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The Ubyssey Sep 15, 1978

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Array UBC bus service slashed
In the face of strong student
protests against bus fare increases,
B.C. Hydro is planning to cut back
bus service to UBC.
B.C. Hydro spokeswoman
Sandra Kass-Smith said Thursday
the service cuts are the result of
Hydro studies of the bus ridership
which reflect changes in ridership
patterns during the past year.
The cuts, which take effect Nov.
10, will mean longer waiting
periods for bus service to and from
the university.
Acting student representative
assembly president Paul Sandhu
and Downtown Eastside Residents'
Association president Bruce
Eriksen slammed the cutbacks,
which will also affect other city bus
routes.
"The cutback in service is
disgusting," Sandhu said Thursday.
Students are being asked to pay
higher fares while B.C. Hydro is
cutting back service, he said. Hydro
should release its ridership studies
and justify its service cuts, Sandhu
added.
Eriksen said Thursday the service
cutbacks will have a significant
effect on bus riders.
"It means a lot to people who
have to wait for the buses."
Eriksen said the service cuts
could lead to many more people
riding each bus.
"One of those buses packed with
people could lead to a very
dangerous situation," he said.
The crown corporation has cut
back service that will amount to 675
less working hours per week for bus
drivers, Eriksen said. That roughly
equals the work put in by 18
bus drivers, he added.
Both DERA and the SRA are
members of a coalition of groups
fighting the 15-cent fare increase
that came into effect Sept. 5.
Kass-Smith said the change in
service is only a "minor adjustment" and had nothing to do
with the fare increase.
The service cutbacks will only
make waiting periods slightly
longer, she calimed.
Students waiting for buses at
UBC were angered when informed
of the service cuts.
"I don't like it, but there's
nothing you can do about it," said
Robert Ford, arts 3.
"It's (Tenth - Hastings) a pretty
busy run, so I guess they should
have put more buses on," said Gary
Sorboc, applied science 3.
Kass-Smith said B.C. Hydro is
running a $60 million deficit
and is making no profit by raising
the bus fares. The service provided
at the current fare is comparable to
bus systems in other cities that
charge similar rates, she added.
But Eriksen said a different
approach is needed towards the
buses.
B.C. Hydro expects the buses to
be paid for by their users, while the
highways system in B.C. is entirely
subsidized by taxes, he said. If the
same attitude was applied to highways, all B.C. roads would require
payment of a toll fee to drive on
them, he added.
Eriksen suggested buses be run
the same way as the highways
system. "Do we ask parliament to
pay for itself? Every time the
government needs money it goes to
the poor people (i.e., bus riders)."
For every 10 per cent increase in
fares, B.C. Hydro will have 12 and
a half per cent decrease in ridership,
he said.
Eriksen added that B.C. Hydro
suffered a 13 million person
ridership loss after its last bus fare
increases and he predicted a similar
loss after this increase.
The bus service cut will mean a
12 minute wait for students
between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. on two
of the busiest runs to and from
campus, the Tenth-Hastings and
Dunbar-Renfrew routes. Currently
the wait is 10 minutes.
The service that runs from Alma
and Tenth to Renfrew and Hastings
will change from a five minute to a
six minute wait.
On Saturdays buses on those
routes will run 12 minutes apart, a
two minute longer wait than the
current 10 minutes. This will be
effective 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and at
5:30 p.m. the waiting interval will
change from eight minutes to 10.
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VANCOUVER, B.C
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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1978
228-2301
Admin 'finds'
extra money
BOARD CHESS PLAYERS contemplate pawning off moves toward edge
of knight and another draw in local re-enactment of chess championship in
Philippines. Game was part of hundreds of activities going on in SUB
— peter menyasz photo
Thursday and today as campus clubs put on annual drive to attract new
members. Korchnoi and Karpov impersonators complained about soporific
effect of Ubyssey lensman's flash unit.
Feds shelve visa sfudent restrictions
OTTAWA (CUP) - The federal government
has shelved for at least another two years
proposals to limit visa students access to
teaching and research assistantships.
According to government official Gerry Van
Kessel, the proposals will probably not be
implemented until at least 1980-81.
The proposals, being considered by the
federal ministry of employment and immigration, would only have allowed visa
students to be hired for full-time assistantships
if there were no qualified Canadians of landed
immigrants available for the jobs.
Van Kessel said the ministry had hoped to
decide whether changes were necessary for
1979/80 by this fall.
However, he said it found it needed more
information.
Since universities would need at least a year
to respond if changes were made, he said,,
changes were "most unlikely" for 1979-80.
The federal government is currently consulting with the provinces on the issue, Van
Kessel said. He said they were discussing both
the necessity of making the changes and what
form the changes might take.
"What we need to do is to discuss this issue
completely. Is it in their (the provinces) interests? Does this need correction or not?"
If both the federal and provincial governments feel that the visa assistantships are a
problem, he said, then "the question is how
best to resolve the problem."
Currently, the federal government allows
visa students to accept assistantships without
any restrictions. For other jobs, however, they
must first show that there is no eligible
Canadian citizen or landed immigrant able to
take the job.
The ministry began reconsidering this policy
when "we noticed we were issuing an increasing amount of assistantships- to foreign
students," Van Kessel said.
"The figures have been up very substantially
for the past couple of years," he said.
Critics of the proposals have said they
would lead to an administrative nightmare.
According to Van Kessel, while the proposals
"will stretch our ingenuity to some extent,
something can be worked out that would not
be an administrative nightmare."
v "v:%. *
•*-•/<»,*!"
By TOM HAWTHORN
Short term investments and
shrewd financial moves have left
the university with a $1.6 million
"cushion for emergency contingencies", administration
president Doug Kenny said
Thursday.
Kenny said the money would be
used to cover unexpected expenses.
"Take for an example, that we
have a heavy snowfall this winter.
Then these funds will be used to
cover those extra expenses."
Kenny also said $400,000 of the
windfall has been spent to finance a
contract for the new computer
system at UBC.
Earnings from short term investments and profits from medical
and computer services provided the
university with the unexpected
funds, he said.
Student board of governors
representative Paul Sandhu said the
budgetary windfall indicates tuition
increases made in 1977 were unnecessary.
"If any money is left over, the
first group which should be
alleviated is the students. The
university has fallen so far back in
the last three and four years in
academic services that the
university should use the money to
improve all faculties affected by
cutbacks," he said.
"There is an academic use for
that money, an academic need for
that money."
Sandhu said that even though the
$1.6 million is not a surplus,
education minister Pat McGeer
might perceive it as a surplus.
But both Kenny and William
White, administration vice-
president of financial affairs, said
the money would not cause any
difficulties between UBC and the
education ministry of Universities
Council of B.C.
"Carry over funds have been
discussed with the provincial
government and we have an understanding that this may occur
from time to time," White said.
Kenny expressed similar sentiments and also stressed that the
windfall amounted to only one per
cent of the university's operating
budget.
In January, UBC recorded a $1.4
million university operating budget
windfall, which was the result of
unexpectedly high investment
profits and an Anti-Inflation Board
rollback of university workers'
salaries.
Kenny was unable to determine
the relationship between the two
cases of unexpected funds Thursday. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15, 1978
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Doubtful future for French at UBC
By GLEN SCHAEFER
Despite a well-meaning motion by
the senate to encourage faculties to
offer courses instructed in French
as well as English, UBC is not likely
to become a western Laval University.
"I don't see that happening,"
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny said Thursday. "The
spirit of the resolution to offer
courses instructed in French was to
broaden the linguistic horizons of
English-speaking students."
Kenny said such a program
would have to work without any extra funds.
"We'll have to work within the
resources we have."
Kenny said courses offered in
French would probably be popular
ones such as Math 100, in which
one section would be taught in
French.
"We would have to see if we had
instructors fluent enough in French
to teach such courses," he added.
Kenny said very few students
speak French well at the university
level and Lawrence Bongie, UBC's
French department head agreed.
"It's hard enough for students to
write in English," he said.
Bongie said he did not see much
hope for an all-French education
program atUBC.
"I don't think there are enough
students at UBC who have French
as their first language to mount
such a program.
"It's an English-speaking university."
Bongie said the French department held an inter-departmental
seminar in French with the political
science, history and economics
departments about five years ago.
"The program flopped," -he said.
—peter menyasz photo
TURKEY TANDEM, admin president Doug Kenny (left) teams up with ing until karmic downpour caused frolicsome, blue-labelled council hacks
dean of medicine William Webber to flip burgers and meet kids amid blar- to retreat inside with abundant offerings of cole slaw, corn and country-
ing din of disco at AMS barbecue Thursday at SUB. Business was boom-   fried chicken.
Hacks boycott leadership conference
ByERICPROMISLOW
Student leaders are refusing to
attend a weekend retreat with
administration, alumni and faculty
members at a student leadership
conference due to the conference's
secret sessions and previous record
of "no real success or positive
results."
The alumni association is inviting
120 students, alumni, faculty and
staff to Sechelt Peninsula's Camp
Elphinstone Sept. 29 to discuss
university issues in closed sessions.
But the student representative
assembly disagrees with the conference principles and refuses to
give financial support.
The Alma Mater Society and the
SRA will not be represented at the
conference.
Kate Andrew, SRA external
affairs officer said Thursday she
thinks the conference is being run
by nostalgic alumni who want to
return to the past. "The conference
is good for those students who
want to join an old boys' network.
I'm not interested at all in that.
"As an officer of the SRA, I
think it would be totally
irresponsible of me to attend a
conference the SRA doesn't
support. I don't need to go 20
miles up the coast and socialize with
them to express the viewpoints and
concerns of the students.
"It's more effective for a student
leader to meet an administrator and
discuss all they want right here on
campus,"   said   SRA   interim
president Paul Sandhu.
"No real success or positive
kinds of results came out of last
year's conference.
"It's a good forum to get
people's ideas, but everyone just
wants to talk talk talk.
"Nothing changed afterwards. A
closed conference doesn't bring
about change," he said.
Andrew said she doubted the
objectivity used in choosing the
conference participants.
Although a key figure in the
AMS, Andrew said she didn't
receive an invitation until former
SRA president Bruce Armstrong
and AMS treasurer Arnold Hedstrom approached Dave Rowat,
one of the alumni association
organizers of the event.
Glenn Wong, SRA director of
finance, said he will attend the
conference    because   he    fears
students will be misrepresented if
no student reps go.
Fran Watters, former president
of the arts undergraduate society,
said the conference was beneficial,
•giving residents, fraternities,
athletes and politicians a chance to
meet each other and discover they
have a lot in common.
"The issues discussed at last
year's conference were very worthwhile," she said, "but the problem
was that the administrators came to
the conference better prepared than
the students, who hadn't thought of
the issues beforehand."
"The administrators gave the
students a snow job," she said.
"They were placing attitudes in
students' heads" "A very narrow
spectrum of people ends up there
(at the conference)" she added, and
Sandhu said the discussions are
biased in the administration's
favor.
Sandhu and Armstrong objected
to the conference because the
discussion, according to the tentative agenda, seemed to focus on
the constitution and sturcture of the
AMS, they said.
"There's no reason why Dr.
Kenny should discuss our constitution," said Armstrong.
"It's an opportunity to get
students, alumni, and the administration together and talk
about the problems the university is
facing," said alumni association
president Paul Hazell.
It's the first opportunity many
student leaders have to meet the
administration and express their
ideas, and the informal atmosphere
helps the administration find out
what the students want, Hazell
said.
"It's a lovely social event, but a
student leadership conference
shouldn't be a social event," said
Armstrong.
Pit draft beer flows free once again
Draft beer is expected to flow again in the Pit today,
and hopes are high that bottled Canadian will again be
on sale next week.
Responding to rumors that Canadian beer was
already in stock but was being witheld from sale until
stocks of U.S. Olympia beer are reduced, acting Pit
manager Rick Papineau and supervisor Pat Bell said
local beer was being stored in the Pit's coolers for
Thursday's Alma Mater Society barbeque.
Any leftover beer would be sold by the Pit, but Bell
said before the barbeque that there would not likely be
leftovers. Draft beer could be on sale today for the
first time since the end of the recent strike-lockout at
local breweries, Papineau said.
Both Papineau and Bell said the supply of local beer
in the next few months would be sporadic while
breweries attempted to catch up to pre-stike lockout
levels of supply, but since the Pit had a good supply of
Olympia, there was no worry of any short-term
droughts.
Bongie said students from
departments other than French did
not support the course.
Geography professor Richard
Harris, who was involved in the interdepartmental seminar, said he
favored courses taught in French.
"A general openness towards
French is desirable here. It could
have the effect of drawing French
speaking students here."
Initial notice of the motion to offer courses instructed in French was
given to senate in May by then student senator Bruce Armstrong. The
original copy of the motion was
written in French and then
translated into English. Due to an
oversight, only the English version
was presented to senate.
Armstrong said he saw the motion as an encouragement for francophone professors to check out the
demand by francophone students
for their courses.
"Students should have the
freedom to take courses in their
maternal language," he said.
"This motion could be a real
beginning. If it can be done in
French, why not Chinese?
Student fund
for guerillas
hit by pres
CALGARY (CUP) - A $1,000
grant from a student supported
charitable fund at the University of
Calgary to the Zimbabwe African
National Union may never reach
the black liberation group.
The donation, which has been a
source of controversy for the
students' association since it was
first made in June, may be thrown
out on a constitutional technicality.
"The committee's (the students
union charitable fund) decision to
fund ZANU may have been made
in somewhat too liberal context to
satisfy the constitutional stipulation
that disburesments be made to
"projects of a developmental,
charitable, or relief nature',"
according to students' union
president John Lefebvre.
The association's finance vice-
president Jeff Proudfoot had
repeatedly refused to sign the
cheque on the grounds that there
was no way to ensure that the
money would be spent by ZANU
for relief purposes.
"I'm afraid this money will end
up in the arms market of Moscow,"
Proudfoot said.
ZANU, which has been fighting
Ian Smith's white supremacist
regime in Rhodesia since 1972, had
requested the money for medicine
and for refugee relief.
Although Lefebvre signed the
cheque, he said he did so more out
of duty and a sense of obligation to
the constitution than out of support
for ZANU. He now feels Proudfoot should not sign the cheque.
The cheque required the
signature of both Lefebvre and
Proudfoot.
By refusing to co-sign the
cheque, Proudfoot had directly
violated the students' association
constitution and faced possible
impeachment. The review board,
judiciary body of the students'
association, had several times ruled
in favor of the decision to fund
ZANU, and in August had informed Proudfoot that it would not
entertain any more appeals unless
new evidence was forthcoming.
The technicality was discovered
after a review of the committee's
minutes by the students' association
executive early in September. The
review board is expected to make a
final decision within the next two
weeks. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15, 1978
Bus boss
must go
B.C. Hydro chairman Robert Bonner was right the
first time.
"It would be unthinkable to reduce service in view
of the social need for public transit service through the
metropolitan area." Almost two years ago Bonner
made this statement and promised bus services would
not be cut no matter what the cost to Hydro.
Yesterday, we discovered major downtown bus
routes are to be cut back, including the overcrowded
Tenth-Hastings route.
The man is a liar. He must resign.
His position is no longer credible and his presence at
the top of B.C.'s largest crown corporation drags the
trouble-ridden company to new lows in public disgust.
Since Bonner was appointed by the Socreds he has
sharply increased the price of everything; gas, electricity and transit; and has provided nothing except
cutbacks in service. The man is a walking disaster.
Under his reign Vancouver has fallen behind other
Canadian cities half its size, such as Edmonton,
because of an unimaginative, conservative administration. It is a disgrace that Vancouver still has no light-
rail transit system or subway.
The blame rests solely on Bonner's weak shoulders.
There would be some consolation, even pity, if the
man was only incompetent, but it's worse than that.
Since his appointment to the highly prestigious
public post, Bonner has shamelessly sought and
received directorships on private firms.
Among other directorships, he is on the board of International Nickel and Montreal Trust and has active
interests in the television business.
It has also been reported recently that he has maintained links with the Bonner and Fouks law firm, a
serious   conflict   of   interest   since   that   company
'rue ueysse/-
specializes in advising wealthy clients on dealing with
government.
Bonner was a mistake from the beginning. His appointment was clearly based on political patronage as
he was premier Bill Bennett's daddy's attorney-
general.
If Bonner does not resign he must be fired, an
unlikely possibility considering his employer.
But the people of this province can fire his boss, the
Socreds, and remove vultures like Bonner from public
payrolls.
The campaign against this provincial government
must begin now, with the bus fare increase and services cutback issue.
The Alma Mater Society will soon be announcing a
new program of protest demonstrations. Get involved.
Demonstrate. Bonner and his kind must go.
NEWS ITEM: Alma Mater Society president resigns with no apparent successor.
Letters
'Preserve Jericho hanger'
One of the west coast's most
uniquely innovative, and creative
designs for an urban park is located
in the city of Vancouver. The
ingenious transformation of a
World War II-era aircraft hanger
into an artist's workshop and
public exhibition hall lends a
character to this park which many
regard as irreplaceable. Although
somewhat unceremoniously
referred to as Jericho Hanger
number five, this portion of the
park is truly a tribute to the people
of Vancouver, who have managed
to preserve in their midst an artistic
community whose work is accessible to young and old alike.
Seldom does one encounter such
an   interesting   and    imaginative
combination of both park and
culture. While many of today's
urban parks are being neglected by
the user population, individuals can
almost always be found wandering
amidst the sculptures and totems
displayed in the Jericho hanger.
However, a popular formula has
recently reared its ugly head: Strip
land of its endowments such as
hangers, natural vegetation, and
replace them with grass and the
occasional tree. This leads one to
wonder what lurks in the minds of
those responsible. Seemingly a
"time-tested" solution to the lack
of urban outdoor space, we are
rapidly coming to realize that this
grass and tree formula often fails to
attract sufficient numbers of people
to  justify   even   this   simple   (artificial) conversion.
Certainly, what is called for is
either a more creative and innovative approach which assures
maximum utilization of the area, or
maintenance of the area in its
present state.
Both of the above-stated of-
jectives would be satisfied by the
preservation of hanger number five.
We can only lament the fact that
Vancouver is at the point of losing
one of its most interesting and
imaginatively developed "recre-
cultural" resources.
F. d'Hospital
grad studies
THE UBYSSEY
>*
SEPTEMBER 15,1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
It was horrible. Decaying bodies were everywhere as PF staffers David Morton and Merriiee Robson
returned from the grave. Gray Kyles and Dick Bale walked around the office rotting. Greg Strong didn't
look much better but that was probably the strain of his first press day. Mike Bocking and Bill Tieleman
were afraid that someone would write a masthead saying that PF was better than newsside. But Mario
Lowther and Eric Promislow said everyone already knew that. John Woudzia, Glen Schaefer and Paul
Hodgins wondered what the smell was. Richard Shretner and Geof Wheelwright told them it was Matt
King mildewing in the darkroom. Marili Moore and Richard Creech wondered if they would look that
old one day and Anne Sharp wondered why Tom Hawthorn and Heather Conn looked so bad after only one year on The Ubyssey. Verne McDonald said, "Live fast, die young and leave a good-looking corpse." Steve Howard and Kevin McGee said, "We'll never be able to do that." It was a darkroom and
stormy night for Pete Menyasz and Mary-Anne. Patti and Biba wondered why no one knew their last
names. Friday, September 15, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Item: Students prominent in the
protest movement against South
Africa's policy of apartheid have
been house-arrested or imprisoned.
Item: In Eastern Europe and the
USSR, many leading academics and
students serve baseless prison
sentences. The recent jailing of the
physicist Yuri Orlov in the USSR is
a good example.
Item: In Iran and Iraq, lecturers
and their students have suffered
imprisonment and torture for
participating in activities viewed as
"subversive."
Item; Argentinian students have
been victim to a wave of repression
aimed at purging the universities of
"left-wing elements".
Around the world, in country
after country, the evil practice of
torture is again as common as in the
middle ages. Governmental
authorities make systematic use of
torture in more than 60 nations.
Houses ef torture
C
By FRASER
EASTON
)
oppressive regime and are therefore
most likely to attack the regime or
government in words and actions.
Because of these and further
reasons, a large part of the world's
prisoners of conscience (men and
women imprisoned for their beliefs,
color, ethnic origin or religion,
who have never used or advocated
violence) are students and teachers.
perspectives
In Uganda, prisoners have their
heads bashed in with rifle butts. In
Oman, victims are lashed to an
apparatus that crushes them against
the ceiling.
Argentina, home of the World
Cup winners, employed over 73
different forms of torture during
the last ten years. In the USSR,
dissident scientists are gently
destroyed with psychiatric drugs
and treatments.
The increased use and growing
sophistication of torture is symptomatic of a general decline in
world respect for human rights. As
Sean MacBride, Nobel Peace Prize
laureate, has said, "the greatest
danger facing the human race today
is the near total breakdown of all
standards of public and personal
morality throughout the world."
Fot this is the century of Mai-Lai
and Auschwitz, of Hiroshima and
the Gulag Archipelago.
This summer, Canadian students
have had a rude awakening to the
entire subject of human rights and
liberty. In Montreal, Peter Treu
was convicted for an offence under
the Official Secrets Act, in a trial
that was kept completely secret.
The RCMP has come under fire for
a range of abuses and crimes, including wiretaps, mail openings,
and common burglaries. These, and
other events, have seen Canadian
law broken, and the Canadian Bill
of Rights ignored.
The  time   has   arrived   when
UBC students may no longer stand
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aloof of human rights problems.
These abuses should awaken us all.
And of course, students should
be concerned. Governments who
enforce a rigid ideological discipline
on the people of their country, and
regimes intent on maintaining their
power against the will of the
majority must rely on a closely
controlled university.
To these governments,
universities are not the bastions of
free thought and producers of new
ideas that we consider them to be.
Instead, they are objects to be
destroyed - or better yet, used. For
the intelligent and questioning
members of the university are the
part of society that is most likely to
detect the basic injustices of an
Authoritarian and totalitarian
regimes rely on secrecy and apathy
to carry out their crimes. Therefore
the interests of humanity demand
theopposite -exposure and action. I
urge you, as fellow students, to get
involved in protecting human
rights. Take an active role. The
only way that basic human decency
is to ever be upheld is if we, the
people, demand it.
As students and questioners we
can do no less.
Fraser East on is president of
Amnesty UBC. This AMS club
works to secure the release of
unjustly imprisoned people with
letters and petitions and tries to
raise consciousness on human
rights issues. Amnesty UBC
meetings are posted in 'Tween
Classes of this newspaper. New
members are welcome.
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VISA Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15, 1978
'Tween classes
TODAY
AMNESTY UBC
Information meeting, noon, SUB 211.
UBC CYCLISTS
Torsion of the testes free clinic,  noon, Trutch
house.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 113.
SQUASH TEAM
Tryouts for CD squash team, 2:30 p.m. to 5
p.m.. Winter Sports Centre.
GEOPIT
Bubblies and bulk, 4 p.m.. Geography building
lounge.
MONDAY
CCCM
Potluck  dinner  and  abortion  discussion,   5:30
p m    Lutheran Campus Centre
Hot flashes
,->aV<
Wheels turn
tor tharity
You've heard about how UBC
administration president Doug Kenny likes to push people around?
Well this Saturday you can see him
in action on campus.
Actually Kenny will be helping
out the UBC extended care unit's
Push for Wheels drive by pushing
wheelchair patients down University Boulevard, starting a 11 a.m.
To raise money for a wheelchair
bus, 60 patients with an average
age of 84 will wing their way on a
haven't Tfri *%eand
FOR NEW S USED
BOOKS
THOUSANDS Of
• TEXTBOOKS
• PAPKBACKS
• REVIEW NOTES
• MONARCH NOIKS
• SCHAUMIi OUT I INFS
:!f.        * COl FS NOlf '.,
■t,'y     * i Ancf :>r sf i f ciion <u
h\ vii w noik; IN 1! r
• WE TRADE USED
POCXETD0OKS
-* /()<)(! SriFNCf   I ICI ION
HOOKS ALWAYS IN SIOCK
CASH PAID FOR TEXTS, ETC.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. lOlli A»«. 224-4144
&>HijuVU!&OK      tef
I TEST PREPARATION
I       SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938
I
^fo/nfiey-H.
Educational Center
Call Days Evenings t Weekends
University Village Bldg.
4900 25th Avenue N.E.
Seattle, Washington 98105
(206) 523-7617
For Information About Other Centers
In Major US Cities & Abroad
Outside NY State
CALL TOLL FREE: 800-223-1782
4-mile trip from the hospital on
Wesbrook Mall to Blanca and
return.
A team of dogs, horse-drawn
wedding coach and a horse-drawn
fringed buggy will ease the
transportation and let the patients
travel with class.
Aid. Marguerite Ford will be
available to push the octogenarians
in her attempt to prove that Fords
are faster.
WOMEN'S ATHLETICS
Swim team organization meeting,  noon,  War
Memorial Gymnasium, room 25.
UBC THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
Tryouts  for   UBC   varsity   hockey,   5:30  p.m..
Winter Sports Centre main rink.
FENCING
General meeting, 7:30 p.m.. Winter Sports Complex gym E.
TUESDAY
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
SIMS
Group meditation, noon, Angus 210.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
CENTRE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENT
Videotapes and films free for students, every
weekday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., IRC building,
room B-80.
THURSDAY
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Organizational meeting with elections, noon,
SUB 213.
PUBLIC
228-6121
^fc
ipL^
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. - 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1:00 — 3:00 p.m.
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STUDENTS
& CHILDREN    .75
ADULTS            $12S
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THUNDERBIRD
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Big or
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Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th:
Vancouver
732-9898
ALSO GARAGES,
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
uoune niumni club
Cecil Green Park
Membership open to 4th year
undergraduates and graduate students
-OPEN -
THURSDAYS 8 P.M. - 12 P.M.
FRIDAY HAPPY HOUR 4 P.M. - 6 P.M.
FRIDAY EVENING 8 P.M. - 1 A.M.
BAND EVERY FRIDAY EVENING
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL
UBC A L UMN IA SSOC.: 228-3313
BICYCLE
STUDENT SALE
it's the best way back to school
. . . and you save $$$ on this sale!
Raleigh Rampar 10-Speed,
Reg. 139.95 - SALE 122.95
Raleigh Record 10-Speed I
Reg. 164.95 - SALE 154.95
Raleigh Grand Prix 10-Speed
Reg. 194.95 - SALE 179.95
Also Chimo, Apollo and many more!
Specials On Touring Bags and Racks!
"Check Our Prices,
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VISA
263-0878
Bank Financing
CLOSED WEDNESDAYS
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial -r- 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S. U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
SPEAKEASY, UBC's crisis and information centre, needs volunteers ' this
session. FREE training, weekend Sept.
22-24. Applications SUB lOOB this
week.
GSA FOLK NIGHT needs talent and
audience Fri., Sept. 22, Grad Centre
Garden Room, 8:30 p.m. Call Glen or
Dave at 2096 days, ASAP.
GARAGE SALE — near UBC Village.
Bikes, desk and lots more! 2061 Allison Rd. Saturday, Sept. 16, 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE. Prof.
Alex B. Woodside, UBC History department, speaks on "Collision of
Revolutions: China and Viet Nam*'
in Lecture Hall 2 of the Woodward
Building Saturday, Sept. 16, at 8:15
p.m. A world specialist on Asia and
author of several books on Vietnamese affairs, Prof. Woodside taught at
Harvard before coming to UBC, where
he has continued his studies in these
areas. This is a free public lecture.
IF YOU LIVE in Gage, Place Vanier,
Totem Park, whv not join the year's
longest party? Disco dancing classes
begin next week. Have a good year!
U.B.C. BOWLING LEAGUE meets Mondays in two shifts, 6:00 p.m. to 8:00
p.m. and 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Bowling begins Monday, Sent. 18 at
SUB I^tips. For information cal!
Karen, 224-6582 or Chris, 224-6539.
25 — Instruction (Continued)
CREATIVE MOVEMENT
and
MODERN DANCE
CLASSES
Call Naava — 264-8575
30 - Jobs
111 HELP   GREENPEACE   HELP I I I
Sellers urgently needed for the Greenpeace "Go Anywhere" lottery. Make
money! Save Life! 2108 West 4th Ave.,
Vancouver, V6K 1N6, 736-0321.
ART STUDENT to do some pen and Ink
drawings and layout work. Call Susie.
736-7611, 9-5 Mon.-Fri.
35 —Lost
LOST — Carved ivory brooch. Reward
Return to SUB lost and found or call
874-2498.
65 — Scandals
I ! ! JOIN AMNESTY UBC ! ! ! See SUB
booth — or — come to new members
meeting — SUB 211,  12:30 today.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for Ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
1M3 VALIANT. Excellent condition
Comv. 225 slant six, 4 bbl., cam, headers, milled head, new paint, new
trans., new 3.55 posi. Steve, 224-9869
after 8:00 p.m.
FRENCH MOPED-for sale. Like new,
1,500 miles, msmv extras. The onlv
way to go. Call John, 731-2559 after 5.
25 — Instruction
CANOEING INSTRUCTION by cert. inst.
15 hour course. 266-5705. Group rates.
Maximum of 6 students.
THE CITY — where the action is. URBAN STUDIES 100, HENNINOS 200.
Every Tues., Wed. 11:30.
CITR — UBC RADIO, FM-Cable 95.9,
open for membership. Room 233 SUB.
Come up for a look around. The
sound of the campus.
85 — Typing
ON CAMPUS TYPIST. Fast, accurate.
Reasonable rates. Phone 732-3690 after
6:00 p.m.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
99 — Miscellaneous
A COMPLIMENTARY (Free) Music Les-
son in an innovative method, will be
given to music lovers wishing to learn
or improve guitar playing skills. This
method has received accreditation
with major Canadian Universities and
been praised by artists of international stature, Leonard Cohen, Leo Brou-
wer and others McGill and other students previously enrolled accomplished
in 3 months what may normally take
one year or more of conventional
study. Beginners. Advanced. Limited
enrollment, 732-7314 for further Information.
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED GET RESULTS  \ photo essay\
How Page Friday operates :
Y Richard Schreirier
1. PAGE FRIDAY begins on Tuesday at 12:30. Pictured here from right to left are
reviewers Dwayne Lucas, Gray Kyles, Ted Collins and Bob Bakshi. They have just handed
in articles for Friday's paper which explains the satisfied look on Gray Kyles' face.
3. ON THURSDAY afternoon, a copy runner takes all the news copy, photos and dummy
sheets to College Printers at 2015 West Twelfth where the articles are set on computer
tape.   Armand Ouellette, one of the printers, pastes them up on full scale grid sheets.
5. LATE THURSDAY NIGHT Richard Blackburn the chargehand or foreman of the
Pressgang sets each plate on the Goss Community offset press. It can reproduce 16,000
copies an hour of any one colour tabloid.
2. ON WEDNESDAY, an editor checks over all the Page Friday copy and if necessary, he
asks for rewrites. Ubyssey editor Mike Bocking is shown here making cuts from a sports
page. After the copy is edited, it is laid out on dummy newspaper sheets
4. THE FINISHED PAGES are checked for typing errors by Page Friday staff and then
each sheet is photographed by this large twenty by twelve foot Brown camera. The image
id then burned onto a plate from the negative.
6. EARLY FRIDAY MORNING the Page Friday editor Greg Strong looks on as the printing presses roll. Both newsside and Page Friday sections of the paper are complete and
ready to hit the streets.
Page Friday, 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15, 1978 [mmic*
Tim Ray rides the crest of New Wave
By PAUL HODGINS
Summer 1977: the Furies hit town.
"Punk" rock is little more than a media-
created fantasy to most Vancouver concert-
goers.
Summer 1978: D.O.A., Dee-Dee and the
Dishrags, and A. V. play to large crowds ai
the Japanese Hall and the Quadra Club.
Vancouver sprouts its own bands. "Punk"
rock has grown up, 'and fast.
Tim Ray of A.V. is a singer, songwriter,
guitarist, and quite possibly Vancouver's first
New Wave star. His orange-eating poster
pose covered walls and mail boxes all over
town before a concert in August. Ray and his
band have had a busy year, cutting E.P.
singles for the local market, recording demo
tapes at Little Mountain Studios for interested American record companies, and of
course, performing. More than a little impressive for a band that's barely nine months
old! I talked to Ray after sittingjn on an ear-
splittingly loud rehearsal. The interview took
place in his car, an old Buick that somehow
seemed to suit him. The environment was
perfect for Ray. He hates to sit still, always
taps and shuffles and shifts his long body.
Here, his nervous energy could be channeled
into the gas pedal while he talked, expansively and spontaneously, about everything.
Carefully-planned questions quickly fell by
the wayside and this first-time interviewer
sighed and let go the reins.
PF: When did A.V. first perform? How
long ago?
R: It was . . . January or February of this
year, at the Japanese Hall, a concert we put
on ourselves . . . yeah, that was the first
time. When it did start off, playing with the
punks, people would think that A.V. was a
punk band. Instead it was just an original
music band.
I wrote the music and the words and I had
people who .could complement it really well
in my own style, which will work out and
does work out as the best way. I've tried being democratic. Doesn't work. So the best
way is to take'over all responsibilities
yourself. We played Japanese Hall, all the
venues that the punks play.
PF: Japanese Hall is by now a kind of
established punk rock hangout?
R: It closed down because of. . . they
won't rent it out any more. /
PF: Because of the damage done?
R: Damage, not done by the punks, but
done by people who ay "Hey, punk rock,
let's destroy some things."
PF: Why do you think the violent aspects
of punk are up-played?
Punk violence
R: It's just image . . . image-impressed.
.The media distort everything. It's . . . the big
companies were scared of it, etc. etc., and
what they did, they supported it. . . actually, they made a satire of it . . . now punk
rock's a big pke. The violence, there was actually . . . tne violence was again the media.
The people who dress up with the pins and
everything are really harmless.
PF: Would you say they're a minority?
R: Yeah, they are. They are a minority.
But, look at how much press they get. And
that press makes them large, Their attitude is
a minority. I mean, you're not gonna get
people doing that. You won't get me doing
that. *
PF: Still, would you say that punk rock or
New Wave is music of discontent?
R: Yeah^ definitely. I think it's the best
thing that's happened in the late '70's. Um,
what happens ... everything gets so indulgent,, and goes to a certain extent, and
then bang! . . . a breakdown again, back
down to the roots. Okay, and then it starts
building up again, then bang! again it goes
down.
But maybe at one of these stages it'll
break, and it'll go towards a different fusion.
People are really experimenting with new
sounds. Tom Verlaine of Television . . . with
a basic line-up of guitar," bass, and drums he
does a lot of different things. Again, another
band that is really an excellent band is Devo.
"Are we not men? We are men." They're industrial rock.
PF: Industrial rock?
R: Industrial"rock. They're frdm mid-
America, Akron, Ohio, and these guys, they
bring humour, and they bring intellectualism.
They're very intellectual. They dohjt vgant to
be stupid rockers. What they do, they'll take
a root song with simple progressions and
they'll change it right around. They'll just do
odd things to it, which is great.
PF: There is that aspect of intellectuality to
your music. Are you consciously trying to set
yourself apart from the other bands in town?
R: I'm not trying to be different in Vancouver, I'm trying to be different on a world
scale. I want to have something that is Tim
Ray and that can be set apart. Right now I'm
.just experimenting with everything. I'd find it
obnoxious to say "Yeah, I'm trying to in-
tellectualize music." I mean, you're intellec-
tualizing music . . . who are you, y'know,
you're just a stupid musician. Musicians are
stupid. I've met too many stupid ... I think
the ideal career — who I really respect — is
Neil Young. He goes through transformations, and ...
PF: Tries to be new?
R: Well, he sets himself apart from
everybody. He's not in the press, like
y'know, -'Neil Young did this and that, dada, da-da". He sells records basically because
he's Neil Young, and you know what to expect. He doesn't cater to trends and things
like that.
PF: That's interesting. He's one of the last
persons I would-have expected you to talk
about.
R: I hate those things. 1 really think they're
fucking disgusting,^    4,
PF: Because they'reibmetimes gimmicky?
R: Yeah, I just don't like gimmicks. But
machines are obviously gonna become . . .
they're very influential. . . they are gonna
be the thing. But not, not synthesizers.
There's only one person in my mind who
knows how to play synthesizer properly, and
that's Brian Eno (formerly of Roxy Music).
That's the only person. I think Emerson blew
it. Eno is the man of the future.
PF: Can you see the resurgence, eventually, of another rock subculture? This whole
scene seems very anachronistic to me ...
R: Yeah, the resurgence of the early
'60's ... is the '80's. All the connotations
and the aura of the '80's is very excfting and
the '60's was the same. Maybe — maybe if
there's someone smart enough, someone who
has it together, someone could really pull off
a quick one. Someone could come up with
something and take everybody by surprise.
We're in the era of doubt, or "what's com-
in' up next?" The '70's were "hipposie". It's
a word I made up. Apathy — the bourgeoisie
and the hipposie — it's a mixture of
"bourgeois" and "hippie". It's just the 70's
apathy, the aftermath of the '60's.
PF: We're in a kind of rain shadow right
now?
R: Yeah, exactly. No new things have been
said. It's been said many times before and it's
Tim Ray ... a musician looking to the future
R: No . . . not at all.
PF: Who do you think your biggest influences are?
R: There's always influences, you can't
hide them, but...
*       *       *       *
Arriving at the house of A.V.'s guitarist,
Bob Coulter, we listen to some tapes of a
local band rehearsing old rock hits. Later, on
the way back, Tim makes some predictions
about the development of rock.
R: I predict ... the standard 1980's thing
will become really mechanical — where it'll,
be sparse . . . instead of sort of going, flowing, it'll be a little more jagged. A Kraftwerk
sort of thing. But they're going to^do it in
such a way that it's gonna sound really pleasant to the ear.
PF: More synthesizer?
R: Not necessarily — synthesizers are horrible machines — but, some kind of
machine . . . where a guitar will be able to
work with it. . . I dunno, I'm not very good
at the technical end of it.
PF: What do you think of things like talk
boxes?
not hard to figure out. After a peaceful time
there's going to be some kind of resurgence
of excitement again, 'cause . . . look at the
mundane issues. The Talking Heads, they're
talking about mundane things because that's
exactly what's happening right now.
PF: You keep talking about rock as if it's
cyclical. What do you think will be the main
differences between the grassroots rock and
roll of the early '60's and what's happening
now?
R: You take a look at the technological advances that've been made since the '50's . .
right now, people are sick of rock and roll,
they're going to be sick of rock and roll, so
now there's an industrial kind of attitude. A
mechanical attitude . . . it's going to be, uh,
maybe not a musical fusion, but an industrial
fusion.
PF: But the products of technological advancement aren't present in your band.
There's no difference between your band and
any other band that's come along in the last
twenty years.
R: Because I want to do to first of all us
ing natural elements, and then when I learn
the technology, I'll use machines.
PF: A kind of self-limitation?
R: Yeah.
* *  »
Finally, we're back at Tim's place in south
Vancouver, a huge, curtainless monster that
bears fresh scars from its most recent
previous tenants, a group of UBC law
students. Over tea and records, Tim finally
seems more at ease, though the nervous
energy still surfaces in his sudden, sweeping
arm movements and constant toe-tapping.
PF: What about you? What's your own
musical history?
R: I started playing guitar because of a
computer programme mix-up, in high
school. I was supposed to be in sewing or
something, and they put me into folk guitar.
I said "I don't wanna buy a guitar". So they
said, "Okay, that's cool, we'll lend you a
guitar", so I said "oh, fine". I don't think I
would ever be a good musician. I think the
creative energy is there, but the actual musicianship is not.
PF: What about your voice?
R: I took two lessons from this old Italian
lady. I did my MI-MA-MO's. She said,
"Son, you've got a good voice. You just
have to open your mouth up more!". She'd
lay me down on the couch and put books on
me, she'd slap me around. But I can't afford
the ten bucks a shot.
Success
PF: How do you feel about your success?
R: I've always done something. I've always
been involved in different things. I've gone
through ten professions in two years, and
I've done well in all of them. But if everyone
was expecting, me to be a big success, it puts
stupid pressures on me, and I don't want that
kind of thing. Nothing's ever fun ... I find
this challenging and rewarding, but not fun.
I'm depressed more than I'm ever happy. But
if I didn't do it, I'd be more depressed. I get
used to the depression, I'm very creative
then.
PF: What about your appearance? Do you
follow the New Wave look?
R: Yeah, actually, I like to stay away from
that. I got my hair cut short about two years
ago because I was doing this film. I was a
member of "A Bridge Too Far". I was an extra in that in Holland ... I was number 46
paratrooper. I never did see it, either. It was
through the agency I was working for in London; my friend and I, just zzzip, y'know. We
had long hair. And I just kept it short and it
was really comfortable.The New Wave kind
of thing is short hair.
PF: Do you dress in a definite style or an-
tistyle?
R: Uh . . . it's not contrived ... I don't
know how to put it. You know, like you're
wearing very college-y clothes, right? Like
Root Shoes and things like that. . . white
socks. It's something . . . that you could
walk down the street in and feel you won't be
threatened.
PF: I don't wear monogrammed sweaters,
though.
R: Well, that's good to hear, Paul. . .
Recording prospects
Later, Tim plays two songs by Devo for
me, "Jockq.Homo" and "Mongoloid". We
talk about his recording sessions at Little
Mountain Sound.
PF: How is the taping going?
Ii: Little Mountain is just a pleasure to
record in . . . fast . . . real fast. We put the
drum'and the bass track down live, which
turned out really well. The bass and drum
have the same tonal qualities . . . they go
together, y'know? Which is very important.
PF: What do you think your prospects
are?
R: No, I'm not worried about it at all. I
know that I'll get something, because they're
obviously good enough: It's a matter of luck,
timing, and ail that kind of thing. I'm
not . . I'm a real cynic, but I've decided to
be an optimist. But they always say optimists
are stupid, so I'm just kinda half and half
right now.
Friday, September 15, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 ^ music/theatre*
Boston stagnating in its past success
By GLEN SCHAEFER
After the release of their debut
album in the fall of 1976, Boston
became an overwhelming overnight
sensation. The album sold over 8
million copies in a perfect combination of aggressive promotion,
good critical response, and what
seemed to be the right sound at the
right time.
Two years later, the honeymoon
is over. Tom Scholz, the band's
main creative force and the
technical whiz kid who devised all
those nifty sounds in his basement
studio, summed up the band's
strategy when he said, "I intend for
the second album to be no major
departure from the last."
It wasn't.
Their first Vancouver concert at
the Pacific Coliseum on Tuesday
left me wishing I had seen them two
years ago, when they were still
something different. Boston had
problems in initially reproducing
their   studio   sound   on   stage;
problems which they have since
overcome. Tuesday's concert was a
competent, technically polished
rendering of the sounds that made
Boston famous, but it was boring as
hell. They played most of the songs
from their first album, songs which
were familiar to me, as I imagine
they are to anyone else who listens
to the,xadio, mass promotion being
what it is. Boston also played much
of their latest album, which was
unnecessary, as it sounded just like
the first.
It appears as though the fans
aren't the only ones who are bored
with Boston. Boston was an easy
band to take photographs of, as
they didn't move around much on
stage. Playing on stage must seem
like a nine-to-five job to them, as it
hasn't changed much in two years.
It is understandable that Boston has
lost most of their initial enthusiasm.
The concert wasn't a total loss,
though.    The    opening    act    was
Sammy Hagar. He and his band,
while they didn't offer anything
new either, seemed charged with the
energy and enthusiasm that Boston
needed. The crowd felt it and was
driven to stamping their feet and
clapping their hands to songs with
such simple yet effective titles as
Turn up the Music and Cruisin' and
Boozin'. Near the end of their set,
after being cheered back onstage
for an encore, Hagar shouted to the
audience "nothing sounds better
than a fuckin' bunch of people just
gettin' off!" What he lacked in
eloquence was made up for in
energy.
Hagar's enthusiasm was
sustained by the tight competence
of his band, as was evidenced in
their set which featured solos from
the drummer, the bass player and
both guitarists. Clearly, Hagar
hasn't lost it.
As for Boston, it was fun two
years ago, but like the song say's
don't look back.
BOSTON . . . getting tired after two years together
Cinema 16 series provides film alternatives
By GRAY KYLES
During the school year conscientious young students occasionally like to drag themselves
out of the library and into one of
the cultural fun centres around
campus.
The Pit naturally attracts most of
them, the masochistic buy season
tickets to Freddy Wood and the
wisest head off-campus.
But there are some who choose to
spend their Monday evenings in a
large dark auditorium watching
subtitled films or Hollywood
classics.
These are the subscribers to
Cinema 16, UBC's 20 year old film
society which trys to present a series
of interesting films that provide an
alternative to the movies playing
downtown.
Every year the society puts
together four separate programs
which cover a wide variety of film
styles. Each series features six
nights of film and the total cost for
the viewer adds up to the best film
bargain in the city.
Phil Whitford, this years Grand
Poobah of C-16, has put together
two series for the fall term and two
more for spring.
Kicking off the season this
coming Monday night will be the
International Series, an annual
event which offers six films from
around the world that you won't
find in a commercial theatre.
Harakiri, the 1962 Japanese
classic will start the series. Directed
by Masaki Kobayashi, one of the
forgotten Japanese directors, it is
the story of a samurai who must
adjust to a time of peace.
On the following Monday Sept.
25, the Animation series gets underway with • Gulliver's Travels.
Although the animation is crude in
parts and the colors are fading, this
feature, which covers only the
Lilliput adventure, is still an exciting example of early Hollywood
feature-length cartoons.
The International and Animation
series will alternate for the
remainder of the term.
After Harakiri comes The Cow,
an Iranian picture which is then
followed by the French film The
Best Way to Walk.
On the night before Halloween
Whitford has booked what has to
be the wierdest movie to play in
SUB in years. Themroc is about a
French worker who turns his
apartment into a cave, sleeps with
his sister and eats policemen. The
dialogue consists of a made up
language.
The series finishes off with the
Bulgarian comedy The Hare Census
and the Russian drama The Orphans.
On alternate Mondays the
Animation series will be rolling
along and should bring a few smiles
to this hard grey campus.
Two weeks after Gulliver's
Travels is Max Fleischer.
Fleischer, along with his brother
Dave, is one of the greats of the
animation world. He directed
Gulliver's Travels and created
Popeye and Betty Boop. Three
Popeye featurettes and several
Betty Boop shorts will make up the
evening program.
George Orwell's Animal Farm is
the main feature for the next show
and it will be followed by An
Evening of Shorts on Nov. 20.
The Animation Series comes to a
close   on   Dec.   4   with   Yellow
Submarine, the film which spawned
a thousand commercials.
After the Christmas break
Cinema 16 returns with its two
Spring programs examining the
careers of Charles Laughton and
Akira Kurosawa.
On Jan. 8 Laughton's 1937 Oscar
winning performance in Private
Life of Henry VIII will start the
series. It is followed by the Barrets
of Wimpole St., Ruggles of Red
Cap Rembrandt and of course the
classic Hunchback of Notre Dame.
The series ends with The Night of
the Hunter, the only film Laughton
ever directed.
The real highlight of this year's
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
Cinema 16 season is the Kurosawa
series. Kurosawa is one of Japan's
three greatest directors, the other
two being Ozu and Mizoguchi. He
is the best known outside of Japan
and is probably the most accessible
to Western audiences.
Kurosawa was a great fan of
American westerns and in his many
samurai pictures he shows just how
much he has been influenced  by
directors    like    John    Ford    and
William Wellman.
One of his most famous films,
the three and a half hour long Seven
Samurai, draws much of its style
and form from Hollywood
westerns. And Hollywood has
returned the favour by adapting
several of his stories to an
American setting.
Turn to page 7
COMING THURSDAY &  FRIDAY
SEPTEMBER 15
CLUBS' DAY
Clubs Day gives you a chance to talk to the many different
clubs you may wish to join. Club representatives will be on
hand at their booths and displays in SUB to explain their
activities and functions.
Notice of Election
An election will be held on the 29th September 1978 to fill the following position within the Alma Mater Society
Senator at Large
Nominations for a person to fill this position will be accepted commencing Thursday the 14th September, 1978. The nomination period
will close at 4:00 p.m. on Thursday the 21st September, 1978.
Nomination forms are available at the Registrar's Office and election
procedures and other information is available at the A.M.S. Office,
Room 246.
Pam Rosengren
Secretary/Treasurer
Room 252, 228-2050
UBC FALL COURSES IN
READING,   WRITING,   AND   STUDY
SKILLS
The University of British Columbia Reading, Writing, and
Study Skills Centre is offering a number of non-credit courses
in reading, writing, technical writing, vocabulary development, grammar and composition review, study skills development and spelling improvement commencing the week of
September 30, 1978. Classes last for 7 to 10 weeks and meet
on the UBC Campus.
FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION
CALL 228-2181, loc. 245
PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED
FOR ALL CLASSES
Shapeliness
With Hillel House!
Join our baseball game (if it's sunny) at the
Eric Hamber Playing Field or our volleyball
game at the JCC (if the sun don't shine) on
Sunday, Sept. 17th, 1978.
If it's sunny then at Eric Hamber at 11:30. If
it ain't then at the JCC at 3:30.
M.    Freedman    narrates    about    Jewish
pioneers   from   Vancouver   on   Tuesday,
Sept. 19, 12:30 at Hillel House.
Page Friday. 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15, 1978 1 fiction/music]
Tale from  the   Black   Obelisk
Written by Erich Maria Remarque
Translated by Frank Kuerbis
Frank Kuerbis is a former Ubyssey staff
member and second year University student.
Tale From the Black Obelisk is a free translation he made from a chapter of Remarque's
novel, Der Schwarze Obelisk, written in
1923. Remarque was a well known German
author and probably best-remembered for
his two novels, Drei Kameraden, Three Comrades, and Im Western Nichts Neues, All
Quiet on the Western Front.
The man made of glass is standing motionless
in the gentle twilight before a bed of roses.
George the Seventh is walking in the chestnut
tree alley. An older Sister is leading a bent old
man with long hair who keeps trying to pinch
her on her massive behind and he is giggling
all the time. Two men are sitting beside me
on a bench, each one explaining to the other
why he is crazy, neither one listening to the
other. Three women in striped dresses are
watering the flowers, they glide with their tin-
cans silently through the evening.
I squat on the bench beside the bed of
roses. Everything is peaceful here and proper. No one is worried that the dollar has
risen twenty thousand marks in one day. No
one hangs himself for that reason as did an
old couple yesterday who were found in a
cabinet, each on a piece of clothesline. Outside of the two, there was nothing in the
cabinet, everything had been sold and pawned, even the bed and the cabinet itself..When
the buyer came to pick up the furniture, he
discovered the corpses. They held each other
and now their swollen blue tongues were
sticking out at each other. They were very
light and other people took them down
quickly. Both were clean and washed, their
hair combed and their clothes well darned.
The buyer, a fullblooded furniture dealer,
vomited when he saw them and said he didn't
want the cabinet anymore. Only in the evening did he change his mind and have it picked
up. Then the corpses were lying on the bed
and had to be moved from there too as the
bed was being taken away at the same time.
The neighbours loaned a couple of tables and
the old people were now laid on top of them
with their heads veiled in silk paper. The silk
paper was the only thing still belonging to
them in the place. They left a letter behind in
which they declared that they had actually
wanted to kill themselves with gas, but the
gas company had shut it off because they
hadn't paid anymore. Therefore they asked
the forgiveness of the furniture dealer for the
circumstances they had created for him.
Isabelle is coming. She is wearing short
blue pants that leave her knees bare, a yellow
shirt and an amber necklace around her neck.
"Where were you?" she asks out of
breath.
I haven't seen her for a couple of days.
Each time after church I had slipped out and
gone home. It wasn't easy to do without the
excellent dinner and the wine with Bodendiek
and Wernicke, but I preferred to be at ease
with Gerda and sandwiches and potato salad.
"Where were you?" repeats Isabelle.
"Outside," I say, "There, where money is
tne main thing."
She sits down on the back of the bench.
Her legs are very brown as if she had been lying in the sun a lot. The two men beside me
are looking up timidly, then they get up and
go. Isabelle slides along the bench.
"Why do children die, Rudolf?" she asks.
"I don't know."
I don't look at her. I don't want to be trapped by her again. It is enough, now that she is
sitting with her long legs and her tennis shorts
as if she knew that I want to live henceforth
in George's way.
"Why are they born if they die again, right
away?"
"You've got to ask Vicar Bodendiek. He
insists that God keeps book on each hair that
falls from any head and that everything has a
meaning and a moral."
Isabelle laughs.
"God keeps book? On whom? On
himself? Why? He knows everything."
"Yes," I say and find I get angry without
knowing why. "He is allknowing,
allrighteous, just and full of love — and
nevertheless, children and the mothers that
they need, die and no one knows why there is
so much misery in the world."
Isabelle turns toward me with a jerk. She
isn't laughing anymore. "Why aren't all people simply happy, Rudolph?" she whispers.
"I don't know. Perhaps it's because God
would be bored otherwise."
"No," she says quickly. "Not on that account."
"Why else?"
"Because he is afraid."
"Afraid? Of what?"
"If everyone was happy, they wouldn't
need a God anymore."
I look at her now. Her eyes are very
penetrating. Her face is brown and thinner
than before. "He is only there for misfortune," she says. "They need him for that and
they pray. He does it for that."
"There are also people who pray to God
because they are happy."
"So," Isabelle smiles distrustfully. "So
they pray because they are afraid that they
will not stay like that. Everything is fear,
Rudolf. Don't you know that?"
The gay old man is brought over by the
hefty Sister. Out of the window of the main
building comes the high pitched hum of a
vacuum cleaner. I look around me. The window is open, but barred — a black hole out
of which the vacuum is screaming like a
damned soul.
"Everything is fear," repeats Isabelle.
Aren't you even afraid?"
"I don't knowi" I reply, still cautious. "I
Georg Grosz (1919) The Friedrichstrasse
believe so. I was afraid often in the war."
"I don't mean that. That is proper fear. I
mean that nameless fear."
"Which? Fear tor one's life?"
She shakes her head. "No, before."
"Of death?"
She shakes her head again. I don't ask
anymore. I don't want to get in there. For a
time we sit silently in the twilight. Once again
I have the feeling that Isabelle is not sick. But
I don't let that come up. If it comes up, the
confusion will be there again and I don't
want it. Isabelle is finally moving. "Why
aren't you saying anything?"
"What are words?"
"A lot," she whispers. "Everything. Are
you afraid of that?"
I reflect. "Probably we are all a little
afraid of big words. There have been so many
lies told with them. Perhaps we are also
afraid of our feelings. We don't trust them
anymore."
Isabelle pulls her legs onto the bench.
"One needs them though, dear," she murmurs. How can one live otherwise?"
The vacuum cleaner has stopped humming. It is suddenly very quiet. The breath of
the moist earth is coming cool from the
flower beds. A bird is calling in the chestnuts,
always the same cry. The evening is suddenly
a scale that carries equal amounts of world
on each side. I feel as if it was weightless,
balancing on my chest. Nothing can happen
to me, I think as long as 1 go on breathing
quietly like that.
"Are you afraid of me?" whispers
Isabelle.
"No," I think and shake my head. "You
are the only person of whom I am not afraid.
Not even with words. In front of you they are
never too big and never ridiculous. You
understand them because you still live in that
world where words and feelings are one and
lies and visions the same thing.
"Why aren't you saying anything?" she
asks.
I shrug my shoulders. "Sometimes one
can't say anything, Isabelle. And it is often so
difficult to let go."
"To let what go?"
"Oneself. There are emotional
resistances."
"A knife can't cut itself, Rudolf. Why are
you afraid?"
"I don't know, Isabelle."
"Don't wait too long, dear. Otherwise it's
too late. One needs words," she murmurs.
I don't answer. "Against fear, Rudolf,"
she says, "they are like lights. They help.
You see how grey everything is getting. Now
blood isn't red anymore. Why don't you help
me?"
I give up my resistances finally. "Sweet
strange heart," I say, "if only I could help
you!"
She bends over and puts her arms on my
shoulders. "Come with me. Help me! They
are calling!"
"Who is calling?"
"Don't you hear them? The voices. They
always call."
"No one is calling, Isabelle. Only your
heart. But what is it that calls?" I feel her
breath on my face. "Love me, then it won't
call anymore," she says.
"I love you."
She lets herself sink beside me. Her eyes
are now closed. It is getting darker and I see
the man made of glass slipping away slowly.
A Sister is grouping together a couple of old
people who have been sitting on benches and
are like dark bundles of sorrow, bent and
motionless.
"It's time," she says to us.
I nod and remain sitting. "They're
calling," whispers Isabelle. "They can't ever
find them. Who has that many tears?"
"No one," I say. "No one in the world,
beloved heart." She doesn't answer. She is
breathing like a tired child beside me. Then I
lift her up and carry her through the alley
back to the pavilion where she lives.
When I let her down, she trips and holds
me tight. She murmurs something I don't
understand and lets herself be led in. The entrance is brightly lit up by a shadowless,
milky light. I set her down in a basket chair in
the hall. She lies in it with closed eyes as if she
had been taken off an unseen cross. Two
Sisters in black habit go past. They are on the
way to the chapel. For a moment it looks as
though they wanted to pick up Isabelle and
bury her. Then the attendant in white comes
and takes her away.
Foreman reveals exciting Blues past
By JOHN WOUDZIA
When Al Foreman and his entourage first
performed "Summertime Blues" at the
Vancouver East Cultural Center on the night
of July 23, it was clear to all in attendance
that they were witnessing something more
than a mere 'history' of the blues. What they
had actually experienced was a star studded
cast of Vancouver locals resurrecting and
reincarnating the personages of the
Bluesmasters themselves.
The success of the show was so
phenomenal that there were almost immediate cries for a repeat performance. As
talk of the significance of the event
began to circulate and increase,
CFRO-FM applied for and received
authorization to repeat the entire taped
performance on the air for the benefit of
those who had missed it live the first time.
This effort however, proved to be all too
compromising and Al Foreman, responding
to the positive sentiments generated by public
enthusiasm acted accordingly and recalled
the entire cast to re-enact the experience of
'Summertime Blues'.
Foreman scheduled the show for Sunday,
September 10 at the Queen Elizabeth
Playhouse and made an appropriate addition
to the original title in accordance with the
genuine love and admiration that both the
public and media had expressed for Blues
music. The show was billed as "Summertime
Blues - An Appreciation."
Set amid the small but comfortable and
accoustically superior confines of the Q.E.
Playhouse, what went down last Sunday
night had to be one of the most exciting and
well organized concerts performed this year.
The cast featured Bill Reiter, the Dr.
Bondolo celebrity, as narrator for Foreman's
21 page script which traces the blues from its
birth until its present day significance,
diversity and feedback. Reiter was the obvious choice for Foreman as M.C. for the
evening's performance. He and Foreman
were old friends and go back years to when
they once formed a blues club at Britannia
High School in 1960. Spotlighted by Reiter's
narration were Vancouver's very own
collection of blues musicians who proved
convincingly that they could hold their own
with the best professional blues musicians in
any circle.
The cast featured Jim Byrnes, who originally from Memphis, came to Vancouver
last March and has since made a name for
himself through performing at Angelica's
Restaurant, on CKVU, and more recently at
the Spinning Wheel with his own band.
A brother team consisting of Carl and
Jack Lavin, guitarist and bassist respectively
from the Powder Blues Band, Betty Chaba
(Loose Change), Jane Mortifee, Denise
MacCann (Tattoo Man), Billy MacCalder,
John Firman and Blue Williams were among
only some of the evening's performers. Of
course the man himself, Al Foreman was
onstage throughout the entire event playing
keyboards, harmonica, singing, struttin'
and generally keeping things in check.
Turn to PF 7
Friday, September 15, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 * music■
The Who darkened by death of Moon
By MARIO LOWTHER
What will happen to the Who
now that Keith Moon has died? My
allegiance to this elite band has
been long and faithful. I wore out
their albums, bought new
copies,and wore them out too.
They were immortal, I believed, the
only band to emerge from the
British music invasion of 1964 and
remain intact to 1978. Until now.
The bad -news is that the Who
have decided not to break up.
Rather they will bring in a guest
drummer for future recordings, but
not as a permanent member of the
band.
Sure, the Who's breaking up
would mean losing it as a band, but
it would be left as a certified golden
legend, a monument to true rock
class. Without Keith Moon it just
won't be the same, and that's bad. I
would hear the drumming and just
knowing that it is not Moon at the
helm would taint the music.
He was more than just the
drummer for Who, he was the most
manic, the most daring, perhaps
the most talented at his instrument
in the entire rock focus. He was in a
select group with Carl Palmer,
John Bonham and Ginger Baker,
but while they all led relatively quiet
lives off stage, Moon was - well, he
was Keith Moon.
"You gotta maintain the
bizarre," was Moon's explanation
for his chaotic lifestyle. "I destroy
things that eventually destroy
themselves. Or that were not there
to begin with. There's an art in
destruction. You can create by
destroying. Some things look
better with a few dents in them."
Such is much of the Who's road
equipment. Pete Townshend
delighted in decimating his guitars
on the stage, against the speakers
or, as he was wont to doing occasionally, through his amps.
Roger Daltrey drove his
microphones whenever and against
whatever he could. If Moon
couldn't kick his drums off the
stage, he would stomp on them
until it didn't matter anymore.
Only John Entwistle remained
calm, plucking his bass while
Armageddon crashed down around
him.
However many backstage fights,
onstage fights or hotel demolitions
the Who survived, nobody disputed
HOLLYWOOD
CLINT EASTWOOD
'THE ENFORCER" 9:20
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Richard Widmark—Honorn Blackman
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A DAUGHTER" 730
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their musical brilliance. Though
Townshend's guitar riffs sometimes
wandered and Entwistle's bass lines
occasionally faded beneath a wall
of sound, Moon's frantic drumming was not only the band's
eternally dependable beat, it filled
in any holes in the music with a
torrent of drum rolls, cymbal
smashes and pounding bass drums.
He never missed a cue, be it in the
studio, live on stage or jamming
with friends.
"I try to involve myself entirely
with the music," he said, "then the
drums become part of the music. I
have the ability to function
physically while my conscience is
elsewhere. I'm listening to what
Pete's doing, I'm listening to what
John's doing. I don't have time to
think about what I'm doing. A
drummer doesn't need to think
about what he's doing. He just does
it."
He also dabbled in acting,
playing perverted Uncle Ernie in the
movie Tommy, and a drummer
(what else) in That'll Be the Day, a
1976 turkey about a struggling
young rock band. Two other films
have yet to be released: a remake of
Gunga Din with Ringo, Harry
Nilsson, directed by Sam
Peckinpah, and Sexettes, Mae
West's comeback, with Alice
Cooper, Van McCoy and Ringo
again.
But these fruits of adulation,
money and freedom were poisonous indeed. The pill-and-booze
existence of the warring Mods and
Rockers days that the Who lived in
the early sixties (The Who was Mod
patterned), and about which
Townshend wrote 1973's double
opus Quadrophenia, seemed to
catch up to Moon. Reclusive and
retiring, the Who had toured only
twice since 1973, and when talk of
live work surfaced last spring, so
did rumours that Moon would be
replaced for any show. Ill health,
they said of a man who had spent
much of 1977 in and out of a Los
Angeles sanitarium, attempting to
beat a bout with alcoholism.
Moon returned to London ap-
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parently fit and ready to anchor
the band again. Soon after
Townshend dropped a bombshell,
announcing that the Who's touring
days were no more.
Then September 7 came, and
Keith Moon cashed it in.
It levelled me. I anticipated the
break up of the Who, figuring they
would never record without Moon
behind the drums, making faces
and goofing off. I played all the old
albums, listening only to Moon,
amazed by his explosiveness, and
all the more saddened by his death.
Then I learned the Who will not
break up. I should be grateful, but I
am definitely not. A band can put
out volumes upon volumes of great
music, but if they don't have the
dignity to quit when they should,
then that is sad indeed. The Who
was never Townshend, Daltrey,
Entwistle and drummer X, it was
the four, and without Keith Moon,
it's just not the Who anymore.
After all, look at the cover to
Who Are You, and Keith Moon in
the polo outfit, sitting on the the
chair that says "Not to be taken
away". It's ironic that now that he
has been taken away, the Who
wants to replace him. No drummer,
no matter how brilliant, can replace
Keith Moon, or should.
SMASH your T.V. Sets and come to
SUBFILMS presentation of 'NETWORK'
"'NETWORK' IS
OUTRAGEOUS. IT'S ALSO
BRILLIANTLY, SAVAGELY
CIIUUY  "        -Vincent Canby,
f  l/lf If f ■ New York Times
NETWORK
Thurs, Sun 7:00
Fri, Sat 7:00 & 9:30
SUB Theatre
$1.00
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CABARET
THIS
WEEK
"1
- L
! RAGE
Page Friday, 6
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.
lii 11 nixirr±
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15, 1978 \ theatre*
Judgement offers food for thought
By GREGORY STRONG
What is the most violent crime a
man commits? Some would argue
murder but we would agree that an
act of cannibalism is the most
shocking human crime. It seems to
be an assault against our human
natures that we could violate each
other's bodies in this way.
Judgement, a play which opened
Tuesday at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre, Richard Monette
plays Officer Vukhov, a Russian
soldier who has been forced to
murder his comrades then eat their
remains so that he might survive a
sixty day imprisonment in a sealed
stone cell.
Our first impression of the stage
is one of distinct and unbroken
grayness. A grayness of cell walls
broken when a small man wearing a
white hospital tunic enters the
stage. From that point on, he rarely
moves his body while he speaks. He
is restraining himself but his legs
tremble. He is ready for the single
word which might pitch him into
black madness or trigger him into a
physical assault of his audience.
Captain Vukhov is played by
Richard Monette and is the sole
character in playwright Barry
Collins' two hour play. He addresses his audience. They are the
military tribunal to judge him. And
Vukhov sings to them his weird
song of the violence, terror, despair
and ultimate degradation and
shame among the men who were
trapped with him in the cell. And
Vukhov demands that they pass
some judgement on him and so let
him rest.
As an actor, Monette has
developed a clever technical interpretation of this character. It is
outstanding, no matter how difficult it is to determine how much
of the work was Monette. Or how
much of the interpretation was the
work of that outstanding English
director Robin Phillips who is the
new head of the Stratford Festival
where the play premiered in June.
Monette uses his small size. He
sees Vukhov as a ferret. And accordingly when Vukhov  and  his
comrades were first imprisoned by
the retreating German Army and
when the group, faced with starvation, drew lots to determine
which man would be killed to
provide food for the others,
Vukhov took no initiative. Neither
was he the first man to eat human
flesh in the cell. He was not the
biggest, nor the strongest, nor the
most courageous man, but he was
the surviving man. It is even worse
that after this terrible experience he
is still a sane man. He is like any of
us.
Collins has based his play on an
actual war incident in 1944 where
two madmen were discovered by
the advancing Russian Army. They
were Russian soldiers who had been
trapped in a monastery and were
found with the half eaten corpses of
five other men. They were given a
decent meal by their liberators and
then shot as a threat to morale
within the Russian Army. Truly
their madness and cannibalism is a
powerful metaphor for that barbarous and terrible war.
But Collins' play is based on the
premise that one man survived
these horrors and his sixty day
period of confinement with an
intact brain. He is sane and we
cannot easily dismiss what he might
tell us about ourselves or the human
condition.
Certainly we are no strangers to
accounts of cannibalism. Everyone
can   remember   the   case   of  the
Richard Monette . . . victim of a brutal ordeal  in Judgement
Mediocrity at the movies
September is traditionally the
Dog Days for movies and this year
is certainly no exception. A look at
a movie page reveals that the
studios are holding all their
worthwhile projects for the
Christmas season. What we're left
with is a lot of holdovers and a few
real    fillers.
HEAVEN CAN WAIT:
Lightweight comedy about a
quarterback who is claimed by the
Heavenly powers before his time is
due. This is. a remake of the
lightweight 40's film.
EYES OF LAURA MARS: Drab
and exploitative mystery film. Faye
Dunaway won an Oscar so that she
could star in this.
ANIMAL HOUSE: National Lampoon's second failed attempt at
filmmaking. Why don't they stick
with the magazine?
SENIORS: "Behind every B.A.
there's a little B.S." We don't need
a movie to tell us that do we?
THE END: Burt Reynolds stars as a
man who discovers he's dying and
decides to end it all quickly. Depending on who you talk to this is the
funniest movie of the year or a
crashing bore.
COR VETTE SUMMER: That
cute, loveable Mark Hamill teams
up with cute loveable newcomer
Annie Potts to create, you got it, a
cute,  loveable comedy —  adventure.
SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER:
A somewhat perceptive look at
young people who have nowhere to
go and one who makes the move to
break out of this restrictive environment. John Travolta makes an impressive movie debut.
GREASE: John Travolta is again
in a film that has about as much to
do with the 50's as Kiss does.
THE CHILDREN OF
THEATRE STREET: The story-of
the Kirov ballet school. This film
reeks of classy documentary tradition type stuff.
FOUL PLA Y: Word has it that
this one is a mediocre comedy with
Chevy Chase engaging in his usual
routines.
THE HOUND OF THE
BASKERVILLES. Two of the funniest men ever born, Peter Cook
and Dudley Moore are apparently
wasted in this remake of the
Sherlock Holmes classic.
REVENGE OF THE PINK
PANTHER: When is someone
finally going to put poor old inspector Clouseau out of his misery?
INTERNATIONAL VELVET:
From all reports this is a thoroughly
enjoyable family film which is out
of step with today's cynical movie
audiences.
NETWORK: Sidney Lumet's excellent satire about television and
big business features a superb cast
and a fine script. This one is showing all weekend in the SUB
Auditorium for only $1.00.
All Women Welcome
to the first
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
MEETING
Tuesday, September 19 12:30 p.m.
Women's Centre SUB 130
Catholic school boys whose plane
crashed in the Andes and were
forced to eat the flesh from corpses.
In Canada, there was the controversial case of the German bush
pilot who ate human flesh and lived
while his companion refused food
and died. This play poses the same
questions about the ultimate price
of survival.
As a theatrical experience,
Judgement is first rate and it
raises ideas and intimations about
the very nature of the theatre. You
can leave behind all the pom-
pousness and cheap effect of city
reviewers like Max Wyman or ex-
playwright John Lazarus and all of
the actors who came to see the play
that first night and compare notes
with the technical expertise of a
virtuouso artist like Richard
Monette.
You can forget that the play is
sometimes meandering and weak
and forget that Monette the actor is
making the occasional technical
error as the character Vukhov. You
can forget all this and jealously
guard your seat, imagining that
Monette is playing this grisly
monologue for you alone when you
see a man stripped like that on stage
with all his pain and suffering
revealed.
What is the theatre about? It is
the eternal revelation of our
humanity. Why go to see plays? We
go to be moved and experience deep
emotions, sharing in the collective
memory and feelings of
humankind.
Finally we return to Vukhov's
crimes against humanity. Should an
act of necessity be considered a
crime? For the men who decided to
eat one another it was the question
of survival or death. And we are
still haunted by Vukhov's ringing
words which do not let us escape
him and his crime so easily.
"I want you to accept me as a
man again, to let me' walk among
you, again." It might well have
been one of us on that judgement
stand. We are left with a pressing
decision as the curtains close and
we must pass some judgement on
this man and his act.	
Summertime
From PF 5
Foreman started things off by
performing a tune written and
performed originally by Blind
Lemon Jefferson entitled
"Cocaine", and did so in an impressive Southern 'slur' style. Jim
Byrnes then proceeded to reconstruct the prevailing sound of the
thirties by performing the original
version of Robert Johnson's
'Crossroads' on bottleneck guitar.
After a short intermission, Reiter
set the mood for the second half of
the show by explaining how the
foundations of blues music, which
had its roots planted firmly in the
black South were altered by performers such as Chuck Berry who
synthesized the sensibility of pure
blues with a Northwestern
'rockabilly' sound to create the
style and form of Thythm and
Blues.
The successive pattern of white
imitators were exposed through
Reiter's narrative as the main
reasons behind the created myth
that blues music is and always has
been a product of North American
culture.
The true identity of the music
. was partially restored however as
the second half of the show
featured favorites for Louis Jordan
and Elmore James, highlighted by
superb performances from Al
Foremand and Him Byrnes doing a
J.B. Lenoir tune dealing with Viet
Nam and the South.
As the entourage left the stage
for the last time, Foreman grabbed
the microphone as he was walking
away, and in a final burst of
exhalted truimph proclaimed,
"Well, we all sure did have a party
tonight, didn't we?" The man was
right, what had started out as mere
'appreciation', ended in overwhelming celebration.
OPEN AIR BEAR GARDEN
TODAY: 4:00 p.m.
IN BUCH.
COURTYARD
sponsored by the A.U.S.
INTRAMURAL REFEREE CLINICS
12:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
12:30 p.m.
Football
Mon. Sept. 18
Volleyball
Tues. Sept. 19
Soccer
Wed. Sept. 20
Basketball
Thur. Sept. 21
Hockey
Fri. Sept. 22
For Further Information
DIAL INTRA-ACTION
228-2401
Rm. 210, War Memorial Gym
Friday, September 15,
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 For the film fanatic, a reasonable
selection this weekend. At the
Pacific Cinematheque, 1155 West
Georgia, on Friday at 7 and 9:15
p.m., Pepe Le Moko, a 1930s
French imitation of Hawks'
Scarface set in Algeria. Saturday
and Sunday, two films by Bay area
film-maker Rick Schmidt,
Showboat 1988 and A Man, A
Woman and a Killer respectively.
Yet another classic double bill at
the Ridge this weekend: Kubrik's
Dr. Strangelove with Peter Sellers
and George C. Scott, and Cat
Ballou. starring Lee Marvin and
Jane Fonda, as hard-bitten as ever.
Meanwhile back at the SUB
Auditorium, Network. A high-
powered anti-TV melodrama, it is
unfortunately a prime example of
what it purports to attack. Has its
moments but more soap opera than
drama.
For those of you into art appreciation, Robert Rauschenberg is
at the Vancouver Art Gallery. The
public viewing of the newest work
by the man who made a household
object of the stuffed Angora goat
stuck in a tire. Don't ask what it's
doing here, just go and check it out.
And at the Nova Gallery, 1972
West 5th, an exhibition of
photographs   by  Michael  Morris.
Finally, for those of a less
aesthetic bent, the new pool's open.
Student swimming is free Saturday
night from 11 p.m. to 1 a.m. That
should sober 'em up.
Cinema 16
is a bargain
From PF 4
The Kurosawa series alone is
worth a membership in Cinema 16
and if you have only enough time
for one series this is the one I would
recommend.
But the International, Animation
and Laughton series are all well
worth seeing and together create a
strong season for the Aim society.
Cinema 16 is a film society with
admission by membership passes
only. These are available for $5.00
per individual series for UBC
students and staff. That means you
are paying less than a dollar to see
each of these quality films. Where
can you match that?
The general public can gain
admission to any one series for
$6.00. If you buy passes for more
fhan one series there are price
reductions that make the deal even
better. And as if the cheap price
isn't enough of an incentive each
member of a series may bring a
guest once for free. No single
admissions are sold, however.
Tickets are available at the
Filmsoc office, SUB 247, the Alma
Mater Society office or at the door.
Each film is shown at 6:00 and 8:30
p.m.
Page Friday
personals
My name is Page Friday. I am an
attractive Mature newspaper (well
hung) seeking to meet equally
attractive, fun, talented, mellow
writers for mutually satisfying experiences, namely reviews, articles
and photography. Only seriously
mellow, mature, (easy) people who
seek a sharing and fulfilling
relationship need apply.
Actually, anyone vaguely interested in writing for the best
student newspaper west of Blanca
will be most welcome. We'll take
anybody.
Weekly meetings are held
Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m. in The
Ubyssey office, Room 241 K of the
Student Union Building.
San Ketio, in the classic Italian tradition.
San Pietro is a flavourful, premium wine reminiscent of the lively
wines of Tuscany in Central Italy. The Italians have a word for such a
wine... "brioso", which means exuberant.
San Pietro captures this true Italian character through specially
selected grapes and the astute blending of our skilled cellarmaster.
San Pietro Red. Hearty, full-flavoured, and naturally dry.
San Pietro White, Mellow and soft with a hint of sweetness.
i^p   *»i*w"$
>' A.' ■*• y<f'^r-       :*i— -
1 he unique taste ot Southern Comfort, enjoyed for over 125 years
The Sound Room
Better Sound for Money
2803 W. Broadway
(Broadway at Macdonald)
1736-7771     J
The Sound Room
CD PIONEER
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2803 W. Broadway
(Broadway at Macdonald)
1736-7771      J
Page Friday. 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15, 1978 The Surrey Art Gallery at 13750
-88th Avenue in Bear Creek Park is
worth a special trip this weekend.
Besides the stunning display of
Diego and Orozco drawings there
will be a Sunday showing of a
biography on his wife Frida Kahlo.
Both Kahlo and Rivera were artists
who made a point of defying conventions and their work is intense
and gripping.
Here's one very special note for
all students on campus this Tuesday. International director Yurek
Bogajewicz who trained with Jerry
Growtowski and the Polish Lab
theatre will be giving a special lecture on contemporary theatre on
Tuesday at 12:30 at the Dorothy
Somerset Studio.
Bogajewicz will be remembered
for his exciting productions of
Shadowdance and the Arts Club
Theatre and Oedipus at the Vancouver Playhouse last year. He is
planning a special series of projects
and workshops to be held in Vancouver.
Yurek Bogajewicz at
Dorothy Somerset on
Tuesday at 12:30
DOGWOOD
BASKETBALL TRYOUTS
Junior & Senior Men
Sept. 21 & 20
6 p.m. ■ 9 p.m.
WINSTON CHURCHILL GYM
BIG
SCOOP
SUNDAE PALACE
2 FOR I
OFFER!
REGULAR, DELUXE
OR CHEESEBURGER
BUY ONE, GET THE
SECOND ONE FREE
Surprise yourself and try one of
the Big Scoop Sundae Palace
Restaurants' very special
burgers. You all know about our
exclusive ice cream and 24 exotic sundae extravaganzas —
now it's time you found out that
our food is of the same high
quality.
Offer good on
Friday, Sept. 22nd &
Saturday, Sept. 23rd
4401 W. 10th at Trimble
Just 4 blocks from the gates.
You could use the break so why
not take this weekend off. You've
worked hard all week. We aren't
Puritans, so relax and turn your
mind to other thinks like CO-OP
radio at 102.7 FM tonight. This
volunteer run station on 337 Carrall
Street, Gastown offers nightly jazz
and new wave music. They also
need new talent.
The Soft Rock Cafe again offers
a weekend of good music and a
pleasant atmosphere. On Friday is a
guest appearance by Country and
Bluegrass band Crowbait, then
Sneaker on Saturday with the
Mulberry Street Jazz Band finishing
on Sunday.
The Soft Rock Cafe also has an
open showcase for local musicians,
writers, poets and actors every
Monday at their special 9:00
Hootenanny.
The Robert Rauschenberg Works
are still being shown at the Vancouver Art Gallery which is open
Saturdays and Sundays. The show
is certainly controversial and worth
DANCE TO A LIVE BAND
with the
U.B.C.
SAILING CLUB
At: The Grad Student Centre ~"
Date: Sat. Sept. 23,1978 — 8:00 p.m. -1:00 a.m.
Tickets available from Club Executive, AMS office or at the door
WEST POINT GREY BAPTIST CHURCH
4509 W. 11th at Sasamat — 228-9747
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th
9:45 a.m. CHURCH SCHOOL - Classes &
Study Opportunities
11:00 a.m. "TASTEFUL LIVING" — John Hardy
7:00 p.m. "MIRACLES" - Dr. John Hodges,
Dept. of Animal Science, U.B.C.
jounemumnicLUB
Cecil Green Park
Membership open to 4th year
undergraduates and graduate students
-OPEN-
THURSDAYS 8 P.M. - 12 P.M.
FRIDAY HAPPY HOUR 4 P.M. - 6 P.M.
FRIDAY EVENING 8 P.M. - 1 A.M.
BAND EVERY FRIDAY EVENING
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CALL
UBC A L UMN I ASSOC.: 228-3313
AMS
APPROVED
STUDENT
ACCIDENT INSURANCE
PARSONS BROWN
&      COMPANY      LTD,
684-0311
470 GRANVILLE
VANCOUVER, B.C.
V6C 1WI
"Just Insurance
for 56 years"
the trip just to see if Rauschenberg
is as good as he believes.
If you haven't been to the Vancouver Planetarium for sometime,
check out their new show under the
dome, Magic Circles Under the
Sun, a recreation of stellar events
five thousand years ago and an investigation into Stonehenge and the
mysterious medicine wheels found
in Saskatchewan. The shows are at
2:30, 8:00 and 9:30 and cost $2.00.
On Monday night at 8:00 you
might catch Music Under the Stars
for $1.00 and hear some
Rachminoff or Beethoven's Symphony No. 6, both accompanied by
lights shows.
[Now Playing at SUB Theatrefl
mmmmm B mm |p      ■
■•HAM
not to be i
confused!
WITH THE!
original;
"FLASH
GORDON"
' > m ill *   :V     'NS;
IN METRO COLOR
Thursday, Sunday: 7:00
Friday, Saturday: 7:00 & 9:30
$1.00
Curlers   ^$
Have you signed up to curl
this year?
IF NOT
Phone Rick 224-2070
UBC Curling Club
 Entry Deadline Sept. 28, 1978
Interested In CA Employment
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1979 graduates
for Vancouver and all other offices of the Firm. Mail (or
bring in) an original or photocopy of your personal
resume (UCPA form is suitable) by October 23,1978 to:
DIRECTOR OF PERSONNEL
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
2300—1055 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6E 2J2
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 31st regarding campus interviews which will take place November 6 - 9th. Additional information is available at the U.B.C. Placement
Office.
BICYCLE
STUDENT SALE
it's the best way back to school
. . . and you save $$$ on this sale!
Raleigh Rampar 10-Speed^
Reg. 139.95 - SALE 122.95
Raleigh Record 10-Speed
Reg. 164.95 - SALE 154.95
Raleigh Grand Prix 10-Speed
Reg. 194.95 - SALE 179.95
Also Chimo, Apollo and many more!
Specials On Touring Bags and Racks!
"Check Our Prices,
Guarantee and
Service —
The Bicycle
Specialists"
3771 W. 10th Avenue (at Alma)    224-3536
Friday, September 15, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, S __^j* rv ^■ jj
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35389 CALIFORNIA JAW II —VARIOUS ARTISTS    2 l.p. set     new 9.99 ea.
34799 LITTLE QUEEN — HEART 4.99 ea.
00823 OUT OF THE BLUE — ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCH.    2 LP. set     6.99 ea.
00679 A NEW WORLD RECORD — ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCH 4.99 ea.
RECORDS
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
4.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
4.99 ea.
4.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
8.99 »
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
4.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
4.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
3.99 ea.
4.99 ea.
899 Sei
3.99 ea.
6-49 5
3.99 ea.
DREAM OF A CHILD-
BURTON CUMMINGS
(TAPES 4.99)
3
99
EA.
BAT OUT OF HELL—
MEATLOAF
(TAPES 4.99)
3
99
EA.
THE HOME OF HIGH FIDELITY
OPEN UNTIL 9
556 SEYMOUR ST., DOWNTOWN       THURSDAY & FRIDAY    682-6144
Page Fridays 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15, 1978 Friday, September 15, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
I
TURN ON
WITH THE
an
your charms
from
„ K n©WSX SERIES
CiD PIONEER
wA"OOU continuous power
output of 20 watts per channel,
into 8 ohms from 20 to 20,000 Hz
with no more than 0.3 totafharmonic
distortion.
PLUS: Hybrid ICs in Power Output,
Direct-Readout Power Meters,
Low-Noise, Wide-Range Phono
Equalizer, Dual-Gate MOS FET in
FM Front End, Automatic FM Pilot
Signal Canceller, BASS/TREBLE
tone controls operated from
CR-type circuit using a negative
feedback loop in power output
section.
oX'DOU continuous power
output of 30 watts per channel,
into 8 ohms, from 20 to 20,000 Hz
with no more than 0.1 % total
harmonic distortion.
Included are all above mentioned
features plus Two-Deck Stereo
Tape Circuits, Two Stereo-Pair
Speaker Selectors.
v>X" /OU continuous power
output of 45 watts per channel,
into 8 ohms, from 20 to 20,000 Hz,
with no more than 0.05% total
harmonic distortion.
In addition to all of the above
features, this model also includes;
Pioneer DC Direct-Coupled Power
Amplifier Circuitry, Musicality
preserved in PHONO EQ, Low Cut
Filter, Tape-Dubbing— Deck 1 to
Deck 2 in Stereo.
oX'OOU continuous power
output of 60 watts per channel,
into 8 ohms from 20 to 20,000 Hz
with no more than 0.05% total
harmonic distortion.
DC Power Amplification, Superb
FM/PHONO EQ, Tape Duplicate/
Monitor Convenience and an array
of outstanding features, assure
you of the finest enjoyment in fine
Hi-fidelity.
■-r<F9.'SQV*->'/nyr'*W ' WW&MW'''*™*!**,*' ■
*XAwm*> ^m-jMTS*
©
r*%
Hk        Wk       iHr
ry   F%     r*|     r^
o *
Nfc. **■
te»
yf
•  Aft
i^mWmUmWf** ^mwKmWmW'
^ma^mim **»«*>
mtm»*mn »»,«..■
Check out the new SX Series at your nearest
Pioneer Dealer soon. You'll be most pleased with
what's in store for you from Pioneer.
Sole Canadian Distributor
.H. PARKER
67 Lesmill Road, Don Mills, Ontario M3B 2T8 575 Lepine Avenue, Dorval, Quebec H9P 2R2 3917 Grant Street, Burnaby, British Columbia V5C 3N4 Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 15, 1978
Distortion Cut In Half— To An Incredible 0.05%
Yamaha's first complete receiver line, with 0.1% distortion, astound-
ure for its whole line. Now, in the new Yamaha receiver
line, IM and total Harmonic distortion are reduced even further, to 0.05%. Makers who had
not succeeded in matching the 0.1 % figure are going to find It even harder to attain the new
Yamaha level of 0.05%!
ALL YAMAHA AUDIO PRODUCTS (EXCEPT CASSETTE DECKS) ARE BACKED BY A FULL
FIVE YEAR WARRANTY ON ALL PARTS AND LABOUR.
YAMAHA CR:620
r channel.       ^^ m^— ^0
in *«  on r\r\r\ l_l- ^^~
.....
O   j   '}
''-.A.11
0.. O
AM/FM RECEIVER
Minimum RMS output per
35 Watts (8ohms) from 20 to 20,000 Hz
at no more than 0.05% Total Harmonic Distortion.
• FM Muting of Inter-Station Noise
• One Touch Spring Loaded Connectors
for Two Sets of Speakers
• LED Indicators of Power AM/FM/
FM-Stereo Functions
•Two Stereo/Mono Switch
• Articulated AM Bar Antennas
• Auxiliary AC Power Supply
NOW
$42995
YAMAHA CR-820
AM/FM RECEIVER
Minimum RMS output per channel 50 Watts {8 ohms) from 20
to 20,000 Hz at no more than 0.05% Total Harmonic Distortion.
• Audio Muting
• FM MUTING
• Provision for Two Sets ot Speakers
and Two Headphones
• LED Indicators ot Major Receiver
Functions
• Stereo/Mono Mode Switch
• Three AC Outlets
NOW
$52995
CA-61011
Natural Sound Integrated Stereo Amplifier Super-Low-Noise
Phono Equalizer for 97dB S/N Ratio Wide 100W—54W Noise/Distortion Clearance Range, Clean 45w RMS per Channel at 0.05% Total Harmonic Distortion
MAIN DIRECT Switch to Bypass Tone Control Amplifier
NOW
$32995
TC800D
professional-level stereo cassette
deck performance, less than 0.06% wow and
flutter, Dolby noise reduction system. Unique features include
pitch control, memory rewind, automatic tape shutoft, OTL-IC
headphone and amp and mix/line
switchover
NOW
*33995
YAHAMA
AUDIO   COMPLETE SYSTEM
/?&
The CR220 is YAMAHA'S lowest priced receiver, yet it still produces less than 0.05% total
harmonic distortion, with 15 watts per channel RMS. Also features: terminals for two sets
of speakers, FM muting, and stereo headphone jack. The YP211 is A special blend of all it
takes to make a good turntable: Attractive styling, precision automatic controls, powerful
motor and sensitive S-type tonearm. And the NS220 Rock monitor speakers provide solid,
accurate music at any level from a whisper to disco-loud!
NOW
COMPLETE
RECORDS
1A TAPES I
u«a ||
50498 NIGHTFLIGHT TO VENUS — B0NEY M 5.29 ea. 4.29 ea.
106 GREATEST HITS — LINDA RONSTADT 5.29 ea. 4.29 ea
128 BOYS IN THE TREES — CARLY SIMON 5.29 ea. 4.29 .a.
3126 BORN LATE — SHAUN CASSIDY 5.29 ea. 4.29 ea.
18133 MANHATTAN TRANSFER —THE MANHATTAN TRANSFER ...5.29«. 3.99 ea
19114 GREATEST HITS — ABBA 5.29 ea. 4.29 ea.
19129 LED ZEPPELIN V — LED ZEPPELIN 5.29 ea. 4.29 ea
103 HOTEL CALIFORNIA —EAGLES 5.29 ea. 4.29 ea.
112 NEWS OF THE WORLD — QUEEN 5.29 ea 4.29 ea.
118 EXCITABLE BOY — WARREN ZEVON 5.29 ea 4.29 ea.
141  BUTSERIOUSLY, FOLKS — JOE WALSH 5.29 ea. 4.29 ea.
104 SIMPLE DREAMS — LINDA RONSTADT 4:29 ea. 3.99 ea
1053 A NIGHT AT THE OPERA —QUEEN     - 3.99 ea.
3010 RUMORS — FLEETWOOD MAC 4.99 ea. 3.99 ea
3079 LITTLE CRIMINALS — RANDY NEWMAN     5.29 ea. 4.29 ea.
3092 FOOTLOOSE AND FANCY FREE — ROD STEWART 5.29 ea 4.29 ea.
3200 LEO SAYER — LEO SAYER    NEW 4.99 ea 3.99 ea
19153 CHIC — CHIC 5.29 ea 4.29 ea
19999 DOUBLE VISION — FOREIGNER 5.29 ea 4.29 „.
92002 MEANWHILE BACK IN PARIS — STREETHART 5.29 ea. 3.99 ea.
39108 SOME GIRLS—THE ROLLING STONES 4.99 ea 4.29 ea
19181   PETER GABRIEL —PETER GABRIEL     NEW 5.29 ea 4.29 ea
200 PHYSICAL GRAFFITI — LED ZEPPELIN    2-LP-SET     — se. 7.99 ea.
1032 JUDITH —JUDITH COLLINS     — 3.99 ea.
2281  FLEETWOOD MAD — FLEETWOOD MAC 5.29 ea 4.29 ea
2875 ATLANTIC CROSSING — ROD STEWART     — 3.99ea.
2893 IN FLIGHT — GEORGE BENSON     — 3.99 ea
3111  BREEZIN'—GEORGE BENSON     — 4.29 ea.
6977 STONEBLUE — F0GHAT     — 4.29 ea.
3222 UNDER WRAPS — SHAUN CASSIDY    NEW 5.29 ea 4.29 ea
2979 GREATEST HITS—JAMES TAYLOR     — 3.99 ea
3151  THE RUTLES —THE RUTLES     — 4.49 ea.
6383 AFTER THE GOLD RUSH — NEIL YOUNG     - 3.99 ea
19173 AND THEN THERE WERE THREE — GENESIS     — 4.29 ea.
3219 IS IT STILL GOOD TO YA — ASHF0RD & SIMPSON     — 4.29 ea.
NONESUCH
CLASSICS
THE HOME OF HIGH FIDELITY
OPEN UNTIL 9
556 SEYMOUR ST., DOWNTOWN       THURSDAY & FRIDAY    682-6144

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