of their own choosing. This in itself
would be well-nigh impossible for SFA considering the academy's apparent lack of conviction about anything other than their own
high morality — or perhaps innocence is a
better word.
Barely three years in existence but already
steeped in understanding they presume to
bemoan what they call "hypocrisy" and
"stoning of the truth" by our debators whom
they see approaching the rostrum with
"heavy hearts" to choke out lies to their
audiences.
In view of the language of their reply it
seems unlikely that SFU will be prepared to
engage in any form of advanced competition
for some time to come. They have some
growing up to do first.
At any, rate, the province's two senior
institutes, UBC and University of Victoria
competed last week. The winner, UBC, will
represent B.C. at the McGoun Cup finals in
January.
down there? The money
they have been losing could
not be gained from that
country in the next five hundred years, anyway. Or do
you think the Yankees are
interested in expanding
South Vietnamese territory?
Mr. Christie has brought
up another essential point:
whom are the Americans
fighting and dealing with in
Viet Nam? There is a fundamental difference in negotiating with a Western democratic country and with a
dictatorship.
It is a regime whose policy
is far from the interests,
feelings and convictions of
the majority of its people;
a regime where there are no
free elections, no public protests, no letters to the editors and no soap-boxes. The
free one-way-choice is closely guarded by the strong,
despotic position and brutal
actions  of state police.
Furthermore, whom are
the imperialists really dealing with? The handful of
names who are presently
on top can be changed overnight. Everything can be
easily blamed on those men
who have just been overthrown.
The tragedy of this war is
that the men bleeding and
dying on the battlefields,
from north and south, are
innocent.
The pathetic truth is that
the bad guys coming from
the north are either forced
to fight against their convictions, or if their convictions
are in accordance with their
actions, are simply not responsible for them. Could
you blame someone, who has
lived all his life on the
plains, and has never seen
or heard of mountains, for
liking the plains only?
Some people might think
I am exaggerating the hardness and restrictions of communist regimes. I have lived
myself long enough (20
years) in one of them and
have seen and learned how
such a system works. And I
have also travelled in all
East European countries, including Russia. The facts
talk. Not numbers, looks
and neat ideas.
There is one class of communists which we call in
Europe the Salon Communists. These are certain intellectuals who theorize about
communism, but do not live
under it.
They try to draw public
attention and popularity by
means of their progressive
ideas on "how to alter Western Society" while sitting in
all the comfort and making
use of all the advantages of
it. There are some of these
among us.
Bft* C J*
arte 3
Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 18, .1966 JAW_M(UW_fMMA{ •
■• -y" \0< 'V ^
C*    •*1J>WW'M ^'W™*'*
V****%     *\    -^   H
<*#r ^^^-i^-o *&,mm
Symphony
thrills critic
Quintet minus one scores
Yesterday, the John Handy "Quintet"
played in Brock.
I say "quintet" because there were only
four musicians.
It is difficult for a quintet, in which
each member is equally important, to retain
the close-knit unity required of such a group
when one member is missing and one other
is new to the group. The Handy group was
able to overcome this, and still present two
hours of good jazz.
The missing member was Mike White,
the violinist. It seems that there was a falling out in the group and rumor has it that
there will be a new violinist.
Sonny Greenwich, the new member, is a
guitarist from Toronto.    Unfortunately, he
was not overly familiar with the times.
Despite these obstacles, the John Handy
Quintet Minus One put on a spectacular display of musical integrity and ability.
High point of the afternoon was Spanish
Lady. An original composition by Handy,
its fiery exuberance was highlighted by the
brilliant technique of former Vancouver
drummer, Terry Clarke.
While most of the program consisted of
gentle, slightly Latin influenced arrangements, Spanish Lady and Both-And retained much of the characteristics of the
early Handy compositions and offered an
exciting change of pace.
For those of you who want to see more
of the John Handy Quintet he is playing
at The Shanghai Junk on Main.
By JUDY HIRT
The symphony concert at
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre
Monday offered music for
the intellect (Mozart), the
heart <Beethoven) and the
passions (Shostakovich).
Masonic Funeral Music
K. 477 by Mozart was the
opening work of the concert.
In this music Mozart is said
to be "more convincingly
religious than in virtually
all his church music."
Although they played sensitively, the musicians failed
to bring out this deeply religious quality.
The second work, Beethoven's Concerto in D
Major, Opus 61, for Violin
and Orchestra, was more
successfully  interpreted.
The first movement Allegro ma non troppo had
strength and often tragic
beauty, the second Larghet-
to was calm and serene, the
third Rondo was filled with
a feeling of "joie de vivre".
The guest soloist, Oscar
Shumsky, played with both
sensitivity and skill. He
handled the difficult cadenzas masterfully though
not without some obvious
terminal errors. The major
defect was the poor co-ordination of orchestra members with the rest of the
orchestra and with Shumsky.
Poor co-ordination was
also  a   shortcoming   in   the
Mime Troupe kicks collective behinds
By ELAINE POPOFF
A minstrel show usually
brings to mind jokes, songs,
banjos, and whites with
blackened faces or Negroes.
Superficially, the San
Francisco Mime Troupe's
performance last Thursday
followed this pattern, but
the underlying purpose of
the show was certainly not
to provide lighthearted entertainment. As musician
Bill Freese pointed out, 'this
is not only a civil rights
commentary, but also is an
attempt to provoke thought
and to spur action . . . we,
in our little way, are trying to be teachers . . . '
The San Francisco Mime
Troupe, in its presentation
of this minstrel show, certainly succeeded, though in
varying proportions, to disrupt the stagnation of the
mind in present day society,
a stagnation concerning
critical problems facing that
same society.
Writer and tour director
Peter Cohen comments: "The
Mime Troupe's a mirror
which you're not allowed
to look away from." The
difficulty lies in sustaining
and evolving a permanent
change of attitude. Once the
mirror is taken away, the
audience finds it much too
easy to slip back into a
state of oblivion concerning
anything outside its own
little world.
Friday,  November  18,   1966
But the troupe has hope
and states: "We know, we
fear, and we rage on."
Th^ minstrel show hits
the hypocricies and prejudices, the integration prob-
Elaine Popoff is a first
year education student. This
article was her submission
for an English 100 assignment lo review the San
Francisco Mime Troupe.
lems and the pragmatism
of American society.
The troupe fights for realization of and insight into
these critical exigencies,
and does not spare middle-
class sensibility in its end-
deavour to reach the public. The members fight to
obtain some inkling of communication and understanding between the audience
and the other side of the
coin.
The Negro point of view
is exposed without prejudice, and without being
clothed in nice words. The
irony of the Negro soldier's
position in Viet Nam is
brought forth; the hypocrisy of the blackman-white-
woman relationsihp is clearly drawn. Canada too receives a kick in the behind
frSrWe©
by references to our treatment of the Indians.
The man in the street on
stage has not been refined
to please the audience, but
is shown completely in his
natural form.
He does not become a
phoney playing a part to
make the audience smile: he
is himself trying to arouse
an awareness in the audience.
The public does respond, in some way: it is
provoked into holding an
opinion, even if it is only
"obscene,    horribly    ob
scene . . ." Other reactions
are of indignation, scorn,
condescension or complete
rejection. Many simply cannot grasp the motives and
smile vaguely contributing
their opinion of "it was a
good show."
Some individuals are sufficiently aroused to boost
themselves out of their rut,
and to join in the hard
struggle for the understanding, the liberty, and the
equality of man. With these
individuals, the success of
the Mime Troupe is established.
CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
November 28 - 29, 1966
Special interest in these fields:
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
COMMERCE  AND   BUSINESS  ADMINISTRATION
GEOLOGY AND GEOPHYSICS
For appointments, contact
The  University Placement  Service Office
HUSKY OIL CANADA LTD.
HUSKY
orchestra's performance of
Symphony No. 5, Opus 47,
by Shostakovich. What
would have been breathtaking pauses were ruined
by the early entrance of
stray instruments.
The music itself is passionate. It evokes everything
from tears of amusement to
tears of anguish.
Vancouver's symphony orchestra well deserved the
standing ovation it received
for this performance.
b»H-
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THE    UBYSSEY
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Come alive, Jesus-
take a cross to lunch
By PETER LINCOLN
The decision made in
Rome on birth control will
be basically either to condemn or condone sex.
The Church, referring to
any and all established religions, seems to be getting
more and more coverage in
the news. At the same time
it seems to be losing any
popularity it may have had
as a useful structure in the
same proportion.
Just recently a wave of
indignation went up when
the Beatles stated they were
more popular than Christ.
Some enthusiastic followers
went as far as to say they
sang better as well.
The point is that the
Church is in the public eye
through a conscious effort
of its own to win back popularity.
The front pages are con-
tinually covered with
articles on topics such as
modern garb for nuns, the
proposed repeal of chastity
vows for priests, or meat
on Friday. And of course
who hasn't heard Dominique.
The Roman Catholic
Church is not the only one
attracting attention. Protestant ministers and Jewish
rabbis receive airplay by
stating they are atheists and
that God is dead; Buddhists
burn themselves.
Furthermore the various
churches unite every little
while in things such as Community Week: "Take somebody to the church of your
choice."
Yet desp'ite the headlines
and the effort, the church
is still failing.
Why? Because it lacks one
of the most modem necessities of any modern business,
a good public relations man.
But it won't be this way
for long I'm sure. Just picture   that   first   memorable
brainstorming   session.
J.P. walks into the office; all the men stand up
quickly.
J.P. addresses them.
"Well, men let's get the ball
rolling; put out a few sails
and see which way the wind
blows."  '
All the men in unison:
"Yes, J.P."
"Boys, I've given this a lot
of thought. I'll pitch out
some balls and you call
them."
"Yes, J.P."
"First I think the name
God, has got to go."
"Got to go, J.P."
"Bad name, J.P."
"My exact sentiments,
J.P."
"I've been thinking it
over. How about changing
it to Big Uncle Bob. What
do you think?"
"Strike, J.P."
"Right up the middle,
J.P."
"You caught him looking,
J.P."
When all the fuss is looked
at with a critical eye—mine
—it seems that the Church
is lost.
It is an institution that
was founded on faith, and it
doesn't seem to have a place
in the modern world.
The modern world is a
world of extremes where
logic and absurdity stand
side by side, where Einstein
and Genet share equal
praise and damnation, where
E equals mc2 and who cares
anyway.
It seems the Church has
been caught leaving its proverbial fly open on purpose
and having nothing to show
for it.
It'll keep the people looking for a while, but their
hopes will soon fade away
when they realize there's
nothing there.
My advice to the Church
is simple: If you're going to
go no matter what, pull your
zipper back up, smile wickedly and let them guess.
Is it or isn't?
Only her God knows for
sure.
The late God in his prime
Hoo hah! it's SuperLBJ
By JUDY BING
Old Superman fans will
welcome a contemporary version of their hero on the pages
of The Great Society Comic
Book.
He is Super LBJ trailing a
Judy Bing reviews the
Great Society comic book by
D. J. Arneson and Tony Tal-
larico, published by Parallax
Comic Books, Inc., $1.00 at
Duthie's.
Page 10
red-white-and-iblue jet stream
as he soars over the great
society.
At the moment "when the
greatest imaginable disaster
faces them," the great society
learns that Super LBJ is missing.  Bobman and Teddy are
pf 4our
THE     UBYSSEY
planning to take over the
great society. ("Mah word! Is
it true?" says Wonderbird.)
The Shadower (Humphrey),
Captain Marvelous (McNamara) the Phantasm (Rusk) and
Wonderbird disperse to find
their super leader.
As he rides off on his brown
mare, Rusk says "Ride, pure
white stallion! I'm the Phantasm, the secret master of the
international jungles. I must
be secret . . . nobody seems
to have heard of me."
They encounter various
supervillians such as Gaulle-
finger, Nyetman, Whiteman
and Businessman.
Wonderbird does battle with
Chefman and his henchmen
who threaten to "undahmine
the great society with theah
horrid fluffy omelets all."
We also meet Colonel America (Barry Goldwater) who
flies an aeroplane without a
left wing.
We see Bobman anti-Teddy
in their Bobcave in New York
where Bobman is doing some
homework. "Let's see, four and
four makes eight ..."
Super LBJ, of course,^ is
finally found and all threats
to his followers are averted.
As satire, the book is uninspired and too transparent
to be clever. It appears to toe
the work of the same liberals
who probably voted for Johnson in the first place.
However it reflects not inaccurately iboth the complete
lack of doubt most Americans
have in the omnipotence of
their leaders, and the political
naivete which convinces Americans that international politics is the battle of the oversimplified moral forces of
good and evil.
The second Great Society
comic book is coming soon.
Don't hold your breath.
Friday, November 18,  1966 r5^''?5^n   '
f s JW+Attff *      £ £***
*■*?*"%$,    "   "*■"
A stone is not a rock
By IAN WALLACfe
The curator of the Fine
Arts Gallery, Alvin Balkind, has brought to the
university some of the most
thought-provoking and socially relevant exhibitions in
the city, and the present
exhibition, Roots of Japanese Architecture, is no exception.
One of the crucial topics
of discussion involving social
scientists, artists, architects
and governments is the need
for a new order in city
planning and living space.
This is a topic relevant to
us all, for the quality of our
environment profoundly affects the quality of our
minds and if there is anything that we need be concerned about it is our peace
of mind.
In North America the
problem is particularly bad
because we have used the
automobile as an escape
from our homes and cities
instead of cultivating a
meaningful living space
wherein we can both work
and relax.
The Japanese architecture
in the exhibition is all based
upon the home, the unit of
space in which a man carries on a biological osmosis
between labour, requiring
functional space, and thought,
requiring creative space,
between the house as a
body or container and the
boundless area of the outside world.
The creation of an environment which is in harmony
with its interplay of op-
posites was not arrived at
through statistical analysis
but rather through a profound understanding of the
meaning of life itself and
the order that man establishes between himself and
the cosmic forces.
A stone is not just a convenient building material;
it is silent dignity.
A tree not only casts
shade; it is a clock of the
seasons.
The tradition of Japanese
architecture is founded upon the qualities of materials,
space, and time. A room
opening onto a garden immediately sets up an interplay   between   the   geomet
rical order of functional
space and the random, infinitely extendable natural
space. Here, the Japanese
architect, together with the
gardener, will purposely
create an anagogical relationship between the inner
and outer by focusing the
attention upon a single
stone placed amidst a carefully gravelled court.
This acts as a stimulus to
meditation, poetry, and
peace of mind and heart.
North Americans who
still have the pioneer spirit
of invading and vanquishing nature might solve the
problems of the resulting
human jungle by learning a
lesson from the Tao.
For the philosophers of
the East incongruity is not
an evil—it is the essence of
life—it is male and female
—it is the harmony of op-
posites.
I Dive
OPPORTUNITIES
SCIENTIFIC
RESEARCH
(Laboratory and  Field  Programs)
CANADA
for graduates in
The Government of Canada offers careers
in pure and applied research, development and instrumentation to capable
science graduates. Opportunities are available to graduates at all degree levels,
and in almost all fields of science. In the
biological sciences, for example, there are
openings for specialists in any of the areas
listed below.
Research scientists from Government Departments will hold interviews on your
campus
NOVEMBER 21, 22 and 23, 1966
They will be familiar with the entire range
of openings for scientists. If you are interested, make an appointment to see
them. You can get full details from
MR. J. CAMERON CRAIK
at the University Placement Office
• AGRICULTURE • FORESTRY • BIOLOGY • BACTERIOLOGY  • BOTANY • ENTOMOLGY
• MICROBIOLOGY • PHARMACOLOGY • PHYSIOLOGY • VETERINARIAN  SERVICE
• CHEMISTRY ^BIOCHEMISTRY • FOOD CHEMISTRY • ORGANIC CHEMISTRY
• PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY • WILDLIFE • ZOOLOGY
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the University to discuss Summer Employment
at Thompson, Manitoba with 1st, 2nd and 3rd year students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
COMMERCE
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held
with Geology and Geophysics students in 1st, 2nd,
3rd, 4th and post-graduate years.
On November 23, 24 and 25
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
COPPER CUFF, ONTARIO
THOMPSON, MANITOBA
Employment Opportunities
(Regular and  Summer)
are available  in
GEOPHYSICS
with
Pan American Petroleum Corporation
(Calgary)
Interviews will  be held
Tuesday and Wednesday, November 22 and 23, 1966
with
Postgraduates, Graduates and  Undergraduates
GEOPHYSICS
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
HONORS PHYSICS
HONORS MATH
HONORS GEOLOGY
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Company
(Indiana) Organization is an expanding major oil and
gas exploration and producing company offering excellent salaries, benefits and opportunities for advancement.
Company and position information is available at your
Student Placement Office. Register there now and learn
how you can be part of Pan American's future.
Friday,  November  18,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11 We Need Foresters
Our woods divisions are rapidly expanding and we
require energetic foresters to assist in Northern and
Interior operations. If you are interested in assuming
individual responsibility and accepting professional
challenges, make an appointment now to see our
representatives who will be on campus November
24 and 25.
e.
OLUMBIA
Q.
ELLULOSE
1111 WEST HASTINGS STREET, VANCOUVER 1, B.C.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos  Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
Ideal for Christmas
Oil Painted
Portrait
on canvas or velvet from
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portrait artist.
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224-5527
3641   W.   29th   Ave.
CAREERS IN MANPOWER
INTERESTING
• CHALLENGING
• REWARDING
The new Department of Manpower and Immigration's
job is to help people find, learn and keep the most
productive jobs of which they are capable, and to
help employers meet their manpower needs and thus
improve production and efficiency.
Interviews are now being conducted on the Campus. For
appointments up to and including November 25, and tor
further  information  contact  the  Placement  Office.
DEPARTMENT OF MANPOWER AND IMMIGRATION
^ZT Frederic Wood Theatre
THE MOST EXCITING PLAY EVER SEEN ON CAMPUS
The Persecution and Assassination
of Marat as Performed by the Inmates
of the Asylum at Charenton Under
the Direction of the Marquis de Sade
By  Peter Weiss
Directed by John Brockington
November 18—26,-8:30 p.m.
Special Student Performances: Monday, Nov. 21  — 7.30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 24, 12:30 p.m.
Student Tickets are Available for All Performances.
Due to the elaborate production student tickets for this play only will be $1.00
BOX OFFICE: RM. 207 FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
There has been a tremendous advance interest in   this play. You are advised to get your tickets early.
Seminar system
requires honesty
By DOROTHY GORDON
The new plan which has
been under discussion toy the
Faculty of Arts which will
lead  to  courses  of seminar
Dorothy Gordon was editor
of The Ubyssey circa 1940.
She now lives in West Vancouver.
in  the  present
may very well
discussion in the humanities
is of particular interest to
me.
I have always thought that
the introduction of discussion and participation methods at the University of
British Columbia would be
for celebration.
However,
situation, it
be the exact opposite
I have participated continually in this type of discussion-education for adults
during the past eighteen
years, much of the time as a
discussion leader.
• •      •
Seminar-type    discussions
at their best can ibe a flowering of true pursuit of scholarship and love of knowledge.
The student can very personally and intimately come
to grips with the original
writing of great thinkers.
Because he is preparing to
discuss them with his peers,
his concentration is deeper
and his analytical power is
fully committed. He has to
crystallize his thoughts in
order to present them to an
equally prepared group.
For him there is no snoozing at a warm two-thirty lecture on the south side of the
building while the buzz of a
fly blends with the drone of
an under-stimulated pedagogue.
• •      •
This great and wonderful
thing can happen, it does
happen, but it is by no means
the whole story. But the pitfalls that 'beset a student
seminar are deep and full of
jagged rocks.
They are two kinds, the
inherent ones resulting from
a lack of the standard structure of formal lectures and
examinations, against which
the student measures himself
at regular intervals; and resulting from the inescapable
fact that even the young are
lazy and rarely initiate mental exercise.
The most obvious difficulty
is time. To cover the vast
quantity of the world's wisdom in seven months a year
for four years, is enough itself to defeat the process.
The second obvious one is
the personality of the seminar director. Th e drone-
teacher becomes the drone
discussion leader with less
outside discipline and more
opportunity  to   waste   time.
fif 6ix
Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Even worse is the strong
minded director who insists
on telling everyone what to
think or where they are
"wrong" or who centres discussion continually on his
own pet enthusiasm.
I visualize the best possible
plan as one of normal lectures followed toy a very informally structured discussion with only the time and
place, length and subject
terms of reference, laid down
by rules.
With very little training in
discussion etiquette the subject can free-wheel intellectually when the director holds
a light rein and insists only
on. scholastic honesty.
The second major difficulty
is inherent in students themselves. In a group of twenty
students, ten will be so timid,
they won't have the confidence to present their ideas
or the inherent skill to abstract their ideas and present
them in an intelligible form.
Many of them toelieve that
the discussion leader knows
more than they do and sincerely want only to listen
and memorize.
The more determined thinkers will express themselves
by telling long tales of their
own experiences. Some of
these will reach the conclusion of twenty-four sentences
without remembering what
they started out to prove.
• •      •
Demonstration of a point
by personal experience isn't
always bad.
One of the most interesting
points of view I ever heard
came from a girl who exploded violently over a Socrates dissertation: "Socrates
is really a lazy old bum, just
like my father, always mumbling around with his cronies, talking, talking, talking,
never giving a moment's
thought to the fact that his
wife didn't have enough
food to cook with and his
children were dressed by the
church rummage sale." A
rare and fine commentary
on great thinkers.
Lastly, of the twenty members, at least one, perhaps as
many as three, will make the
seminar method useless.
They are convinced, flaming,
political activists who know
all the answers and have
memorized fifteen hundred
cliches in support of their
crusade for their own version of utopia.
• •      •
They have absolutely no
self-doubt. They are the only
true students; they are the
concerned, the committed,
the modern prophets and will
dedicate themselves to spout
the only true wisdom as long
as they have an audience.
Seminar study, like ideals
without form and method to
support them, needs dedication and wisdom to achieve
even moderate success.
Seminar study requires the
strictest intellectual honesty.
Friday,  November  18,   1966 Suicide reaction
Reprinted from the British anarchist weekly Freedom,
Sept. 24, 1966.
Early in August, Professor Hsiu of Peking was condemned by the Young Guards of Peking as a reactionary
and ordered, in penance, to draw two loads of dung through
the streets to the University.
Professor Hsiu did not comply, and committed suicide.
In his last note, now circulating among Chinese students,
he stated: "At the age of 80 I do not fear death and cannot
be coerced. I cannot fight back, as I know, and my only
way is by immolation. If I do so, it is not because I despise
the honorable and worthy task of the dung-carrier.
"It is because those now in power wish to degrade the
dung-carrier that they choose his work as a symbol of
degradation. But I have carried my little load of dung
daily through the lecture halls, ever since I thought it was
possible to work in the New China for the people's cause.
"The academic life is a degradation that they might
impose upon the rebellious dung-carrier.
"If I were young again I would fight back. Or if
necessary I would take on the task of the dung-carrier.
"But where there is no freedom there is no academic
life and the professor is as they truly suggest a carrier
of intellectual dung."
Professor Hsiu was one of the first to translate Kro-
potkin into Chinese. He belonged to the group of professors who, although associated with the older anarchist
movement, continued their careers in Communist China.
This attitude has been condemned by the Chinese
anarchist movement generally. (The Chinese Government
recognizes a distinction between 'philosophic' and 'criminal',
i.e. revolutionary, anarchists.)
In his death, however, and refusal to compromise
further, Professor Hsiu would seem to have recognized
his old comrades.
Internationalist
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
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A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers and
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What ever your need in footwear you'll find it at
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DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833
Invites you to consider an executive career in retail merchandising.
Our Training Programme offers a challenging and thorough framework
in which you can make rapid advancement tuned to your personal drive
and ability.
A career with "The Bay" can lead you to any of the major cities
between Victoria and Montreal. As a merchandise executive you could
be sent on buying trips to  markets in  North  America, Europe and  Asia.
Retail Merchandising will enable you to use your abilities to manage
people, to judge demands of customers, to administer the operations
of a department, to be creative and imaginative; it will challenge
your initiative  and  drive  in  the  ever changing  world  of  retailers.
Graduates in Commerce, Business
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Cor   our   Training   Programme   of:
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e 2 year course in merchandising which supplements on-the-job training.
e Training under an experienced Department Manager in Sales Management,  Buying and  Department  Administration.
Make an appointment now with your Placement Officer to see our
Representatives for full derails or come in and see us in the store. Our
Personnel Office is located on the Sth floor.
Interviews will be
conducted on Campus
Monday and Tuesday, Nov. 21 and 22
^utiscrnlsXa^iljompana,
MCOeHMATiO !••■»* MIO
Friday, November 18,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13 *«"#»-.
Canadian films
By LANNY BECKMAN
Larry Kent's second feature length film, Sweet Substitute subtly retitled Caressed by his American distributor, will be shown in Vancouver at the Lyric Theatre
from Nov. 23 to Nov. 30.
The film had a successful
run at UBC two years ago,
but this is the first time it
will be shown commercially
in Canada.
The lack of support Canadians give to their indigenous film industry is truly
abominable. For example,
Don Barnes, manager of the
Varsity Theatre, refused to
show Sweet Substitute because he said it wasn't "artistic" enough.
This was after such prestigious papers as the New
York Times   and   the   Man-
llHiti
Chester Guardian gave the
film highly favorable reviews during its successful
runs at the New York film
festival and the London film
festival,   respectively.
The Guardian said of the
film: "Unusual impact — its
subject high school sex . . .
as convincing as it is erotic."
And it is highly erotic.
The Times said, "Mr. Kent
is a man to watch." Unless,
of course, you happen to be
Canadian.
Americans at 60 theatres
have watched to the tune of
about $200,000 whereas
only a handful of Canadians
have ever seen the film.
Countries such as Sweden
and Argentina, amongst
many others, demand that
nationally produced films be
granted wide distribution
within their countries. In
Canada, however, unless a
film bears the stamp of the
National Film Board, almost
no one gets to see it.
As a matter of fact, Kent's
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This weekend don't be left out . . . join the "in crowd"
Dance to Terry and The Viscounts
featuring the dynamic Bud Currie
Friday and  Saturday  Night at the
EMBASSY    BALLROOM
1024   Davie
Dancing   from   10:00   until   1:00   a.m.
'The   Place   With   the   Dancing   Lights"
Admission   only   $1.50
THE PRINT CENTRE
2760 W. Broadway      —      Vancouver      —      RE 8-1421
" David Silverberg Exhibition"
(GRAPHIC   PROFESSOR MT.  ALLISON  UNIVERSITY)
Coloured Engravings - Nov. 22 - Dec. 3
Page  14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  18,   1966 -,  **."■  >  GnAk % V
smmmm.'i.
taw.   *_J»#N \ A
snubbed
next film, his fourth, will
portray auto biographically
the financial barriers and
moral discouragements
which greet the independent
Canadian film maker — a
poor man's &/z.
At the Montreal film festival this past summer, six
feature length Canadian
films, one of which was
Kent's When Tomorrow
Dies, were selected to compete, with $2,000 to go to
the winner.
The judges, however, decided that none of the six
was meritorious enough to
be awarded the prize.
This is the sort of subtle
kick in the teeth that Canadians are constantly faced
with. Surely if the six films
were considered worthy to
participate in the festival,
one of them should have
been awarded the prize even
if it was merely given as a
sign of formal and moral
encouragement.
So much for diatribe.
Sweet Substitute (Caressed) is a film worth seeing,
p a .t r o nizing considerations
aside. It deals with an interesting and generally ignored
subject in a fresh, frank and
sympathetic manner.
So far the $200,000 receipts, mentioned above,
have been absorbed in costs;
Kent has received nothing
yet. He hopes to make
enough on the presentation
of the movie at the Lyric
Theatre to enable him to
make a start on his next
film beginning in May.
Seeing the film will be
one good way of supporting
Canadian art, non-existant
as it almost is.
Sweet Substitute was shot
entirely in Vancouver with
a largely UBC student cast,
so even if you don't enjoy
the film you might see a
familiar landscape or a
friend or two which will
make the experience worthwhile.
Wishful thinkers
call U.S. altruistic
Editor, Page Friday:
I am almost in tears after reading Bertrand Russell's
article in the Ubyssey of Nov. 10. Yes, I believe what he
says, and yes, my politics are left of centre, as I admit
for the benefit of those who would immediately accuse
me of being a pinko. But must one be a socialist to be a
humanist?
Why is it that people, especially thinking students,
cannot understand the real motives of the U.S. in Viet Nam?
What kind of contorted right-wing idealist is it today
who actually believes that Johnson's motives are altruistic,
that he and his military supporters are seeking freedom,
self-determination, and peace for all? For these people
are surely the wishful thinkers of today.
All one has to do is analyze the economy of America
to find the whole basis for its foreign policy. It is industrial, needing great amounts of raw material, much of it
available only in certain countries abroad. It is capitalistic,
and must invest tremendous sums abroad, then protect its
interests. It is militaristic; the arms production industry
is an incalculably huge source of revenue to industrial
monopolies.
The idea of Chinese aggression in Asia is completely
irrelevant: Forget the Chinese who may be exploiting
and look at the Americans who are exploiting.
Every student should read Bertrand Russell's article,
not as an indoctrinational blurb, but a source of information. For if we cannot believe this man—a highly educated,
clear-thinking philosopher, with no reason to promote
doctrinal calumny, who is to be believed at all?
I don't necessarily want to be left—I only want to be right.
MARGARET NELSON. Arts I
Pros
By  NELSON  MILLER
The Professional — an
adventure film about
four hardy men who
rescue a maiden:
1. Their artillery: pistols,
rifles, bow and arrow,
bow and arrow with
dynamite and of
course  just   dynamite.
2. Their opponents: 150
Mexican bandits full
of smiling danger.
3. The setting: the desert
— beautiful tableaux
and difficult terrain.
4. The action: build-up of
suspense which explodes into violence
that happens in quick,
sequential      moves.
5. Characterization: well
defined types; no time
wasted on psychological motivation.
Message: Love conquers
all.
Medium: Western hero
myth — strong, silent,
resourceful men of
action.
Capsule: Little dialogue;
lots of adventure.
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presenting
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Dancing 9 to  3   Every
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HAROLD
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVAHD
1IVERSITY HILL                        ST. ANSELMS'
(United)                                    (Anglican)
a.m. Combined B.C. Centennial Thanksgiving
Service
at University Hill United Church
Speaker: Rev. Dr. R. W. Henderson
Ample Parking
821   RIVER RD.,  RICHMOND
Special  Student rate with
AMS  Cards Friday
Reservations,  CR  8-2624
D.m.    TALK BACK    St. Anselm's
"Will turn on . . . Tune in" Robert Tazi
MacKAY                                           JIM McKIBBON
■
CAREERS IN RESEARCH          -.
DEVELOPMENT, AND             fl|
INSTRUMENTATION
for graduates in
PHYSICAL AND
INORGANIC
CHEMISTRY
MATHEMATICS
PHYSICS
GEOPHYSICS
GEOLOGY
MINING
METALLURGY
MINERALOGY
OCEANOGRAPHY
ELECTRONICS
ASTRONOMY
PHYSICAL
GEOGRAPHY
Department?  of  the   Federal   Government
carry out some of Canada's most extensive
research  programs. These programs need
science graduates capable of  performing
high quality pure or applied research, development, or  instrumentation.  Graduates
are   required   at   all   degree   levels;   and,
because the work  covers  most  branches
of   science,   opportunities  exist   in   almost
all  specialties.  In  the  physical and  earth
sciences, for example, there are openings
for graduates  in the areas listed at left.
Research scientists representing a number
of government departments will hold interviews on your campus on
NOVEMBER 21, 22 and 23, 1966
They will  be acquainted with  the whole
range of openings for science graduates.
If your career  interests  are   in  research,
development, or instrumentation, they will
be pleased to discuss these opportunities
with you.
An interview appointment can be arranged
by contacting.
MR. J. CAMERON CRAIK
at your University Placement Office.
CAN
OCTOGENERIANS
MAKE  WITH  THE  SIXTIES?
You bet your sweet young life they can. Take
Grassies downtown on Seymour. Right now in
swinging sixty-six Grassies are celebrating their
eightieth birthday. And they're as young as
ever. They have to be. Catering for youth demands a youthful approach. Grassies have it.
All the way — from jewellery to time-pieces,
cufflinks to earrings, bracelets to brooches to
necklaces and   all  things   rare  and   beautiful.
Because Grassies emphasise 'style.' Prefer the
"way out" to what's "in." They approve and
applaude today's young set. Like what they see.
So will you. When you step into Grassies —
jewellers extraordinaire!
566 SEYMOUR . . . 685-2271
E
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Friday, November 18,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
CUISINE AT ITS BEST?
MODERN CAFE
Bavarian Room   -:-  3005 W. Broadway   -:-   RE 6-9012
Page 15 '"sc^sy^F m *"" *p5",v *
Masses   not   asses
By GABOR MATE
Jean-Guy Allard and Serge Khamouff are
two young Quebecois who have proven that
they have the courage of their convictions:
they have both faced conviction several
times in the courts of Quebec. On one occasion Khamouff was beaten in jail by Montreal police with the result that his vision in
one eye has been permanently injured. His
crime was the selling of a legal political
newspaper on a Montreal street.
Now, a man can be ready to face arrest
and brutality and still foe wrong in his political opinions, tout he will probably be serious
about them. It is essential, therefore, that
we seek to understand these opinions —
especially since many people in Quebec may
be coming to share these opinions in the
future. Khamouff is secretary general of a
young political club which began five weeks
ago with seven members: they now number
over three hundred.
To understand their opinions is not necessarily to agree with them, but without understanding no intelligent and meaningful dialogue is possible. Allard and Khamouff are
Marxists and socialists. As Marxists, they
share the Marxist analysis of society and its
problems, and as socialists they seek a socialist solution to these problems.
"There are two economic classes in Quebec," says Allard, "the bourgeoisie and the
proletariat. The bourgeoise, a small minority,
proletariat. The bourgeoisie, a small minority,
means of production, that is to say the natural resources and the industries of Quebec.
"The proletariat includes the workers, the
farmers, the intellectuals, the civil servants
—in fact all those who have no control or
share in the means of production." Thus the
proletariat, by Allard's definition, includes
the vast majority of people of Quebec.
"The Quebec bourgeoisie," continues Allard, "is extremely small. In fact most of
the industry of Quebec is in American hands,
and the rest in the hands of English Cana
dians. What we want is that Quebec should
possess and control her own economy, so that
its benefits would not go outside the province, but to the people of Quebec."
According to Allard and Khamouff, only
a socialist system in Quebec can ensure that
the people of Quebec actually do control
their own economy. We feel that all large industries, utilities, and resources should toe
nationalized."
How is this state ownership to be achieved
' *iWl?^&%F*!9 '-SA
?"W4*,"i3S/ "
and administered? Through the dictatorship
of the proletariat, say Allard and Khamouff.
"The word dictatorship scares many people,"
says Khamouff. "But these people do not
realize that we do not mean a dictatorship
in the nazi,, fascist, or Stalinist sense. As we
see it, the existing system is also a dictatorship — a dictatorship by an extremely small
and largely foreign minority.
The bourgeois dictatorship has the trappings of democracy, but in effect the masses
are merely manipulated by sham institutions
and  the  bourgeois  controlled news-media.
"We have no desire to eliminate anyone
as people — if there is violence, it will result
from the bourgeoisie using violence to keep
the proletariat from gaining power. If there
is police brutality in Quebec today, it is because the bourgeoisie have already begun to
use naked violence because they feel threatened by our ideas."
Khamouff and Allard feel that Quebec
will have to separate from the rest of Canada
in order to achieve full independence. "We
do not believe that Quebec can gain control
of her destiny while it is tied to an exploitative political union.
"We believe that Quebec is a nation, larger
than many nations in the world, and that
she deserves complete self-determination.
Most people in Quebec agree that separation
will come sooner or later — the essential
debate is over what form independence will
take."
ARTS and COMMERCE GRADUATES
For:
Production
MacMILLAN  BLOEDEL LIMITED
"Canada's largest integrated Forest Products Company"
Invites you to discuss Career Opportunities in our Wood
Products and Pulp and Paper Groups
Interviews will be held on campus November 28, 29, 30,
Dec. 1, 2
For information and appointments please see your
Student   Placement   Office
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
HIGH SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
1967 CANADIAN  UNION  OF
STUDENT NATIONAL SEMINAR
CO-ORDINATOR:
Applications are now being received for the Co-ordinator of the 1967 Canadian Union of Students National
Seminar to be co-hosted by the Universities of British
Columbia and Simon iFraser in August-September,
1967. Please state interest, experience, faculty and
year. Further inquiries and applications should be
directed to Miss Daphne Kelgard, Chairman, Canadian
Union of Students Committee, Box 153, Brock Hall.
STUDENT ADMINISTRATION
ADVISORY COMMITTEES:
Applications are now toeing received to select students
to sit on joint student-Administration advisory committees concerned with:
1. Food Services
2. Traffic and Parking
3. The Bookstore
4. Student Residences
Applications in writing stating interest, experience,
faculty and year should be submitted to the A.M.S.
Secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall.
FINANCE COMMITTEE:
Conference grant requests will now be accepted for
the spring term. "Grant Request" forms are available
from the accountant, Mrs. Hyslop, in the A.M.S.
office and are to be returned to the Treasurer, Box
53, Brock Hall.
Both Coca-Col- and Coke are registered trade marks which identity the product ol Coca-Cola Ltd.
Mmiftmtn ♦ > <
just lave
basketball
players.
And Ihey love Coca-Cola on every campus. Coca-Cola
has the taste you never get tired of...always
refreshing. That's why things go better with Coke
... after Coke... after Coke.
Page   16
THE     UBYSSEY
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola ltd.
WOMETCO (B.C.) LIMITED
Friday, November 18,  1966 21 years
the story of
Peter Van Dyke,
campus barber
By BONI LEE
Twenty-one years on campus and he's never
attended a lecture.
And, says campus barber Peter van Dyke
of his university career, "No one is perfect but
we split hairs trying."
Peter is the manager of the Alma Mater
Society barber shop in Brock extension.
He's been clipping and trimming there for
the last 21 years.
"But we're worried now," he said. "We need
more space."
Peter now has four barbering chairs in his
basement shop.
"We would like to expand to up to eight
chairs in the new student union building."
OPEN FOR BIDS
But Peter may not get even one chair in SUB.
The AMS is putting the SUB barber shop
lease up for open bid.
"I don't think it's right, but what should we
do about it?
"I don't want to make any comment on it,
really."
AMS president Peter Braund said all SUB
shops are going for open bid.
"It's the only fair way to do it. Students get
the best deal," he said.
"But Peter has an advantage over other
applicants," he said.
On a busy day, up to 100 customers will
come in.
REGULAR CUSTOMER
Professor William Ziegler is a regular
customer.
"You get more for your money. They're quite
helpful here, friendly and quiet," he said.
"The cut's all right," said J. S. Forsythe,
applied science.
Peter lathered Forsythe's hairline and sharpened a razor.
"The service is good — there's no long wait,"
Barry SSearle .engineering 1, commented as he
was neatly wrapped in a plastic bib.
George Parkolab, science 1, in for his first
time, said he would return.
"Since these people are catering to students,
they have a greater knowledge of what we like
—derrek webb photos
Peter Van Dyke, campus barber, uses the clippers on Bob Sloper, science 3.
and dislike and will do a better job," he said.
"Peter does a pretty good job," said theology
student Ken Kuhn.
Greatest demand is for men's cut and styling
but women's cuts are also offered.
Trims, shampoos, shaves, and even a clay
pack are available at the campus barber. On
occasion, the shop has even used hair -spray
and hair dye on men.
Manitoba-born Peter came to UBC from
downtown Vancouver in 1945. "I was investigating the UBC barbering business and the AMS
was casting about for a barber."
One early experience with the university
proved very embarrassing.
"This person came in and I thought he was
And an inch off the back for Lyn Tansey, arts 1.
the barber I had requested. After making 'quite
a few blusters' I asked, 'Aren't you a barber?'
The man said: 'I am Dr. Mackenzie, president
of the University','' said Peter.
While clipping Peter jokes with fellow barbers Aenar Jit, Eila Mannyvali and Bob Terris.
Finnish Eila is one of the few women barbers
in Canada.
The shop door is open and passing students
frequently hail Peter. Two girls dropped in to
request change and Peter amiably obliged.
On one wall are displayed such slogans as:
"How's business, you liar?" and
"If you're so smart,
Why ain't you rich?"
A Norris cartoon depicting a long-haired' lad
and his parents with caption reading: "Isn't
it nice — Our Harry wants to join the Voice of
Women", occupies a place of honor.
LONG-HAIRED MALES
Peter said he has had long-haired male customers.
"I don't know what prompts boys to do it,"
he commented. "But then when I was 16, I
might have done the same thing.''
On another wall a United Nations mural
hangs.
Peter believes our international problems
would foe more easily solved if we really supported the UN.
"If we were honest and sincere in the west,
we would have much more respect and we'd
have a reason to expect more respect," he said.
"The crux of the whole problem is that we
need to care more about other people," he said.
NOT CONCERNED
"Students in general are not so concerned
over reaching their goal. In the class the attitude
is, 'Who cares.?' "
"Teenagers today are just as confused as they
were 20 years ago but know what they're confused about."
"I blame the elders for the whole works."
Peter has one daughter in fourth year.
Looking ahead, Peter notes: "Popular demand
regulates what one does in a place like this."
"We're all planning to take advance courses
in barbering," he said. "One of our barbers is
studying now."
New beauty techniques for men-styling, waving and dyeing hair will be offered.
"We meet the demand," concluded Peter.
Friday, November 18,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  17 Page 18
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November  18,  1966
ECONOMIC STUDY
Prof hunts hunt game
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
Two UBC economists Thursday released the first major
study of a $2 million B.C. industry—big game hunting.
Dr. Peter Pearse and research assistant Gary Bowden carried out the research
under a grant from Resources
for the Future Inc., a private
American research corporation.
The study centred on big
game hunting in the East
Kootenays.
In a press conference at the
Faculty   Club   Thursday,   Dr.
Pearse said the hunting situation everywhere is notoriously
inefficient.
"The standards for the required hunting guides are slipshod and there is no incentive
Meeting set
for opt-out
OTTAWA (CUP) — Prime
Minister Pearson will meet
with government officials concerned with vocational education to discuss federal withdrawal from the field.
The meeting, agreed to at
the recent federal-provincial
fiscal conference here, will include discussion on definition
of such terms as adult and
senior matriculation.
Tentatively set for Nov. 23,
the meeting will also determine what items z>re included
in the university operating
costs, a spokesman for Pearson said.
PETER PEARSE
. . studies gamely
for these guides to develop
personal standards," Pearse
said.
He didn't estimate the value
of the industry although statistics reveal 15,000 big game
hunters spent more than $2
million in the East Kootenay
1964 hunting season.
Only 15 per cent goes back
to fish and game production.
"As an economist, I am interested in this dissipation of
public resources and economic
waste," he said.
Pearse also feels too much
money is spent in policing
hunters and not enough in
managing herds.
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Interviews will be held Thursday and Friday, November 24 and 25, 1966
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GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES IN
HONORS or ARTS GEOLOGY or
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Com pany (Indiana) Organization is an expanding major
oil and gas exploration and producing company offering excellent salaries, benefits and opportunities
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Company and position information is available at your Student Placement Office. Register there now
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Officers In The Canadian Forces Enjoy Challenging Jobs
With The Excitement Of Travel and Responsibility, and
There May Be A Place For You Among Them
UNDER GRADS
May Qualify For Subsidized
University Training — Including:
• Tuition Fully Paid
• Book Allowance
• $180 M. Salary
12   Mo.   Yr.   While   Attending   University
• Month  Paid  Holiday Annually
• Free Medical & Dental Care
• An Assured Future
UNIVERSITY GRADS
May Qualify For :
O   Immediate Commissions
• Excellent Pay
• An Assured Future in a Unique and
Interesting Profession
• Early Pension Benifits At Top Rales
Phone or Visit The
Canadian    Forces
Recruiting Center
547 Seymour St.
Vancouver
684-7341 Friday, November 18,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  19
—ol harvey photo
TABLES  WERE TURNED   when   engineers   dunked   fellow
redshirts in their infamous fishbowl Thursday. Splashers
were dunked because they weren't wearing red or they
hadn't bought a Slipstick, the EUS yearbook.
Coed freedom lies
three feet further
WASHINGTON, D.C. (PSP)
—Late leave rules and visitor
restrictions have been liberalized in many U.S. women's
residences, but with some
stings attached.
After a long battle to allow
men in the rooms, women at
Smith College can now entertain their male friends from
two to five on Sunday afternoons.
Doors have to be open six
inches ,and three feet must
be on the floor.
And   at   the  University   of
Georgia, administrators are
just now allowing women to
visit men's apartments.
The university does not consider one room an apartment,
however. Bathrooms don't
count as a room either — but
a kitchen  might.
Formerly girls had to sign
out personally for lates which
could extend to 1:30 a.m. on
weekdays and 2:15 on Saturdays.
Now a girl may call her
dormitory and request someone to sign her out
_.   . c£
when it comes to   .] f^
wool  knits, ifs hard
to beat a LION'S DEN
SWEATER - So why
try? -  T'-&£
Slip into this soft, '„{{,-■
sumptuous full-fashioned pullover styled
with mock turtleneck
and relax. Colors are
biege, black, pine
green and burgundy.
Sizes S, M,  L,  XL.
$25.00
THE
LION'S
DEN
771 Granville St.
MU 1-2934
Open Friday night* till 9
Loyola drops
CUS vote
for wording
MONTREAL (CUP) —Loyola College has scrapped its
proposed Nov. 18 vote on
membership in The Canadian
Union of Students until student's council rewords the
referendum.
The original wording offered Loyola students membership in CUS, membership in
l'Union Generale des Etudiants
du Quebec, or withdrawal
from both organizations.
It was vetoed by council
president Richard  Aitkin.
Explaining the unprecedented use of his constitutional
veto power, Aitkin said: "It
is the feeling of the students'
council that the proposed
referendum does not provide
for the proper utilization of
the voting power of students."
FOR FACTUAL INFORMATION ON ALL ASPECTS OF
SOCIAL   PROBLEMS   READ   TECHNOCRACY   MAGAZINES.
1 YEAR SUBSCRIPTION $4.00
Technocracy Digest, 3642 Kingsway
Vancouver 16, B.C., 434-1134 or 327-1306
^^^ss^ssss^s^^^
&*
SATURDAY
NIGHT
INDOOR
AUTO RACES
War on the Agrodome Floor'
FOREIGN STOCKS
A cross  between  stock  car
racing  and a  demolition
derby.
AGRODOME
Time trials 7:30 - Races 8:30
Adult $2.00, Student $1.25
Children under 12 Free with Adults!
«i
YOUNG MODERNS
SHOWUP IN
PURE WOOL
SS
SS
ss
ss
ss
SS
Glenayr
631/692
SWEATERS,
SKIRTS, SLIMS
Whether you're off for a
day of fun or an evening
of friendship and chatter,
you'll feel relaxed in
this "London Rib" mock-
turtle pullover with long
sleeves and neck zipper.
Just imagine—machine-
washable. 100% English
Botany wool in lots of
new shades for Fall. To
compliment your sweater, these perfectly tailored
pure wool worsted slims
woven from 1 00% super-
fine English Botany.
They're dry-cleanable
and perfectly dyod-to-
match any Kitten Botany
wool sweater. At all fine
shops everywhere.
88
SS
SS
SS
SS
SH
ss
ss
ss
&
ss
ss
88
ss
05      ^ ££
H       Without lliis label    £ ^_ii.;^| itisimias-nuiiiBKITTKN.       $
RECORD SALE
ffia
FAMOUS LONDON LABEL
Our Entire $4.20 Group
NOW
ONLY
each
Thousands to Choose From
Here are a few examples:
• Rolling Stones • Roy Orbison • The
Ventures • Jan & Dean • Roger Miller
• Gary Lewis  &  The Playboys • The
Pair • Swingle Singers • Sandy Nelson
• Jame Brown
All the Greet Artists—Lores* Hits—
Broadway Musicals—Rock and Roll—
Popular—Folk Music, Etc.
Hurry down — pick out your favourite record
and save. Choose from Pops, Classics, Stiowtunes.
All are  now in stock at our Record Department.
LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN-
ABSOUND
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571  GRANVILLE  (at Dunsmuir)
MU 2-4846 Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  November  18,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Troupe ducat discount
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last Minute tickets available
for the Ukrainian Dance troupe
for tonight only. Pick up
voucher from cashier at AMS.
GUERRILLA SOC
Welsh philosopher John Elliot continues his discussion of
guerrilla warfare in UBC's department of philosophy. Noon
in Hebb 210.
SCM
Myth party with Miss P.
Merivale, Dr. C. Anderson,
Rev. J. Shaver at the Lutheran
centre, 5 p.m. through dinner
and evening.
LIBERAL CLUB
MLA Alan  Williams speaks
today at noon in Bu. 214.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Hootenanny Sunday night at
7:30 in the Newman Lounge,
St. Mark's. Bring guitars.
WUS
Art Dolsen discusses Student
Life in Yugoslavia, Monday at
noon in Brock council chambers.
COMMERCE US
Dance Saturday night to the
Stags and the Nightrain Revue
in the fieldhouse, 8:30 to 12:30.
Admission $1.50 per person.
IH
Dance  tonight in the  IH
lower   lounge.   Admission   25
cents.
EL CIRCULO
Movies: Madrid, old and new
Bitter bookies
can beef today
Don't forget to fill out a
questionnaire today.
UBC library is surveying
students for comments and
criticism about the library.
Forms will be available
from tables at various
places around the campus.
There are sixteen questions and it will take only
about a minute and a half.
—Goya, today at noon in Bu.
204. Non-member admission ten
cents.
IH DANCE
Dance to the Highlife tonight
8:30 to midnight, IH lounge.
Sponsored by the African Students Ass'n.
NEW ARTS
Meeting today at noon, in the
Brock stage room.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting today at noon in IH.
Film, Statues D'Epouvante will
be shown.
MUSSOC
Meeting for those interested
in working on this year's program, today at noon in the clubroom.
VIET NAM COMM
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
212.
GERMAN CLUB
Film, The Queen's Visit to
Germany will be shown today
at noon in Bu. 203.
VCF
Students interested in attending the International Student's supper Saturday, call
263-7718, or 224-5637.
NUS
The films No Longer. Alone,
and Sonic Aid for the Blind
will be shown Monday at noon
in Wes. 201.
VCF
Dr. Ross discusses Seeing is
Believing, at noon today in
Ang. 110.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
General meeting Monday at
noon in Bu. 203.
PHYSOC
Grad talk today at noon on
Solid State. Lab tour will
follow.
EUS
Mixer  tonight at Hallmark
Hall. Home-Ec and Ed. girls invited, admission 75 cents.
SCM
Dr. Kassis discusses Ancient
CHALLENGING
AND PROFITABLE
CAREERS
. . . for 1967 graduates in Arts, Commerce, Business
and Mathematics, with one of Canada's leading international life insurance companies. Outstanding opportunities in the following fields.
* Actuarial Trainee *  Electronic Data  Processing
* Group  Products *  General  Administration
* Agency Staff Trainee     *  Branch Office Administration
To arrange an interview please make an appointment
at the Placement Service. Mr. Colin A. Smith of our
Toronto Head Office will be on your campus on November 24th.
MANUFACTURERS LIFE
INSURANCE COMPANY
Asset* Exceed $1,4 Billion. — Branch Offices in  IS Countries
Near Eastern Myth, today at
noon in Bu. 100.
POETRY READING
Ken Belford reads today at
noon in Ang. 104.
MUSSOC
Those interested in publicity
for How to Succeed, meet in
the auditorium Sat. at 12:30.
CIRCLE K
Meeting Monday at noon in
Bu. 2205.
AQUA SOC
Christmas Dive list now
open, sign up and details in the
clubroom.
YOUNG MEN
How About A Xmas Engagement?
WE HAVE A
LARGE
SELECTION
OF BEAUTIFUL
RINGS TO
DELIGHT THE
YOUNG
LADY
SELECT
TODAY, SET
ASIDE FOR
.  XMAS DAY
REMEMBER
YOUR A.M.S.
CARD FOR YOUR
10%   DISCOUNT
VARSITY JEWELLERS
4517 W. 10th AVE. 224-4432
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND LADY'S RING BY H.A.
Bldg. Pick up at Chinese Varsity
Club, H 6.
Greetings
12
Coming Dances
12A
FRI., NOV. 18, HALLMARK HALL.,
with "The Painted Ship." Eng. -
Ed. - Home-Ec. Mixer. Men $1.25,
girls .75,  9:00  p.m,
A TOTEM PARK SPECTACULAR!
Dance to UBC's own "Brave New
World" from 9:00 to 1:00 Satur-
day,  November 19th.   Only  75c.
TWO!
(NIGHTRAINS    &    STAGS)
GREAT BANDS
at
ONE    GIANT    DANCE !
(Sat. nite — Fieldhouse
8:30  to 12:30)
Special Notices
13
SKIERS SPECIAL RATES.
Double Rooms. Phone 492-2969.
Write Braemore Lodge. Reservations 2402 South Main St., Penticton.
FOLLOW-UP MEETING MAHAR-
ishi talk Academy of The Arts,
2695 West Broadway, Nov. 20,
8:00 p.m.	
SKIING COMPANION WITH A
car needed by newcomer to Vancouver will split costs. Phone Lee
after 7:00 p.m. at 878-0432.
WHITE SLAVE MARKET ! '54
Consul named Fred -^ needs hos-
pitalization, best offer — 988-7300.
YOU .... CHANGE ? WORKSHOP
Nov. 19, 9:00 a.m., I.H. "Personal
Change in Cross Cultural Living".
All welcome.
GIRLS ! ARE YOU IN EDUCATION
or Home-Ec? Care to mix with
Engineers? Then come out to a
Great Mixer with "The Painted
Ship". Fri., Nov. 18, Hallmark
Hall.
MECHANIC'S BARGAIN ! — '54
Consul needs slight repair — best
offer,   988-7300.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED URGENTLY ED-
munds and Kingsway call Ann-
Marie  522-900C.
RIDERS WANTED FOR 8:30's
Mon. - Fri. vie. of 45th and Blvd.
Ralph AM 1-1281.
RIDE WANTED TO LOS ANGE-
les around 20th Dec. Share expenses and driving. John Chislett
224-9667.
THE PAINTED SHIP SAILS! TO
Hallmark Hall, Fri., Nov. 18, 9:00
p.m. Eng.-Ed.-Home-Ec. Mixer.
Girls  .75. Men *1.25.
Wanted
15
WANTED: USED FENDER DUAL-
Showman or Bassman amp. or
English Vox Bass amp. Call
Wayne  736-4045  or  AM 1-2495.
YOU AND YOUR IDEAS FOR A
Workshop on "Personal Change
in Cross Cultural Living" Sat.,
Nov. 19, 9:00 a.m. I.H. "Everyone   Qualifies".
Automobiles  (Cont'd.)
I960 VW. VERY GOOD CONDI-
tion. Contact Ron KO, Rm. 3370,
Biological Science or phone 731-
4468  after 6 p.m.
FORD '58 AUTO. 6, RADIO, RE-
built motor, new tires, battery,
etc.   Fine   condition.   Ph.   224-4249.
MOB '64, WIRE WHEELS, FIRE-
stone tires. Drv. lights, headrests,
ski rack, $1,600 succinct. WA 2-
8954.
MUST SELL! 1961 ALPINE, TOP
condition, $700. Will trade for
Volks. Phone 435-9139 after 6:00>
p.m.
Accessories & Repairs
22
IMPORTED CAR PARTS! SPORTS
car accessories! Metric tools! Get
them all at:
OVERSEAS    AUTO    PARTS
12th   &  Alma 736-9804
(10%    Student   Discount)
Automobiles Wanted
25
HAVE   CASH   AND   '58   TR-3 (2.2
engine,    competition    clutch) for
later model, any make. Ron, 731-
7019.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
Scandals
39A
SASKATOON SEXCURSION RE-
turn trip at Christmas CN chartered car share a berth for lower
rates call Doug Hut 8, Rm. 1. 224-
9055  or  Nels  228-8708.
YOU   .   .   .   CHANGE?  WORKSHOP
I.H.  Nov. 19, 9:00 a.m.
OH,   YES!
It will be a really big  (Dance &)
Show in the Fieldhouse this Sat.
nite !   (And   old   "Stoneface"   will
not be there.)	
SYISDAHL SURFED AND CA-
vorted at the New Delhi Wed.
nite.  All were duly shocked.
MGB    FOR    SALE
See   ads.
THE
NOVEL
SOUND
RETURNS!
ITS
THE
BRAVE
NEW
WORLD!
TOTEM
PARK
SATURDAY
NOVEMBER
19th
9:00
TIL
1:00
ADMISSION
76C
WHADDYA MEAN GOD IS DEAD?
His birthday was Wednesday.
Love  and  a Holy Time,  Carpool.
DOUGABA6GI YOUR BOD IS LE-
gal and FREE on the 20th Beautiful !   Love  the  group.
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LIMITED
70th   & Granville  Street        263-4530
TYPING — ESSAYS, THESIS,
Stencils, etc. Close to University,
224-0244.
Music
63
INSTRUCTION —
SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. 736-6923. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish,
German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
LESSONS IN GERMAN FOR STU-
dents and persons eager to speak
the language. $2.00 per lesson.
325-4902.
Instruction Wanted
66
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available. Now. Limited
Number. Buy now, only 76 cents
from Publications Office, Brock
Hall, or the Bookstore.
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1961
issues for only 50 cents — Publications office in Brock.
LADIES SKI BOOTS FOR SALE;
near new; woman's shoe size 7.
Call  AM  1-7026.
FOR SALE: NIKKOREX 35SLR
$50. Roger Howard, Hennings 305.
Call 228-2856  or 224-5395.
NEW 'HARMONY' CLASSICAL
Guitar with Case. Free lesson included. $50. Bio. Sci. Room 4324,
or   evenings   228-3360   or   266-9037.
RENTALS   &  REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
NEED A ROOM CLOSE TO CAM-
pus, only $35 Monthly. Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity House, 4435
W. 12th. Phone 224-9654 after 6
p.m.
ROOM WITH BREAKFAST. MALE
student sharing. 2427 West 3rd
Ave.   Phone:   731-6062.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
near campus, Pri. bath, semi private entrance, females only. 733-
7501.
LUXURY LIVING AT ITS BEST.
Room and Board at the ZBT
Hilton.   Phone   224-9660   after   5.
ROOM AND BOARD. LAUNDRY
included. Male students only. RE
1-1865.	
ROOM AND BOARD CHEAP. CALL
Andy Sandilands, Zeta Psi Fraternity 2250 Wesbrook Cres. 224-
9662.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, reports, etc.
Low rates — phone 733-0734 any
time.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1952 CHEV. 4-DOOR, GOOD CON-
dition. Must sell $100.00. YU 8-
5125,  236 E-6th, N.  Van.
MUST SACRIFICE: '64 TRIUMPH
Spitfire, only $895, make yourself
some $$$ Sell it next summer:
Also Stereo Tape Recorder. 224-
6857.
PROFESSORS
Fully   exp.   in   the   typing   of   your
theses. Reas. rates. Ref. Inger 872-
7380.
STUDENTS!
Am once again free to accept your
typing  requirements.   Elec.   Typewriter.   Inger  872-7380.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
DRUMMER FOR FOLK ROCK
group. Phone Kurt 224-7174 or
Dave RE 1-9445 after 6.
CON-ARTIST? STRAIGHT COM-
mission. Approx. 35% part-tine.
Ph. 872-2275.
LUXURIOUS APARTMENT FOR
senior man adjacent to campus.
Phone 228-2265 or 228-8645. Joel
Brenner.
NEEDED MALE ROOM MATE TO
share West End apt. 3rd or 4th
Arts pref. Nick 684-6742 evenings.
Real Estate
BELIEVE   IT   OR   NOT !
Tehre is 25,000 sq. ft. of floor space
available In the Fieldhouse for that
Giant  Dance this  Sat.  nite !
CLASSIFIED
BUY  -  SELL  -  RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY

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