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The Ubyssey Oct 2, 1981

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 9
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 2,1981
228-2301
Fighting for Justice
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
The 80 mile long Okanagan lake is nestled
between mountains and hills with lush green
orchards, heavy with fruit in the summer
months.
For many of the more than 2,000
Quebecois who travel to this area each summer, the valley holds promises. But the
dreams of easy work for decent wages under
the hot summer sun are short-lived, vanishing
as quickly as a rain storm in the intense heat.
The fruit pickers find poor wages, some
making only $30 for a back-breaking 10 hour
day of work. The workers find no accomodation provided for them and they sleep on the
river banks or in the dry hills.
They are foreigners in a not-so-friendly
land. Some have been subjected to violent
racist attacks and told by locals to "go back
to Quebec."
These problems are all reasons why the
Canadian Farmworkers Union opened an office in Kelowna last summer. "They're really
considered second class citizens," said CFU
organizer Mario Lanthier in a July interview.
"We've started to work with the farm
workers and they know the union is the only
way to solve those problems."
An April 23 human rights commission investigation held in Kelowna found that the
workers' most pressing problem was housing.
"What came out of that was that the housing problem for the fruit pickers is terrible.
There's nothing for them," says Lanthier,
who added that local groups like the Justice
Council and the Elizabeth Fry Society all
played a part in the investigation.
"They (the pickers) have nowhere to put
their tents, they have to go to the mountains.
Down south, they don't have very much
either, no running water, no showers," he
says.
down on our B.C. farms
Lanthier himself knows well the plight of
the workers. He came to the Okanagan in
1980 from Montreal to pick fruit and became
interested in the union.
For their first summer in operation, the
CFU spent its energies on solving the housing
problem and letting workers know they exist,
said Lanthier.
"Our main job this summer (was) to get
the word around that the union is here to
help workers. To show we're not a monster."
But the federal, provincial and municipal
governments were slow to help the CFU with
their plans to provide decent housing, he
says.
"Nobody is doing anything about housing,
that's for sure," Lanthier said, citing the city
of Kelowna's refusal to recognize the housing
problem as an example.
kelowna has no youth hostel and most
campsites, if they will accept a tent, charge
$10 a night which, says Lantheir, is steep on a
picker's salary.
But housing is just one problem the
workers face. Racism is another. Lanthier
said some were followed around department
stores by managers who wanted to make sure
they weren't shoplifting. Restaurant owners
have refused to serve them claiming that they
'smelled' and others have been beaten by
locals.
"We say to the restaurant owners, if the
pickers smell it's because they have to wash in
the river and that is not so good."
Racist attacks are caused by only a few
people but have increased tensions between
workers and valley residents, he said. "Even
in campsites fights are going on all the time.
It's only a small portion of them who are doing it though."
The fledgling CFU must also deal with
anti-union attitudes of some farmers.
"The growers really want to smash down
the union any way they can. It's ridiculous.
They don't win anything in the end."
Richard Bullock, the president of B.C.
Tree Fruits, the local growers' association,
says his organization recognizes the worker's
right to organize. "We're prepared to live
with the situation as it develops. It's a fact of
life."
But CFU president Raj Chouhan says that
the Okanagan farmers have already threatened to mechanize farms rather than accept a
union even though no contracts have been
signed in the Okanagan.
"We're here to stay, we're not going to go
with any threats. We're not going to tolerate
any discrimination."
The CFU's organizing efforts in the Fraser
Valley were met with threats of violence. The
farmworkers talked about these problems in
A Time to Rise, a national film board
documentary which was first screened Sept.
22 at the Robson Square media centre.
Union vice president Jwala Singh Grewal,
65, stands beside his family car which has
been smashed by vandals. "I never had
enemies, but now this. If we'd been warned,
we'd have been ready," he says. About 80
per cent of the 12,000 seasonal farmworkers
in   the   Fraser   Valley   are   East   Indian-
Canadians.
The film also recorded interviews with
some of the Fraser Valley growers who openly opposed the union's attempts to organize.
Valley grower Martin Smith who keeps a
barking, long toothed Doberman Pinscher
on his property "to back anyone off if they
come up here" says, "it's mainly just kids
earning a little extra money picking out
there."
Union treasurer Sarwan Boal describes
how four unknown men attacked him outside
a local Vancouver cafe. Boal and two other
white farmworkers were singing union songs
when the men approached and shouted,
"let's get that fucking Hindu."
Boal was knocked to the ground, kicked
repeatedly and says that if it had not been for
the two men with him he would have died.
"I'd be dead if the others hadn't saved me. I
still don't know if it was because of the union
or just because of my race."
Smith says that "no one ever got hurt from
picking berries" as he denies that the workers
need protection from Workers Compensation or the union.
Chouhan said in a question period after
the film that the WCB has refused to give
farmworkers coverage unless farmers request
it and the matter has been referred back to
the provincial labour ministry.
"Now it's up to the farmer whether he
wishes to get Worker's Compensation." Of
the 1,300 commercial farms in B.C. only 210
offer their workers that coverage.
The workers face not only long hours of
back breaking work in all kinds of weather,
but must deal with the hazards of pesticide
use.
Chouhan said many workers are currently
See page 4: WORKING Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
By. CHARLES CAMPBELL
It's Tuesday night and Rohans is
packed as usual. The Jerry's Cove
crowd is just filtering in after the
pub's 11:30 p.m. closing. The
frenetic saxophone of the Villians'
fills every smoky pore in the
building. I stand in the aisle beside
the mixing booth and order a drink.
I move away from the counter on
one side of the aisle to let somebody
Trust's broken promise leaves Rohans
30 days instead of three years to
remain Vancouver's oldest rockpile
Christie shakes his boyish head. A
nearsighted waitress might ask him
for I.D. It's hard to believe he's
been mixing drinks at Rohans for
six years.
"When we first got the eviction
notice I didn't take it seriously. I
don't know why. Then I became
SWEET DICK . . . Dan Smith and Drew Neville
shocked and outraged about the
by and someone else takes my
place. Predictably the bouncer
comes along and tells me I'm going
to have to find another place to
stand. The waitress can't find me; I
don't get my drink for 20 minutes.
Jack Christie the bar manager is
on a break. He's just put his 50
cents in the asteroids machine.
"Tomorrow early would be a good
time to talk," he says. "About
nine, after I set up."
That's fine with me. I just wanted
an excuse to see the Villians.
There are a lot of familiar faces
on the dance floor; people I've
never met, but know because I've
seen them here so many times
before. It's hard to imagine them
without Rohans to go to anymore.
But that's inevitable now, whether
it's next month or three years in the
future, Vancouver's oldest live
music club is slated for demolition.
The building has been sold by
Royal Trust and the new owners,
CITI Management wants to build a
block of condominiums on the site.
Rohans was served a 30 day eviction
notice at the end of July. However
they are challenging the eviction
notice and are suing the former
owners, Royal Trust, for an alleged
contract violation.
It appears that Rohans had a
verbal agreement with Royal Trust
to have the lease extended for two
or three years. Last November they
did some renovations and had to
secure that guarantee in order to
have a $40,000 bank loan approved.
On Wednesday night the club is
quiet. But it's only 9 o'clock,
nobody ever comes to Rohans
before    10:30    or    11.    Jack
fact that somebody would try and
do us all out of a job in 30 days.
That was the heaviest part about it.
I've got a family, there are a lot of
family people here. It's just not that
easy to go out and get another
job."
What bothers Jack Christie the
most though is the underhanded
way the eviction was dealt with. He
feels they were deliberately deceived.
"I saw the surveyors here in
February and I didn't think they'd
come around just to make sure the
building was okay. So we started to
write letters to Royal Trust asking
them what their plans were. They'd
said they'd get in touch with us.
We didn't hear from them and we
wrote them again and they said
their plans weren't clear yet. The
next thing we got was our 30 day
eviction notice. But when we started
to investigate we found that they'd
filed plans at city hall back at the
beginning of February, so they had
lots of time to let us know."
In the meantime Rohans is in a
real financial bind. Under the Commercial Tenancy Act if they contest
occupancy when their lease has expired they must pay double the normal rent. In addition they must deal
with legal expenses. All this on top
of a bank loan at a time when clubs
are in a financially precarious position. In fact it has always been a
battle to keep Rohans alive.
The club has gone through a lot
of changes in the process of compromising the balance books to the
liquor laws, keeping the police
amicable with the clientel, and the
clientel amicable with one another.
Jack Christie himself arrived
"just after the hippies had thrown
out the bikers." He explains that
there was quite a fuss; "originally
bikers were the first customers here
and they wanted to make it their
turf. Of course the owners wanted a
friendly neighborhood bar.
Anyways it all culminated with
motorcycles being thrown through
the front window."
Christie explains that the liquor
regulations in the early seventies
made it tough to run a club. It used to be that the government set the
price you charged for booze as well
as the price you paid for it so there
wasn't much flexibility. Originally
Rohans was a cabaret/restaurant;
you could eat and drink draft until
8 p.m. and then the cover went on
and we had live entertainment. But
then the government came down on
dual licences and we had to close
down the restaurant. That effectively wiped out any profit that we were
making."
There have always been worries
about the police too, though the
last time they ever had any real
trouble was in 1976.
"They closed us down for a week
because we failed to let them in
quickly enough. They were
plainclothes and somebody at the
door asked to see their badges."
Rohans is still doing better than
most clubs though; they almost
break even. They've built that success by providing a regular clientel
with the best local rock, blues and
folk music available. In fact having
played Rohans is a credibility ticket
that makes bookings elsewhere in
town easier to get.
Christie says that other clubs
have tried to pattern their own success on Rohans'. "a lot of clubs
have the same format as us, they
book the same bands and they have
a monthly program like ours."
Ultimately though, a place like
Rohans is impossible to recreate.
The commitment of people like
Jack Christie and others, like Vicki
Sigurdson are things that cannot be
bought.
Sigurdson, who's worked at
Rohans in several capacities for the
last three years doesn't relish the
prospect of leaving people she obviously considers her friends. She's a
What bothers Jfack
Christie is the
underhanded manner
in which the eviction
notice was dealt with.
little bit.er when asked if it's going
to be a hassle looking for work. Of
course it's going to be a drag, I've
been here three years. I really don't
know whee I'm going to start."
Peter Padden, drummer for Six
Cylinder, Wildroot and Sweet Dick,
is equally annoyed. If Rohans
closes I'm just going to lose my
favorite place to play in the whole
world. The audience here, and the
staff, everybody is just fantastic."
The musicians' commitment to
Rohans can be measured in dollar
terms. Since the eviction notice was
served bands have played for
nothing or for much less than their
normal fee.
Christie estimates that Rohans
has saved as much as $20,000
because of that kind of generosity.
"The Questionaires, Powder Blues,
Shari Ulrich, Doucette, Wildroot
and a lot of others — people who
got their start here — they've all
been really supportive."
Christie says he thinks that
Rohans' inevitable closing will be a
blow to the Vancouver music scene.
"It will create a vacuum, and I
don't exactly know what will come
along to fill it. I don't think there
will be another Rohans, in name or
in spirit. If there's another club in
Kitsilano I think it would be like the
Body Shop, a high energy rock and
roll meatmarket type of place.
"I'm not sure if the current
owners would get involved in
another club. It's hard to move a liquor license let alone get one. Fred
(Xavier), Lynn (Lowther) and
Thora (Sigurdson) Can hardly afford moving expenses with a bank
loan to pay off.
"If we lose the legal battle I guess
that's really it. We can't sit here and
wait for the sheriff to haul us away.
But basically our motto is still 'Hell
no, we won't go.' And if we get a
three year reprieve I think we'll be
okay. In 30 days there's not much
you can do except what we're doing. But at least we'll have had our
last hurrah. Nobody can say we just
folded our tent and disappeared.
"If this place does come down I
know I'll be outside serving
margueritas and I know that Jim
McGillveray and some of the folks
from Wildroot will be out there
singing Auld Lang Syne as it hits
the ground."
Jack Christie's got to get to the
bar. Rohans is filling up again.
Sweet Dick is about to come on.
Before the end of the evening some
members of Doug and the Slugs will
have joined them on stage, and
Frankie Allison will have made love
to a mike stand while singing Heartbreak Hotel. Local bandleaders
Bing Jensen and Jerry Doucette will
be there watching and laughing. But
in the back of their minds they will
all be wondering what will happen
in court when Royal Trust faces the
music.
ROHANS STAYS ON
tes in court Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
Pickers face racist attacks
in unionization attempts
From page 1
working with pesticides without knowing
what the chemicals are or how to protect
themselves.
"At the present time, it's a mess, no one
knows what to do. It's especially dangerous
for pregnant women and children."
He explained that one woman was actually
blinded by pesticide use and is currently suing
her employer and contracter in a civil suit.
In the film two workers from Jensen's
mushroom farm the main supplier for
Money's mushrooms which is now unionized, told how they were still using a pesticide
which was banned by the federal government
two years ago.
"(The farmer) said he wanted to use the
spray up," says one Jensen worker. People
there were also given, what they described as
"worthless" protective gear to wear.
The film traces and debunks many of the
arguments made by growers against
unionization. Says Cesar Chavez, president
of the American United Farmworkers, the
price for a head of lettuce rose only one-
eighth of a cent when the farmworkers in
California unionized.
"Mr. Grower, "he says," recognize that
we're human beings and we'll get along
alright."
But even in the CFU's short history, Mr.
Grower has not dealt honestly with the
workers. As the film documents, Driediger
farms promised to sign a contract with the
CFU but backed down on that agreement
and signed one with local contractors.
Said George Driediger, ex-mayor of
Langley and longtime Socred ?when the CFU
picketed his farm, "Next year, they (the
picketers) won't have jobs."
Chouhan said that two months ago, at a
public meeting in Abbotsford, Fraser Valley
Social Credit MLA Bill Ritchie also made,
clear his opposition to the union.
"He said, 'I'd oppose the CFU in every
way I can.' " and Ritchie indicated that was
the Socred position, Chouhan said.
Meanwhile the problems of low wages,
lack of daycare, housing and protection persist.
The workers often have no access to toilets
or running water as they labor in the fields.
"We've been talking about these things for
years," says Chouhan.
Another major problem is the lack of
daycare for the children. Last summer a
7-month-old baby girl drowned in a bucket
of drinking water in her parents home: a converted horse stall. Three East Indian children
drowned in a flooded gravel pit as their
parents worked in nearby fields.
The idea of women paying for a babysitter
is impossible on a $5,000 a year income and
Chouhan says the union is asking farmers to
provide an hourly wage for a daycare worker
on farms where there are children.
According to grower Martin Smith, having
children in the fields allows parents to
develop a closer relationship with their kids.
"You know they tell them things (they
wouldn't otherwise)," he says with a grin.
Undoubtedly the force of the CFU's
organization drives was captured in film by
Pritam Kuar. As she was interviewed in her
kitchen, a small, dingy basement suite, she
explains in her native language why she is a
farmworker:
"White people won't do it. We won't go
on welfare and we are starving, so we do it."
Kuar says that she makes between $4,000
and $5,000 a year for her long hard days in
the field. In one incredibly powerful scene,
she sees a group of CFU organizers and supporters marching down a dusty country road
and slowly, then with speed she rushes
towards them.
She is joined by others as she enthusiastically breaks into song and dance,
a dance of freedom and hope.
There was nothing manipulated to produce
that moment and it did not ring false. It is a
tribute to its makers, producers and directors
Anand Patwardhan and Jim Monro.
The 40 minute color film was a concise and
insightful examination of the farmworkers
plight and outlined the need for the CFU. As
Chouhan explains: "People who produce
food for other people but don't have food
for themselves, are exploited."
Philips gives traditional
concert to new audience
By ROSEANNE MORAN
"Someday if all goes well we won't need contracts at all. There won't be any us and
them . . . there'll be just us."
These were but a few of the many words of wisdom that Utah Philips had to give to
the audience at the Canadian Farmworkers' Benefit last Sunday night. Phillips is a a
well known American labour singer, now living in the Seattle area. His shows are
unusual though, because he is also a storyteller, talking about the history behind the
songs he sings and preaching politics and class consciousness. He is so easy and comfortable on stage that somehow the audience didn't mind hearing it all again.
On Sunday night, he caught the spirit and the excitement that the member's of the
fledgling Canadian Farmworkers' Union are feeling and sang it back to us, often convincing the audience to sing along with him.
He opened with an old standard, We're Gonna Roll the Union On and finished with
There is Power In a Band of Working Folks.In between Philips sang about a modern
day Robin Hood in Woody Guthrie's song Pretty Boy Floyd. Floyd's philosophy is
that "There's a lot of funny men. Some will rob you with a six-gun, some with a fountain pen."
He sang about Ernesto Perez, a little boy who wandered off while his parents were
working in the fields and was poisoned by a spray that had been used on the crops.
Considering that two main issues concerning the Farmworkers' union are daycare and
the dangers of pesticide use, this song really hit home. Phillips said that he hadn't
thought of the song "for years," but that the problems the farmworkers in B.C. face,
had struck him as parallel and brought the song to mind.
Phillips seems to find words to bring all those people who soundlessly and nameless-
ly suffer to the surface of our consciousness. He sang about the nameless hobos who
get sacrificed in industrial accidents and about old people who spend their lives making somebody rich only to be told that they're "all used up" at the end of the road.
He read a poem by German playwright Bertolt Brecht, quoted Eugene Debbs,
founder of the American Socialist Party and sang a letter written by Sacco of Sacco
and Venzetti, two Italian immigrants who were electrocuted by the state of
Massachusetts for organizing workers. Although he covered a lot of territory, Phillips
continually wove it together and made connections between the historical circumstances that gave rise to his material and the farmworkers' struggle.
Phillips called up a local labour singer, Al Greerson, who is reviving old Wobblie
songs that haven't been sung for 50 years. Greerson did an old Joe Hill song about a
boss who finally saw the light and began to treat his workers properly.
The evening ended with a plea for the organizers. Phillips asked that a substantial
amount of the benefit money go towards paying them for the work that they do, and
we all left singing There is Power in a Band of Working Folks . . .
An*     **"$a&*'i    *w    *£3s«pr ^. i***^F
^1% 5    #1
v;
.-*.*• -
FARMWORKERS . . . demanding a better deal
Sun can shine some other time
By STEVE McCLURE
"As near as we configure it rains 54.13 per
cent of the winter session days on the UBC
campus. But then, think how depressing that
would be if you had to shovel it."
—UBC Reports Sept. 30, 1981
"Rain — / don't mind,
Shine some other time — the weather's
fine."
— The Beatles.
Whatever you think of it, rain is something
we all have to get used to here in Vancouver.
In the past few days we've settled into the
long winter rainy season which will probably
last until April or May or even further . . .
Some would say we'd just entered fall but
that term is irrelevant here on the Raincoast.
What we have is a temperate and moist
climate that could perhaps be best divided up
into the wet-cold season versus the wet-hot
season (sometimes known as summer). We
must resolutely cast off the shackling labels
of summer, fall, spring and winter, and the
European cultural heritage that prevents us
from establishing our own uniquely British
Columbian identity. So they say.
Now that we've transcended this collective
conceptual block we can discuss ways in
which to cope with the rain situation. Many
people's difficulties with the watery stuff
stem from a lot of unnecessary preconceptions that prevent one from enjoying rain to
the fullest.
For example, did you know there is a
school of thought which holds that human
evolution's sole purpose is to transport
water? That's right. Since our bodies are
made up of water to the tune of 70 per cent,
some argue that human's close relationship
with and dependence on water is due to us
filling an unsuspected role in nature's scheme
of things, that of water transporters.
In other words, we are nothing more than
mobile water bags with direction-finding
equipment (i.e. brains) attached. Pretty grim
isn't it? And you thought you were Nobel
Prize material when all you really are is a
glorified canteen.
Unfortunately this theory is one on which
the human mind cannot dwell too long, the
brain being inherently incapable of imagining
itself as anything but the centre of all existence.
The mind needs a sense of purpose, a goal
to orient itself towards, and so we must move
onto other ways of looking at rain so we can
appreciate it rather than see it as a nuisance.
Cleanliness is often overlooked in discussions regarding the meteorlogical merits of
this or that locality. Have you ever noticed
how dirty cities are that don't get a lot of
rain? They're a drag to visit mainly because
one tends to cough all the time. Calgary is a
case in point, though the fumes emanating
from the cowpens surrounding the unfortunate city do much to explain the unpleasant
stench that dominates the poor place.
Here in Vancouver we suffer from no such
problem. Our air is always pristine and
aromatic because much of our "air" is really
water. The old adage about Vancouverites
having gills as well as lungs is being studied
by pioneering geneticists right now as they examine fourth and fifth generation Vancouverites to see if indeed nascent gills are
forming inside the jowls of long-time citizens
from some of the city's older families.
The propensity of some of the leading
members of the city's old established clans to
"drink like fish," as he saying goes, could
perhaps be explained by this phenomenon.
One objection to this theory could perhaps
be raised, and indeed little Himie
Winkleminder over there in the third row has
already raised his hand. Thank you for your
rapt attention. I imagine you're all asking,
'well, if we're all going to grow gills eventually, then why haven't the coast Indians,
who've lived here for countless generations?
They don't have gills.'
The answer is simple. A growing body of
scientific opinion is slowly establishing a
working model of West Coast ethnological
development that theorizes that on, the West
Coast, humans who came from the sea
originally, slowly revert to amphibian form
and return.
This process has been slowed of course, by
the invention of central heating and the umbrella but there's no use standing in nature's
way.
Obviously a change in our thinking and
our lifestyle is necessary. Efforts to communicate with dolphins will have to be greatly accelerated since we may be close
neighbours in a few generations. Otherwise
we'll be seeing a Dolphin TV show about a
cute human who is always getting his or her
dolphin masters out of the most unlikely
zany scrapes.
Let us then meditate upon the awesome
responsibility that has been thrust upon us
here on the Raincoast. We are in the
forefront of human evolution and will be the
first of the human race to make the long trek
back to the sea, our true home. So don't
curse the rain, look on it as a survival course
you're getting for free. Friday, October 2,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
limning minne at
By MARK LEIREN-YOUNG
Mind powers are frightening. Fascinating,
but frightening.
Imagine what it would be like to have your
innermost thoughts on display. If people
could see all your secrets. Your dreams. And
your motives. Imagine what it would be like
to be transparent.
People are drawn to psychics and fortune
tellers. They are drawn to healers and
mystics. And they were drawn to
Vancouver's recent 2nd annual ESP Psychic
Fair, at the P.N.E.
The fair, which ran from Sept.  16 to
20, had all the flavour and flash of an old
fashioned carnival. It looked like a collection
of hucksters and charlatans with a lot of glitter but no gloss. Appearances, however, can
be deceiving.
It was a fair, it was also a collection of very
serious individuals who believed in
themselves and what they were doing.
There were tarot readers, psychics,
astrologers, reflexologists, aura readers, faith
healers, Hare Krishnas, palmists and
paraspsychologists of all ages, shapes and
sizes.
For $5 dollars visitors could visit "reader's
row" which carried the disclaimer "for
amusement purposes only" and have their
psychograph taken, their aura read, or their
future told through any of a dozen different
methods.
Outside reader's row there were the more
expensive experiences. Tea leaf readings were
$15, evil spirits exorcism was $20, and future
forecasts from $15 to $20. Or you could ask
questions of the I Ching for $20.
And, of course, there were the freebies.
The Church of Divine Man gave aura healings while the major demonstrations and the
ESP testing area were available for those who
had blown their budget on the fair's $3.50
admission charge.
And there were things for sale too.
Pyramids, ionizers, books, health food, tarot
cards, incense, pendulums and any other
essentials for the believer's survival in the
paranormal.
But the fair wasn't just a psychic shopping
centre, it was an experience. And to understand the experience you have to be willing to
believe, just a bit.
According to those who believe in an aura,
every living being has this extension of the
body, or the soul, that is normally invisible to
the human eye. But some have become sensitized to them. These auras are different
colors which represent the type of person you
are.
The most prominent people offering free
aura readings at the fair were the members of
the Washington Psychic institute or The
Church of Divine Man. According to
reverend Matthew Deschner of the CODM,
they exist as a church because: "in order to
do healings in the states you need to be a
minister.
"We have a one year program in which we
teach people how to read auras. We also help
people on their spiritual path."
I met one of the Washington Psychic Institute on reader's row. Her name is Rev.
Gloria Lamson, an ordinary looking woman
in early twenties, who practices psychic
readings and aura healings.
"Generally, what I do is take a look at someone's energy. It's like looking at what's
going on inside of them in relationship to
their personal growth," says Lamson.
She offered to demonstrate. She would
give me a psychic reading.
Most people believe mildly in the paranormal, but as a reporter covering an event like
this, cynicism strikes. I agreed, remembering
the Barnum Effect. This basically states that
by making very general statements a 'psychic'
can convince someone that they actually have
read their mind. An example: "Sometimes
people don't understand you." Who doesn't
that apply to?
I prepared myself for a good laugh, but
tried not to close my mind at the possibility
that just maybe . . .
The reverend proceeded to give me the
most frighteningly accurate psychological
profile I could imagine. She told me intimate
details of my life while I tried desperately to
keep a poker face. I was supposed to be
cynical.
She unravelled thread after thread of the
tapestry that makes up my life history. She
told me about how I relate to people. Why I
relate to them the way I do. What my life as a
student has been like since grade school. And
more. And she wasn't wrong once. I wasn't
frightened, I was in awe.
Then she asked me if I had trouble with my
wrists. This was the first time I really spoke
to her during the entire reading. I had been
fighting hard not to speak. Not to let her
know how well she was doing. Occasionally I
boke into a smile but I hadn't spoken. I told
her my wrists had always been fine.
She was slightly taken aback. Then she
told me that creative energy flows through
the arms and my wrists were blocked by
negative energy. This was a bit too
metaphysical for my liking.
She told me she was going to remove the
negative energy. Energy which, she said, was
made up of other people's negative energies
as well as my own.
Lamson proceeded to do some moves to
remove the negative energy from my right
arm. It was fast. I assured myself that I had
THE MAGICIAN.
been psyched up to feel the slight tingle that
ran down my arm.
Then she asked me if I had ever written
with my left hand and had been beaten so
that I would use my right hand. I reponded
that I hadn't. Again she was surprised.
There was more negative energy in my left
arm and it would be much harder to remove,
she said. I smiled. She began to remove it. I
tried to convince myself that what happened
next was in my imagination; that I had been
psyched up to feel the pain that was charging
my left arm like a strong electric shock.
It didn't seem real as I dug the nails of my
left hand into my knee. How I forced myself
not to move my right arm was to hold my left
one where it was hurting. I forced myself not
to cry out and tell her to stop. Then it was
over. The pain was gone. She said she had
removed the negative energy.
I had been easy to work with because, she
said, I had come with a relatively open mind.
She said it was much harder, if not impossible to read people who just came to prove to
themselves that no one could read their
minds.
"It's funny, because people think psychic
ability is different or far out but it's real.
Everyone is psychic it's just that everyone has
a different amount of permission to use that
energy."
My next interview was a nine year old boy
who was drawing pictures of people's auras
for $1.50.
Chris Eastman has been reading auras for
people since he was seven years old.
"When you're a little kid you can usually
see auras, but then your mother says 'you're
crazy' so you stop seeing them. I just look up
above the person and I see colors,"
Eastman said.
His mother had been attending the New
Age Centre, a group who believes there is
more to life than we perceive, at the time he
first started seeing colors, he said. She told
him they were auras, and explained them to
him.
Eastman, says he, then began reading
auras at the centre.
The child was one of the biggest draws at
the fair. His small table was constantly surrounded by curious spectators but he took
breaks whenever the crowd grew too large.
Eastman said a blue aura symbolizes love,
green — peace, red — happiness, yellow —
relaxation, and purple — stress.
Traditional psychics were also represented.
The astrologers, the palmists, the tarot
readers . . .
"Anybody can read tarot given that they
have normal intelligence. Given that they
aren't mentally deficient to begin with," according to tarot reader Roderick Hall.
Hall was charging $ 15 for a 15 minute tarot
reading. His short readings took anywhere
from 25 minutes to an hour. Hall is a man
who enjoys his work.
The tarot is a 78 card deck which contains
various picture symbols used by mystics to interpret the future.
"Reading tarot is a talent that is
developable the same as any other talents are
developable."
According to Hall the most difficult part
of tarot reading is trying not to frighten or
unduly influence the subject.
"When a person starts to become involved
in doing readings you have to be a little bit
tempered yourself. You don't want to unduly
influence people.
"You gauge a person that you talk to and
you become very careful with the advice that
you give people, because you don't want to
be responsible for someone taking a thing too
much to heart or going overboard on it.
"For some people it can become their
gospel and that is what it should not be. You
should not become dependent of the tarot or
any other psychic ability to solve all of your
problems," he said.
Hall says he treats the tarot as a tool to
help resolve people's problems.
"If you look at them (the tarot cards) as a
picture book you can look at the story of
your life. You'll find in them things that
relate to you, and you'll also find areas that
you can, perhaps, correct: a hang up, or a
deficiency, or something that holds you
back.
"It's not that you couldn't do it without
the cards but, perhaps, they allow you to
look at things a little more objectively."
When asked how the cards worked, Hall
said, "How does a psychologist work? How
does a doctor diagnose? How they work is
debatable but the 'why' is because people
have a desire for them to work."
I illustrate his point that anyone can read
tarot, Hall had a subject read him the tarot.
Hall gave her a sheet which stated the traditional interpretations for each card and told
her what positions on the table symbolized.
She proceeded to give Hall a rather personal, well done reading. By the end of the
reading she had decided to buy her own deck
of tarot cards, but Hall advised her that the
tradition was to receive them as a gift.
Of course there was more. There were
philosophies everywhere like the disciples of
Bhagnan Shree Rajneesh who were
distributing balloons which espoused the
philosophy "Be a joke unto yourself."
And there were people who distributed
tabloids with headlines like "Biblical Miracle
Duplicated — Water turned into wine in astounding test seance;" and "You Will Live
After You Die."
There was everything from the fascinating
to the absurd.
But as organizer Michael O'Brien said,
"There are people here who want to make
money, but they also believe in what they are
doing.
"There are no phonies here. There are
some people here who are fooling
themselves, but aren't all of us, to one degree
or another?" Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
Musical Theatre plays up
By ERICA LEIREN
Used to be the closest we children
of the 1970s and 1980s could
get to the ducktails, poodle skirts,
and black leather jackets of the
fabulous 1950s was to watch Annette Funicello and Frankie Avalon
frolicking in the sand in Beach
Blanket Bingo on a rainy Sunday
afternoon.
But I stepped through a timewarp
last Sunday afternoon (on which,
true to type, it was raining) when I
walked into North Vancouver's
Centennial Theatre to catch the last
matinee performance of Vancouver
Musical Theatre's production of the
rock 'n' roll musical Grease.
Vancouver Musical Theatre,
under the guidance of producer J.
Andrew Russell, is a relative
newcomer, having been an entity
for little more than a year. Compared to Theatre Under the Stars'
many years of producing musicals
at Stanley Park's Malkin Bowl.
Russell's company is just cutting its
first teeth. And cut its teeth it has,
molars first so it would seem, with
this summer's smash production of
Grease.
The company's exuberant production of the 1950s musical that
inspired the movie American Graf-
IS THIS ... the new TUTS without the drips
We've got the
best people in
town who aren't
professionals
fitti, which gave birth to the television series Happy Days, has now
finished its run. Both public and
critical response have been very enthusiastic. "We've gotten great
reviews from everyone in town,"
says (producer) Russell, "except for
the Sun; Wayne Edmunstone
wouldn't review us because we
aren't a professional group."
The Theatre is a semi-
professional group. But Russell emphasizes that his actors are not
amateurs.      "We're      semi-
professional (as opposed to professional) only in the sense that our
people don't choose to make their
living at this. What we've got are
the best people in town who aren't
professionals."
Russell, who's interest in entertainment began as a youngster when
he toured the city performing magic
for orphanages and rest homes, has
acted in musicals, dramas, and
worked on the production of many
theatre groups, including Mussoc
and the Frederick Wood Theatre.
The company receives no outside
funding. Russell says he is running
it as a business enterprise. He
started out with a bank loan which
he paid back after his first production, and the box office receipts are
now paying the bill, he says.
Their first production, last summer's Fiddler On The Roof, and its
spring follow-up, Godspell, were
both well-received. But Grease has
been their greatest success to date,
and the production Russell personally is most pleased with.
It played to sold-out-in-advance
houses in Vancouver, ran with standing ovations for each performance
against stiff competition from
Beatlemania and The Nylons over
the Labour Day weekend in Vic-
FREESEE
Sponsored by The Women Students' Office
With the support of The Leon and
Thea Koerner Foundation
AMERICA
A personal history of the United States
Oct. 6 - Nov. 10
Every Tuesday, 12:35 p.m.
SUB Auditorium FREE
All Students, Faculty and Staff are invited.
INTERESTED IN
CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1982 graduates/
for Vancouver and all other offices of the Firm. Submit
your resume to the Canada Employment Centre on<
Campus (forms are available from the Centre) by Oc-|
tober 5, 1981.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 12th regarding campus interviews which will take place during the weeks of Oc-,
tober 19 and 26th. Additional information is available at
the U.B.C. Canada Employment Centre and the Ac-1
counting Club.
toria (where, according to Russell,
audiences are usually loath to wear
out their shoe leather on such
vulgar displays of enthusiasm), and
finally finished its run with a held-
over engagement in North Vancouver.
Financially, the production did
best during its time at Vancouver's
Metro. The theatre in Victoria was
empty of all sound and lighting
equipment so Russell had to deal
with equipment rental and
transportation costs with everything
else.
But he says the road experience
was a good one just the same. The
production staff, backstage crew,
and cast all pulled together on the
road trip. "We had all the equipment down and packed up in two
hours and 20 minutes, with the help
of the cast."
"We towed the car (which is used
as a prop in the play) behind a 24
foot U-Haul with all our equipment
in it, plus two buses full of the cast
and crew." It's a team spirit that
adds a lot to the whole experience.
Though Vancouver Musical
Theatre does not have a permanent
repertory group, six of the 17
Grease   members   are  carry-overs
from   the   company's   previous
musical productions.
"They're people we've worked
with before, and I was a bit concerned at first as to whether we were
using them because we know them.
But it's because they're the best in
town. We auditioned better actors,
better singers, better dancers, but
these people have the best combination of all three talents."
Semi-professional musical
theatre in Vancouver has had its
drawbacks. TUTS has not always
won great critical or public acclaim,
and given Vancouver's often less
than clement weather, sitting outside under the stars, or the
rainclouds, as the case may be, can
have it's disadvantages. Vancouver
Musical Theatre will provide a good
opportunity for young local actors
to try out their talents on audiences
out of reach of the weather.
According to Russell, his theatre
fills a void in the city's theatrical
scene where TUTS is the only other
company staging musicals, and then
only for the summer season. But
Russell says the Arts Club's recent
production of Pippin was a
musical and is evidence of a new
direction in Vancouver theatre.
Russell plans three productions in
the coming year; an as yet unannounced family production for the
Christmas season and a spring and
summer musical are all on the agenda.
The beginning has been
auspicious. The Vancouver Musical
Theatre is a company to watch.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Sunday, Oct. 11th, 7 p.m.
Tickets: VTC (630 Hamilton St.), all Eaton's Stores & Infor Centres in
major malls. Information, 687-4444, Charge-By-Phone, 687-1818.
HELP YOURSELF
FREE WORKSHOPS TO IMPROVE
ACADEMIC AND PERSONAL SKILLS
STUDY SKILLS
Four one hour sessions to develop more efficient study methods.
TIME MANAGEMENT
Single session workshops focusing on the effective use of time.
CAREER EXPLORATION
Five two hour sessions in which participants will actively explore the process of career decision making.
SELF HELP WORKSHOP
Three one hour workshops dealing with self-control, stress management
and personal problem solving strategies.
RURAL STUDENT SUPPORT GROUP
A series of one hour workshops to assist students from rural communities
in their transition to University.
DYNAMICS OF CAREER DEVELOPMENT
Six one hour sessions designed to explore how values and other factors influence career patterns.
PERSONAL GROWTH GROUP
A small group workshop to help define personal goals, set plans to reach
them and practice new behaviour with the support of other interested
persons.
Workshops Commence in October. Register now as enrollment
limited at:
Student Counselling and Resources Centre
Brock Hall -Room 200 228-3811 Friday, October 2, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
AMERICAN
ATRPC/TfeS
rCOlLCCT
'THE WHOLE
rsfT, KIPS! v
TO WORK IN THE COAL MINES OF COLORADO
IN 1913 WAS TO WORK   IN HELL. THE MINE
OWNERS DECIDED THAT IT WAS CHEAPER TO
REPLACE A DEAD OR INJURED  MINER WITH A
NEW ONE RATHER THAN PAY FOR SAFETY
PRECAUTIONS. IN 1913
ALONE, 464 MINERS
WERE KILLED OR
SEVERELY INJURED
IN THE COLORADO
MINES. IN SEPTEMBER,
m. 9000 OF THE
11,000 SOUTHERN
COLORADO MINERS
WENT ON STRIKE. THE
STRIKERS AND THEIR
FAMILIES GATHERED
AT...    ^
*<***
MAR/ HARRIS "MOTHER'JONES,-A
HARD-FIGHTING   82-YEAR-OLD
ORGANIZER   FOR THE UNITED
MINE WORKERS, ADDRESSED
THE MINERS ON SEPTEMBER 15.
IF IT IS SLAVERY  Ofe
STRIKE, I SAY STRIKE
UNTIL THE LAST ONE OIF
you PROPS MO YOUR
GRAVE/
Jtl ^
r'.i>'.'?V'?.f--'
//<rrj>A
.. HER WORDS WERE
TO BE PROPHETIC.
THE STOKERS WANTED AN 8-HOUR
DAY, RECOGNITION OF THEIR UNION,
A 10% WAGE HIKE (THEY WERE
BEING PAID 50 CENTS FOR EVERY
TON OF COAL THEY BROUGHT UP),
THE RIGHT NOT TO HAVE TO SHOP
AT THE COMPAW STORES. AND
THE ENFORCEMENT   OF THE STAJE
SAFETY LAWS. AT THIS TIME, M/NE
OWNERS WOULD ONLY PROVIDE VENTILATION WHEN THE DUST GOT
SOlhHCK  THEIR MUES COULD NOT
SEE WELL ENOUGH TO HAUL COAL
TO THE SURFACE.
THE OWNERS REFUSED TO NEGOTIATE,
AND EV/CTEDTHE STRIKERS FROM
THE COMPANY- OWNED SHACKS.
WITH VENTER COMING,
THEUMONSET UP TENT
CITIES FOR THE HOMELESS STRIKERS. ONE
WAS AT THE TINY
HAMLET OF LUDLOW
-WfVi
MEANWHILE, BOTH SIDES ARMED. THE
COLORADO FUEL i IRON CO. SPENT
S3O.OO0 ON ARMS FOR ITS GUARDS.
THE UNION DISTRIBUTED A
FEW RIFLES. THE COLORADO
FUEL $ IRON COMPANY
(OWNED B/ JOHN D.
ROCKEFELLER JR., NELSONS
DAD) BUILT A "DEATH
SPECIAL; AN ARMOURED
CAR EQUIPPED WITH A
400-SHOT PER MINUTE
MACHINE GUN. AMASSED
AGAINST THE STRIKERS
AND THEIR FAMILIES
WERE COMR-W GUARDS.
HIRED DETECTIVES,
SHERRIFF'S DEPUTES,
AND THE STATE MILITIA,
A REAL TRIGGER-HAPPY
GROUP.
IT WAS A VIOLENT WINTER^)
*v
BRIG. GEN.  JOHN CHASE OF THE NATIONAL GUARD SLASHED OPEN   A
DEMONSTRATOR'S HEAD WITH HIS OWN
SWORD. ENGAGED STRIKERS LATER
BESIEGED TWO MINES, KILLING 10
GUARDS AND DEPUTIES.
THEN, ON THE MORNING OF APRIL
20, W14, MILITIA BULLETS TORE
THROUGH THE TENTS OF THE
LUDLOW ENCAMPMENT
THE MINERS FOUGHT BACK.
'mi m*«Miir» w kwm— «-wm
DURING ONE OF THE FORAYS INTO
THE CAMP, MILITIA LEADER  KARL
LINDERFELT CAME ACROSS THE
CAMP LEADER, LOUS TIKAS. LINDERFELT
CLUBBED TIKAS WITH HIS RIFLE.
THEN TIKAS WAS SHOT AND KILLED.
THAT EVENING SOLDIERS SWEPT THROUGH THE TENT
COLON/ POURING KEROSENE ON THE TENTS AND
SETTING THEM ALIGHT WITH FLAMING BROOMS. IN
THE MORNING, WORKERS CAME ACROSS THE BODIES I
OF TWO WOMEN AND 11 CHILDREN WHO HAD HIDDEN |
IN A TRENCH BUILT BENEATH A TENT. THEY HAD
SUFFOCATED WHEN THE  TENT BURNED.
ite^^fSf^
.•?»;' .-j/
THAT BROUGHT TO 25 THE NUMBER OF STRIKERS
MURDERED THAT DAY. THE ENRAGED MINERS COUNTERATTACKED SOLDIERS ALONG A 40-MILE FRONT.
FOR 10 DANS, THE MINERS SET
FIRES TO MINING COMPANY BUILDINGS
MID DROPPED DYNAMITE DOWN
MINE SHAFTS. BUT BY'THE END
OF THE YEAR, THEY  KNEW THF?/
WERE BEATEN.  MOTHER  JONES
TOLD A NEW YORK AUDIENCE THAT
THE UNION HAD LOST BECAUSE   IT
"HAD ONLY THE CONSTITUTION. THE
OTHER 3DE HAD THE BAYONETS."
FOR MORE INFORMATION, READ "THE
GREAT COALFIELD WAR." BY GEORGE
MCGCVERN AND LEONARD GUTTRIDGE,
AMD THE DECEMBER T9 ISSUE OF
MOTHER JONES MAGA7INE. ALSO, FOR
SL50,¥DU CAN GET "CORPORATE CRIME
COMICS *1" FROM KfTCHEN SINK ENT.
$©
WELL, ALL THB ABOUT KIDS
BEING KILLED BV GOVERNMENT
TROOPS AND STUFF SOUNDS
PRETTY AWFUL, BUT EVEN
THOUGH THE SAME PARASITES
ARE STILL IN POWER TODAY,
WE DID SET UP A MONUMENT
FDR THE STRIKERS. \T'b STILL
THERE, JUST OFF INTERSTATE
25 IN COLORADO.
S*ifc Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
Blue terms
Perhaps you've noticed. Helpful,
friendly service at UBC libraries is
rare, if not defunct.
Approaching the information
desk at Sedgewick is a considerable
task; everything about the desk tells
you, "Proceed at your own risk."
Well, it seems that the folks at
Sedgewick (or somewhere in the
UBC hierarchy) want to change that
image. The friendly librarian is here
and here to stay, trumpets the 10
minute film, Term Paper Blues, by
UBC student Alison Drysdale.
The film follows the trials and
tribulations of a first-year student
who hasn't done his term paper. As
the due date approaches, Mark
looks relentlessly for books on cloning. Surprise, they're all taken, and
the paper is due tomorrow.
Our archetypal student Mark approaches the information desk with
trepidation. But the librarian
(another archetype) is cheerful and
helpful, and guides Mark to various
stacks and information files.
Soon, he has all the data he needs
and sets about writing his paper. He
finishes in time (the film makes no
mention of how late he had to stay
up to complete the paper). The next
day he meets a fellow student who
makes all sorts of excuses about
why she hasn't done her paper.
Mark is only too happy to guide his
friend through the library (no, he
will not let her copy his paper).
Term Paper Blues is informative,
and of special use to first year
students.   It  is   frequently  super
ficial, but it manages to encompass
the type of information available at
Sedgewick completely.
Term Paper Blues continues today at 12:35 p.m. and 1 p.m., in
Buch. 104.
*3r*
$****"»f'"V"H*|*
>,T
r
Touche Boss &Co.
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If you have a committed interest in a professional
business career as a chartered accountant, have
the desire to attain "hands - on" knowledge of
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while extending yourself through study, are able to
accept responsibility, have above average communication skills and possess the ability to work
with others as a team, we invite you to discuss
career opportunities with Touche Ross & Co.
representitives on campus, October 19 to 23.
Interviews may be arranged through the
Employment Centre on Campus until October
5. Recent courses transcripts should accompany interview applications.
"N
Coopers
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the full range of financial and
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Westcoast Actors
preeent
Sam Shepard's Pulitzer Prize Winner
"a challenging S provocative theatre".    Allen, Province
"a pleasure to watch       Weiss, CHQM
"rare work    . brilliantly directed"    . langford, Westender
"solid performances all round'      Prongos. CISL
MUST CLOSE TIclwU:
OCT. 10th 685-6217
WATERFRONT
THEATRE
GRANVILLE ISLAND
ARTS '20
RELAY
THURS., OCT. 8
Register Before Fri., Oct. 2
Categories: Faculty (M & W), Sorority,
Fraternity, Corec, Faculty & Staff,
Frosh, Varsity (M & W), Independent
THE ALTERNATIVE
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"Sales Tailored to YOUR Needs" Friday, October 2, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
YOLOCAMBA ITA . . . band that hopes to help end war
Playing
for
history
By TOM HAWTHORN
For Canadian University Press
The tour bus passengers could only stare
vacantly, for there, in plain view of the city's
courthouse steps, on a dreary Sunday afternoon when this city is usually abandoned to
roving bands of tourist families, were 400
crazies shouting, maybe even singing their
cry, "No a la in-ter-ven-tion," over and
over, carefully enunciating each Spanish
syllable as if that made their demand clearer.
And then, once they had their pronouncia-
tion clear, they picked up the tempo, racing
ahead, faster and louder, until is seemed that
the five grinning musicians who instigated
this madness were going to use this almost
religious fervour to exorcize U.S. intervention in their homeland.
But it was not to be, for these musicians
were more than 3,000 miles removed from
the slaughter that now greets every sunrise in
El Salvador. For these members of Yolocam-
ba Ita, this was yet another stop in a tour that
so far has lasted three years and nine nations,
a mission that probably won't be complete
until their companeros have won El
Salvador. These men think themselves as
much revolutionaries as musicians, as revolu
tionary as any guerilla fighting at home; they
have merely traded the rebel's surplus rifle
for an acoustic guitar.
Speaking through an interpreter in a Vancouver interview, the five band members told
of how there is little distinction made by the
junta in El Salvador between raising a gun
against the government, and raising a musical
instrument. "During so many years," says,
Alvar Castillo, "the popular culture of our
people was so repressed, and now that it is.
coming out in the open they have to keep it
down, now that the artists are telling
everybody about it through the music and the
arts."
Last year, a thousand people attending a
ceremony for the Democratic Revolutionary
Front (FDR), the broad-based coalition opposing the junta, were attacked by government troops. Musicians and their unarmed
audience scattered as machine gun bullets
sprayed and bazooka shells exploded
throughout the theatre. The band members
say they lost several fellow musicians and
comrades in that one attack alone.
"A revolutionary artist right now is
fighting together with the people in the front
and he goes through the same jobs and duties
that anybody fighting now has," Castillo
says.
When Yolocamba Ita was formed six years
ago, its members pledged two goals: to express the Salvadoran struggle through song,
and to rescue the cultural roots which had
been so brutally repressed. Even the group's
name is taken from the now extinct Lenca
dialect. It means the Rebellion of the Sowing.
"In 1932," says Castillo, "all the tradition
that had come before the colony, and after
the colony, had a break, because in 1932
there was an insurrection of our people where
there had been participation by Indians and
our peasants. The repression had been indiscriminate.
"If you spoke Lav/ock, that's Lenca, or
had indiginous customs, or if you wore a certain type of shirt that you use to perform, it
was to be a communist, and for that reason
to be killed. Our people had to hide their
culture and a lot of our people, more than
30,000, were killed.
"So our group, in this moment of struggle
. . . our duty has been to dig for this culture.
So for that reason we have a lot of traditional
music from our country that has taken us a
lot of work to find. And we have gathered
different elements of our culture to show
now the situation, so that we can sing about
what is now going on."
Their struggle to resurrect what was almost
a permanently lost culture has resulted in a
fusion of tradition and modern revolution,
of communism and communionism. It has
meant that Yolocamba Ita and their songs,
their guitars, marimbas, mandolins, flutes
and percussion instruments have enraptured
tense Salvadoran peasants during land occupations, and comfortable Canadians at
folk festivals. They sing of struggle and they
sing of Sr. Oscar Romero, the revered Archbishop and folk hero assassinated while
conducting mass, and for whom band
member Guillermo Cuellar was once an aide.
"The bombing," Franklin Quasada sighed, "and the daily massacres — everything is
with American armaments . . . our people
have had to direct their struggle for more
than 10 years through armed struggle. This is
very hard for the democratic countries of the
world to understand. Now through our songs
and cultural work we are giving a very small
piece of the work of informing, of telling
everybody what is going on in El Salvador."
"Our people want democracy," Cuellar
says heavily. "But we believe that the model
of democracy that the United States has is
not the best. We want an independent
democracy."
Fish and other musical exotica
By EVAN McINTYRE
The local music scene is fanning out
steadily like a brushfire.
As previously untouched horizons come
closer, there seems to be no limit to the
variety of music competent Vancouver-
based musicians are offering and the number of people persuing local talent over the
hollow hype of Top 40 tedium.
Vancouver's two dailies and major radio
stations fall loosely into the category of
New Wave. These are the more clamorous
and vibrant alternatives, bands such as
DOA, the Questionnaires and hybrid bands
(to a lesser extent) that manage to draw
steady audiences to their frequent and ubiquitous gigs.
But some of our most exciting local music
gets lost in the din raised by the myriad
"new wave" groups. Jazz gets very little
coverage anywhere.
There are a few trash bands that only mar
the reputation that deserving bands work so
hard to develop. Trash bands are the
esthetic ripoffs that have no right to be paid
for what they do.
Trash bands will even on occasion
besmirch the setting and atmosphere for
talented visiting bands. When Mrs. Lux-
ford's Fish played for a crowd at Robson
Square early in September, the audience
had come to see the Lounge Lizards, an exciting jazz group from New York. The fishy
band gave the worst example of excess a
local audience has ever been forced to sit
through.
The only value a band like Luxford's Fish
has, and it has it only in miniscule quantity,
is novelty. And the novelty of having someone bellow lines from a Wonder Bra
commercial beneath a 10-foot papier mache
fish backed up by non-musicians making
noise, dissipates within a minute at most.
When the novelty wears off, the audience
gets angry.
One patron paid $8.50 for the privilege of
having a fresh fish head, cold and dripping,
BUD LUXFORD . . . namesake band fishy
placed on his lap by the band's repugnantly
prehensile drummer. He came within a few
feet of having the fish head intimately
returned to him when the angry patron
hurled it back seconds later.
There are too many parallel ways an audience can get dumped on unexpectedly. So
many of the people who spend significantly
for a rare concert from a quality visiting
band can often catch comparable acts most
nights of the week in the various local
clubs.
Many of these clubs regularly feature a
variety of jazz styles from nostalgic to experimental, are devoid of hype and aggression and give a full evening's entertainment
for a low cover charge.
The Classical Joint, at 231 Carral St.
(near Cordova) is a small and cosy club that
draws in jazz lovers for tea or coffee (it's
unlicensed) or snacks as they enjoy hours of
good quality jazz from local and visiting
musicians.
The Gavin Walker Quartet is featured
there Thursday nights with occasional appearances and jam sessions from Ted
Quinlan, Perry White, Hugh Fraser, Dick
Smith and scores of other fine musicians
usually on Wednesday or weekend nights.
Another choice location for jazz is the
Sheraton Landmark jazz bar at the
Sheraton Landmark hotel on Robson and
the tiny yet vital Darby D. Dawes at Fourth
and MacDonald.
Darby's offers its finest sessions (for no
cover charge) on Saturday afternoons from
about 1:30 to 6 p.m.
Saturday regulars are treated to the likes
of Doc Fingers and Jim Rothermiel. Fingers
is a versatile pianist and crooner who even
takes requests while virtuoso soprano saxophonist Rothermiel's lovely tone churns
the Toby-draft saturated air.
Both the Landmark jazz bar and Darby's
are fully licensed as is The Hot Jazz Club on
Main St. The Hot Jazz offers everything
from swing to Dixieland along with more
contemporary styles. It also has a great atmosphere and has a dance floor unlike the
often-crowded Darby's.
Some of the best after hours jam sessions
can be found weekend nights beginning at 2
a.m. or so at Basin Street on 136 East
Hastings. Like The Classical Joint, Basin
Street is small and unlicensed but the people
there are extremely kind and the music will
very definitely keep your eyelids open.
Another good local band is VEJI. All of
VEJI's regular members were awarded fine
arts scholarships to study in Banff early in
September but they will return Oct. 23 to do
two nights at the Landmark (Oct. 23 and
24) with two additional shows on Sunday,
Oct. 25 at the Arts Club.
They also have an album coming out
around mid-October that will feature some
of the original compositions played in the
Bentall Plaza this summer during two lunch
hour urban concerts. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell & Co.
Peat, Marwick is one of the largest international firms
of Chartered Accountants with professional staff of
20,000 of which 1,300 are located in Canada.
Representatives of our Vancouver, Richmond and Coquitlam offices will be on campus October 20 through
October 23 at the Canada Employment Centre and
would like to meet with those of you who will be eligible
for student registration with The Institute of Chartered
Accountants of British Columbia.
Our Vancouver practice has in excess of one hundred
professionals servicing a wide variety of clients. Our
Richmond and Coquitlam practices are smaller sized offices servicing clients in their locale.
Arrangements for interviews can be made through the
Canada Employment Centre, Brock Hall by October 5.
Please indicate on your application the Peat, Marwick
office of most interest to you.
CHECK
INTO
YOUR
FUTURE
AT
AECL
RESEARCH
COMPANY
Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories
Whiteshell Nuclear Research
Establishment
Careers in Research
and Development
Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Research Company
operates Canada's national nuclear research laboratories
located at Chalk River, Ontario and Pinawa, Manitoba We
are responsible for basic and applied research and development in the field of nuclear energy for the benefit of Canada.
Our research and development teams provide the science and
technology to lead and assist the nuclear industry in the
development and use of nuclear power. New applications
are being developed for nuclear energy which will help to
contribute to future energy self sufficiency in Canada.
We require graduates at all levels in the following disciplines.
ENGINEERING CHEMISTRY
Chemical
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If you are interested in checking into your future with us,
we would like to meet you. For further information, and interview dates, contact your on-campus placement office
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MERYL STREEP JEREMY IRONS
aKARELREISZhuh
THE FRENCH UEXJTENANTS WOMAN"
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LEOMcKERN HAROLDPINTCR
BA1ED i Xs THE fWJVf L B> W !t-t( HY
JOHN FOWLES G\fl DAVIS
LE0NCL0RE KARELREISZ
HEAD THE SIGNET MPHBACK TEOWCOlOt8
COPIHH.HT (   MCMUOXJUNIP6RHLMS   ||_.*_J   «    - »__
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i-VANCOUVER CENTRE.
GRANVILLE A GEORGIA 6694442
DAILY: 3:00 5:15 7:35 9:55
WARNING   Some suggestive scenes
and very coarse language   —B.C. Dir.
(MATURE) Friday, October 2, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
From Mao to Mozart: Two views
? m
my
;a
Eloquent film
glows with hope
By KERRY REGIER
How long has it been since you
saw an eloquent, beautiful film?
How long since you have walked
out of a theatre in the company of
an audience smiling, radiantly happy, glowing with joy and hope?
From Mao to Mozart:
Isaac Stern in China
At the Ridge Theatre
This happens at every showing of
From Mao to Mozart. It is a
delicate film, a gentle, honest, loving, joyous film and the audience
responds. People fall in love with
the music, with the humanity, with
the joy of violinist Isaac Stern.
From Mao to Mozart documents
Isaac Stern's recent tour of
mainland China. Stern visited
music schools, talked with students,
gave concerts, and gave public
master classes in which he listened
to students and showed them how
he made music.
The master classes form the heart
of the film, showing Stern at his
gregarious, loving, passionate best.
He sits quietly, listening as a student plays a melody by Brahms.
Then his eyes begin to glow, and
taking his violin says "That was
nice, this is how you played," and
he copies her, playing in a plain,
cold, note-correct manner.
"Why can't you play it like this?
Sing it! Sing!" And moving closer
to her, rolling his hips slightly, smiling gently, he plays with the fire of
gypsy, feeling the music every moment, loving it, and showing his
student that music is a thing of
closeness, of intimate joy, and not
of technical expertise and
mechanical demands.
And the student picks up Stern's
phrasing, his rhythm, and makes it
her own, playing like she has never
played in her life, and feeling what
Brahms felt, what Stern feels, so
deeply she begins to cry for the joy
of the music.
And the Chinese audience feels
with them, and applauds, and the
audience in the theatre feels the moment and we too sigh, applaud, and
cheer.
Stern visits a music school,
always listening, playing, helping,
inspiring. He speaks with the director of the school, a violin teacher
himself. The camera closes on just
the teacher's face as he describes his
life during the Cultural Revolution.
Foreign art had then become,
discouraged or illegal, and as a
violinist he was suspect. Beginning
with the classical detachment of the
Chinese culture,  he describes his
persecution and eventual 18 month
imprisonment in a school closet
under the basement stairs, next to a
septic tank.
Slowly the teacher's control
breaks, and as he talks of the five
minute visit he was permitted with
his daughter, his voice begins to
waver and that tension which
precedes tears creeps in around his
eyes. How difficult to live in a
culture of introversion, of non-
display, and be tormented for his
belief in Western music, an art
essentially of display, of the giving
of emotion.
Stern encounters this very reluctance to relent at a rehearsal of a
Mozart concerto with the Shanghai
orchestra. Frustrated by their cool
**,'\.
Intentions good,
polemics not
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
From Mao to Mozart: Isaac Stern
in China is designed to make you
feel all gushy and romantic about
how the perennially delirious Mr.
Stern comes to China in 1979 with
his musical entourage and teaches
enthusiastic Chinese students the
proper way to play classical music
— with feeling and warmth.
But while the intentions of the
film may be honourable, the film
itself is less than a success as a
documentary, and its polemics are
questionable.
From Mao to Mozart:
Isaac Stern in China
Directed by Murray Lerner
Playing at the Ridge
It is obvious that Stern, as an accomplished violinist and humanist,
has much to offer his new students.
STERN
full of joy or preachiness?
playing and finding words inadequate, he finally leaps at the
players, playing with exaggerated
mannerisms, laughing, and the orchestra finally laughs, relaxes and
returns the love which he gave
them.
And again the audience responds,
laughing with the musicians, and
taking that hope and happiness out
of the theatre with them. Indeed,
every time someone talks of the
film, even days afterwards, their
eyes begin to glow, and they want to
see it again, perhaps several times.
And why not? In a world of fear,
jealousy and envy, violence and
hatred, how often can you share a
really joyful experience? How often
can you be happy without the fear
that something must be wrong?
PRNW^MUmWMfM
h^
When his class begins to play, Ihe
music chimes in unison, but it is
cold and dispassionate. Stern, striving to break the cultural barrier,
plays a violin the way a student does
and then proceeds to play the
melody the way it should be.
It is also obvious that the Chinese
students and master adore Stern: he
is a king who can do no wrong.
When David Golub, a pianist,
discovers that a piano in a Shanghai
theatre is unsuitable, Stern has little
problem getting it replaced. The
Chinese officials hold Stern in awe,
admiring his every move.
Then, with no warning, the film
departs from the music lessons and
dreary travelogue scenes of Chinese
landscapes, and suddenly we have a
close-up of the director of a conservatory revealing his tribulations
during the cultural revolution of the
1960's.    In   graphic   detail,    he
describes his life in a tiny room filled with septic tank odors.
At this point, it becomes clear
what the film has been leading up
to: a rebuttal of the cultural revolution of the 1960's and a message
that classical music is here to stay
in China. And Stern is just the man
who's going to show them how it's
done.
There is a certain naivete that
operates in the film. Stern may be
an excellent musician (he gets ample
chance to demonstrate his talents in
the movie) but doesn't seem the
least bit concerned about reasons
for the Cultural Revolution.
What counts is that the revolution robbed young musicians of opportunity to continue their practice.
The fact that there is a definitely
Chinese musical identity doesn't
concern the filmmakers at all.
From Mao to Mozart isn't a
documentary: it's a pro-Western
film designed for showing to the
Coca-Cola company before they
risk their dollars in a new market.
The film doesn't show a country
trying to bridge a gap; for the film's
purposes, that gap has already been
reached. There are continual shots
of supposedly representative
Chinese citizens speaking glorious
praises of Western music, including
country music.
From Mao to Mozart isn't the
least bit interested in illustrating the
interrelationship of Chinese and
Western music in China. There are
glimpses of the Peking Opera but
they don't amount to much.
And Stern, discussing Western
music with officials, makes a flippant remark about how Mozart
wasn't peculiar to his age, that his
music could have germinated in any
political system.
Watching a group of talented
gymnasts contorting in breathtaking positions, Stern says, "But they
can't play Mozart," jokingly, but
one gets the distinct impression that
Stern believes it — and so do the
filmmakers. Mechanical
movements, though intense and
learned, have no place in this film's
heart.
It would have been great if the
film had managed to operate
dynamically, offering us a more
complete view of Chinese society
and its rich musical culture. From
Mao to Mozart doesn't do this.
You're supposed to feel exuberant about Stern's journey and
his accomplishments with the
Chinese students. Yet watching the
movie, you just can't share the
film's outlook. Something holds
you back, and you begin to question what this film is really trying to
say.
The film is satisified with itself a>
a document of Stern's important
journey. Many, undoubtedly, will
rejoice with Stern as he struts his
stuff. Others, also undoubtedly,
will wonder about Stern and his
company; they look suspiciously
like missionaries bringing the gospel
to uncultured and uncivilized
peoples.
f
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
Go-Gos combine bounce and wit
THE GO-GOS . . . bouncing, lively alternative to
soggy radio sound.
By MARTIN STRONG
Bouncing on the stage, The Go-
Gos lead singer Belinda Carlisle
looks somewhat like a cross between Deborah Harry and Shirley
Temple. With huge tacky earrings
dangling from side to side, she sings
songs like Skid Marks On My Heart
and We Got the Beat.
A female band, the Go-Gos
combine the liveliness of 1960s pop
with wit and intelligence. Strangely
enough their early musical influences were not all aimed in the same
direction. Lead guitarist Charlotte
Caffey was actually a formally
trained classical pianist before picking up a guitar and joining the Go-
Gos. She, along with rhythm
guitarist Jane Wiedlin, writes most
of the band's material.
"We're all different," says Caffey in a Ubyssey interview. "Everyone of us listen to different things,
and it's not necessarily the type of
music we play. We just took all our
influences and tastes, wound it up
into a big ball and threw it against
the wall."
From that the Go-Gos say
they've come up with an inventive
brand of danceable pop music. But
as a streamlined pop band do they
consider themselves as rebellious toward what is currently being played
on the radio?
"I don't know if we're rebell
ious," says lead singer Carlisle.
"But I do think radio used to be a
lot better in the mid sixties and now
it's gotten a little soggy. Let's put it
this way; if there's a good song on
the radio it really stands out."
The Go-Gos have come a long
way since their formation in 1978.
"We were very rough back then because nobody knew how to play,"
Carlisle says in total seriousness.
"Our ideas were the same but not
our abilities. We had some of the
same songs but we just sounded incredibly awful, as well the equipment we were using was very primitive."
But that's all in their past now as
the band sets out to do dates all
over the world. Their Tuesday night
Vancouver show at the Commodore
ballroom was their second in Canada, after playing at the Police Picnic in Toronto last summer with
bands like the Specials, Iggy Pop,
and the Payolas.
From Vancouver they'll set out to
do a single date with the Rolling
Stones in Illinois.
Though their album, Beauty and
the Beat, now stands lifeless at the
bottom of Canadian charts, it's
making considerable headway in
the United States.
The album is well produced by
Richard Gottehrer. Well known for
his work on the first, and best, two
Blondie albums, IRS Records president Miles Copeland chose Gottehrer for the Go-Gos. Carlisle adds,
"He was very energetic and spontaneous, and he knew the best restaurants in New York."
The single Our Lips are Sealed
from their album was used for the
band's promotional video. When
the video is mentioned, Charlotte
Caffey groans, saying, "We didn't
have much say in what was going
on, and we had better ideas for our
video, so next time it'll be better.
But it was fun."
On stage last Tuesday at the
Commodore the band was rougher,
with Caffey's simple but intense
leads following the steady beat of
drummer Gina Schock. Visually
and musically interesting they provided a short, exciting set.
The real surprise from Tuesday's
concert came from the backup
bands. First up were the Fleshtones
from New York who delivered a
rocking Chuck Berry sound which
left the unexpectant crowd buzzing.
The show continued with the
Payolas who, led by Paul Hyde,
took the stage for a solid and tough
set. The band even had the confidence not to include the song China
Boys in their set. A gutsy move for
a band that has relied heavily on the
song in the past, including it on all
of their last three discs.
Zfe'en Vagi Dhn«*».
Welcome to Body Heat anything can happen in sun
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Everything in Body Heat — actors and locals alike — seems to
languish in heated passion and
steamy sweat. In the maddening
heat of summer, anything can happen — and it usually does.
For Ned Racine (William Hurt), an
incompetent lawyer, the heat means
added restlessness. For Matty
Walker (Kathleen Turner), rich sensual but deadly, Ned is just the right
fool to satisfy midnight cravings
and do in a flabby, unattractive
husband.
As the fans t jperately twirl the
hazy air, thick with cic-rette smoke
that permeates every arid room in
town, Ned and Matty are engaging
in some very adult interplay. Where
the affair leads to is obvious —
murder — and a labyrinth of
broken promises, double crosses,
and general tomfoolery ensues.
Welcome to Body Heat.
Body Heat represents Lawrence
Kasdan's first attempt as a director,
his previous experience was
restricted to writing screenplays
(The Empire Strikes Back, Raiders
of the Lost Ark, and Continental
Divide).   As   a  director,   Kasdan
Body Heat
Directed by Lawrence Kasdan
Playing at Capitol Six
makes all the right decisions in
Body Heat, guiding his actors
through intricate plot structures
and giving them maximum freedom
to interpret the characters. There is
nothing remarkable about the
movie's concept — even the
scenario is familiar — but half the
pleasure of Body Heat is enjoying
the broad strokes of color and
'moves' Kasdan concocts.
The colors in Body Heat are so
vivid and blazing they seem to
have a life of their own. Kasdan
photographs   his   actors   against
large, dark silhouettes, setting the
contours of their bodies off bold
reds and cool satin blues. The composition is obvious, but it works
beautifully. It gives an illusion of
depth to what is essentially a super-
fical movie.
Body Heat is a genre film to its
core. It has all the ingredients of a
thriller and its similarity to films
like The Postman Always Rings
Twice (1946) is apparent
throughout the movie. What is
fascinating about Body Heat is that
Kasdan infuses the plot
characteristics of a dime-store novel
with an acute cinematic sensibility.
Body Heat is more than just a copy
of old B-grade movies; it is a
homage to them.
Body Heat is the product of the
imagination of a filmmaker who
saw and loved just about every
1940s and 1950s B-grade effort
with a sexy siren and dastardly
vamp. In Kathleen Turner, Kasdan
has found that perfect vamp.
Turner's   delivery   is   almost   a
satire of the traditional vamp.
There is a deliberate sultriness in
her voice, and it is about as
dangerous as a black widow
spider's bite. "You're not very
smart, are you?" she tells Ned at
their first meeting. "I like that in a
man."
Turner doesn't play down to the
typical character of the vamp; she
pays tribute to it. Everything about
her — her looks, her lips — is inviting and playful. She seems a
spoiled child with too many toys.
Ned Racine is, like others who come
to Matty's parlour, ripe for her
manipulation. There is nothing
remotely resembling love in their
relationship; it's purely sexual.
While she plays the subservient
partner in their affair, Ned enjoys
the thought of sharing the millions
Matty will inherit if her husband
dies.
Matty has an explanation for
everything that happens around
her. "It's the heat," she says, and it
makes   Ned   do   strange   things.
Refusing to heed his friends' warning about her ("She's big time, major league trouble' says a
policeman friend), Ned dives into
Matty's life and sinks deeper and
deeper. As the solo saxaphone
envelopes them in their sexual
foreplay with a jazzy passion, Matty has already gotten her Adam to
bite the figurative fruit.
The dialogue in Body Heat is full
of cliches, but you begin to enjoy
them because there is nothing that
calls attention to them. The fast and
furious dialogue is just a part of the
overall design of Body Heat. The
script, also by Kasdan, is surprisingly economical; there are no wasted
words or langorous scenes. Once
Ned and Matty meet, there is no
question and where they'll end up.
Previously, Kasdan has rewritten the script for Empire Strikes
Back, which managed to weave
science-fiction characters within a
mythological framework. Foi
Raiders of the Lost Ark, a tribute to
the adventure serials, Kasdan show- Friday, October 2, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Creeps is tense, but funny
imer sweat
ed some of the same potential for
dialogue that seems to ricochet off
the frame. Only in Continental
Divide has Kasdan failed.
Kasdan doesn't fall into the same
trap director Steven Spielberg did
with Raiders. He sticks closely to
the conventions of the genre
without becoming mechanical.
Watching Body Heat, you just
know Kasdan enjoys every twist in
the plot. And at the end, he does
something daring. He lets the
camera take its time panning 360
degrees around Matty, to punctuate
where she is (on a tropical, exotic
land) and where Ned is (in jail).
Body Heat is no work of art —
the film begins to disappear from
memory the moment you leave the
theatre — but is artful in its execution. The film would have been
memorable had Kasdan slowly
perverted his concept (the way
Robert Towne and Roman Polanski
did in Chinatown). But as it is,
Body Heat doesn't do disservice to
its genre; it enriches it.
Caretaker
is silent
By MARK LEIREN-YOUNG
Silence. Uncomfortable silence.
That's what Harold Pinter's The
Caretaker is all about. Silence, and
what fills in the gaps.
The Caretaker, which opened
Friday at the Freddy Wood theatre,
is a play laced with uncomfortable
moments and pregnant pauses. The
tone regularly shifts from amusement to brutal intensity, and does
so beautifully.
The Caretaker by Harold Pinter
At the
Freddy Wood Theatre
Directed by Charles Siegel
The story explores the relationship between two brothers and a
derelict caretaker. What it means
depends on who you ask. The play's
theme is what you make of it, and
that is what many audience
members found frustrating.
The rapid-fire exchanges between
the younger brother, Mick (Tom
McBeath), and the caretaker,
Davies (Duncan Fraser), are equally
fascinating. Fraser, who got off to a
slow start, was at his best when he
explained his presence in the apartment to McBeath. And McBeath's
bitterly sarcastic style. was as enjoyable to watch as the moments he
found himself reflexively defending
his brother, whom he usually seems
to find a burden.
Charles Siegel does a fine job of
directing the three equity actors in
professional-quality production.
And the set. The set was clutter as
art. It consisted of a one room flat
done in Early Junk Yard.
Everything from the bathtub to the
old newspapers to the broken
typewriter in the sink served to add
to the play's claustrophobic atmosphere.
By WENDY CUMMING
Creeps is not a horror show or a
murder mystery. In fact, David
Freeman's 1972 play, which exposes
the predicament of a minority
group, is not in the least
mysterious. Freeman's messages are
fired directly at the audience in this
tense and humorous drama.
Creeps
By David Freeman
Directed by Catherine Caines
At Studio 5* until Oct. 10
Creeps focuses on a somewhat
neglected social issue: society's
treatment of the handicapped,
especially those with cerebral
palsy.
According to Freeman, cerebral
palsy victims face two alternatives:
either to join workshops for the
handicapped where employees confront mind numbing tasks such as
folding boxes or sanding blocks, or
be part of society, where they are
pitied or labelled as creeps.
Directed by Catherine Caines,
Langara's Studio 58 cast produces
an awesomely realistic portrayal of
life in such a workshop.
Creeps is set in a workshop
washroom, where the main
characters are introduced. Pete
(Tracey   Olsen),   who   joined   the
workshop to become a carpenter, is
still folding boxes.
An abstract painter, Tom
(Michael Vairo), who despises the
workshop, is afraid to leave.
Through Vairo's convincing performance, we accept Tom as he relates
his one big fear: being trapped in
the workshop until he is; mentally
destroyed. Jim (Thomas Hunt), by
contrast, is a university graduate
and a talented writer who simply accepts his demeaning role in the
workshop.
The men generally poke fun at
each other and complain about
their jobs. As their characters
develop, however, we discover
angry, frustrated young men behind
the cigarettes, the dirty books and
the witty jokes. Their conversations
reveal some of the many misconceptions about handicapped people.
Nelson Brown's striking performance as Sam, a man confined to a
wheelchair, debunks the idea that
handicapped people have no sexual
desires.
A colourful parade of clowns,
magicians and dancing women
break the dramatic tension. More
profoundly, the parade is a surrealistic party Freeman uses to
mock the Kiwanis club and the
Shriners. These clubs organize free
outing   to   the   glue   factory   and
Christmas festivities with free hot
dogs and ice-cream for the 'needy
cripples'.
The play ends in a confrontation.
Carson, the stiff, conservative factory owner who won't listen to his
workers orders the men back to
work. Tom articulates the workers'
grievances, but Carson, of course,
is a non-listener. Tom walks out.
He begs Jim to join him, but Jim
refuses choosing security over
freedom.
Throughout the one-act play, the
disabled workers are believable.
But, the appearances of Saunders
and Carson (who represent society),
are so short that their characters are
scarcely developed. Carson stands
as a symbol of an unrighteous
capitalist society, but not as a well
rounded character. The consec-
quence is a good versus evil view of
society: the stoic handicapped
against the unthinking masses.
Nonetheless, the cast's
remarkable interpretation of a handicapped person's speech patterns
and movements renders an impressive performance. Creeps
humors, questions and shocks its
audience. But more crucially, it
dispels myths about the handicapped.
Dixon blues beat beats monotony
By CHARLES CAMPBELL
The blues is a simple form of
music. The same songs are cross
bred or adapted again and again by
different musicians. Undoubtedly
the blues is music's most incestuous
family. There is probably more
sheer variety in Beethoven's ninth
symphony than there is in blues
music from 1940 to 1960.
Yet it's exactly because the blues
is so simple that it's so hard to do
well. Blues musicians can easily
become monotonous, even painful
at their barroom worst.
Of course neither Willy Dixon
nor James Cotton were
monotonous in their double bill at
the Commodore last Friday night,
but for different reasons: Dixon
because he is the master of his art,
Cotton only because he didn't play
much blues.
Willy Dixon and his Chicago
Blues Allstars were first up (a reversal of the previous evening's show)
and their 90 minute set created a
pace that Cotton was eventually
unable to top.
The Allstarts work as a well-knit
unit depending on the interplay of
musicians for a full sound. Dixon's
musicians don't run off on
egotistical tangents — every note is
neccessary and sufficient punctuation for his superb vocals. Dixon
showed perfect control of timing
and volume, alternately wailing and
whispering into the microphone.
The set was notable for the songs
Dixon managed to get away without
playing. Spoonful, Hoochie
Coochie Man, and Little Red
Rooster were all given a rest while
Willy explored a lot of unfamiliar
material with the same perfect
simplicity he would have applied to
those more famous tunes. Still there
were rousing renditions of Back
Door Man and Seventh Son.
Late in the program Dixon
brought out his acoustic bass and
played it in his own unmistakable
style slapping the strings with his
left hand while plucking them with
his right. It was a completely satisfying set from the consummate
blues artist.
And it was a completely satisfied
audience that James Cotton faced.
Fortunately, Cotton didn't play a
lot of blues. His inferiority would
have been too obvious if he had. Instead he relied heavily on the talents
of saxophone player Doug Fagan
and played a lot of funk and jazz.
And while Cotton and his nimble
musicians worked up an awful
sweat, their intensity was no
substitute for the spirit and control
of Willy Dixon.'
Making matters worse was the
fact that James Cotton can't sing. It
simply hurts to listen to his out-of-
tune shouting, and growing.
Despite Cotton's long pedigree,
(he is a cousin to Bobby Blue Bland,
apprenticed to Sonny Boy Williamson, who played with Howlin' Wolf
for four years, and Muddy Waters
for 12.)
James Cotton doesn't appear to
know what the blues is about. "No
matter what category you stick it
in," he says, "Rock, blues, disco,
jazz, it's still just dance music."
That's just not true. Blues is
simplicity with feeling. Simplicity is
foreign to jazz, feeling has nothing
to do with disco, and both simplicity and feeling are usually absent
from rock.
Cotton further betrays his ignorance with the release of his most
recent album My Foundation which
he also produced. The album is a
collection of the blues classics on
which Cotton was weaned. But if
there are 18 versions each of
Hungry Country, Dust My Broom
and Take Out Some Insurance,
then 17 of them are better than Cotton's pedestrian arrangements.
The worst of it though is that
James Cotton would be a great
pleasure if he would only go back to
playing harmonica in somebody
else's band.
—charitw camptMll photo
WILLY DIXON . . . unmistakable style Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
*Oi
Birdwatch
The women's field hockey team
will be hosting the Early Bird Tournament this weekend. Participants
include league rivals University of
Victoria, as well as Simon Fraser
University, the UBC junior varsity
team and four teams from the Vancouver league.
Tournament play starts Saturday
at 8:30 a.m. on both McGregor and
Warren fields.
* »     »
The men's rugby team will be
tangling with the Ex-Brits this Saturday at Clinton Park. The 'Birds
are currently 1-0 in league play. The
varsity game gets under way at 2:30
p.m. while UBC's second, third and
fourth teams start at 10:45 a.m.
* *     »
UBC will be the site of the boys'
senior high school volleyball tournament this weekend. The tournament starts today at 4 p.m. in War
Memorial gym and Osborne centre,
with 32 high schools from around
the province competing.
The UBC varsity team will play
an intersquad on Saturday, in other
volleyball action.
* *      *
The football team will be in Cheney, Wash. Saturday to play the
Eastern Washington University
Eagles. It is a non-conference game
that is being used to fill up a hole in
UBC's schedule.
At the halfway point in the season the 'Birds are in first place in
the Western Intercollegiate Football
League. UBC coach Frank Smith
will be using the game to keep his
team in shape for the second half of
the season.
*     *     »
Also on the road today is the
men's soccer team.
The 'Birds are travelling to Saskatoon for an afternoon game
against the Saskatchewan Huskies.
Then on Saturday, UBC will be in
Calgary to play against the University of Calgary.
UBC is 1-0 in league play after
defeating Saskatchewan here last
weekend. The game against Calgary
will be very important as UBC and
Calgary tied for first place last year.
UBC has also not won in Calgary
for the last three years.
Because of budget cuts the 'Birds
will only be taking 15 players on the
trip. UBC coach Joe Johnson is
hoping the injury problem that occurred last year will not arise again.
»       *       «
As the little grey box above this
column will tell you, we desperately
need men and women to come in
and write sports copy for us.
Remember, 241k SUB any Monday, Wednesday or Thursday.
The black sheep of Canadian liquors.
Yukon
Jack
Soft-spoken and smooth,
its northern flavour
simmers just below the
surface, waiting to be
discovered. Straight, on the
rocks, or mixed, "Yukon Jack
is a breed apart; unlike any
liqueur you've ever tasted.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
Grey box** are usually used to try and attract naw staff members to Th* Ubyssey, but not this one. The Ubyssey is going to enter the
Arts'20 race (if we get our registration form in on time today) so this gray Ikhc ie gohrg to be used to slur and challenge aH our potential
opponents. Nestor Korchinsky laughed when he heard The Ubyssey was going to enter the race. He said "can anyone run on the staff?"
You know we can And we can do it better than any frats or gears or nurses or whoever. But we will only bet against the men's field
lacrosse team. We are even wilting to back this up vyith 50 of the big ones •- that right 50 bucks. Even the gears do not back up their
claims with real money. We considered challenging them but we did not want to get tied up in a blanket. Nestor also tofd us the
women's volleyball team said they could beat ui. We think not. They m«y ba good volleyball players but eight miles is eight mites and
aa yott do in vofleybali is jump end down and move in a ctrcis.
NOTICE OF ELECTION
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1981
A.M.S. BY-ELECTION
FOR THE POSITION OF
VICE-PRESIDENT
Candidates:
CHOW, Pat
FULKER, Chris
MENZIES, Charles
Polling Stations:
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1981 - 9:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
War Memorial Gym Computer Science
Sedgewick Library Civil-Mechanical Engineering
Angus Law
MacMillan Scarfe
Woodward Grad Students Centre
Buchanan S.U.B.
ADVANCE POLLS: Thurs., October 8, 1981 - 4.30-7:00 p.m.
at Totem Park, Place Vanier and Gage Common Blocks
Note: Poll hours and locations are subject to the
availability of poll clerks.
Civil, Mechanical and Electrical
engineering grads:
Let's talk about your future.
Who are we. We are Canada's third-largest electrical utility, generating, transmitting and distributing
electricity across British Columbia. We also operate Canada's third-largest natural gas distribution system,
and run a modern industrial railway.
We're one of the biggest companies in Canada and a provincial Crown Corporation of 9,500 people
committed to providing efficient energy to British Columbians—today, and far into tomorrow.
We need engineering graduates interested in the challenging environment of energy resource
development and management.
We offer a stimulating work environment with some of the best professionals in the business.
And exposure to high-technology solutions for moving energy over vast distances and rugged terrain.
You receive excellent training and the opportunity to determine your own career path. You'll also get
competitive salaries and a benefit package that includes 17 days off each year in addition to three weeks
annual vacation.
Interested? Our recruiters will be on your campus in October to talk with you and receive applications.
Watch for dates on your bulletin boards or check with your student representative. Personal interviews will
be scheduled for sometime in November.
Let's talk about your future
®B.CHydio Friday, October 2, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Unknown mystery
By JENNIFER RYAN
According to her promoters,
West German Gina Kikoine's second and most recent album is supposed to represent "the unknown
quality as part of the feminine and
masculine chromosomes."
Unfortunately this mystery is
never explained by the music, but
more importantly, Performance
X-trodinaire is not that interesting.
Performance X-trodinaire
Gina Kikoine
Rio Records
A recent Rio records release,
Kikoine's music is reminiscent of
Kraftwerk and the Alan Parsons
project but is also akin to the disco
beat found in gay bars that will
keep your toes tapping in spite of
yourself.
The second side of the LP is the
better of the two. The beat loses
some of its disco gloss here and two
songs even make some kind of comment. At their best the lyrics have
the tacky-wit of the Rocky Horror
Picture Show; at their worst, they
are blush-embarassing.
For example Cologne Intime has
a voice-over reminiscent of Mork's
Orson or the Wizard of Oz.
The best cut is Nowhere Wolf, a
very stylized song about coming out
with lyrics like "O, Nowhere Wolf,
you can be free, tear off your mask
and be like me." The music is not
original but the lyrics are
courageous.
In short, if a science-fiction-
minded lesbian friend is having a
party and needs dance music, bring
along Performance X-trodinaire. If
not, pick up another Kraftwerk
album instead.
Mo is another European group
who have been together since
November 1979, and have recently
released an album with Rio records.
Mo
Mo
Rio Records
On their first album, Mo, there
are straight, understandable lyrics
PREPARE FOR
MCAT-LSAT-GMAT m
SAT-DAT-GRE    **
NATL MEDICAL BDS
VQE • ECFMG • FLEX
NDB•NPBI-NLE
sung in a straight, bar-band style,
electronic sounds and staccatto
rhythms reminiscent of the early
Police. The band has borrowed one
or two touches from Devo and Gary
Numan's keyboards for decoration.
(The press release for the album
claimed; "Comparisons with other
groups can't be made." Really?)
Mo isn't always a successful mix.
Vocalist Heili Helder's unspectacular, very normal voice often
sounds out of place with the discordant electronic background. Many
of these pieces would be better as
straight instrumentals. But on the
best cuts such as Visions and Short
Legged Dog, the album works.
This band has an interesting
feature, an electric bassoon, which
at times gives the music added texture. In Nancy Little Girl backing
vocals adds some interest.
Most of the lyrics revolve around
the hoary theme of "Hurrah, I'm in
love, God it's awful." It's easy to
develop an affection for lines like,
"You turn me into a boozer." In
one cut there is a wonderful piece of
irony in the line, "You even get used to these plastic songs."
Not a bad album, but listen to someone else's copy before you buy
it.
I
THE test
preparation
KflPtAN I specialists
educational    I since 1938
CENTER ■
Call Days, Evenings 1 Weekends
University Village Bldg.
4900 25th Avenue NE.
Seattle, Washington 98105
 (206) 523-7617
CUSO
1961-81
YEARS
CUSO
Information Session
IS c.u.s.o.
FOR YOU?
Thursday,
Oct. 8—7:30 p.m.
Upper Lounge
International House
Slide-tape show on "CUSO
in West Africa". 2 returned
volunteers will talk about
their CUSO postings
overseas. Recruitment information will be available.
THE WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
WITH THE SUPPORT OF
THE LEON & THEA KOERNER FOUNDATION
presents
BIG BLONDE
by Dorothy Parker
THEATRE SAMPLER
AND CONVERSATION WITH
BUCHANAN PENTHOUSE
ABBY HAGYARD
PLAYWRIGHT and ACTRESS
THURS, OCT 8 — 12:30-2:00
■.*•...»   * .i&^r~*t4*r.lki»
r^"*.^ ,
rr
STUDENT
ENGINEERS
The summer employment program at
Ce'anese will provide you with an ideaj
opportunity to apply your knowledge in a
practical working environment.
Your skills will be applied in a support role
working with experienced Chemical and
Mechanical Engineers. Project assignments
could include energy conservation,
environment, health and safety or plant
modification.
At Celanese, professionals work
independently; you too will enjoy
professional freedom on specific
assignments.
Both students and industry benefit from
work experience programs. Experience in
the petro-chemical industry will assist you
in defining your employment goals. You are
building your education now, why not start
building your career as well?
Please submit your application to your local
campus Canada Employment Centre. We
will be in touch with you shortly thereafter.
CELANESE Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
b*B******&*CT*=-
The Friday edition of The Ubyssey needs more writers, photographers,
layout people, and yes, perhaps even you. If you are interested in seeing
your scribblings in these pages or have any other interest in the sad and
twisted world of student journalism then please for the sake of the widows
and orphans who depend on us lend us a hand and join the Friday staff.
Meetings happen Tuesdays at noon right up here in SUB 241k. We want
newsfeatures, entertainment features, reviews, interviews, fiction and any
other good writing. Now, back to regular programming . . .
°%)NG DISTANCE
GET THE FEELING:      HOW TO ENTER:
3 DRAWS:
Imagine how good it would feel to
be sitting in the cockpit of the most aerodynamic standard-equipped North
American car on the road today.
Keep that picture in mind as you
complete the entry form below. Read the
rules and regulations carefully and answer
the Long Distance Feeling Quiz Question.
Long Distance
TransCanada Telephone System
Drawings will be held on October 21st,
December 15th and February 15th. If you don't
win in the first draw your entry will automatically
go into the second and third drawings. Watch
for the second Long Distance Feeling entry form
in November's paper. Enter as often as you like.
You may be calling the folks back home to share
the winning feeling soon!
FEEL LUCKY? THE SOONER YOU FJHER THE MORE CHANCESTOWIN!
1. To enter and qualify, correctly complete the Official
Entry Form and quiz question or game included therein.
Only Official Entry Forms will be considered Mail to:
The Long Distance feeling Sweepstakes
Box 1437. Toronto, Ontario M5W 2E8
Contest will commence September 1. 1981.
2. There will be a total of 3 prizes awarded (See Rule
#3 for prize distribution). Each prize will consist of
a 1982 Mercury LN-7 automobile (approximate retail
value $9,000 each) Local delivery, provincial and
municipal taxes as applicable, are included as part of
the prize at no cost to the winner. Drivers permit and
insurance will be the responsibility of each winner.
Each car will be delivered to a Mercury dealership
nearest the winners' residence in Canada. All prizes
will be awarded Only one prize per person. Prizes
must be accepted as awarded, no substitutions.
3. Selections at random will be made from all entries
received by the sweepstakes judging organization
by noon on the following dates: October 21,1961,
December 15,1981 and the contest closing date.
February 15,1982. Entries not selected in the October
21 draw will automatically be entered for the December
15,1981 draw. Entries not selected in the December
15,1981 draw will automatically be entered for the final
draw, February 15,1982 One car will be awarded in
each draw Chances of winning are dependent upon
the number of entries received. Selected entrants, in
order to win, will be required to first correctly answer
a time-limited, arithmetical, skill-testing question
during a prearranged tape recorded telephone interview. Decisions of the judging organization shall be
final. By entering, winners agree to the use of their
name, address and photograph for resulting publicity
in connection with this contest. The winners will also
be required to sign a legal document stating compliance with contest rules. The names of the winners
may be obtained by sending a stamped self-addressed
envelope to: TCTS, 410 Laurier Ave. W., Room 950.
Box 2410. Station 0, Ottawa. Ontario KIP 6H5
4. This contest is open only to students who are
registered fult-time or part-time at any accredited
Canadian University, College or Post-Secondary institution. Employees of TCTS. its member companies and
affiliates, its advertising and promotional Agencies,
the independent judging organization and their immediate families are not eligible. This contest is subject
to all Federal, Provincial* and Municipal laws.
5. 'Quebec Residents
All taxes eligible under la Loi sur les loteries. les
courses, les cone ours publicitaires et les appareils
d'amusements have been paid A complaint respecting
the administration of this contest may be submitted
to the Regie des loteries et courses du Quebec
The Long Distance Feeling Quiz Question.
We know there are zillions of
reasons to call Long Distance. We
know it's faster than a speeding
bullet, less costly than a locomotive, and easier than leaping tall
buildings in a single bound. But
we want to know why you get
the feeling.
Unique, personal reasons.
Wild, crazy reasons. Maybe you
call up Mom every Groundhog
Day. We don't know. So tell us!
3..
Name	
Address	
City/Town	
Postal Code.
(PLEASE PRINT)
1.
Tel. No. (your own or where
you can be reached)
University Attending . Friday, October 2, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
Fa I we 11 condemns manual
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Reprinted from Kinesis
The most recent target of
American Moral Majority leader
Jerry Falwell is what he terms an
"immoral" publication.
This time Falwell has taken on
the Boston women's health book
collective and their women's health
and sex education manual, Our
Bodies Our Selves, according to Big
Mama Rag, a feminist publication
from Colorado.
The manual is currently in its
fourth printing and has been a national best seller in the United
States since its original publication
in 1971.
In a recent newsletter to the
millions on Falwell's mailing list, he
charges the book is a "pornographic sex manual." He urges
his readers to examine school and
public libraries for "immoral, anti-
family and anti-American
content."
"Do you want your child to
choose his values free from your influence and free from any standard
of right or wrong based on issues
like premarital sex, extramarital
sex, homosexuality, lesbianism, and
bisexuality?" asks Falwell.
Moral Majority officials say they
have had an overwhelming response
to the newsletter and currently a
fight is underway in Spencer, Mass.
to remove the book from use in a
high school sex education course.
The Boston women's health collective say they also know of dozens
of new attempts to ban the manual.
They say the attack on their book
is symptomatic of the group's attitudes towards women.
"We view that attack on (the
manual) as part of a larger attack
on women's rights in general, most
notably from the anti-ERA, anti-
childcare, and anti-abortion activity.
"Though this activity may represent the viewpoint of a small
minority, it has been well financed,
has had an alarming influence on
policy makers, and represents a major challenge to the women's movement in this country," the collective
says.
Falwell and his group are particularly concerned about passages
which deal with female sexuality
and masturbation.
The envelope to members bears
the   warning:    "Sexually   explicit
—■mold hodstron* photo
OBSERVANT SCIENCE type is quick to notice unique properties of new
beer on market called Labatt's Extrahypo stock. Supersaturated with his
solution, ever-questing quizzoid must now ask whether he is brave enough
to test next new LCB product. Three Mile Island Reisling. The quest for
knowledge is expensive, and don't forget sales tax.
materials enclosed. Do not let this
letter fall into the hands of small
children."
Under a heading cautioning,
"important adults only," are the
following offending sections of the
book:
• on page 26 ... a photograph
of woman using mirror to examine
self plus advocating the use of a
speculum.
• section entitled 'sex with
ourselves — masturbation.' "It's
exciting to make up sexual fantasies
while masturbating when we feel
those fantasies coming on. Some of
us like to insert something while
masturbating.
• "Some of us find our or other
parts of our bodies erotically sensitive and rub them."
• page 113 . . . "Not until we
have an economic-social system
that puts people before profit will
everyone be able to participate."
• "Although this book is
available at various places, we object to our tax dollars being used to
provide this explicit, immoral information in our libraries and our
schools. We are still 'one nation
under God.' "
I»r«s7^nr —
«■»■-» SeiiUi Cant-1 •,      .
•«*x.w«.'D.,c!*i)0J,-"'-»-
 _  —— *  w
oli„ 1a..-"V,  "oman "Stno mirror <■„ . ...
Page 26
! p«9e 43
something S ""• *5f °* us ltke to Insert
°«r oodles erotfc"ny°^rn$1Mor •«■«■ Wrts of
fore or whUe Y sens'«ve and rub them be-
*•*"'* tot mean our " ^"^"S ourselves
"Not *" P'rtS °f our ■»<•■«•"   ^ 'Mrn1n9
ml Zll'1%4 ^^-'oc.a, system that
to participate." "nl ev*"-yone be able
*^^sSb=2m*5&
,__  SIt" one nation under Sod »   and our schools.
p«9e 113
MORAL . . . Majority says knowledge obscene
UBC Deficit May
Climb Due To
Postal Increases
UBC may have to spend $456,000
more on postage this year as a result
of the recent 76 per cent increase for
first class letter rates.
"Six hundred thousand dollars
was spent on postage last fiscal
year," said university services vice
president Jim Kennedy. "The budget for postage has remained unchanged so everyone is looking at
how much postage they really
need."
Kennedy said he imagined that either the departments will have to
mail fewer letters or get money
from elsewhere. "We don't have a
pot of money at the moment. The
squeeze is on all quarters."
Said Paul Bullen, chief accountant for the finance department:
"I'm not sure how we're going to
cope with the increase. Big departments like (the finance department)
or the registrar will have problems."
Audrey Campbell, program director for guided independent study
(correspondence), doubts that the
fees for correspondence will increase with the price of stamps.
"No strategy has been made because it is not effective until Jan.
1," Campbell said. "But unless the
Foresfers scarce in Canada
By DAVID MARWOOD
and Canadian University Press
Canada is not producing enough
foresters to meet its needs, but universities are hampered by lack of
staff, physical facilities and operating funds to make up the shortfall.
A recent report in Forest Science
newspaper warns of the shortages
of trained personnel and calls for
improved educational facilities. The
author, University of Toronto forestry dean Vidar Nordin, says Canada will need up to 8,000 trained
foresters in the next 10 years. Only
400 forestry students graduate each
year from the six universities offering the program.
Nordin believes the forestry universities have been "lacking in
staff, physical facilities and operations funds since their inception."
Also lacking are adequate programs
to publicize forestry and relate careers available in operations research and education.
Nordin's report accurately reflects conditions at UBC's forestry
faculty.
According to one forestry professor, the faculty is suffering from a
lack of space and research support
staff.
"The prime thing is that teaching
and research is undepressed,"
John Worral said Thursday.
Fifty cents from every dollar
made in B.C. comes from forestry
but the UBC forestry faculty has
only three floors in one wing of the
MacMillan building, he added. The
agriculture faculty has two full
wings and one floor on the third.
"We have the research floors but
we could use classrooms as well,"
Worrall said.
Forestry professor Gordon Weet-
man said there are 4,400 foresters in
Canada, or one forester for every
400,000 hectares of productive forest land. There is one forester for
every 8,000 hectares in the U.S.
One forester for every 40,000
hectares would be desirable in
Canada, Weetman said.
The high demand for foresters is
demonstrated by the fact that most
forestry graduates find jobs right
away, according to forestry professor Oscar Sziklai. "We need more
foresters," he said.
In his report Nordin proposed a
meeting with university, government and industry officials to find a
solution to the problem.
price increase is reflected in a 76 per
cent improvement in postal service,
I think it's horrendous."
Unless mailing habits change, a
76 per cent increase to the current
budget of $600,000 for mailing will
mean about $456,000 will have to
be found to make up the shortfall.
Arts To Have
A Serious Parity
The arts undergraduate society
will be having a party this Tuesday.
That's not the news.
The news is that the theme of the
party is a serious one, student concern over education cutbacks.
The AUS has rented the SUB
party room from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.
that afternoon where they hope
students responding to their poster
campaign will congregate.
The AUS hopes to convince the
board of governors, who will be
meeting at the same time in council
chambers down the hall, to join
them and have an open meeting.
AUS president Paul Yascowich
hopes for a large student turnout,
hence the rental of the party room.
"I want to stress that this is a
campus-wide campaign and that
students from all faculties are urged
to attend because the issues to be
discussed concern everyone,"
Yascowich said Thursday.
He said the meeting would be
well organized, with chairs, tables
and a microphone provided. Individual spokespersons will be making prepared presentations.
In the event that the board
declines the invitation to open their
meeting, a student forum will be
held in the party room to discuss
concerns and plot possible future
strategy, Yascowich said.
Fundamentalists Rip
Off Krishna Leaflets
A Hindu priest's personal mission to enlighten UBC students was
jarringly halted by campus fundamentalist Christians, the priest
charged Wednesday.
Tom Garden, religious studies 2,
said he paid $80 for literature printed by the International Krishna Society only to have it stolen within 24
hours by fundamentalists who considered the literature satanical.
"We don't want that kind of sa-
tanic crap on campus," Garden
quoted one of the culprits as saying.
Garden said he left literature outlining Eastern religious philosophy
in the student union building, Buchanan and the science building late
Monday afternoon. By 10 a.m. the
leaflets were stolen from SUB and
Buchanan, Garden claimed.
Garden said that while investigating the disappearance of the leaflets
in SUB, a student approached him
and warned: "If it's there again,
it'll be gone."
"I was really taken aback," Garden said. "I'm not a rich man. I'm
just a poor student."
He said the worst part of the experience was that it made him
angry.
"It's weird," he said. "There's
some kind of fanatic Christian
group on campus doing some crazy
things."
Garden said he bought the literature himself and left it in open
boxes to assist fellow students in
finding self-realization.
Garden is a priest of the Vaisnava
priest, a devotional Hindu cult.
Tie A Yellow Banner
Round The . . .
When the 63rd annual Arts '20
race is run from Vancouver
General Hospital to UBC next
Thursday, a giant banner welcoming the runners to campus probably
will not be present.
The 14 by 40 foot yellow banner,
valued at over $1,000 was stolen
from outside War Memorial gym
Monday night after being up less
than two days, intramurals director
Nestor Korchinsky said Thursday.
"We wanted to advertise the
race. If someone wanted to borrow
it and put it on their building, they
would have been more than welcome," Korchinsky said.
"I wish the hell they would put it
up and display it. The Arts '20 race
deserves some exposure. We didn't
get the mileage out of it we
wanted."
Korchinsky promises a "no questions asked" return policy.
The Arts '20 race honors a march
from the UBC Fairview campus,
the present site of VGH, to the current Point Grey campus in 1922.
Korchinsky said Monday an
inter-team challenge board has been
established in the gym, Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
hi
Ben/Suddeutsche Zeitung/Mumch
Letters
Council ignored committee
The standing committee on student accessibility has recently come
under attack for "not working with
Council." The entire committee
resigned on Sept. 23 because of
council interference and
stranglehold regulations. Subsequently, commerce representative
Frances Carey charged "I have not
been impressed so far with their attitude towards Council. They seem
not to be working with Council."
Frances Carey would do well to
take his statements to heart. As the
committee has been at pains to
point out, it has been treated differently than other committees by
Council. While the student accessibility committee is prevented
from undertaking a single action
without council's expressed approval, it seems the ever-so impor
tant student leadership conference
committee can do what it will.
At the same council meeting as
the accessibility committee resigned, the student leadership people
refused to provide information
regarding the subject of a two-hour
in camera meeting. Frances Carey
defended the right to committee
privacy by saying that it was not appropriate for council to know what
happened at the meeting.
Also at this historic council
meeting, the student administrative
commission's minutes were questioned. SAC had provided a booth
for the committee against racist
and fascist violence at clubs day,
although this club is not affiliated
with the AMS. Nevertheless, council respected the wisdom of SAC
and passed its minutes.
So who is being unfair? It seems
council is willing to shut its eyes to
committees which it likes, which are
composed of the "in" groups of
people, but attacks and harrasses
students who are trying to work for
the benefit of the student population in a manner which has been
shown to have student support.
Perhaps the real problem is that
council is mortally frightened of
having its "power base" and
authority undermined.
After all, councilors need good
resume items, and, let's face it, the
administration is depending on
them to keep students' rightful
anger under control this year. Admin, and council don't want
any more mistakes like last March's
rally.
Trish Boyd
Iaw3
Club fights creationists
British Columbia has become the
newest battleground for the
evolution-creationism controversy.
So far, this battle has been very
one-sided. Fundamentalist creationists having been putting persistent political pressure on the B.C.
Minister of Education; and are
brainwashing the public with a
flood of misleading propoganda.
The purpose of this letter is not to
explain why creationism shouldn't
be taught as science in our science
classrooms;  but rather to inform
Christians break heart
-\
I would like to voice the shock and indignation which I have
recently felt at the injustices of some prejudiced and closed-minded
individuals on campus.
As a practicing worshipper of a concept of God well known in India and around the world as Sri Krsna, as I recently had boxes of
magazines preaching Krsna consciousness stolen from the Buchanan
and SUB buildings. They had been opened and a sign set up inviting
everyone to take one. I am a student, and student means poor. Pardon me if I sound sentimental, but it broke my heart to see the $80
that I had personally spent on those magazines, in the hope of lending some spiritual inspiration to some of my fellow students, lost.
While searching for their whereabouts, and becoming irate about
it, one fellow approached me and said, "We don't want that Satanic
crap here on our campus. If any more magazines like that show up
here again they'll be gone just like the others." I asked him just who
he was but he left and refused to speak further. I presume he was a
fundamentalist Christian, as his choice of words seemed to indicate.
To that man and his associates, I would like to ask him to return
those magazines, please. If you would read what was inside you
might realize that love of God is not the sole domain of any one
religious sect.
For myself, I do not hate you for your beliefs, but I question
whether you have grasped the essence of Lord Jesus' teachings.
Tom R. Garden
religions studies
students that a new Alma Mater
Society club has been formed to oppose the teaching of fundamentalist
creationism in the science
classrooms of B.C. public schools.
The club is called Citizens
Against the Undermining of Science
Education (CAUSE). CAUSE has
already been active for six months
before becoming an AMS club; and
has received strong support and approval from many scientists,
theologians, and educators.
Anyone who is truly familiar with
the evolution-creationism issue will
find our attitude very reasonable
and our position to be one of common sense. As well as opposing
creationism in science classrooms,
we are also developing proposals
for positive educational alternatives
such as the establishment in our
schools of a comparative Human
Belief Systems course which will
fairly examine all the major
philosophical and religious views of
human existence.
Anyone interested in finding out
more about CAUSE, or in joining
us in our attempt to prevent the
undermining of science education in
B.C. should come to our first
general meeting, on Friday, Oct. 2
at noon in SUB 211.
Garry Marchant
grad studies
Slave labor
on the farm
One of the ways to gauge how civilized a society is is to look at
how it treats the weak and disadvantaged.
In this respect Canadian society can be said to be found wanting
as evidenced by its treatment of its farmworkers.
These people perform some of the most basic and essential tasks
in our society, tasks that automation has not yet replaced. We can
go to the moon and cure all sorts of rare diseases but we can't
seem to give some members of our society a decent living wage or
provide decent shelter for the dispossessed.
It's a serious oversight on our part, but one we seem able to live
with as long as fruit and vegetables keep appearing, as if by magic,
in our supermarkets. We don't realize, in our complacent stupor,
that human sweat has brought these products to us and not the
benevolence of Safeway.
Some will argue that East Indian farmworkers in the Fraser valley
are better off here than they are in India and they should therefore
be content with their lot. And it can't be denied that these people
have come to Canada for specific reasons, in that they see Canada
as a land of opportunity, which may sound corny to us now.
But we should realize that these people have come to Canada to
be Canadians and they should enjoy a square deal from the rest of
us, instead of being used as a cheap labor pool. Here the Trudeau
government is as much to blame as anybody else. By misleading
people into thinking Canadian streets are paved with gold it has
thrust them upon their arrival in Canada into the worst sort of
quasi-serfdom imaginable.
It's perhaps fashionable nowadays to criticize unions and what
they stand for but if there's one union that's performing a needed
task it's the Canadian Farmworkers Union. Besides organizing
farmworkers of East Indian origin the union has been working
among the migrant Quebecois workers who come to the Okanagan
every summer.
So sign the petitions and go to the demos and benefits but at
least think about what's on your plate and how it got there. You
owe it to yourself.
Give the
banner back
It's a sign of the times.
The people who stole a large Arts '20 race banner from the War
Memorial gym roof Monday should think twice about their actions.
We are the first to admit it started out as a very good prank,
despite the fact someone could have been killed or seriously injured
in its execution.
A joke is a joke, but the effort placed on the historic race isn't. A
large number of people work very hard organizing and running in it.
Students pay $4,500 for the run, including $1,000 for the stolen
banner.
The prank occurred Monday. It is now Friday. Yes, it was funny,
but four days later it is now time to return it.
The offenders should seriously consider accepting the no-
questions-asked-offer for the banner's return. If this is not acceptable to the thieves, then the offending group should display it
somewhere on campus.
Arts '20 marks a very historical event in UBC history. The great
trek of 1922 marked the start of student involvement on this campus when hundreds of students marched to 'build the university?
Thousands of UBC students do not know of the race, or its
historical importance. The banner was to have helped enlighten at
least some of the masses.
To not return the banner turns a good prank into a sick and
foolish act.
THE UBYSSEY
October 2, 1981
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the .Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
"Raise them legal" shouted Scott McDonald, trainer extraordinaire for the Ubyeeey Arts
'20 team. Meanwhle team member* Craig Brook*. Arnold Hedstrom, Nancy Campbell and
Julie Wheelwright jogged around Maclnnes field in practiee for the big day. Steve McClure,
Tom Hawthorn, Verne McDonald and Kevin McGee watched from SUB 241k saying "This
never would have happened in our years — we wouldn't heve permitted it."
"I think we can win," said Glen Sanford. "I bat we can even beat the men's field lacrosse
team" said Mark Lieren-Young. Carl Lum, Muriel Draaiama and Kerry Regier said
simultaneously "look at them go, first place will ba eaay. Neator Korchinsky told Shaffin
Shariff and Chariee Campbe) he would rig the race for The Ubyssey on the occaasion of The
Ubyssey's first entry in history. Erica Leiren, Wendy cumming and Evan Mclntra said it wasn't
needed, and proceeded to ye* loudly at the Intruder. Jennifer Ryan, Gary Brookfietd, Martin
Strong and David Marwood were then assigned to cover the race from a runners point of
view, thereby round out The Ubyssey teem. Friday, October 2,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
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Registering causes 'unacceptable stress'
I enclose a copy of a letter which I have
sent to the registrar.
Perhaps I should mention that, though I
work for the health department, my letter is
not written as a representative of that agency
but as a private psychologist.
Dear Sir:
As a psychologist who is interested in the
effects and management of stress, I was appalled to discover that University of British
Columbia students are being subjected, unnecessarily, to an extremely stressful situation.
It is the unnecessary feature of this particular stress which concerns me as I am aware
that many of the stressful situations in a student's life are relatively unavoidable.
During registration week I observed students pushed to the limit of their endurance by
the need to juggle combinations of courses
over and over again (with long lines and trips
across campus in between) before they were
able to find a set of courses which were available and would fit their needs and timetable.
That this procedure should have to occur after they have already had their original set approved by a counselor, and that they must
then get the new one approved, added to the
frustration.
Many side effects of this system, which created anxiety, were the rumors that passed
through the lineups to the effect that courses
were filled, other buildings were not checking
registration times so that later registrants
were already picking up scarce spots, and
some students were cheating by obscuring
their registration time or getting to the front
of a long queue by pretending that they had
an earlier time (but in fact standing around
there until their time).
I am unable to understand why this whole
process cannot be done by mail and with the
use of computers. Possibly the counselling
session is advisable for most students but the
time of faculty and students as well as the inefficiency of the manual system of working
out combinations seems totally unnecessary
to me. In addition to the stress, which is my
primary concern, the misuse of time and
money spent taking courses, which neither
interest the students nor fit into their ultimate
plans, offends me.
Of course, not all students would get their
first choices. However, with a priority system, higher year students who have narrowed
their direction as well as those who require a
course for a specific purpose, would be more
likely to be successful. Others, having listed
alternatives would more likely be close to
what they chose. Certainly the need to make
changes while standing at a table, knowing
that if you don't act quickly alternatives
might also be gone, is not the best way to
make decisions about your future.
The system which I suggest is by no means
a revolutionary idea. It is the one in operation at Simon Fraser University and, I
understand, at many other colleges and universities throughout the continent. I hope
that it will be possible to bring UBC students
into the 20th century before too long so that
they can begin their university year feeling
that the administration cares whether or not
they develop stress related illness.
J. C. Morton
6420 MacDonald
Platypus fresh9
Platypus International is a coalition of students intent on providing
a viable alternative to the usual resume-creating, conservative element that normally runs for elected
positions on our student council.
We are not afraid to make statements that may jeopardize our personal futures.
Platypus is a dynamic and vibrant
party that wishes to bring fresh
ideas to relieve the current stagnation of the AMS. Platypus is a serious party, but more importantly it
is a student's party, for the student
willing to fight back against the
stagnant elements of our community and the system they created.
Platypus, when elected, will seriously examine the AMS profits and
lobby to redistribute these profits in
an equitable fashion. The Hawaiian
vacation club proposed last year
was originally created to bring attention to the fact that the AMS
profit was too large and that some
of the monies should be returned to
the student body. After observing
that the AMS in its infinite wisdom
saw fit to rent limousines for student orientation, the Hawaiian holiday club and free beer nights in the
Pit are rational projects in our estimation.
For any additional information
feel free to phone 224-9715 or
224-9098 and ask for Charles Menzies.
Charles R. Menzies
Platypus Itemational
candidate for vice-president
Enrol in Arts '20
The 62nd annual Arts '20 relay
will be held on Thursday, Oct. 8.
Each team is required to register
under one of the following twelve
categories: 1) men's faculty; 2)
women's .faculty; 3) Corec; 4)
fraternity; 5) sorority; 6) men's
frosh; 7) women's frosh; 8) men's
independent; 9) women's independent; 10) men's varsity; 11)
women's varsity; 12) faculty/staff.
If you wish to enter a team, have
any questions concerning the race
or would like to help run the race,
contact  the  intramural  office  in
War Memorial gym,  203.  Phone
228-2203.
Also, this year a challenge board
has been put up. The Ubyssey is
challenging "anyone" to beat them
(limiting the challenge "to teams
comprised of people who have had
major surgery recently").
Money is asked not to be involved in the challenge unless it goes to
charity. Beer is allowed!! Be
creative on your challenge and be
realistic to the team you are
challenging.
Cindy Young
intramurals
Active psyches
The psychology students association is going strong in its second
year of establishing for psychology
students special committees and in
arranging special events. This year
the PSA has many important goals
and objectives in mind, and only
through the help of concerned
fellow students can we become a
strong and enduring force on this
campus. It should also be added
that the PSA is not only for
psychology majors and honors, but
for all who are interested in
psychology.
One of the main objectives of the
psychology students association is
to foster socializing amongst
students of psychology, who are
generally spread out throughout the
campus and have little opportunity
of meeting others of like interest.
Activities away from the
academia include many dances, and
other social events, which will make
it possible for students to have a
balance between the academic and
social life.
Join  the  psychology  students
association, meet interesting others,
and   make   your   year   most'
memorable.
Suman L. Singh
secretary PSA
Wheelchair tennis anyone?
The British Columbia wheelchair
tennis association invites you to attend the first annual wheelchair tennis championships to be held at the
Delta Town and Country Inn, 6005,
17th Highway, Delta. The championships will be held Saturday,
with matches from 12 noon to 6
p.m., and the finals will take place
on Sunday, commencing at noon.
On Saturday between 2 and  3
p.m. there will be celebrity
wheelchair matches with some of
our local politicians, sportspeople
and press people participating,   \
In this international year of the
disabled, your attendance would
support these athletes and the
association would be in your debt.
Thanking you in advance.
Suzanne Milne,
Directory BCWTA
AMS PRESIDENT HAUGEN . . . supervises undergrad presidents
Drip to drip, drop to drop
To Nelson Santos, Bob Vidoni
and all the other engineers. This
is in response to your interfacul-
ty blood donation campaign that
takes place next week.
Before your blood drive challenge had even hit the press, we
had matched your $100. The
reason we accepted so quickly
was that we will take great joy in
donating the money to the
United Way on behalf of
science. You had better use a
percentage formula, because this
year no one will be donating
more blood than science!
To all the other faculties, we
in science hope that you too rise
to this challenge. Consider the
challenge coming from both
science   and   engineering.
Students at the university have
always supported the Red Cross
in a big way;  the Red Cross
depends on our help. Bob,
Nelson, and many others, have
put a lot of work into promoting
this blood drive. Hopefully no
one will let them down.
Dave Frank
president, SUS
Brothers bleed for beer
The brothers of Alpha belta
Phi issue a challenge to ali UBC
fraternities to donate blood at
the Red Cross SUB blood donor
clinics on Oct. 5 to 9.
Consult your  fraternity  for
further   details,
prize involved.
Massive   beer
Bleed for the Red Cross, your
fraternity (and beer).
The Alpha Delts
Filmsoc fails to explain
I would like to respond to filmsoc
acting chair Dusan Milatovic's unfair criticism of my Sept. 29 article,
Filmsoc petitions for fee fight vote.
His letter (Filmsoccers explain
financial fight with AMS, Oct. 1)
begins, "Eric Eggertson's slanted
article was a Messy Sight Indeed. If
escalating controversy was its object, then here is my reply."
Milatovic then fails to explain
why he feels the article is slanted, a
messy sight and escalates con-
trovery. That's what I call a cheap
shot.
While writing the article I kept in
mind that The Ubyssey had published a front page article the previous
week giving filmsoc's side, but not
covering the reaction of the AMS
executive or the budget committee.
Because of time constraints, The
Ubyssey had published only one
side of the story. My article was a
follow up, telling both sides of the
argument.
As for his claim that the article is
slanted, that's just not true. I bent
over backwards to state the
arguments without pushing one side
or the other. I can only presume
Milatovic was upset because the article wasn't slanted in filmsoc's
favor.
Milatovic's cryptic comment
about escalating controversy puzzles
me as well. If anyone is excalating
controversy, it is filmsoc's membership and Milatovic himself. Or does
Milatovic forget that his club is
planning to put a referendum
before students to change both the
SUBfilmsi pricing structure and the
profit sharing agreement with the
AMS?
He further escalates the controversy (whatever that means) by
saying in his letter, "Finance director Jane Loftus froze our accounts
and balls last spring," hardly a
statement meant to defuse the conflict.
Had I been writing an opinion
piece I would have stated my support for filmsoc's attempt to keep
film prices down. But I was writing
a news article, and my opinions did
not belong there.
I suggest if Milatovic continues to
represent his club to the public that
he refrain from attacking the
messengers who bring news he may
not want to hear.
Eric Eggertson
arts 4 Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
EXTRAVAGANZA.
Now you're talkin taste.
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&
MORE ADVICE —
JUST WHAT YOU NEED
Marriage, your firstborn, your first fulltime job ... all seem to
stimulate world production of advice until suddenly ...
you're swamped in the stuff. Does this mean no
advice from Mitel? Not exactly. But instead of the advice,
we've concentrated on the "advisors" for your CAREER DAY.
In fact, these Mitel employees are all UBC graduates like:
GREG AASEN, IC design engineer, Class of 79, Electrical
Engineering.
DEAN GRUMLOSE, Research and Design engineer in Digital
Systems Group, Class of '80 in Electrical Engineering.
COLLIN HARRIS, Product engineer, in IC design, Class of
'80, Engineering Physics.
DUNCAN KLETT, Manager of Computer Aided Design, Class
of 79, Masters in Electrical Engineering.
DARWIN RAMBO, Software design engineer in Software
development, Class of '80, Electrical Engineering.
TINO VARELAS, IC design engineer, Class of 77, Electrical
Engineering.
And — JOAN KAVANAGH, On-Campus Recruitment Administrator with an Honors 3A from Queen's.
We think you'll find that nothing beats talking to people who
have already travelled a road you might take. We can tell
you that Mitel is state-of-the-art telecommunications from
the IC's up, but your alumni can tell you what that means in
terms of jobs, working conditions, pay scales, benefits, and
the future.
So look for the Mitel Booth on Career Day, and look up our
UBC alumni crew. They're looking forward to meeting you!
f^-) MITEL
BUILDING BETTER COMMUNICATIONS Friday, October 2, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 21
vista
Well, here we are again and now
its time to tell you about an important event which will be happening
at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre starting Oct. 8. It's Hank
Williams: The Show He Never Gave
with the irrepressible Sneezy
Waters. Hank it seems died in the.
back of a car from an overdose of
amphetamines on New Year's Day
1953 but Sneezy really warms up the
old corpse. Tickets are $8.50 in
general and a mere $7 for students
and seniors.
The first Days And Months And
Years to Come concert is happening
this Sunday at 8 p.m. at the good
old VECC again and revolves
around the theme of West Coast
Music, featuring the talents of Norman Newton and his new composi
tion Tamoanchan. Tickets are $4.50
for students and seniors and an
amazing $15 for Other People.
That's what it says here.
Earle Birney will be reading his
poetry Oct. 7 in Buchanan room
106 at noon. Admission is free and
the reading is sponsored by the
creative writing department and is a
Hewitt Bostock Memorial Lecture.
So check it out and bring your
mountain climbing equipment.
Tonight is the night when you'll
be able to go down to the Russian
Community Centre and catch The
Questionnaires for a dance which is
sponsored by, of all people, The
Dharmadhatu Buddhist Meditation
Centre. Is life not a dance through
the ocean of suffering, the sea of
Maya? Or is it a good seat at
Yankee stadium?
The Contemporary Art Society
of Vancouver will be showing two
films featuring the work of two artists. Roy Lien tenstein and Christo
will be shown at the Emily Carr art
college at 8 p.m. Oct. 5 down there
on Granville island. Admission is
free and it's open to the public.
Ann Mortifee, that ex-Crofton
House girl who has wowed audiences from the vine-covered walls
of Blenheim and forty-first to
Toronto and points beyond is coming to town. Mortifee will be playing with Doug Edwards, Tom
Hazlitt, Robbie King and Jim
McGillvery. Tickets can be had at
the Vancouver Ticket Centre Oct. 7
to Oct. 8 at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.
The entertainment of the month
will be found, next to the silver
crab, under the stars, and near the
lapping ocean. Give up? Well, this
mysterious place is the
Planetarium. The national film
board presents a showcase of its
best documentaries Saturdays at 8
p.m. in the Vancouver Auditorium.
For a mere $2.50 you can take in
Cree Hunters of Mltsasaini and
Waxing People's Commune on
Oct. 17.
Wasted Efforts a selection of
women's undergarments (1960-
1960) will be on display from
now until later this month. The collection shows how fashionable
ladies suffered in pursuit of altered
shapes and how the women's movement has freed them from their
stays.
Gordon
with   the
money, has
after him.
observatory
Fridays at 3
noon to 10
Sundays.
Southam, the man
newspapers and the
an observatory named
Unlike his books, the
is open to the public on
p.m. to 10:30 p.m. and
p.m. on Saturdays and
It's Fun
And It
Works'
> The West Coast's most exciting fitness
experience
> Totally co-ed! Exercise to music!
> Professionally designed to give you a total
workout
> Everyone works at their own rate
Mon. thru Thurs. upstairs in SUB from
3:45-5:00 p.m. — No registration
Just drop in a dollar each time you participate
"NOBODY HAS IT FITTER"
NOSTALGIA-PLUS
WICKER
2868 W. 4th -733-1511
TUB
CHAIRS
BSKTS.
LAMPS
MATS
BLINDS
SCREENS
FRAMED
PRINTS
CHESTS
NITE-
TABLES
STUDENTS
10%
DISC.
WITH
ID CARD
„>'«>
ft ?
„ >*,
.:.£>«-?r:*ivm'i (^vrsfcifcf:
If you think "pads and rollers"are
just a California craze,
you're not ready for New Memorex.
Pads and rollers are key components of a cassette's tape
transport system.
This system guides the tape
past your deck's tape head. It must
do so with unerring accuracy.
And no cassette does it more
accurately than totally new
Memorex.
The new Memorex tape transport system is precision engineered to exacting tolerances.
Flanged, seamless rollers guide
the tape effortlessly and exactly.
An oversize pad hugs the tape to
the tape head with critical pressure: firm enough for precise
'alignment, gentle enough to
dramatically reduce wear.
Our unique ultra-low-friction
polyolefin wafers help precision-
molded hubs dispense and
gather tape silently and uniformly,
play after play. Even after 1,000
plays.
In fact, our new
Memorex cassette will always
deliver true
sound reproduction, or we'll
replace it. Free.
Of course, reproduction that true
and that enduring
owes a lot to Per-
mapass™ our extraordinary new binding
process. It even owes a
little to our unique new
fumble-free storage album.
But when you record on new
Memorex, whether it's HIGH
BIAS II, normal bias MRX I or
METAL IV, don't forget the importance of those pads and rollers.
Enjoy the music as the tape glides
unerringly across the head.
And remember: getting it there
is half the fun.
NOW MORE THAN EVER T
WE ASK: IS IT LIVE, OR IS IT   - -"
MEMOREX
© 1981, Memorex Corporation, Santa Clara. California 95052. USA Page 22
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
I
Tween I
] Hisses
]
TODAY
AMNESTY UBC
Latter writing workshop, open to general public,
noon, SUB 113.
ANONYMOUS
A recitai by Soviet musicians and singers, noon,
recital hall. Music Duiiding. M welcome for an
hour of guaranteed good music and entertainment.
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY PRESS
Copy editing seminar with journalist Kathy Ford,
4:30 p.m.. Peak newsroom in the Rotunda at Si
mon Fraser University.
CAUSE
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
COMPUTER SCIENCE STUDENT SOCIETY
First social night of the aeaaon. 8 p.m. to midnight, SUB 211. All computer science students
invited.
QRAD STUDENTS
Annual General Meeting, 3 p.m., Grad Centre
bellroom.
Wine and cheese party, 7:X p.m., Grad Centre
ballroom. Three free wine tickets for grad students, extra drinks 75 cents cash. Free admission.
INTRAMURALS
Jolly Jogger's run (3.5 km for men and women),
noon, between SUB and Main library.
Registration deadline for 62nd Annual Arts '20
Relay, men's hockey and innertube water polo,
1:30 p.m., WMG 203.
Men's UBC open golf tournament, preliminary
round, 5 p.m., UBC golf course.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
La premiere reunion, midi, International House
lounge.
Fete a la Francaise, 8 p.m., SUB 206.
POTTERY CLUB
Pot giveaway, noon, SUB 251. AH former pottery club members, pleaas claim all your pots and
day from last year or they wM be disposed of.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Dance with CITR, 8 p.m., Isabefte McGuinnees
lounge. Gage.
SUS
Science Kahlua and Suds night (Bzzr Garden),
4:30 to 7 p.m., SUB 207/209.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Toga party, 8 p.m., SUB party room. Beer and
wine, music, open to aH Liberals, potential Liberals, and liberal minded people in general. Toga
suggested, but not required.
UBC WARGAM1NQ SOCIETY
Dance with Pacheena, Vancouver's newest recording artists, 8 p.m. SUB ballroom. Be there!
Tickets M at AMS box office.
UBC ATHLETICS
B.C. high school boys' invitational volleyball
tournament, all day, WMG. Continues on Saturday.
SATUR0AY
CHESS CLUB
Junior ch«st tournament, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m , Angus 426. Open to all players bom after Sept. 1,
1962. Entry fee »6 for UBC chess club members,
$10 for non-members.
CSA
Orientation night, 7 tc 11 p.m., Asian Centre
auditorium. Everyone welcome.
EISA
Welcome back dance, 8 p.m., SUB party room.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Oktoberfest. 7 p.m. to 1 a.m.. International
House lower lounge. Bntwurst and sauerkraut
served, fuN facilities, everyone welcome, free ad-
INTRAMURALS
Men's UBC open golf tournament, championship round, 11 a.m.. UBC golf course.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Wine and cheese, games night, 7 p.m., SUB
207/208.
UBC ATHLETICS
Women's "Early Biro" field hockey tournament,
aa day, Warren and McGregor fields. Continues
aH day Sunday.
B.C.  high school boys' invitational voleyba*
tournament, all day, WMG.
First dhMon rugby match vs Ex-Brits rugby
team, 1:30 p.m., Clinton Park, Vancouver.
SUNDAY
AQUASOC
Underwater hockey, 10 p.m.. Aquatic Centra.
All students welcome.
CHESS CLUB
Junior chess tournement, 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., Angus 425. See Saturday's listing for more details.
INTRAMURALS
Women's and  Co-rec (mixed .JoubJes)  tennis
tournament, no time given, Armory
UBC ATHLETICS
Women's "Earty 3ird" field hockey tournament,
all day, Warren and McGregor fields.
MONDAY
CHESS CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205. Note change
of room for this week.
CONTEMPORARY ART SOCIETY
OF VANCOUVER
Two contemporary art films,  Roy Lichtenstein
and Christo - Ten Works in Progress, 8 p.m.,
Emily Carr College of Art and Design, Granville
Island.
CVC
Elections for two frosh reps, noon, SUB 216a.
INTRAMURALS
Co-rec badminton drop-in, 7:30 p.m., Osborne
Centre, gym A and B.
ROCKERS CO-OP
General meeting,  noon,  SUB  117.  Collecting
resumes for the new directory.
TUESDAY
B.C. PIRO
Organizational meeting,  noon,  SUB  125.  Find
out what a PIRG ia. All welcome.
CCCM
Eucharist as usual, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
COLLEGIATE AOVENTISTS
Group diecussion on First Corinthians, noon,
SUB 113.
eve
Elections for two frosh rape, noon, SUB 216a.
PRE-MED, SOCIETY
Lecture on volunteering,  noon,  IRC  1.  New
memberships accepted.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Free film series presents America: A
[
Hot I'lashc
s
Get kidnapped
In Arts '20
We have a very important message to relay to you. It's come a
long distance and has to run today.
If you've ever wanted to take a
closer look at the scenery between
Vancouver General Hospital and
UBC, then the Arts '20 Relay Race
is for you.
It's a tradition that just has to be
kept up, even if it means panting
your guts out on a wet and slimy
day on some anonymous 1.2 km
stretch of road between the two offending institutions. Of course,
there's plenty of fun too, and who
knows, you might even get kidnapped this year as an extra treat.
If you're crazy enough, you have
to register by this afternoon. If you
enjoy craziness, get out along the
route and watch those wild and
crazy people strut their stuff on
Thursday.
The relay begins at 1 p.m. You
relay shouldn't miss it, dahling.
War dances
Death, war, mutilation, athlete's
foot. These and all sorts of other
hideous fates await you if you defy
the gods. The wrath of the gods is
not only unending, but generally
unpleasant.
And the gods have deigned that
you shall attend a dance tonight.
The band is Pacheena and they
were inspired by the muses and
probably the Beatles too. It's
tonight at the SUB ballroom at 8:00
p.m. Tickets on sale now. Tickets
are also available at the door.
It's being sponsored by the
wargaming society and you don't
want to incur their wrath, do you?
They knew that some of you would
come to your senses and see
Pacheena instead of the Rolling
Rocks.
Lesbian line
First there was the crisis line,
then the volunteer line, the rape relief line and even the conservative
line. If you've been feeling left out
up till now, there is help yet — the
Lesbian Information Line.
The LIL collective invites lesbian
women to join. Call 734-1016 between 7 and 10 p.m. on Thursdays
and Sundays. Discussion and support is only as far away as your
phone.
Good hockey
The Soviets are coming! The
Soviets are comingl Want to hear
some singing in a crazy language?
Want to see some real live people
from a communist country? If you
do then you should drop by the Recital Hall in the Music building today at noon.
There will be a recital given by
musicians and singers from the
Soviet Union (that's the big country
with the good hockey team) and it
is open to the general public.
Knowledge of Russian is not required, only an appreciation of good
music.
•unsnine sets
600 LPs selling for lower than
wholesale costl Wowl
Yes folks, the people at Sunshine
Records are having their first "going out of business sale" today at
5:30 (that's p.m.) in SUB 213.
With each LP sold goes a free
color poster.
The company is moving "into nature and natural aspects wholeheartedly, instead of choosing the
commercial road filled with confusion and imbalance."
Perhaps your value of 'natural' is
your prime ideal too.
WANTED
Richard Lucas, Mark McConchie, Carla Paran, Kate Frisson, Sigmund Freud,
Kathy Ford, Nancy Campbell, Mark Leiren-Young, Craig Brooks, Jo-Anne
Falkiner, John Boyle, Arnold Hedstrom, Mike McLoughlin, Graham Hatt, Evan
Mclntyre, Eric Eggertson, Shaffin Shariff, Patricia Mcleod, Scott McDonald,
Julie Wheelwright, Verne McDonald, Craig YuRI, Brian Jones, Pat Burdett, Glen
Sanford, Duncan Alexander, Karen Savage, Kari Marx, Ken Waters, Katrina
Baranszky, Patty Moore, Neil Parker, Stephanie Legauft, Waiters variieshout,
Farley Mowatt, Muriel Ore Aisms, David Marwood, Rhiennon Charles (Chuck),
Glen Schaefer, Michael Hirschsprung, Nancy Bell, Robert GG, Lois Enns, Terra
Satterfield, Elaine Chang, Robert WhWome, Cheryl Sihoe, Carl Lum, Sue-Anne
Hickey, Kathleen McGauvey, Keith Lovatt, Sandra Goodey, Chris Wong,
Deedee Anderson, Charlotte Olsen, Baiou Antia, Miriam Sobrino, Margaret
Copping, Doug Schmidt, Fred Banning, Steve McClure, Charles Campbell, Bill
Tieleman, Sheona Bell-Irving
IF ANYONE'S SEEN 1HBSE VAWHYTS
TELL EM THEIt HUES AIE WANTS!
IN TIE UIYSSEY tfFTCE, SSI 241k. ALL IS FMGIVEN,
PLEASE CONE IN EH A CUP OE JAVA ANI HELP VS FIGURE
OUT WHAT'S HAPPENIN6 ON THE LONESOME PIADUE.
WUNTY HUNlttS WELCOME.
personal history of the United States, noon,
SUB auditorium.
WEDNESDAY
AMS ELECTIONS COMMITTEE
All-Candidates Meeting for the Oct. 9 byelection
for AMS vice president, noon, SUB conversation pit.
CCCM
Community din-din and program, 5:30 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
General meeting, elections, noon, SUB 224.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting and slide show, noon. Chemistry 260. For more information go to their dub-
room (in SUB basement, opposite T-Btrd shop)
any lunch hour.
THURSDAY
CUSO
Information night: Is CUSO for you?, 7:X p.m..
International Houae upper lounge. Slide tape
show and two returned volunteers will talk about
their CUSO postings overseas. Recruitment information win be available.
INTRAMURALS
62nd Annual Arts'20 relay, 1 p.m., VGH to UBC.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Abby Hagyard, playwright and actress, gives an
advance "theatre sampler" of her production of
Dorothy Parker's short story Big Blonde, noon,
Buchanan penthouse. She will also discuss various aspects of Parker's life and works. Free.
ONGOING
CO-OP ED/INTERNSHIPS
Student Internships '81: Senior arts students apply now for study-rsisted non-psid work experience before graduation. Brock 213, 228-3022.
SUBFILMS presents
A Subfilms Six Pack
Thurs., 7:00
Time After Time
Fri., 7:00
The Bugs Bunny/
Road Runner
Movie
Fri., 9:30
Batman
Sat., 7:00
Simon
Sat.. 9:30
The Inlaws
Sun., 7:00
Blazing Saddles
$1.50 per show
SUB AUD
Oct. 1-4
s
]
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 HnM, I day tt.00; Mkfltkmal km, BBc.
CommweM - 3 BrtM. 1 dsy SiJfe «tMManal HnM
SBc.Addtttonai days tt.30«ndOOc.
Oasa/focl ads an notaccaptad by talapborm and an payable in
advanca. DaatWnait 10:30 a.m. tha day baton publication.
Publications Office, /horn 241, S.U.&, UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
20 — Housing
The Vancouver Institute
Free Public Lecture
DR. ALEXANDRE
MINKOWSKI
Hopital Port Royal
Paris
PRACTICAL MEDICINE AND
THE DEVELOPING WORLD
Dr. Minkowski is a leading authority on
early human development and health
care in developing nations.
LECTURE HALL 2,
WOODWARD BUILDING,
SATURDAY, OCT. 3
AT 8:15 P.M.
TEXAS MICKEY NITE
Dance to the sound of
PACHEENA
SUB Ballroom Oct. 2 8:00-12:30 P.M.
Texas Mickey to be raffled
off at 11:30 - BE THERE
Tickets at A.M.S. Box Office
SHARED ACCOMMODATION wanted for
Oct. 15 or Nov. 1. Grad, non-smoker. Approx. $200. Jim, 224-6735.
25 — Instruction
INCREASE CONCENTRATION, memory &
recall. Get ready for exams now. Phone
681-7388. Alpha Hypnosis Clinic.
30 - Jobs
INTERVIEWERS REQUIRED for Canadian
Consumer Research firm. Good hourly
wage. Mostly evening and weekend work.
Project begins October 19th and runs two
weeks. Phone 271-5053 for more information.
BASKIN ROBBINS ice cream, 4065 Cam-
bie at 25th requires counter worker/supervisor, 3-4 shifts evenings and weekends only. Call 872-3715, Mrs. Shecter.
35 — Lost
Delightful Theatre on Record
GOING OUT OF
BUSINESS SALE
"SUNSHINE BUS"
Selling all L.P.'s
BELOW WHOLESALE
COST
- 2 for 1 -
Buy 1 L.P. Get 1 Magic
Poster Free
THURS. & FRI.,
OCT. 1 & 2 - 5:30 p.m.
Room 213 SUB
LOST: Gold I.D. bracelet engraved "Laurie",
Friday. Sept. 20th. Sentimental value.
Phone Laurie, 266-5833. Reward!
LOST GOLDEN Australian kangaroo pin
in Isabelle Mclness lounge on Friday, has
great sentimental value. Reward. Louise,
228-0867
40 — Messages
PRACTICAL acupuncture moxibustion
home study course. P.O. Box 35676, Vancouver, B.C. V6M 4G9.
50 — Rentals
60 - Rides
FREESEE. The long AMERICA series starting Oct. 6 every Tuesday, 12:30 p.m. SUB
Aud. Free film series.
ROLLING STONES tickets available. Bus
Tour, 228-0769.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS: A store packed
with ski wear, soccer boots, hockey equipment racquets of all kinds, jogging shoes
and dozens of other sports items at
reasonable prices, {including adult small
hockey jerseys for ladies hockey teams at
$10.95). 3615 W. Broadway
REASONABLY PRICED older furniture &
desks at Townhouse Antiques, 3928 Main.
Student discount with A.M.S. card.
11 — For Sale — Private
OMEGA B600 ENLARGER. lens, easel,
timer, safelight, $200. Call 271-2929 after 6
p.m. or weekends anytime.
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and hair-
styling. Student hairstyle - $8, haircut
$3.50. 601 West Broadway, 874-0633.
85 — Typing
PROFESSIONAL court recorder guarantees
fast, accurate typing. Essays, theses,
manuscripts, letters, resumes. Phone
Carol, 987-6527.
TYPING Special Student Rates. Filtness of
Cameron Public Stenographers, 5670 Yew
Street. Phone 266-6814.
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric Call 736-4042.
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857. Friday, October 2, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 23
(She (Mieatiitt -XIjeebe 3tin
A Jrauittanal English Restaurant
«S8B Ounbar at 30th 224-2521
3 COURSE LUNCH SPECIAL      3.75
DINNER SPECIALS from 4.75
Plus complete Menu Selection
\ of Salad. Sandwich and
\ House Specialties
i
«) Open: 11:30 - Midnight
.- Monday thru Saturday
■' ENJOY ENGLISH PUB-STYLE
FOOD IN AN AUTHENTIC SETTING
Fully Licensed Premises
Make "The Cheese" Your Local
Jnur^r^.r=Jf=Jn=Jt=ii=irsJr=lKlffJj^ip]
CAfc«*\,
i
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fast delivery I
228-9513
4610 West 10th Ave.
JSt-Jc'r'r- 'fr^'^'d'=l'=J'=1=''=''=''r'=''^'si3!gF-*'
11 a.m.-1 a.m.
Monday to Saturday
4-11 Sunday
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.
RED LEAF     -
RESTAURANT ^
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK-UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISE
Mon.-Fri. 11:30*00 p.m.
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sunday* and Holidays
4:00 p.m.-MO p.m.
_      2142 WsMm Parkway
!■      U.E.L. Vancouver. B.C.
(Opposite Chevron Station)
ROTIMAN DELI   .
CARIBBEAN FOODS
Roti— Curry Chicken—Beef—
Stew—Poulourri Rice TV' Peas
Take Out—Catering—Delivery
Tel: 876-6056
Tues.-Thurs. 11:30-6:00
Fri.-Sat. 11:30-10:00
922 Kingsway - Opp. ICBC
UBG Gampas
^ub?    Pizza
Steak & Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224 0529
2136 Western Parkway
mmm
i
•   Salad Bar   •   Ribs   •   Lounge
Spinach Pie   •  Mouseka   •  Lamb
•   Prime Rib   •   Pizza
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Dally from 11 a.m
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
224-3434 224-6336
AND
AMS
TICKET
OFFICE
AMS PRESENTS
The Future Is Now — A Multimedia Show and Lecture —
Fri., Oct. 2, 8:00 p.m., I.R.C.
Kim Carnes & Gary U.S. Bonds
- Thurs., Oct. 8,8:00 p.m.. War
Memorial Gym.
The Villains — Fri., Oct. 9, 8:00
p.m., SUB Ballroom.
Monty Python's Phenomena
with Graham Chapman —
Thurs., Oct. 29. 8:00 p.m., SUB
CBO EVENTS Ballroom.
Spotlight Special No. 1 — featuring Blue Northern & Jim Byrnes —
Sat.. Oct. 3. 8:30 p.m.. Commodore.
The Legendary Blues Band — formerly the Muddy Waters Band —
Wed., Oct. 7, 9:00 p.m.. Commodore.
Warren Miller's — Ski in the Sun — Mon.. Oct. 5, 8:00 p.m., Tues.,
Oct. 8, 8:00 p.m.. Queen Elizabeth Theatre.
Dutch Mason Blues Band — Wed., Oct. 14, 9:00 p.m.. Commodore.
Oktoberfest '81 — Fri.. Oct. 9, 8:30 p.m.,
Thurs.. Oct. 15, 8:30 p.m., Fri., Oct. 16,
8:30 p.m.. Commodore.
The  Imperials  —  Thurs..  Nov.  19. 8:00
p.m., Orpheum.
Buy your tickets at
the AMS Box Office
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
•*f UNIVERSITY BLVD/?
W     Eat In and Take Out    fffc
►tt       OPEN EVERY DAY      x>
j,    4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.    P*-
%' PHONE: 224-6121 /5
The GALLERY LOUNGE
proudly presents!
He
GEORGIA
HOTEL
Proudly Presents
GEORGIA EXECUTIVE
HAIRSTYLISTS
Under New Management
For Appointment Call
801 W. Georgia 681-5615
Lower Level
Licensed Bistro
For Light Meats & Snacks
Tues. Sat , 5:30 p.m.-12:00 a.m.
Sun., 5:30 p.m.-11:00 p.m.
3502 W. 4th Ave.    732-7016
Dine out
tonight
at one of
the Fine
Restaurants
advertised
in
today's
Ubyssey
CITR-UBC RADIO
AND THE PIT
seconds out it's round
one. Two new bands
come out fighting in the
"HOT
AIR
SHOW"
Live Bands
THE IMPOSTERS
and more!
The Cheapest Free
Entertainment in Town
P.S. BRING YOUR BEST JOKE!
Mon., Oct. 5, 9:00 p.m.!
No Cover
from
San
Francisco
Sept. 23-26
Wed.-Sat.
8:30-
Midnight
W&2
Sept. 30-
Oct. 4
dL:-*"
ALSO APPEARING:
"Peter Chabanowich"
at the piano
Mon & Tues 9:00 - Midnight
$1 at the door       Sept 21, 23, 28 & 29
Student Union Big - main Floor
THE
GALLERY LOUNGE
proudly presents!
"DON PROFIUS"
-- Rock Review of the 60's -
Oct. 7 - Oct. 10 Wed-Sat: 8:30 - Midnight
Also Appearing At The Piano
Mon Oct. 5
Tues Oct. 6
Peter Chabanowich
S.U.B. Main Floor
NOW, A NEW
BURGER THAT'S
MORE BURGER
THAN
RUN
Introducing the new hamburger from the DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER store. In a new "six to a pound" size that really
gives you some meat for your money. Instead of a banquet of
bun.
You see, while other burger chains
get as many as ten hamburgers from a
pound of beef, we get only six. And
that gives you "more burger than
bun." A burger that's tender,
deliciously-cooked. Every time. The
new burger from DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER.
2601 W. Broadway
Dairy
Queen
brazier Page 24
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 2, 1981
RHODES OCTOBER
FESTIVAL OF VALUES
GIGANTIC SAVINGS!
wi ****jEL
SONY.   Technics
PERFECTLY MATCHED
. . 28 watts per channel with
TOP QUALITY EQUIPMENT -
—The new Sony STR-VX2 receiver
Acute Servo Lock Tuning.
—Technics SL-B202 semi-auto, belt drive turntable complete with
cartridge.
— AR 18 two-way bookshelf speakers.
y- r
Technics
A SYSTEM FEATURING THREE OF THE TOP NAMES IN AUDIO
— New. from Technics the SA-203 slim-line receiver with 30 watts
per channel.
— Sony PS-LX2 semi-auto, direct drive servo-locked turntable complete with cartridge.
— JBL L19 two-way bookshelf speakers.
^fT^fSiPP**-*
^' klipsch
EXCEPTIONAL SOUND - OUTSTANDING VALUE
— Sony's new STR-VX4 receiver with 40 watts per channel, digital tuning, and eight station memory presets.
—The   Sony   PS-LX4" semi-auto,   direct   drive,   quartz-
locked turntable with Shure M95HE cartridge.
—The incredible Klipsch Heresy three-way speakers in
raw brich finish.
V klipsch
discwasher®   "Y
PRODUCTS TO CARE FOR YOUR MUSIC
The scientific cleaning
system for your
valuable record collection.
TDK
<
SA-C-90
Popular high bias tape
SA-XC90
Double-coated Premium tape
HD-01
Cassette head demagnetizer .
0	
$499
$788
f34"
AN IMPORTANT ANNOUNCEMENT
FROM RHODES
TO Ali LOVERS OF
CLASSICAL MUSIC.
A STATEMENT OF POLICY:
1. INTRODUCING CLASSICAL DAYS.
As of October 2nd 1981, you'll hear
classical music, and only classical music,
all day Fridays, every Saturday morning,
and weekdays 4-6 pm, when shopping for
records at Rhodes.
2. SELECTION
It is Rhodes' policy to continue to offer you
one of the largest, most comprehensive
selections of classical records and tapes in
Canada.
3. SERVICE
Courteous informed staff are on hand to
help you in any way possible with your
classical music needs.
... AND A PROMISE:
RHODES WILL ENDEAVOUR TO OFFER
YOU THE LOWEST POSSIBLE PRICES
ON CLASSICAL RECORDS AND TAPES.
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9*
,NOOM
TCS-310
Portable stereo with recording and playback. Great for
taping    lectures   and
your favourite music.
*219
STUDENT SPECIAL/
KV-4000
Sony's smallest colour
TV . . . 3.7 inch
screen . . . Trinitron
tube . . . 4-way power
supply: AC, car battery,
battery pack, or 9 D
cells.
*689
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^N/O.^^cvAV?
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PLUS HUNDREDS
l-STORE SPECIALS
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THE FINEST FOR LESS
STEREO
VIDEO
733-5914
RECORDS
TAPES
733-2215
1905 WEST BROADWAY
ONE BLOCK WEST OF BURRARD ... IN THE HEART OF VANCOUVER

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