UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey May 24, 2011

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128307.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128307.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128307-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128307-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128307-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128307-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128307-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128307-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128307-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128307.ris

Full Text

Array Rocking the domestic SINCE 1918
recwff 6ZIBSB6SBIZB
illMMIM
*•*     <«.
#
» «
9s Oil 91S* | 0/| g/£
3H^Q3W0H    Z 0N110H     _Jv^w
tfAftfft,
With Canucks tickets worth more than twice face
value, are scalpers making an immoral buck?
<e
V
k.wi
■
-V
*
K>r
dE 28, NUMBER 2
DENT UN30N BU3LD3NG
ONDAYS AND THURSDAYS
(MJBYSSEY.CA
91 Oil 91S^
VN3MV
SU390U O
GSS votes to suspend operations
indefinitely on Thursday, fires
manager on Friday More on Page 3. 2/U BYSSEY. CA/E VENTS/2011.0 5.24
MAY 24, 2011
SUMMER VOLUME XXVIII,  N°II
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Justin McElroy: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
MANAGING PRINT EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield:printeditor@ubyssey.ca
MANAGING WEB EDITOR
Arshy Mann: webeditor@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITORS
Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan:
news@ubyssey.ca
ART DIRECTOR
Geoff Lister: art@ubyssey.ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Ginny Monaco: culture@ubyssey.ca
SENIOR CULTURE WRITER
Taylor Loren: tloren@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Drake Fenton: sports@ubyssey.ca
FEATURES EDITOR
Brian Piatt :features@ubyssey.ca
VIDEO EDITOR
David Marino: video@ubyssey.ca
WEB WRITER
Andrew Bates: abates@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Indiana Joel: ijoel@ubyssey.ca
WEBMASTER
Jeff Blake :webmaster@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback@ubyssey.ca
BUSINESS
BUSINESS MANAGER
FerniePereira: business@ubyssey.ca
AD SALES
Alex Ho opes: advertising@ubyssey,ca
Room 23, Student Union Building
print advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
web advertising: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTORS
Ming Wong Alison Mah
Josh Curran Claire Fong
Ion Chiang Will McDonald
Bryce Warnes
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of the University of British Columbia. It
is published every Monday and Thursday by
The Ubyssey Publications Society. We are an
autonomous, democratically run student organization, and all students are encouraged
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opin-
on of the staff, and do not necessarily reflect
the views of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. Al
editorial content appearing in The Ubyssey is
the property of The Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs and artwork contained herein cannot be reproduced
without the expressed, written permission of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to
CUP's guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300
words. Please include your phone number,
student number and signature (not for publication) as well as your year and faculty with
all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey; otherwise verification
will be done by phone. "Perspectives" are
opinion pieces over 300 words but under 750
words and are run according to space. "Free-
styles" are opinion pieces written by Ubyssey
staff members. Priority will be given to letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces
will not be run until the identity of the writer
has been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit submissions for length and clar-
ity. All letters must be received by 12 noon
the day before intended publication. Letters
received after this point will be published in
the following issue unless there is an urgent
time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display
or classified advertising that if the Ubyssey
Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the UPS will not be greater than the
price paid for the ad. The UPS shall not be
responsible for slight changes or typograph-
cal errors that do not lessen the value or the
mpact of the ad
7\V
^» %f^ Canadian
-_*■ qi *--■ University
roL        Press
jpe- Rainforest
Alliance
Canada Post
Sales Agreement
#0040878022
EVENTS
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby! Learn
about layout and editing, video
production and more. • Sundays-
Fridays, 11am-5pm.
AMS SUMMER MARKETPLACE* The
AMS Summer Marketplace is
back! There will be plenty of
past favourites as well as great
new vendors. Stroll through the
SUB concourse and see what's
hot this summer. • May 10-31.
For more info check out ams.
ubc.ca.
NOON YOGA $1 • Led by the UBC
Yoga Club—all skill levels are
welcome. Bring your own mat and
enjoy this invigorating session.
RSVP on the Facebook events
page. • Tuesdays, 12-lpm, UBC
Bookstore, $1.
GRADUATION   CEREMONIES   •
Graduating students take to the
stage to receive their degrees,
awards and say goodbye to UBC.
• May 25: Arts, graduate studies in
Social Work, Audiology, Medicine
and Population and Public Health.
May 26: Arts, graduate studies in
Education, Library Archival and
Information Studies, Human
Kinetics and Law. May 27: Arts,
Applied Science, graduate studies
in Forestry and Nursing. May
30: Science, graduate studies
in Science.May 31: Applied
Science, Land and Food Systems,
Interdisiplinary studies, graduate
studies in Interdisiplinary Studies
and Environmental Health. Jun. 1:
Commerce and graduate studies
in Business Administration.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 25
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC BACCALAUREATE CONCERT • Featuring graduating students from
the school of music, this free
event is sure to perk the ears
of any classical enthusiast. •
Free, May 25, 8-10pm, Chan
Centre. concerts@interchange.
ubc.ca or 604-822-5574 for more
information.
MONDAY, MAY 30
THE MATHEMATICS OF DOODLING*
Ravi Vakil (Stanford University) shares the mathematical
aspects of doodling: patterns,
shapes and numbers, and talks
about finding patterns in nature.
Niven Lecture. • May 30, 1:30-
2:30pm, Geography building
GAMES AND COMICS
1
2
3
'
1
'
6
7
*
1
'
10
11
12
13
li
"
"
17
"
■
19
20
21
"
■
"
■ ,""'-
"
■
■
27
2S
29
30
"
"
33
34
35
36
■
37
,.
'
L
AO
"
12
■
AA
IS
1
"
•SS      I
49
50
51
■
"
53
■ 54
"
■
1
5?
SB
59
■ 60
„
m
"
63
G4
65
66
67
66
1
■
70
1
"
"
73
"
"
(CUP) — Puzzles prov
ded by Best-
36-Young __
Crosswords.com
Used   with
37-Acclaim
permission
ACROSS
39- Chews
40-Vessel
42- Causing goose bumps
44-Very, in Versailles
1- Equa
45- Layers
5-Victor's cry
47- Fragment
9- Feudal lord
49-Wreath of flowers
14-Arthur Ashe's alma
mater
50- Move apart
15-All there
52- Waver
16- Conductor Dorati
54- Smoke deposit
17- Jutting rock
56- Sand hill by the sea
18-Astounding
57- Italian wine city
20- Chinese martial art
60-Marry
22- Gal of song
62- Lunatic
23-As to
66- Oppressively heavy
24-Part of Q.E.D.
69- Dresden's river
26- Protracted
70-Angler's basket
28- Like some ulcers
71- Incline
32-Must
72-Bound
73- Sows
74- Kind of prof.
75- Fill to surfeit
DOWN
I- Playful sprite
2-Beige
3-Brio
4-Tattered
5-The act of issuing
6- Buddhist temple
7- Burden
8- Sherpa's home
9-PC linkup
10-Needy
II- Collar type
12- Massive wild ox
13-Additional
19- North Carolina college
21-At liberty
25- Stories
27- Bit of film, to a photog
28-Brushes
29- Square
30- Bendable twig, usually of a willow tree
31- Coniferous tree
33- "Our Gang" girl
34-Chirp
35-Actor Davis
38- Exhausted
41-Was in the chair
43- Convenience
46-Paulo
48-Colada
51- Feathers
53- Principles
55- Inventor Nikola
57- Basics
58- Deodorant brand
59- Corner
61- Evil is as evil	
63- Bones found in the hip
64-Assist, often in a criminal act
65- Give up
67- Golfer Ernie
68-Barker and Bell
C0MICMASTER BY MARIA CIRSTEA
MA»2ATBc>fJ -fo RAlS^
AWA12&^5 OF M£ • • •
Vl_L fee IAAV\M^ 14 &BERS
Evetev Houfc fop-tBef
AU- PROCQg^ WILL- 6»o
HA&VT.
3
1
V
i
1
±
s
S
\
1
s
a
3
3
S
a
3
1
^
N
V
3
1
i
3
3
V
D
Oi.
1
9
1
1,
3
B9
O
S
N
3
£3
a
V
n
S
99
3
S9
V
?9
1
E9
N
V
29
a
19
3
M| I  1
09 H
X
6S
s
B5
V
it
13
N
3
a
95
1
0
O
s ■
vs ■
3
1
V
1
ES
1
S
3
H
IS
a
ts
V
3
H
d
s
OS
1
3
1
1 d
1     *■-■
V
V
D
s
| s
1     9V
a
3
1
±
sv
s
3
V
1 II 3
:■'■:■■ ■    |       If:-'
1
V
3
3 1 | d
*-■   |     TV
1
H
s
0s
s
M
V
N
3 1
GE ■
1
BE
V
1
D
3 ■
■■'if ■
S
N
n
9E
0
SE
±
?e
a
E£
3
3
N
1
IE
V
N
3
a
O
0E
n
6Z
a
8?
1 °
N
iZ
0
1
9Z
1
V
a
3 ■
3
y
N
■ ^
V
s
ZZ
n
d
D
N
n
02
s
n
0
a
N
3
151
d
n
1
I
1
3
V
V
D
il
1
V
1
N
%
l
3
N
V
I
*
1
D
n
3
EI
3
It
1
01
\
Ns
0
9
's
«.
3
E
3;
d
1
.room 100.
*
w
s
fl
£
•—
S
i>;     Oh
0
+^     fl
O    —
s •«
2 «
O      2
+J      Q
-M      <->
5     >N
d     ~
fl^
P     3
-    t
fl    ^2
P     S
>       5U
«U       >
c ^
2  £
a w
Your campus radio station
with online streaming
and podcasts
Tofino twice a day... Every day...
Call 1.866.986.3466
or book online and Save!
fEEEf ___?'
TOFiHOBUS.COM
immii
Island Express
CiTR
1Q1.9fm/CITR.ca
OWN YOUR FREQUENCY
and
publisher
of
H*<#M=H 2011.05.2 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
NEWS
WEB EXCLUSIVES
CHECK OUT UBYSSEY.CA
FORTHIS AND MORE
Hairspray reviewed
Marcelle nominated CIS athlete ofthe year
Study: iPhone oximeter to Uganda
Turning greenhouse gases to fuel
UBC crime report
EDITORS KALYEENA MAKORTOFF & MICKI COWAN»news@ubyssey.ca
Koerners Pub closing from the summer
GSS suspends operations and fires manager, hopes of re-opening in fall
MICKI COWAN
news@ubyssey.ca
Amidst high emotions and tensions, the Graduate Student Society (GSS) voted to close Koerner's
Pub and Catering for the summer
with no scheduled re-opening
date. GSS Council was in session
for almost four hours, eventually
voting 13-5 (with six abstentions)
to close the pub as soon as possible, with the exact date to be determined by the GSS Executive.
GSS President Andrew Patterson and VP Administration Paul
Save cited mounting financial
losses for forcing the pub's closure. Koerner's and GSS Catering
lost$152,148in2010 and was projected to lose $175,000 thisyear.
"A lot of people, including the
executive, want it back up and
running in September," said
Patterson.
"The procedure we have to go
through is to talk with the union,
to talk with all the stakeholders
so that we find a solution that's
agreeable." Patterson said negotiations will take place with
CUPE 116, the union that represents workers at Koerner's, to
work out what steps to take during the summer.
David Lance, a CUPE representative, threatened legal action at
the meeting if employees were effectively suspended for the summer without due process.
"Try it—we'll see you at the labour board. Thirty people's jobs
are in jeopardy here.
"I caution you about the ease
some of you may think it is to
i.-d and operated hy the Graduate .Student Society
Everyone
Welcome
Free Pool    -Free Shuffleboard
•Micro breweries our «„„..:..._.
■Huge garden
enes our specialty
"■^Bar„en patio .Live Music
»* Screen TV -16 beers „„ tap
0-tdoorBBQ   .StBdaitp.
-~;:^Lo-rL-e,
Koerner's Pub sign sits outside the door. JORDAN DAWE PHOTO/FLICKR
close down the pub. We're extending our hand to help out before
the legal ball gets rolling, rather
than paying lawyers—which will
be the alternative."
Lance's concerns over the lack
of notice given to employees were
echoed by workers themselves.
Tatiana Pakhomova, an employee at Koerner's and an undergraduate student, didn't find out
about the possible loss of her job
until she read about it in The Ubyssey. "As an employee, we weren't
told about this at all. We weren't
told by the GSS, we weren't told
by anybody. I don't want to read
about the fact that I'm losing my
job in The Ubyssey newspaper.
That's not the way it's supposed
to go."
She also thought it was unfair to graduate students who
were away from campus for the
summer.
"It's completely disrespectful
to everybody, and not just the employees, but the students and the
managerial staff. They're making a very big mistake and I hope
they know that."
Gerald Cole, food and beverage manager for the GSS, argued
against suspending the pub's activities, claiming it would harm
attempts for a better market at Koerner's, but said later that day he
would do what he had been asked
to by his employers.
"I do know there certainly are
plans that are trying to be put in
place to guarantee the continued existence of the facility as
Koerner's. I certainly hope they
will be successful. Whether or
not I will be part of that remains
to be seen," he said to The Ubyssey on Friday.
But Cole will not be part of
those plans. Later that day, he
was fired by the GSS.
"They're shutting down the pub
for three months, so there's no
real need for a manager," said
Cole, who added he would decline
further comment until a severance is negotiated with the GSS.
The GSS declined comment on
the firing.
Patterson said he was relieved
to have the motion passed and begin discussing the next steps. "We
have to go through negotiations
with various people. Who knows,
maybe we'll be able to figure out
a situation where we'll be able to
keep it continuous throughout the
entire summer."
"Unfortunately we had to move
quickly with this as it was a substantial loss," said Patterson." We
felt that council had to move on
it very quickly to recognize the
problem and essentially stop the
bleeding." til
Participate in class, get higher grades
UBC study shows "traditional" teaching styles to be ineffective
MING WONG
Contributor
A new UBC study is proving that
professors can't just be a "talking textbook."
The report from the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative (CWSEI) shows that students
learn and engage with course
material more when the professor uses interactive teaching methods as opposed to traditional, standalone lecturing.
"In a typical first-year physics
class, you [usually] see people
talking to their friends, they're
on their computers, but whether
they're doing physics is another thing," said study co-author
Ellen Schelew, a physics master's student.
Conducted lastyear, the study
compared two introductory undergraduate physics classes, one
taught by a professor using traditional research-based instruction, the other taught by Schelew and post-doctoral researcher Louis Deslaurier for an experimental week.
Using their cognitive psychology-based interactive teaching
methods, Deslaurier and Schelew assigned pre-reading assignments before class, gave out
Students participate in a physics class. JON CHIANG PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
reading quizzes and led small
group and clicker-based question discussions, all within a
class of more than 200 students.
The experimental class resulted in an attendance increase of
20 per cent, as well as increased
engagement overall, according
to the study. Scores rose from
an average of 41 per cent in the
regular class, to 74 per cent in
the experimental class.
"There's a difference in the
[experimental] class. The students are engaged and they
are actually focusing on the
material being covered," said
Schelew. "In class, they can't just
turn off their brains and go on
their computer."
A reason for the students' focus is the method of deliberate
practice, where the instructor
provides opportunities for students to engage. Participation
has a heavier weight in interactive learning, where even simple clicker questions can help engage the class to discuss ideas.
"We want them [the students]
to get feedback through their
peers, throwing ideas back and
forth," said Schelew. "It's all part
of this thinking process."
Ninety per cent ofthe students
surveyed in the class said they
enjoyed the new teaching methods and 77 per cent agreed they
would have learned more if the
whole course were taught in the
experimental style.
Around 50 science classes at
UBC have already been transformed, and more will start
adopting these new methods
into class curricula at the discretion of professors.
Cyprien Lomas, director ofthe
Learning Centre for the Faculty of Land and Food Systems,
thinks the study gives credibility to new teaching methods that
are often met with resistance by
skeptical faculty members. "It
should give them the courage
to go ahead and feel vindicated
and try these [methods]."
While there is no research yet
connecting the methods developed in the science-based study
to other faculties, Lomas believes general interactive techniques can easily translate across
campus.
"For this to work, students
have to put in the effort and
that does motivate them to be
involved," said Schelew. vl
NEWS BRIEFS
KLEIN TO DIRECT UBC SCHOOL OF
JOURNALISM
Three-time Emmy Award winner Peter W. Klein will take the
helm ofthe University of British
Columbia's Graduate School of
Journalism as Acting Director,
starting on July 1, 2011.
Klein, an associate professor
at the school, was a long-time
producer of 60 Minutes of CBS
News, and before that at ABC
News 20/20 and Nightline. He
also helped launch New York
Times TV.
In 2009, Klein created UBC's
International Reporting Program,
in which he and his colleagues
take graduate students around
the world to report on under-
covered global stories.
BRITISH COLUMBIANS PAY MORE
FOR GENERIC DRUGS: STUDY
If BC had the same pricing model for generic drugs as Ontario,
we could have saved $157 million last year. That's the finding
of a new UBC study comparing
drug prices across the country.
Researchers looked at prescription costs at 5000 pharmacies in Canada; they found
that since 2006, Ontario has
slashed the price patients pay
for generic drugs to the point
where they pay 25 per cent of
the brand name cost, the lowest price in Canada.
British Columbians pay about
40 per cent more for our generic drugs.
UBC STUDENT WINS TRUDEAU
SCHOLARSHIP
A University of British Columbia graduate student has been
named a 2011 Trudeau Scholar,
one of Canada's most coveted
awards for social sciences and
humanities graduate students.
Lara Rosenoff, a PhD student studying anthropology at
UBC, is among this year's 14
Trudeau Scholarship recipients.
The recipients are each awarded a scholarship of $180,000 for
their education and research to
examine issues of fundamental
importance to Canadians, such
as the environment, international affairs, responsible citizenship
and human rights.
For her PhD, Rosenoff is
studying how violence and displacement in northern Uganda
has interrupted the transmission
of moral and cultural knowledge
between generations.
UBC NAMES NEW HEAD FOR ITS
INVESTMENT ARM
Peter W. Webster, Chair of the
Board of Directors for UBC Investment Management Trust Ine
(UBC IMANT), has announced
the appointment of Jai Parihar
as President and Chief Executive Officer.
Parihar is responsible for selecting and overseeing institutional investment fund managers
and ensuring that UBC IMANT's
strategic and operating objectives are achieved in accordance
with the investment policies of
UBC's Endowment, Staff Pension Plan and other funds, which
total over $2 billion.
Parihar previously worked for
Alberta's Ministry of Finance. *vU  11 \       if 6/UBYSSEY.CA/SPORTS&CULTURE/2011.05.24
SPORTS
EDITOR DRAKE FENTON »sports@ubyssey.ca
Winning nationals the Ultimate goal
UBC's mens team to compete in USA invitational tournament
CLAIRE FONG
Contributor
For the first time in six years,
the UBC Men's Ultimate team
will play at the USA Nationals—
the only Canadian team to qualify from more than 200 schools.
This is only the second time the
team has qualified for Nationals. The team has a plethora of
talent and numerous veteran
players, but not a single member
of the team has had the opportunity to compete at Nationals.
Head coach Kevin Chung
doesn't believe this will be an
issue. "We have a pretty decent
shot," he said after the team's final home practice Sunday.
"We have a lot of guys who
have been playing in world
championships. Quite a number of these guys played at U23,
mostatU19. [We have] a lot of experience at big tournaments, we
just haven't played at this [specific] tournament."
Aaron Liu, one of six players
on the team explicitly given a
leadership role, discussed the
mentality the team will need
to win the tournament.
"[We] gotta focus, one game
at a time," said Liu, a fourth-
year player on the team. "We
can't look past any other team
because it's still the top 20 teams
in the nation, so every game will
be tough."
The team has had a strong
season, losing only three out of
28 games to date. Their most recent loss came against the University of Oregon, but the general consensus is that Carleton
College of Northfield, Minnesota
Members of UBC's ultimate team take advantage of a rare break of good weather during the long weekend. JOSH CURRAN PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
and Pittsburgh University are
the teams to beat in the the tournament. UBC has yet to play Carleton and lost by one point to
Pittsburgh previously in the season. Coach Jung believes that
Carleton will pose the biggest
threat of ruining UBC's title
aspirations.
"I've heard they are pretty
quick, and they have been a
strong team for a number of
years now."
In order to be successful,
coach Jung believes that the
team will have to stay true to
its "simple" style of play and
stick with classic strategies.
"Defensively we will focus on
getting strong one-on-one match
ups; we have some stellar defenders and we just try to get
them against the superstars on
the other team. Offensively, we
just have to try to get into our
rhythm," he said.
Rookie Keane Knapp has
been an integral member of
the team this year. He has previously played throughout the
Vancouver juniors scene and
won the Nationals with the BC
All-Stars, but he credited his
teammates for getting the team
this far.
"The big thing is that we have
had a lot of experienced players
come and play for UBC this year.
We have guy's like John Norris,
Aaron Loach from U Vic and also
Matt Berezan from Alberta; just
a bunch of vets who have really
stepped up in their fifth [and final] year and have really wanted to get to Nationals," he said.
Though the recent exam period kept the team from practicing as much as they would
have liked, the end of the academic year has allowed them
to be together again.
"Our timing [during games]
is not exactly perfect right now,
but when we are, we could probably be the best team at the tournament...we definitely have a
shot," said Liu. *vU
The USA Ultimate Nationals start
May 27.
EDITOR GINNY MONACO »culture@ubyssey.ca
UBC student to have film shown at TIFF Showcase
CATHERINE GUAM
cguam@ubyssey.ca
The Toronto International Film
Festival (TIFF) is known for attracting the likes of Hollywood
heartthrobs, silver screen sirens
and the odd auteur. This month,
however, TIFF is spotlighting
a few names that you probably
haven't heard before. The eighth
annual Student Film Showcase
features 12 short films made by
students across the country. Setting out in Toronto on May 24,
the Showcase will make its inaugural visit to Vancouver on
Thursday, May 26 at the Pacific
Cinematheque.
The 90 minute program represents some of the finest student filmmaking in Canada, according to TIFF Programmer
Magali Simard.
"These films stood out for
their artistry, for the courage of
their narrative lines," she said.
Included in this lauded assembly is Leash, a live action
film directed by UBC Film 2011
graduate Kevin Doherty. The
film chronicles the misadventures of a boy and his father
looking for their missing dog.
A screeencap from the animated film The Dimming. COURTESY 0FT0R0NT0 INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL
It's a bittersweet look at loss and
learning to let go. "Leash is such
a subtle film that we don't usually see from people in universities," said Simard, "I hate to
say mature, but if there's another word for it."
For Simard, Doherty's film
stood out because he opted
against the "big bang" for a more
"slice-of-life" approach. But, that
wasn't his original intention. "It
was supposed to be about something to do with aliens...the dog
was abducted by aliens," he said.
What makes thisyear's selection special? "These films are
very courageous," replied Simard. Some delve into provocative subjects like sexual abuse,
warfare and the connotations
ofthe word fat, while others are
visually arresting, using clayma-
tion and paper-craft animation.
Prizes to be awarded include
Best Film in both live action and
animation categories. The category for animated films is a recent addition to the Showcase.
The reason, explained Simard,
is that "animation in Canada is
going up through the roof...It's
still kind of mind-boggling how
animators can become so good
in two years in a film program."
One of those mind-bogglers
is Emily Carr student Ippiksaut
Friesen, who made the The Dimming. Depicting the Inuit folklore of the creation of the sun
and the moon, her arsenal included Photoshop as well as clay
and black-light makeup. "What
I envisioned of the film was to
give it a realistic setting with
a mix of experimental animation," said Friesen.
Doherty, Friesen and the other students will participate in
panel discussions with animator/director Larry Jacobs (Cail-
lou, Johnny Test), and filmmakers Kari Skogland (50 Dead Men
Walking) and Warren Sonoda
(Coopers' Camera, Textuality).
They will have the chance to connect with industry professionals and with each other to begin their future in filmmaking.
The Student Film Showcase
offers the audience a glimpse
into the future of Canadian film.
From where Simard is standing,
the future looks good.
"They are redefining film language, which is a rare thing and
a beautiful thing." *vU 2011.05.24/UBYSSEY.CA/OPINIONS/7
OPINIONS
DO YOU CARE? WRITE US A LETTER»feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITORIAL
CUTTING KOERNER'S
Last spring, Koerner's had its liquor license suspended by UBC, was forced to make substantial
changes to operations and all but grovel at Stephen
Toope's feet to get their license back. It would be
hard to imagine the beloved campus pub in worse
shape thanks to the bungling ofthe Graduate Student Society (GSS).
But bless them, they are trying.
Earlier this month the GSS Executive came to the
conclusion that after losing nearly $200,000 since
the beginning of 2010, perhaps shutting down Koerner's for the summer time was a sensible business decision and brought it before council for a
vote. Nothing wrong there.
Yet the general impression President Andrew
Patterson and VP Administration Paul Save have
given the public is not that of decisive leaders who
can make tough decisions, but high schoolers in student council who were given a little too much power.
They alerted pretty much nobody of the decision—
which ticked off councillors and Koerner's employees alike—and then tried to argue that CUPE's threat
of a lawsuit for terminating summer jobs without
collective negotiation was an idle threat. The next
day, the executive fired Gerald Cole, the manager
of Koerner's. So, other than failing to communicate
properly, a union threatening to sue and no management to oversee a new business plan, this operation went smoothly.
Student leaders, with real power and responsibility for the first time, often make rash decisions.
The GSS has pledged to find a way to reopen Koerner's, but with Cole gone, it is now entirely on the
shoulders ofthe executives themselves to steward
its return. It's a monumental task, and given how
they handled this one, we're not all that confident.
When the GSS eventually announces the final
day Koerner's will be open this summer, we suggest you stop by there and order a pint. Odds are,
it'll be the last one you have there. "(j
SKEPTICS OF SLUT WALK PROVE ITS WORTH
Of all the offhand commentary people have made
about the Slut Walk this month, that of Dr Tom Sullivan stands out. At his Vancouver hotel, Sullivan began texting his wife and daughter in Pennsylvania
about all the people who had "taken to the streets."
While he offered his support for the women, he added, "It took [me] by surprise that there would be this
level of enthusiasm over what seems so innocuous
as a statement by the police to dress down."
At first glance, Sullivan is not entirely wrong about
the "innocuousness" of the comment made by Toronto PD Constable Michael Sanguetti. However,
what Sullivan and critics of the Slut Walk movement
are not taking into account is just how offhandedly the constable said, "Women should avoid dressing like sluts in order not to be victimized." As if it
were common sense.
This is the issue Slut Walk organizers and supporters mobilized to protest. Our culture encourages the hypersexualiztion of women and girls and
then tears them down when they embrace that sexuality. It is a minefield trying to navigate the reasons women dress the way they do. It is never as
simple as wanting attention from men. Clothes are
a mode of self-expression and, even if that expression takes the form of a miniskirt, are never invitations for unwanted sexual attention.
There are a lot of derogatory things you can call
a woman, but feminist shouldn't be one of them.
Yet on May 12, Globe and Mail columnist and consummate WASP Margaret Wente called the Slut
Walk movement "whatyou get when graduate students in feminist studies run out of things to do."
Katie Raso, organizer ofthe Vancouver march took
offence to this. "My immediate response was, I'm
not a women's studies student!'" she said.
"And then my secondary response was 'and so
what if I was?' This is a march about respect and
value," Raso said. "Why is a women's studies student no longer of value? Why is her critique no longer of worth?"
'Feminist' should not be a dirty word. Why are
we ashamed of standing up for women's rights? Despite whatever strides we have made towards legislating equality, the effects are not always apparent.
It sometimes takes as sensational a term as "Slut
Walk" to remind us of where we are as a society and
how much further we have to go. tl
GU 55 ES
?rrctf£R5
OPINIONS
BRYCE WARNES GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
Closing Koerners a short-term necessity
JAMIE PARIS
Contributor
How did we get to needing to close Koerner's for the summer? The pub was only
estimated to run at a net loss of approximately $105,000. Sadly, our projected
pub losses for the year are going to be
much closer to $175,000. In contrast,
the society has only budgeted $54,216 to
spend directly on students in the form of
our orientation, athletics, weekly events
and advocacy. We would have to spend
around $44,000 of our rainy day fund
just to stay open. Spending just under
half of our rainy day fund could hamstring the society, leaving us vulnerable if any other difficulties arose during the year. Furthermore, accessing the
rainy day fund is conditional on having
a clear repayment plan. The only way to
do this is raising student fees.
Thus, the GSS is in an ethical bind.
Our core mission is to provide services and advocacy for graduate students,
but we can't do this effectively because
we don't have the funds. This is because
so much of our operating expenses are
tied up in the pub. Sadly, the best way
to save the pub is to close it for the summer as a way to mitigate our short term
losses, and as a way to develop long term
plans. We are consulting with third party management groups, and with UBC,
to see how the risk ofthe pub can be distributed. The GSS simply cannot afford
to be the sole holders of liability on this
issue any longer.
We are strongly committed to responsibly reopening the pub, and hope it
will be accomplished for the fall orientation. In the motivation section of the
motion, we placed language that makes
it clear that our intention is for the GSS
to reopen the pub as soon as doing so
would be responsible for the society. As
well, we asked council to bind us to revisit this decision by August. This allows us to finish negations with third
party groups, and to present to council
all of our options to both have the pub
and limit our liability.
There's some concern on our part
that the pub is not actually meeting the
cultural and social needs of all graduate
students on campus. Any reopening of
the pub would, then, have to walk the delicate line between preserving what the
pub's aficionados appreciate about the
space, while at the same time making
changes to everything from the menu
to the pricing points.
Lastly the food market on this campus
has changed. At one time the pub was
only really competing with the AMS in
the food and beverage game. Students
have more choices about where to socialize on campus than ever before.
Even though we have a wonderful
patio, our obscure location, poor campus reputation and lack of an integrated marketing plan have made it difficult for us to compete in an ever more
competitive food and beverage market.
Can the pub be viable in this market?
This requires rethinking and rebrand-
ing the pub. The best time to do this is
during the summer.
Jamie Paris is the GSS VP Academic and
External Affairs
It's not what they did, but how they did it
JAISHANKAR IYER
Contributor
GSS Council decided on May 19 to shut
down the Koerner's Pub for the summer
and haven't decided on a date to reopen.
While the GSS represents the voice of
over 9000 graduate students, this important decision was taken without proper student involvement. I learned about
it through a Facebook event page and
was appalled to see absolutely nothing
about this on the GSS website. It's shameful that GSS execs have still not updated the GSS website with their decision
even after four days.
Yes, Koerner's Pub had been operating at a loss for manyyears. Unfortunately, lastyear the pub was slapped with a
four-month liquor ban which crippled
the GSS finances. Yet the overall GSS
finances still recorded a lesser loss in
2010 than in 2009. As GSS VP Finance
lastyear, I had some ofthe reports and
after doing some basic math, I realized
that if Koerner's had not been closed for
those four months, the GSS would have
managed to break even in 2010.
Surprisingly, the decision to close
down the pub was made without even
consulting the now-fired Manager Gerald Cole, who was confident that if his
restructuring plan worked then the pub
would get out ofthe red. But council decided to disregard the opinions of Cole,
myself and many other students.
I expected the finance committee to
consult the manager and come to Thursday's council meeting prepared with
all the possibilities considered and financed for. However, there was no proper presentation showing a comparative
chart of finances when the pub is running in summer as against the pub being shut down.
Many ofthe costs related to the shut
down were not considered, including any
worst-case legalities emerging from this.
Furthermore, they could have weighed
the possibility of raising the GSS student fee by a certain amount, around
$10/year. But the execs did not come to
council to discuss. They had pre-deter-
mined to close the pub no matter what
the counter-argument was.
This is supposed to be a grad student
organization, but this decision was made
without proper consultation with grad
students, without proper analysis of alternative actions, without letting the
manager have a last chance to implement his plan and without any sympathy
to all the grad students that work there.
It doesn't have to be this way. Will grad
students force the GSS to revoke their
decision, come up with stronger arguments and let us decide for ourselves?
Students can make this happen, and I
hope they will.
Jaishankar Iyer was the GSS VP Finance
in 2009/2010 With the summer concert season beginning to hit Rogers
Arena, the Canucks have often been forced to practice
at UBC's Winter Sports Centre in recent weeks, often to
hundreds of adoring fans. No
word yet on the bill for the
broken pane of glass the Canucks delighted in shooting
pucks through.
amS Insider weekly
student society
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
CENSUS
Students, don't forget to fill out
the 2011 census!
The census can now be completed online!
AMS
FINANCIAL
HARDS
SUBSID
APPLI"
UPass/SUB renewal subsidy
For more information visit
www.ams.u6c.ca
AMS FINANCIAL
SUMMER 2<"1
STUDENT
UNION
BUILDING
MAIN
CONCOURSE
JUNE
1&2
7,8,9 & 10
14,15,16&17
21,22,23 & 24
27,28,29 & 30
The New SUB Design Development phase is well underway
and is on track to be completed by August 2011.
Join us at UBC Alumni Day on May 28th for an update by
the New SUB Committee. You can also
drop by the Design Cube Thursday IMf_    NEW
mornings to learn more or visit:
www.mynewsub.com
it
STAY  UP TO  DATE W   TH THE AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
*
Twitter:
AMSExecutive

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128307/manifest

Comment

Related Items