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The Ubyssey Feb 2, 1967

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 43
VANCOUVER,  B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 2,  1967
COLLEGE <■»£*->   PRINTERS
224-3916
— kurt hilger photo
ENGINEERING PRESIDENT Eric Newell boozily bleeds at the
spring blood drive in the armory. Students may be sanguinarily charitable until the end of next week.
This advertisement is not published or displayed by the
Liquor Control Board or by the Government of British Columbia.
AMS going broke
asks $3 fee hike
Slowly going broke, the AMS council
will ask students to give their government
$3 more in a referendum Feb. 15.
Recommendation for the fee increase
was contained in AMS treasurer Lome
Hudson's mid-year report.
The referendum will be worded to explain the reasons for the hike:
• The AMS budget is facing serious cutbacks;
• Increased funds would significantly assist such activities as undergraduate societies, intramural sports, publications, academic activities and further extend the
AMS program to additional students;
• Increased funds would enaible the AMS
to participate more fully in the areas of
student housing, university reform and
higher education promotion; and
• The students' council strongly supports this increase.
The referendum then asks if students
are in favor of increasing all AMS students'
levy by $3, by a yes or no answer.
In proposing the fee increase, Hudson's
report states:
"This would enable some present activities to be upgraded, others developed to be
relevant to additional students, and further,
it would aid in the necessary development
of the AiMS as a promoter of higher educa
tion in this province."
The mid-year report also notes the
"rather disturbing trend of fairly fixed revenues trying to cope with increased costs
and demands being made upon them."
The Academic Activities Committee account is $1,000 over budget, the publications
budget is strained, and undergraduate societies, student associations, World University Service, special events and conferences
are suffering from cutbacks in this year's
budget.
"The present crisis confronting higher
education suggests that we should be spending more on first-rate research, political action, and in taking our case to the public,"
Hudson said.
He warned that the alternatives to a fee
increase are steady cutbacks and the establishment of drastic priorities.
"A $3 fee increase is not much and will
still keep our activity fee as one of the
lowest  in Canada."
AMS President Peter Braund noted at
Monday's council meeting that the average
student council fee in Canada is $44 whereas UBC's now stands at $29.
If the fee referendum passes by the required two-thirds majority it will give the
AMS an additional $45,000 to $50,000 per
year.
ROBSON GOES MOTHERLY
Forty doubting lower mall male residents
heard housing administrator Les Rohringer
explain Tuesday night why he is changing
males for maidens to wash their floors.
Rohringer was invited after TO of the
96 students in Robson House announced
on an opinion sheet that they preferred to
keep their male janitor.
The students complained females would
cause them inconvenience while cleaning
washrooms.
They also claimed housing is hiring
women basically because they get lower
wages than men.
Rohringer admitted cost was a factor in
SAYS FACULTY REP
the switch tout said women gave better service as well.
And as for inconvenience, he said the
women he hired were "fair-looking motherly types" with "not much attraction as far
as sex is concerned.''
Rohringer said he was making attempts
not to fire the male janitors, but to switch
them to other jobs in the university while
opportunities were available.
He said the switch will not be until the
end of the year in any case, because the
men residents would probably "give the
poor women hell" as things stand now.
Tuition raise predicted
The past president of the UBC faculty association predicted Wednesday there will
"almost certainly" be a raise in tuition fees
next year.
"Unless Premier Bennett finds he can
channel federal funds to the universities
the students will have to pay — and that
means higher fees," Dr. John Norris said
in an interview.
"There will almost certainly be a fee
raise next year," said the history professor.
Norris was a contributor to the 1964 education report, Guideposts to Innovation.
He said that since Bennett is short this
year on his money he may be reluctant
this year to increase his expenditure on
education."
(Two weeks ago UBC President John
Macdonald said to meet the costs the universities must get $66 million, twice this
year's budget. "This $66 million isn't just
a pipe dream", Macdonald said. "It is what
this province's universities must have to do
their job properly.")
Norris said the university was clearly
in need of more money. He said the alternative — cutting back in expenses — might
damage  the  university's   academic   quality.
"The administration has only two alternatives — to keep the place operating or
to close it down. And they won't be allowed
to close it down," he said.
So unless Bennett finds that he can
channel those federal funds to the universities, the students will have to pay—and
that means higher fees, said Norris.
Norris hailed the hew federal government grants to education as vastly increased
over the old per capita grant.
But, he said, Bennett might not choose
(To Page 3)
See: BENNETT Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February  2,   1967
'Fight racist society/
Harris urges Negroes
By BO HANSEN
Integration is irrelevant to
the problems of the American
negro.
This is the word from John
Harris, a former Student Nonviolent Co-ordinating Committee worker and now a member
of the Progressive Labor
Party, in the U.S.
"What is important is the
money and dignity to do what
we want," he stated Tuesday
noon in the auditorium.
Harris says that America is
fundamentally a racist society,
and that Negroes don't want
to  accept white values.
"We cannot unite or integrate first, then fight. We
must fight first, then through
struggle and revolutionary example we can unite."
Harris used the example of
Watts to~ show the enemy of
Negroes is not themselves.
"The whole force of the
California police and National
Guard was concentrated in the
three and a half square mile
area of Watts within a few
days of the riots under the
pretext of stopping the looting."
But the looting was not
stealing, rather a protest
against the people who had
these goods, the people who
are expoiting the Negroes,
Harris contended.
"Negroes were taking what
they felt belonged to them,
the same motive as behind the
Boston tea party."
Harris said the whole 'retraining' concept is a myth.
"In places like the General
Motors plant in Watts 85 per
cent of the jobs require no
training whatsoever."
"Negroes are being retrained for jobs that don't exist. In
Mississippi, the Job Corps is
training Negroes to shoe
horses. Negroes work harder
and get paid less."
"This new attitude rejects
the efforts of white liberals
who are doing missionary activities. They work in Negro
areas because they think they
are morally right, because
that's where the action is or
because they feel guilty."
"Negroes are rejecting these
people by saying that if they
are serious they should work
in the white community with
poverty   among  the   whites."
Harris   links   the    Negroes'
problems to those of all oppressed people the world over.
The common enemy is American imperialism.
"It is not the Negroes' problem in Vietnam because it
is the big corporations who
are making the profits. However black people are being
forced to go over in numbers
out of proportion to ther percentage of the population."
"Negroes are 11 per cent of
the American population, 22
per cent of the American
troops, and 60 to 70 percent
of the front line troops in some
regiments."
The oppressed peoples of
Africa and Asia are not turn
ing their cheeks like we have
been taught to do, says Harris.
"The National Liberation
Front appears to be winning
the war in Vietnam, and Negroes are seeing from this that
America may be a paper
tiger."
American   power  to  an   octopus.
"While the oppressed people
Harris compared white
in Asia were hacking tentacles,
Negroes in America could attack the heart with switchblades and molotov cocktails."
The creation of black revolutionary cadres in America
was one way Harris sees to
bring about change.
St. Marys University
retains CUS membership
The students of St. Mary's University in Halifax
voted Friday by a 73.5 per cent margin to retain
membership in the 160,000-member Canadian Union
of Students.
CUS chief Doug Ward said he was "delighted" by
the news. "Under the leadership of an extremely active
council, St. Mary's have become one of the most aware
campuses in the  Union.
"I hope St. Maty's will use this mandate to dig
in hard, and get to work on the implementation of programs confronting the problems of the University
community," he said.
The New
Tenant
comedy of
the absurd
by   Eugene  lonesco
directed   by Judith   Penner
FREDERIC WOOD
STUDIO
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Feb. 9
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566 SEYMOUR - 685-2271 Thursday, February  2,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Wilson's formula to rule:
Turn right, follow no one'
FOOTLOOSE CO-ED with a loose foot limps lopsidedly
past Buchanan. Photog forgot to ask name of soleless
student and how she lost boot, to boot.
BofG'ers boycott
AMS-board dinner
AMS councillors expressed disappointment Wednesday
because only one-third of the board of governors attended
the annual board of governors-AMS dinne'r meeting.
Only   board   chairman   Mr.   ^^"*"■"■»^—"~■"-"■"■^~—•
Justice   Nathan   Nemetz,   and   ^ I |
members   John   Liersch   and  OOCf 6C7     D101II
Richard Bibbs attended.
"I was disappointed that only
three out of nine board members were there," said Charlie
Boylan.
"There was frank and open
discussion, but we didn't come
to any conclusions or agreements on policy," he added.
"It was better than last year
as there was much franker
discussion of problems facing
the university community,"
said Peter Braund.
POINT GREY (UNS) — A
bearded blorg has been sighted
wildly typing on a new electronic word machine. Witnesses were aphasiated.
reveals cost
A B.C. Hydro bond issue
prospectus published in June
1966, revealed Wednesday that
the Social Credit government
planned to spend $56.9 million
on post-secondary education
in 1967.
The prospectus, available
only in the U.S. gave government estimates for all its
spending this year.
The amount stated in the
prospectus represents 86 per
cent of the $66 million which
UBC president John Macdonald has requested for the
1967-68  year.
By MARGARET LADBURY
Parliamentary government is over, cabinet government is fading and prime ministerial government is in, an expert on British
politics said Tuesday.
"A prime ministerial dictatorship governs
Britain today," Dr. Robert McKenzie told
students.
McKenzie is a UBC grad and professor of
political science at London School of Economics.
"The idea that a party is democratic
and that its leaders simply follow the policy
decisions of the mass is an illusion."
Wilson's current dictatorship is best illustrated, McKenzie said, by his reaction to
complaints about his wage-price policies from
the party rank and file.
Asked what he was going to do, the PM
replied: "Govern."
"Wilson is a very astute politician; he has
taken my breath away with the ease with
which he has taken control of his party,"
McKenzie said.
"Policy will now be shaped to fit what
the electorate wants; it is a new era of
'market polities'."
This accounts for the many switches in
policies since the election.
Labor has turned further right than the
Tories ever did, claimed McKenzie. British
politics have moved to a new fulcrum slightly to the right of center.
"The main policy lines of Wilson's government are almost identical to those of the
previous Conservative one.
"In foreign policy they have given absolute priority to the Anglo-American world,
including an almost complete acceptance of
the Vietnam war. This is very annoying to
the rest of Europe — especially De Gaulle."
McKenzie quoted De Gaulle on Britain's
Vietnam policy: "If they lack courage to
speak independently on that issue, why don't
they keep quiet like the Italians?"
"Today Wilson is going full speed ahead
to get Britain into the European Common
Market. This is a big switch from his election
position of asking for impossible conditions
for entrance," McKenzie said.
"Again in the issue of defense, Wilson
has dropped his election position and moved
over to the Conservative stand. Today he
favors keeping a nuclear force.
"Wilson's innovation, the department of
economic affairs, has come to a dead stop.
The finance minister has more power today
than ever before.
"The  party's  economic  policies  are  op-
Borrower fined
A false statement in an application for
a $1,000 Canada Student Loan has cost a
former UBC student $500.
Francois Albert Ramey was fined in university magistrate's court Friday.
Ramey obtained a $1,000 student loan
from the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce on University Boulevard on Dec. 3,
1965.
The court was told he then obtained
another $1,000 loan from the campus branch
of the Bank of Montreal on Dec. 23, 1965,
stating in his application that he had not
received any other student loans.
Ramey, 30, is now a laborer.
posed by the trade unions which supply four-
fifths of the party funds.
"The deflationary policy deliberately
creates unemployment and by suspending
collective bargaining steps harder on the
union than any Tory government has in this
century."
The Labor government has slowed down
social spending so that Britain's social program lags behind every country in the
European Common Market.
"The difference between the parties are
slight in practice."
McKenzie quoted from Churchill: "Four-
fifths of each party agree on four-fifths of
tne things to be done."
"The old idea that certain classes voted
for certain classes is wildly inaccurate," he
said. "In the last election the Conservatives
received half their votes from the working
class."
'BENNETT SHORT
(Continued from Page 1)
to channel all the funds into education because of shortabes elsewhere.
Next year will be the first time federal
money to higher education is channelled
through the provincial treasury, instead of
directly going to the universities. The
money, to approach $27 million for B.C.,
will be only a base sum. For every dollar
above the $27 million Bennett spends on
education, he is promised fifty cents from
Ottawa.
Manganese rises
to the surface
By MURRAY McMILLAN
The first discovery of underwater manganese deposits in B.C. waters has been made
by a UBC team of geologist-oceanographers.
The location of nodules of the minerals
in Jervis Inlet was announced Tuseday by
Dr. James W. Murray of the Institute of
Oceanography.
"This is an exciting find, and one which
opens up the possibility that there may be
underwater deposits of minerals of commercial value in B.C. coastal inlets," Murray
said.
First traces of the nodules were found
in June 1966, when master's degree candi-
rate Bob MacDonald was making an underwater survey of the inlet as part of his thesis
work.
W. M. Matthews, head of the geology
department said: "The provincial government asked that the announcement be delayed until the order-in-council concerning the
rights to minerals on the sea floor was made
public."
Matthews said economic evaluation of the
deposits will be difficult until more is known
about underwater mining. Murray added that
to the best of his knowledge there is on sea
mining of manganese at present.
The original nodules were brought to the
surface during a routine sample by the research vessel Ehkoli; after the original discovery, a grid was set up to determine the
extent of the deposits.
ITS DIFFICULT*'AU^OTHER^ Dr\H6EROUS SITUATION.f BUTX'/H
ouN-m.Esand all aviuMts)* m/TARy nwi x .jill f/ght)
AND ALL THE LOUER KAA/KSQJO PRESERVE OUR ^ACELlBulmh
' * ^ ' T GENERAL. IT/SALQ \ t$rt*\'*t
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THt U9YSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Atma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage  in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday,  loc.  24;  features,   sports,  loc.   23;  advertising,   loc.  26.
Winner  Canadian University  Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
FEBRUARY 2, 1967
Focus on $3
On Tuesday, we said the AMS must change its
fester focus from crap to substance.
We define crap as concentration of activity on reform of university services — food, housing, structures,
parking and clubs. That's virtually the total of the
AMS today.
Substance is involvement in what students are most
concerned about — their educations. We suggest there
are serious reforms and revolutions that need to happen
to university teaching. A president's committee on academic goals in 1963 agreed with us.
Student government today is not at all involved
in academics. Until it becames involved, it will remain
immaterial to most students.
Last Monday, treasurer Lorne Hudson created a
referendum for the Feb. 15 slate which asks students
to support a $3 hike in AMS feees — $29 to $32.
He said the extra $50,000 would be used to both
expand existing programs and to create new areas of
work for student government.
We don't seriously think any candidates in the
coming • elections will offer a coherent platform; few
have in the past.
But if anybody is moved to present a platform, we
suggest it include uses for that $50,000 Hudson says
the AMS .needs. Only then will students be able to
judge the value of paying $3 extra — and we think
any hike is ill-advised if the AMS does not use it to
enter academic  affairs.
First slate elections — president, secretary and
second vice-president — close at 4:30 p.m. today.
Festival tops
We have to chortle at the centennial people, running
all over Canadian history looking for an elusive national
identity.
For if they cared to check, that identity is smeared
all around UBC this week and next. It's called the
Festival of Contemporary Arts 1967, and contains nothing
but current Canadian works.
It shows clearly why the centennial people,
self-consciously trying to cram history down our national
throat, have failed to nab that lost identity. The Canadian
identity doesn't give a damn about history — that's
what distinguishes it from, say, the Americans, and
separates our festival from American equivalents.
I wore my op art ensemble to the march . . .
what are you wearing for   the strike?
Governors to consider
non-secrecy—Nemetz
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
Thank you for your letter
of January 26th. I agree with
you that further steps should
be taken to improve understanding between students
and the board of governors
since we are both striving to
achieve the same end, namely
a better University of British
Columbia.
As I told you last summer,
I had hoped to make certain
proposals to president Macdonald and my colleagues
which would cover a wide
range of areas for closer liason with student organizations. It has been a matter of
great regret and concern to
me that Dr. Macdonald's resignation has interrupted my
plans. I hope that with the
appointment of a new presi
dent  that work  will  go  forward.
In   the   meanwhile,   in   regard to your request to have
The   Ubyssey   cover   board
meetings, this must be a decision   of   the   full   board.   I
have   therefore   placed   your
proposal as contained in your
letter on the agenda for our
meeting of February  9th.
NATHAN NEMETZ
Chairman,
UBC board of governors
EDITOR: John Keltay
Newt.   .     -_   .     .   . Carol Wilson
City . _ Danny Stoffman
Photo  .      Powoll Hargravo
Page Friday _   __      Claudia Gwinn
Focus  Kris Emmott
Sports    _. Sua Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Ass't News  Al Bimw
Ass't City                _         _ _     Tom Morris
CUP        Sort Hill
Letters
'Blue  brain
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In a recent edition of Science, an article concerned
with psilocybin appeared.
''Psilcoybin, a hallucinogen, formed a blue colour
with a subtraction of rat-
brain mitochondria believed
to contain nerve-ending particles."
Or in simpler terms: psilo-
bycin reacts with the brain
cells to form a blue coloured
compound.
Let those who say hallucinogens have no physiological effects beware they are
not looking through "bluey"
eyes.
MIKKEL   SCHAN
grad studies
'Gift  horse
Editor,  The Ubyssey:
It appears to me that we
are taking entirely the wrong
approach in pushing for higher education. Until now we
have been pressing for higher education on virtually
moral grounds alone.
By now it should be obvious the only arguments our
$ocial 0redit government understands are economic.
Therefore we must convince
our politicians of the great
financial gain to be had from
higher  education.
A negative argument would
be to ask our politician what
would happen if tomorrow
morning every individual in
the province holding a university degree stopped working. A positive argument
would be first to suppose that
our government in the next
ten years spent an extra bil-
To Page 5
Telex arrived. Kelsey, wide-eyed
and frothing with glee, enlightened the continent. "Kelsey is
like a child in knickers," said responsible Wang Ming, who is
putrid. Soothseekers Kathi Harkness, Norman Gidney, David
Hastings, Val Thorn, Peter Shapiro, Don Stanley, Helen Manning, Margaret Ladbury, the ineffable Lin Tse-hsu, and Val Zuker.
Sportsmen were Pio Uran and
Mike  Jessen.
Fotogging was in the shutters
of Al Harvey, Kurt Hilger, Crawford, and Chris Blake.
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
BY  TOM  WAYMAN
Computers cope with first names only
Tom Wayman was Ubyssey editor-in-chief last
year. He is now studying for his master of fine arts
degree at the U.C. Irvine campus. This is the first
of a series of articles on the Catiforunia university
situation.
The University of California, Irvine, rises out
of the ranchlands of Orange County like an architect's dream. Six of the university's permanent
academic 'buildings stand in a semi-circle in the
midst of a rolling prairie that bears an uncanny
resemblance to those empty backdrops one sees in
so many architect's sketches. Occasionally there
are cows gazing in the
distance, or a hawk
swooping down over the
far mesquit or nearby
auxiliary buildings —
residences, gymnasium,
shopping plaza. But from
any angle you approach
UC Irvine, the beautiful
modern buildings dominate the scene.
At first, the Irvine
campus—35 miles south
of the bustle of L.A. —
seemed like a student's dream as well. With scars
WAYMAN
still fresh from last year's tuition fight at UBC, I
was pleased to learn that the UC system has been
tuition-free for most of its 90 years.
Irvine opened in 1965 as the ninth and newest
of the 80,000-student UC system.
But residents of California, which make up
about 85 per cent of UC students, also have a vast
state college and community college network in
which to obtain their free higher education. So
the UC students represent the cream of the crop—
I was assured of bright, interested classmates.
Also, faculty. Though Irvine was a new school,
the UC tag makes it respectable immediately.
In the English department, where I am a graduate student, such respected scholars as Harvey
Gross and Murray Krieger are on staff. The writing program is headed toy James B. Hall, one of
the founders of Northwest Review, and the current poet-in-residence is X. J. Kennedy.
Ties with Hollywood, just up the freeway, keep
the artist-in-residence program in the fine arts
lively. Stirling Holloway was actor-in-residence in
the fall quarter.
Other departments have also drawn first rate
professors.
A. I. Melden, chairman of the philosophy de
partment and head of the Academic Senate, is
the reason why two Oxford graduate students are
attending Irvine this year.
And in each department the emphasis is on
youth and new ideas, as well as the more venerable, respectable names.
In English, for example, no faculty member
was selected unless he had some background in
creative, as well as critical, writing in hopes of
keeping the department as non-pedantic as
possible.
Even the administration seemed progressive.
This is a post-Berkeley institution, and the lessons
of the 1964 troubles have ostensibly been well
learned.
The chancellor, who is the local equivalent to
UBC's president, maintains a complete "open-
door" policy for any of Irvine's 2,000-odd students
and 200-odd faculty.
The chancellor even takes part in the vast
counselling program that has each professor in
the institution responsible for guiding a certain
number of undergraduates.
This program was instituted to prevent any
member of Irvine's eventual 27,000 projected stu-
dent population from feeling he is part of a "face-
To Page 5: See NO Thursday,  February   2,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
^mmmmmMIMmB:
lion dollars on higher education.
Then, in the following ten
years how many more billions would be returned to
the economy, or, what is probably more important to our
politicians, how many more
billions would appear as increased tax revenues?
Thus, instead of our placards reading, "Help our
needy universities," they
should read, "Don't look a
gift horse in the mouth."
HUGH   ROSS
science 4
He moved
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re editorial of January 26
— It's your move.
At the invitation of the editorial I move we examine its
content.
The editor uses the words
"drastically cut education
budget." Premier Bennett has
stated that the universities
will not  get  less  than  they
are now getting,, and further
states that the actual amount
will not be divulged until
about March 3.
Fee hikes are mentiond as
a possibility but no mention
has been made of the higher
government scholarships for
marks announced earlier.
He mentions "suffering of
quality" but does not enlarge
on this, so the reader becomes alarmed without realizing that no details have
been given to explain what
quality is going to be lost.
We seem also to disagree
on the definition of responsible. My dictionary says —
"capable  of rational action."
I put it to you that a march
on Victoria is not a rational
solution to the problem. I
suggest that a five cent
stamp, a sheet of notepaper
and an envelope, used by
these students, would accomplish as much and be a great
deal cheaper.
What is accomplished by a
NO FACELESS MASS'
less mass". Each
arbitarily assigned a professor
to help him on a one-to-one
basis when he first enters the
school — and he may reject
that professor's advice, or
change advisors, or become
fast friends with "his" professor in the course of four
years study.
Such concern with the individual is reflected throughout Irvine's administrative
bureaucracy.
No secretary is unmarried,
but neither is there one who
is not young, beautiful, and
cheerful. Last names and student numbers are taboo—you
are continually referred to by
your first name.
This    counterbalances    the
From Page 4
student is fact that Irvine is completely
computerized.
Enrollment consists of submitting your intended program to a secretary, who has
it coded and fed into the computer. After a 10 minute pause
you are handed a slip which
provides the computer's opinion on your course load.
"Is this student enrolled?"
asks a pre-fed question, printed below the course description, times, etc., which you requested. "Yes," answers the
computer, if all has gone well.
But — and this is an indicative touch—the computer
answers "yes" in green ink.
Your SKI MYSTERY Entry
Pi
presented by
CYVR RADIO-ubc radio society
duMAURIER   international
AT MT. ORFARD
in Quebec
CASA
967
EVENTS    ORGANIZED    BV    THE    CANADIAN    AMATSUIt    SMI    ASSOCIATION
The Clues to date:—
1. Birds of a feather flock together.
2. Person, Place or Thing are clues of which you
need  remember two.
3. From Sea to Sea Canadians love to ski.
4. Mt. Orford and Whistler are a part — bring them
together and you have a start.
5. There's Gold in Them Thar Hills.
6. One of the seasons is a part of the whole
The correct choice determines your goal
7. We have the facilities  but we must prove our capabilities
8. The duMaurier  International  may pave the way
for our mystery to occur one day
9. Ancient Greeks once  decided
that  our  mystery  shall  be provided
LISTEN TO    CYVR    FOR DAILY CLUES
AMS ENTRY BOXES ARE PROVIDED
Prizes
1. Pair of ikb
2. Dinner for two atop Grouse
3. Months supply of cigarettes.
YOUR OFFICIAL ENTRY
ANSWER	
All entries become sole property
of CYVR. Judges decisions final.
First 3 correct answers win respective  prizes  upon   receipt  of entry.
NAME   	
ADDRESS . PHONE	
All UBC Radio Society Members & Employees of duMaurier are Ineligible.
picture on the front page of
the paper of a group of picketers? The public has become
blase about marchers. Several times a year they are
treated to this sight, so the
effectiveness the editor claims
is negated by familiarity.
I suggest that the men in
the "Canadian tradition" he
refers to knew their situation
and found ways to make their
positions known. Not by
marches, but by obtaining
positions from which they
could effectively work to
change legislation. Will those
students, so willing to pick
up a placard, be so willing to
pick up the cost and the
cause of education after
graduation?
RONALD   KANEEN
science 3
Huberman
Educational
Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
University Subjects
Morris  Huberman.
Educational Consultant
Knowledge and Success
through Learning Power
215* W. 12th Ave., Vancouver
Fer Appointment, Phone
732-5535       263-4808
GETTING MARRIED?
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME
ADDRESS .     . ..     _
MR.  ROY YACHT,  Consultant
™* CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
^M ^Diamond with \Lonfidence
"Flair"
from
$100
Special   10% Discount to all   UBC Students
on   Diamond   Engagement   Rings
FIR-BANKS
DOWNTOWN
BRENTWOOD
PARK   ROYAL
DECIDEDLY
DI11EREMT
To be able to READ Efficiently & More
Quickly and with GREATER EASE
To be able to PREPARE YOUR NOTES
COMPLETELY and ACCURATELY
To be able to STUDY for EXAMS MORE
EFFECTIVELY
DON'T TAKE OUR WORD
SEE FOR YOUR SELF
FREE
Demonstration
THURSDAY - 8 P.M.-University Hill Secondary
School Auditorium
FRIDAY - 5 & 8 P.M.-Downtown-Bayshore Inn
Prospect Room
-New Westminster-Royal Towers
Golden Key Room
EVELYN WOOD
READING DYNAMICS J&Sl
OFBCLTD-
Main Office 549 Howe St., Vancouver, Suite 210 685-2374 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February  2,   1967
BACK  TO CUS
List growing
for top job
Anyone for another presidential candidate — maybe
vice-president of the University of Manitoba Dr. Henry
Duckworth.
Downtown newspaper speculation has it that Duckworth
will swim freely into the job
to be vacated by UBC president John Macdonald on June
30.
Anyway he is coming to
UBC Feb. 4 to address the
Vancouver Institute at 8:15
p.m. in Bu. 106 on "A century
of atomic physics."
Among other accomplishments, Duckworth has been a
member of the board of governors at McMaster University
and its dean of graduate studies. He has also published four
books—titles unknown.
Newfie crowned
WATERLOO (UNS)—Linda
Inkpen, a second-year science
student at Memorial University in Newfoundland was
named Miss Canadian University Queen here Friday night.
She was selected from seven
finalists.
Show   of   colour   prints   by
Modigliani and Klee
From $1.95
At the
Downstairs Gallery,
Village  Square,
West Vancouver
Some things
You DESIRE ...
Some You Need!
And one of these is education. Imperatively! Once it
was a prerequisite of success.
Now you need it just to get
by! YOU know this. Consult
us. Vancouver's first tutoring college. (Still here because we get results). To
third year University — Our
staff is fully qualified. Success rate? Above 90 per cent
pass in subjects tutored.
Universal Tutoring
College
(Vancouver) Ltd.
571   Howe  Street
683-8464
SFA reapplies  for membership
Simon Fraser has applied for reinstatement in the Canadian
Union of Students.
In a letter to CUS, SFA student president Stan Wong said:
"We are seeking immediate reinstatement in the union and are
holding a referendum Feb. 24 to solve the situation once and
for all."
Simon Fraser withdrew from 160,000-member union in
December for financial reasons.
The decision to rejoin CUS was taken at the second council
meeting following the election of six candidates running for
office on a pro-CUS slate.
Last May the students at Simon Fraser voted by a 92 per
cent margin to support membership in CUS.
In Ottawa, CUS vice-president Dave Young said: "We are
happy to welcome Simon Fraser back into the union. Simon
Fraser, because of its trimester system, its unprecedented
growth, and its academic innovations, is an important experiment for higher education in Canada."
Young said that Simon Fraser's application for reinstate
ment will be submitted to the union's board of directors by a
telegram vote.
If the application is accepted, as is expected, CUS services
will be reinstated immediately.
McGeer urges speed up
in building new colleges
Demands for a new university in B.C. every two
years were made Tuesday by UBC prof and Liberal
MLA Dr. Pat McGeer.
"It is time to give thought to smaller universities
throughout the province and to building one every other
year," McGeer said.
He claimed a start should be made by building a
four-year university at Westbank in the Okanagan
and followed up with universities at Kamloops, Prince
George and Castlegar.
V*\;      .. At"-©'      '■'
What it means to work where things are happening
It's having ability—and using it. It's a feeling of personal pride. It's doing something
really meaningful. It's challenging and
changing the world. It's living. And doing.
And professional growth. It's excitement.
It's now.
What's happening at IBM?
Just about everything under the sun—and
beyond. Twenty years ago, the electronic
computer was just getting off the ground.
In this short time, it has come to be called
the most beneficial invention in history.
The pace of new applications is literally
fantastic. Business, goverment, law education, medicine, science and the humanities. All are affected by IBM's information
and control systems. Positively affected.
Chances are there's a place for you in the
growing world of information and control
applications.
Whatever your educational background,
whatever your discipline, you could be a
part of what's happening at IBM.
Make it a point to investigate the advantages of this growth company with the
IBM representative who will be visiting
the campus February 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10.
Your Placement Officer can arrange an
appointment for you. If you cannot attend
the interviews, please write or visit the
IBM office in Vancouver at 1445 West
Georgia Street.
IBM
International Business Machines Company Limited Thursday, February  2,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Rallyist   Robiraille
first to the finish
A UBC man formed half of the winning team in the
Canadian National and B.C. Regional Championship car rally.
Last weekend Allan Robitaille of UBC and Bob Wilson
swept the overall title with a total of seven penalty points.
They were driving a factory-sponsored Citroen along the
complex 1,130 mile course — from Vancouver to Kamloops
and back.
Conditions were harsh as the competitors moved over
secondary roads, logging and farm roads, and trails — many
slicked with snow and ice.
Bob Dunwoodie and John O'Dwyer, winners for the past
three years, took second place in their modified Volkswagen.
Don Lamont and Ed Deak finished third in a Datsun 1300.
The victorious six are veteran Shell rallyists.
Of 32 starters, 23 completed the course.
Manufacturers' points were awarded towards the manufacturers' championships. And the winners drove home richer.
fe^a-s^'..'
SLICING THROUGH a sea of white powder is UBC ski team member Elwood Peskett.
International Intercollegiate Ski Meet happens at Banff, Alberta from Feb. 2-5. Intramural  meet goes  on Seymour  Sunday.  Register at Mem. Gym office.
Mash Manitoba
The UBC basketball Thunderbirds travel to Winnipeg this
weekend for two Western Conference games against the Uni-
versity of Manitoba Bisons.
The Birds are in second place in WCIAA standings with
a 5-3 record, good for 14 points. The University of Calgary
is in first with 8-2 (16 pts.), Alberta has 5-5 (10 pts.), Saskatchewan 4-4 (8 pts.) and Manitoba is in the ibasement with 0-8.
The games at Winnipeg are important ones for the Birds
as they are worth four points each. Although Manitoba has
not won a Conference game this season coach Peter Mullins
is not taking them.lightly because they can be tough on their
home court.
The UBC basketball JV's play the second of their best of
three semi-final series against YMCA tonight at John Oliver
gym. The JVs won the first game.
Weekend sports events
UBC swimmers meet SFA and University of Washington
frosh at SFA, Friday at 6.00 p.m. and University of Alberta
Saturday at the same time, Percy Norman Pool.
• •       •
On Saturday UBC's volleyball team travels to Seattle to
meet University of Washington.
• •       •
UBC figure skaters compete Friday and Saturday at the
University of Alberta at Edmonton in the WCIAA Championships.
Soccer Birds live  for the  sun
Soccer fell under the weather last weekend as the UBC-
North Shore game was rained out.
The game will be played before the finals if a deciding
game is needed. UBC is still running a close fourth in league
standings.
Soccer action this Saturday has UBC playing second place
Victoria on the Island.
Ice hockey Birds bent
on breaking the Bisons
The Birds are back on home ice this weekend as they
host the Manitoba Bisons.
The powerful Bisons are now in third place in the Western Conference, with a 5-5 record.
Two top goal-getters to watch will be centre Rod Linquist
and left winger Jim Pineau with 15 goals each.
Game times are Friday, 8:30 p.m. and Saturday, 2:30 p.m.
at file Thunderbird Arena.
FOOTBALL
Attention all football Birds
and JV's — don't forget the
meeting Thursday noon in
Memorial  Gym,  rm   211.
PLAY
BY
Samuel Beckett
AUTHOR OF
WAITING   FOR GODOT
Directed by Judi Freiman
Thur. 12:30 Fri.
Feb. 2
25c
Feb. 3
FREDERIC   WOOD   THEATRE
PLAY
BY
Samuel Beckett
SPECIAL RATES
For Spring Formal Events
(UBC  Students  Only)
$7.50—Black Tuxedos
$850—Colored  Dinner Jackets
$9.50-Tails
•   Everything   included   —  Shirt,   Tie,
Links and Suspenders
2500 Garments to Choose  From
E. A LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
Studs,
623  Howe (Downstairs)
MU  3-2457
The every-popular Solitaire
Diamond, in a modern 14-
18k Gold mounting, styled
with elegant and graceful
Flortine   shoulders.
Priced   from:   $250.00
Extended Terms Available.
Special Courtesy Discount
to U.B.C. Students and Personnel.
The  Store  with the
Diamond   Dotted   "I"!
millers
655 Granville Street.
47 West Hastings Street.
Vancouver, B.C.
622 Columbia Street
New Westminster, B.C.
OPEN    EVERY    FRI.
•TILL   9   P.M.
«■#«_*■■??
SALE
SKIS - BOOTS - PARKAS
STEEL BOOTS-AFTER SKI BOOTS
STRETCHIE SLACKS
HEAD BANDS - TOQUES
NORTH WESTERN SPORTING GOODS LTD.
10th at Alma Phone 224-5040 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 2,  1967
TWEEN CLASSES
Love, sex spark talk
COLLEGE  LIFE
Lecture on Love,  Sex  and
Marriage tonight, 9:01, Salish
house lounge.
CONTEMPORARY
ARTS FESTIVAL
Thursday's events are: A
Concert of Chamber music,
Bu. 106 and a Poets' Market—
Vancouver poets read and sell
their work in printed form.
Readings by 21 poets, second
floor, Buchanan.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Meeting today, noon, IH 400
to discuss dance,  open house.
Singing   and   Russian   conversation session.
EUS
Mixer   today,   noon,   Brock
lounge. Women free, everyone
else, 25 cents.
SOCIALIST CLUB
Ross Dawson discusses Will
Canada  Go  Socialist?,  today,
noon, Bu. 102.
PRE  SOCIAL  WORK
Field    trip    to    Willingdon
School for Girls leaves north
west  Buchanan  extension   today, 12:45.
YUKON PCSF
Executive meeting today,
noon, Bu. 3252.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
Political debate, Canada:
Ten Provinces or One Nature,
today, noon, Bu. 100.
GUEST LECTURER
Prof. A. G. McMay discusses
The Pleasure Domes of Baiae,
Friday, noon, Bu.  100.
CURLING CLUB
Graveyard   bonspeil    Saturday,   10  p.m.  arena. Enter  at
arena or phone 261-6103,  $12
per rink.
SPORTS  CAR CLUB
General   meeting    today,
noon, chem  250. Hear  T'Bird
Tall   Tails,   also   super   racy
movies.
ROD AND GUN CLUB
Meeting today, noon, clubroom to discuss steelhead trip.
UBYSSEY
Blorgs rule the world! Come
and work   for   The   Ubyssey.
See   us   downstairs   in   north
Brock, anytime.
MUSSOC
Anyone willing to usher for
How  to  Succeed, please  sign
list  in   clubroom   above  auditorium.
GOLF CLUB
Girls   interested   in   playing
golf meet Friday, noon, FH.
VCF
Joe Curry of Calgary speaks
Friday, noon, Bi. Sci. 2000.
Press study
A two-year study of the
freedoms and responsibilities
of the United States student
press has been launched by
the National Council of College Publications Advisors.
Delegates to a recent
NCCPA national convention
voted unanimously to establish a study commission to
make "specific recommendations to dispell the confusions
surrounding the freedoms and
responsibilities of the student
press."
w
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15, 1967
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS —
SATURDAYS -
SUNDAYS —
12:45
2:00
7:30
3:00
7:30
2:45 p.m.*
3:30 p.m.
9:30 pm.
5:00 p.m.
9:30 p.m.**
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.*»
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
♦Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
•♦Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons —    Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings      —   Students .50      Adults .75
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
NEED A CAR?
1058 ALBERNI
685 - 0536
FOR AN EVENING
OR A WEEKEND
ONLY $5.00 plus 5c a mile on ANY of our cars over night.
5:00 p.m. - 9:00 a.m.
24 Hours Weekend
$5.00 $12.00
RAMBLERS
5c/mile
5c/mils
VALIANTS
$6.00
5e/milo
$14.00
5c/miU
GALAXIE 500'$, H.T.
FURY Hi's, H.T.
$8.00
5c/mile
$18.00
5e/mile
MUSTANG'S, H.T.
SPORT FURY
$8.00
5c/mile
$18.00
5e/mil.
ALL RATES PLUS GAS
(Ages 21-25 Collision Insurance Extra)
SPECIAL RATES FOR TEAM, CLUB AND OTHER ORGANIZATIONS
INTERNATIONALISTS
Dr. Willaim Willmott of the
Asian   Studies   department
speaks on South East Asia in
Turmoil, Friday, 8 p.m. lower
mall common lounge.
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
H e w a r d    Grafftey,    MP,
speaks Friday, noon, Bu. 205.
CUS
Eugene   Heckathorn   speaks
on Ethics in Business, Friday,
noon, Ang. 413.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
NOTICE OF ELECTION:
The election of the Executive of the Students' Council 1967-68 will be held as follows:
First Slate: for President, Secretary, Second Vice-
President. Nominations open January 25 and
continue to February 2, 1967. Election will be
held on February 8, 1967.
Second Slate: for First Vice-President, Treasurer, Coordinator. Nominations open February 1 and
continue to February 9, 1967. Election will be
held on February 15, 1967.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads are not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost ft Found
11
LOST: ENGLISH 383 NOTEBOOK,
Buchanan, Monday. Important.
Finder   Please   Phone  731-3074.
LOST: SILVER INDIAN RING IN
Showmart  washroom  on  Monday,
. Jan. 23 (Evening) Phone Jack
261-3839.
LADIES WATCH FOUND IN
Grad Students Centre. Claim
there.
LOST BLACK TOP HAT AT
Mardi Gras Sat. night. Please
phone  Dennis  983-1488.
SILVER EARRING FOUND OUT-
side HG 14 at 11:30 on Monday.
Claim at Publications Office,
Brock  Hall.
FOUND   A   GREAT   NOON   MIXER
at   Brock  today   12:30-2:30.   Guys
25c. Girls Free.
REWARD FOR RETURN OF
watch taken from Mem. Gym,
ladles changing room. Great sentimental value! Contact Marg.
253-8516  PLEASE!!
LONG RED AND BLUE SCARF
last Saturday at Acadia. Phone
Dianne   224-9884.
LOST: CAMEL SWEATER AFTER
3:30 bowling Tuesday. Phone
Linda,  266-2740.
Coming Dances
12A
SEMI - FORMAL BLUE CHIPS
Commerce Dance at Commodore
Feb 3   8:30  p.m.
GREAT  EUS MIXER
Today, 12:30 to 2:30
Brock Lounge
You  25c
Women Free!!
$6.00!
worth of big-beat entertainment
will be playing for your dancing and
listening pleasure this Sat. nite at
CAMPUS A GO-GO (Revisited). By
now you know who's playing — suffice to say that they are 3 of Vancouver's GREATEST BANDS. And
the cost to you? The same price
that you would pay to see a typical movie. You can go to a show
anytime, but how often is it possible to be entertained by a TRIPLE
BAND PROGRAM and yet pay only
$1.50   a person?
VERY,  VERY SELDOM
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM BROAD-
way at Boundary. M,W,&F at 8:00
a.m.   Please phone  224-6850.
RIDE NEEDED FROM 15th AND
Lonsdale. Monday to Friday for
8:30  classes.   Phone   987-2156  eves.
RIDE NEEDED FROM AREA
Grandview & Nanaimo: Mon.-Fri.
for 8:30s.   Marilyn  435-7957.
Wanted
15
WANTED:   ROLL  BAR  FOR   TR-4
Call  Bob  at 228-8343.
WANTED: "RADIO AND WIRE-
less 30" Vocational Correspondence   course   call   435-5767.
Travel Opportunities
16
ONE AMS RETURN CHARTER
ticket from London, $195.00. Phone
321-9775 after 10 p.m.
MALE STUDENT TO SHARE AC-
commod. for tour in Russia.
Phone   Don at   228-8825.
AUTOMOTIVE  ft MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'52 DESOTO—352 HEMI. P. STEER-
Ing and brakes. New transmission. Phone 433-6370—Bruce after
6 p.m.
VAUXHALL CRESTA '62 std. trans.
31,000 miles, snow tires. $950.00 or
best   offer.   FA   5-3036.
1959 GREEN VOLVO — 544 SPORT,
City tested, body and engine —
excellent condition. Phone Bob
922-1326 after 4.
1961 SIMCA EXCELLENT COND.
New clutch, battery. $300. Phone
Dave 266-0879.
Automobile Parts
21A
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM OPEN MON.-
Fri. 12:30-1:30 F.&G. 116 — come
and  see our minerals and fossils.
ALL ARTSMEN — ENTER THE
Arts Poetry Contest now. Cash
prizes. Deadline Feb. 24. For further information contact Arts
Office  Brock  359.
HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS
Without Really Trying. Student
Performances Feb. 6th, 7th, 8:30,
9th,  12:30.  75c.
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's —
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.	
GIRLS: ESCORTS UNLIMITED
can provide you with an escort
for any occasion . . . Reasonable
rates. All Inquiries handled personally and confidentially. Reply
1157  Steveston  Highway.	
ONE HORNY ENGINEER RE-
quires date for dreaded Engineer's
Ball. Contact "Cookies" Campbell
S.F.
•61 FIAT SPYDER PARTS. NEW
top, clutch, tires trans., body
parts.   CY  9-4874.
Accessories & Repairs
22
Bodywork, Glass
23
GLASS     FILLING     AND
work    at   Commerce    Blue
dance Feb.  3.  Commodore.
BODY
Chips
8:30.
Automobiles Wanted
25
Motorcycles
27
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
Sewing ft Alterations
40
CLOTHES ALTERATION — NEW
— old — repairs — reasonable
charge. Phone 224 - 7141 afternoons.
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-6621.
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4530
ELECTRIC TYPING, THESIS AND
essay. Call Joan 228-8384.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call  277-5640.
ATTENTION: NORTH SHORE
students: Typing done in my
home. Fast, Accurate, Reasonable.
Phone   987-3548   before   8  p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
INSTRUCTION
SCHOOLS
Music
63
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKIS: KNEISSL COMBI W, POLES
and BOOTS. (10), all used one
season.   228-8652   (evenings).
RENTALS  ft  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
BASEMENT SLEEPING ROOM
for male student, separate entrance. Semi Private shower and
toilet.  Phone  224-6883  6 to  8  p.m.
Room ft Board
82
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. — "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T.. Eaton's
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.
IF YOU DON'T LIKE BLEEDING
ears, hire the Jabberwok. They
play vaudeville, too. Phone John,
CA  4-9073 or  Lindy,   CA  4-4555.
8:30 P.M. — B.Y.O.B. — 1:00 A.M.
BLUE CHIPS. Commerce Dance
at Commodore Feb.   3.
FOR   YOU
This   Sat.   Nite
A TRIPLE BAND
SPECTACULAR!
A 4%  Hour
Dance & Show
CAMPUS "
GO-GO!
ANOTHER GREAT BROCK NOON
Mixer today. Live music by the
Rouges.  Guys 25c,  Girls free.
VOLKSWAGENS 1953 TO 1967 —
Stop that noise before it gets
louder and more expensive. Auto-
Henneken Oak and Marine Dr.
263-8121.
EXCELLENT VIEW, GOOD FOOD,
and enjoyable atmosphere at the
Delta Upsilon Frat. House. Call
Ron   or   Scott  at   224-9841.
FOR CONVENIENCE, COMFORT,
and congeniality, stay at Zeta PSI
Fraternity, 2250 Wesbrook Cres.
Phone 224-9662 between 5:00 p.m.
and  7:00 p.m.	
ROOM & BOARD AT UBC GATES
single $105.00; sharing $90.00. Only
those who are serious about their
studies   need   apply.   224-6441.
ROOM AND BOARD. MALE STU-
dent. $85 per month. Non-Smoker.
5 min. walk University. CA 4-5154.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
FEMALE WANTS ROOM-MATE
for furnished apartment near Kits
beach.   Phone  736-5280 after 4:30.
Real Estate
86
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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