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The Ubyssey Oct 9, 1964

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Array MISSISSIPPI: STATE OF BEAUTY, TERROR
Ubyssey Editor - in - chief
Mike Horsey has just returned from a 10-day trip to Mississippi. Sole purpose of the
voyage, financed by the
Alma Mater Society, was to
find out what makes Black
and While lick in Mississippi.
Il was no holiday, as you'll
see below.
By MIKE HORSEY
Snap one, two, three pictures of the little girl and her
mother entering the school.
A meaty hand slashes the
camera away from you, breaking the strap.
"Don' go doin' that sort of
thing, son," says a gruff voice
as you watch a fat, sweaty
man open your camera and
unroll the film.
Both are handed back.
Nothing more is said as the
sheriff's deputy disappears
into a crowd of milling men.
You made a mistake. It was
a Negro girl whose picture
you took.
The place: Mississippi. The
time, incredibly: 1964.
A few days later in Jackson,
capital of Mississippi, another
problem.
A  blue  Chev  police  wagon
goes by. You look.  It  comes
the other way. You look again
and begin to worry.
Turn up a street. Get away.
It comes down the street toward you.
Panic. Run into an alley.
Stand beside a tumbled-down
shed for 15 long, hot minutes.
Forget your destination.
Get back to the motel.
You made another mistake:
Walking   alone   in   the  Negro
section.
In Hattiesburg, south Mississippi, ask a white lunch attendant: "Which way to Mobile Street?"
"Jus' what part o' Mobile
street you want, mistuh?"
The wrong part. In the
middle of the Negro section.
"Yu one o' them nigger
lovin' commies?" No directions, fumble along and find it
yourself.
Mistake number three:
Don't ask the white citizenry
where the civil rights workers
are. You learn fast.
I spent ten days in Mississippi this September. It is both
a beautiful and deadly place.
Beautiful because it is a
green, rolling country with a
great   river   winding   through
it.
Deadly because it is hostile
to northern newspapermen
and student civil rights workers.
This is the last stronghold
of massive racial intolerance.
The white Mississippian has
had more than a century to
convince himself he is superior to the Negro.
The Negro Mississippian
has spent the same time learning the same lesson.
The civil rights workers
and northerners who flooded
into Mississippi this summer
upset things. The white Mississippian reacted violently to
these  intruders.
He    murdered    five     civil
(Continued on Page 4)
SEE: MORE MISS
Will Makarios
have Turkey
THE UBYSSEY
for
Thanksgiving?
VOL. XLVII, No. 10
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964
CA 4-3916
WANTED: A PICKET
No. 13 unlucky for Frosh
as elections postponed
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Council Reporter
A Frosh Orientation committee bungle has resulted in
cancellation of Thursday's
Frosh elections.
Frosh, however, will get a
chance to vote again today.
Alma Mater Society president Roger McAfee ordered
polling closed at 1 p.m. Thursday, three hours ahead of
schedule.
All ballots cast were destroyed, including 150 votes
cast Wednesday night at polling stations in residences.
The closure came after several Frosh complained polling
station officials were stopping
them from voting, saying their
AMS cards showed they had
already cast ballots.
Polling station officials were
instructed to punch the number 13 on AMS cards for this
election, but the complaining
Frosh pointed out they had had
number 13 punched when they
voted for Frosh Queen last
week.
Investigation of the matter
by AMS officials revealed
punching of 13 for the queens
was arranged without AMS
approval by the organizers of
the Queen event.
Then   the   AMS   issued   the
number for the Frosh election,
not realizing it had already
been used.
"The slip-up was unfortunate, but the situation is not
completely lost," said election
chairman Jason Leask.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: UNLUCKY
TIME CHANGE
Because of the Thanksgiving holiday Monday there
will be no Tuesday Ubyssey.
Instead there will be papers
Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday.
Faculty
to demand
salary hike
By ROBBI WEST
The UBC Faculty Association is going to demand another
salary hike.
"We need an average 16.9
per cent salary increase for
1965-66," Dr. John Norris,
president of the association,
told a meeting of his group
Thursday.
He said UBC is 11th in the
Canadian university pay scale.
"Even with last year's raise
of $400 we are still not attracting the young graduates,"
Dr. Norris said.
"To attract these graduate
students, we must have an adequate salary floor and UBC is
definitely not considered to be
in the market," he said.
The present salary floor, set
in 1960, is $500 lower than the
lowest of the top ten.
"The 16.9 per cent we ask is
a moderate increase; it brings
us to the median salary level
of the top ten universities in
Canada."
The meeting moved to accept
Norris' statements, and will
present a brief to the Board of
Governors before the university budget is brought down for
next year.
Dr. Norris said the 16.9 per
cent comprises three sets of
figures:
• The annual percentage
increase of the Canadian universities salary structure—4.5
per cent;
The percentage increase
made necessary by replacement differentials, and age-
sal'ary factor—4.4 per cent;
To close the gap. between
UBC's floor and, for example,
Queen's floor—is an eight per
cent hike.
PORTER BUTTS
Family death
slows SUB
A death in the family of
Student Union Building consultant Porter Butts has delayed the second stage of architectural competition five weeks.
The second stage of the competition was scheduled to be
completed by Nov. 15, but is
now set back to Dec. 21.
Four firms are in the competition for the $3.8 million
building, which will incorporate lounge and food service
facilities, reading rooms, games
rooms, office space and a ballroom.
The SUB will be built on the
site of the present stadium,
which must be torn down before construction can begin. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1964
JOHN PARNALL
. . . disagrees
'Housing
equally
important'
By AL FRANCIS
UBC Registrar John Parnall
and President John Macdonald
disagreed on the difference between housing and academic
buildings.
In an interview with The
Ubyssey regarding use of Gordon Shrum Commons for an
education class, Parnall said,
"I don't like to distinguish between residence and academic
buildings. They're all the same
thing."
But in a statement in UBC
Reports, released Wednesday
by the administration, Macdonald differentiated between
the two, saying:
"All the building capital we
anticipate until 1969 is committed to our $30 million academic building plan, which must
have priority over housing."
Displays galore
While your time
on rocks, Indians
By AL FRANCIS
If you're looking for a way to while away some time
'tween classes, try the campus' permanent displays and
museums.
Glenayr
Largest one is run by the
Anthropology department in
the basement of the library. It
is open to anyone, 1 to 6 p.m.
Curator Mrs. Audrey Hawthorne said the museum has the
best Kwakiutl Indian collection
in the world. About one-fifth of
available material is shown,
and displays are changed twice
yearly, she said.
It is used frequently by professors to illustrate lecture
material, she said.
Also in the library basement
is the Fine Arts gallery which
opens Oct. 14 with a collection
of collages.
The small ibut bright gallery
has no permanent collection.
It rents exhibits for three-week
runs.
Fine Arts Gallery is open to
everyone, but attendance varies
according to the exhibit and
the weather, said curator Alvin
Balkind; who is also faculty
advisor for the Brock Hall art
collection.
This collection, bypassed by
hordes of hurrying students,
consists of paintings bought
with student funds.
It is one of the finest collections of its kind in Canada,
said Kyle Mitchell, AMS Treasurer.
Then there is the geology
museum in the basement of the
geology building.
The museum is small and
poorly lighted, but offers an
excellent collection of rocks,
minerals, and fossils. Visits are
by request.
1.   Clients'   Committee -
Student  Union   Building
Applications for a Clients' Committee for the Student
Union Building are now being accepted. This
Committee will be in operation during construction of the Building, working closely with the
architect, and will be involved from the time of
production of working drawings to the final
acceptance of the Building from the contractors,
up to three years.
This is the Committee which will decide the detailed
planning of the areas within the Building and is
therefore most" important.
Since this Committee will be operating over a con-
sidable length of time, consideration will be
given to younger- students, who might be prepared to spend more than one year on it.
Applications should be directed to Marilyn McMeans,
Secretary, Box 55, Brock Hall.
2.   Name   for   S.U.B.
The proposed new Student Union Building now needs
a name. Please forward suggestions in writing,
along with your name and phone number, to the
A.M.S. Secretary, Box 55, Brock Hall.
3. Games  Room  Supervisors
Applications for Games Room Supervisors for both
mornings and afternoons are now being accepted
at the Co-Ordinator's Office in South Brock.
4. Submissions  for Government   Brief
Anyone having submissions for the Alma Mater
Society's annual Brief to the Provincial Government should leave them in the Secretary's box
(55) or give them to a member of the Executive
immediately.
UNLUCKY
(Continued from Page 1)
"We'll just have to do it
over on Friday, and hope at
least the same number of
people turn out."
Leask said it would be hard
to estimate what today's total
vote would have been if the
polls had remained open, but
the 150 turnout, in residences
Wednesday almost assured a
better turnout than the 400
last year (13 per cent of the
Frosh   class).
Leask said plans were being
made to staff the polling stations today, and if all went
well they would be at the same
place as Thursday.
They will be open from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Polling stations yesterday
were located in Brock South,
outside Buchanan 106, Education, Westbrook, and the College Library.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
IDEAS
at
LARGE
Pink elepants
By OLD SOURDOUGH
Pink slims have invaded the
campus.
Ever since a downtown columnist did a piece on the
geographical distribution of
pink slims throughout B.C.
this summer, I figured any columnist worth his salt should
climb on the bandwagon and
add his two cents worth on
the subject.
• • •
My resolve was given a legitimate excuse when I saw a
pair wiggling along the path
ahead of me on the campus
the other day.
As to whether they appeal
. . . well, as we say in French,
chacun a son gout, or something.
On the question of the practicality of pink slims: Every
time I see a girl wearing a
pair I'm on the verge of a nervous breakdown until she passes out of sight, for fear a
seam will split.
• •    •
But luckily (or unluckily)
it's never happened yet.
I have spent sleepless
hours, though, wondering
about what happens to girls
wearing pink slims when they
play tunnel ball or leapfrog.
Finally, what's the basic
reason underlying this latest
craze of wearing pink slims?
Is it merely the desire to
attract attention?
Do the girls think slims
make them attractive?
• •    •
Or does the real reason escape a mere male?
Undoubtedly the most interesting field for thought here
is HOW in hell do they get
the things ON?
Next time you see a pair of
pink slims jouncing down the
sidewalk in front of your mesmerized gaze, here's a little
jingle to hum. It goes something like this:
Jig-jig-jiggles,
Yeah, yeah, yeah . . .
FROSH VOTE for naught. Mix up in punching AMS cards
resulted in election being cancelled yesterday. Election
will be re-run today. (See story Page 1).
Ledpharttes lives
on as new Pique
Ledpharttes' Magazine lives on in the piqued hearts of
its millions of fans.
The campus magazine, published last March by the Young
Bourgeois Authors and Artists
Association, reached four hundred lucky students.
That was the end of Ledpharttes. But it heralded the
rebirth of Pique.
A few young bourgeois types
suryived, and rebuilt the organization, former editor
Wayne Nyberg said.
They plan to publish the
brave new magazine, Pique.
Pique was the name of UBC's
former humour mag, but it
has been defunct for 10 years.
Marriage pains
Tight schedule
delays Cuba talk
By ART CASPERSON
Bryan Belfont was a busy boy yesterday.
He drove to Seattle, got married, and rushed back to cam-
us to deliver a talk about his
year in Cuba.
He was so rushed that he arrived on campus half an hour
late for his talk.
The gap was filled by a talk
on Cuba by Tate Roof.
Belfont heralded his arrival
with: "Sorry I'm late. This is
my wife, by the way."
His wife is Isode Dreckmann
of Germany. He met her in
Cuba where she was a teacher
at the Abraham Lincoln Institute of Languages.
A spectator asked why Cubans carry guns. According to
Belfont, they do so to protect
themselves and their places of
employment from counter revolutionists.
At the prison Pinar del Rio,
the inmates carry guns, he said.
"It's an island and there's
nowhere to go. The prisoners
feel they are being trusted."
In his talk Belfont described
what he called the vicious circle of the cold war. He said
the Americans sell tires to
Britain, Britain sells the same
tires to Rumania, and Rumania
uses the tires on the tractors it
sells to Cuba.
UBC could take a lesson
from Cuba on the question of
residences, said Belfont. At
Havana University some 30,000
scholarship students are provided with free lodging.
Bryan dares
NDP club
Bryan Belfont, who spent last
year in Cuba, has challenged
The New Democratic Party's
opinion of Castro's regime.
(In a letter to The Ubyssey,
NDP Policy Committee member Peter Penz said Cuba has
no freedom of speech, press,
or elections.)
Belfont said he has booked
Education 100 for two hours
next Thursday at lunchtime for
a debate with Penz.
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Interference charges
backed by CUS head
REGINA   (CUP)—A  charge  of  academic   interference
at the University of Saskatchewan has been supported by
the Canadian Union of Students.
Students objected to Conser
vative MP Kenneth More's demand that a Russian professor
be prevented from spreading
communist ideology. The university administration last
month backed up the student's
protest.
CUS President Jean Bazin
says the MP's remarks indicated a misunderstanding of the
role of the university and the
student.
"Academic freedom is a fundamental right inherent in the
concept of the university," he
said. "It is too easy for the general public to forget the value
of this concept."
University principal Dr. W.
A.   Riddell   said   the   Russian
would be lecturing on non-
market economy and not on
Soviet ideology. Exposure of
students only to approved doctrine is characteristic of totalitarian societies, he said.
VOLKSWAGEN
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he best-tasting filter cigarette THE URYSSEY More Miss
Negroes,
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Authorized as second-class
mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 9, 1964
Faux Pas, 7964
"Freshmen," the handbooks usually point out, "Are
inexperienced, unwise to the ways of the world, and
should be kept under the wings of their elders."
That was yesterday.
That was before we found that the frosh elections
had been hopelessly bungled—not by freshmen but by
the  wise,  learned  upperclassmen.
You see, some bureaucratic upperclassman forgot to
keep the number 13 slot on the AMS activities card open
so it could be punched to signify that frosh Joe X had
voted.
It had already been allotted to indicate that frosh
Joe X had voted for the frosh queen.
The result? Each and every Joe X frosh who was
rash enough to have voted for a frosh Queen candidate
found he was cut out of his franchise by wary poll
attendents who suspected such freshmen Were trying to
cast a double vote.
The election will be run again today . . . little consolation to freshmen who are already fighting to keep their
own representative on council.
A move afoot this year to remove the frosh president from council and represent frosh through the
faculties they intend to enter is primarily based on the
argument that only 400 of almost 4,000 eligible frosh
voted last year.
Although frosh were evidently voting in larger
numbers this year—more than 150 votes were cast in
the residences alone Wednesday night—today's vote will
likely be lower than if things had gone swimmingly the
first time around.
You couldn't blame the frosh for being a little discouraged.
We hope this foul-up will make the freshmen see red
and turn out in record numbers.
Such a display would be a powerful position to argue
from when upperclassmen present their well-rehearsed
reasons for the removal of the frosh president from
council.
It might also give the frosih impetus to want to run
things properly for 1965's freshman class.
God knows the kids will need some kind of break.
Not like this in Mississippi
problems
(Continued from Page 1)
rights workers. He beat and
harrassed hundreds of workers and ministers. He tossed
bombs at Negro homes and he
gave newspapermen a bad
time.
I broke a law by taking the
picture of the little girl and
her mother as they integrated
a school in Carthage, Miss.
The police and the local
school board have a deal—no
pictures of Negroes integrating schools.
• •    •
It's the same everywhere.
There have been albout 1,000
"intruders" in the state this
summer—mostly students, but
a fair sprinkling of adult professionals — lawyers, doctors
and ministers.
They have been registering
voters, setting up schools
v/here the white won't, establishing libraries, giving medical aid and money to help the
Negro!
In the field, civil rights workers go through an organization called COFO (Council of
Federated Organizations).
This is the co-ordinating body
for all people working in Mississippi.
• •    •
In some communities the
COFO office is a small, formerly   abandoned   house.
Civil rights workers follow
strict rules in Mississippi.
They like to live.
Workers do not travel at
night.
They smash the inside lights
of their cars so they may get
out of them without attracting
attention at night.
They don't stand with light
behind them—no silhouettes
for targets.
They don't sleep near windows and always at the back
of buildings for fear of bombings.
"It's best to travel in a car
that goes over 100 miles an
hour," said Sandy Leigh, 27-
year-old project director in
Hattiesburg.
Joyce Brown, a 21-year-old
Negro in her fourth year at
New Orleans Xavier univer-
ity pointed to a tight string of
holes in the driver's side of
the car.
South, it is an old store in the
unbelievably run down Negro
section.
•   •    •
Slugs from hunting rifles.
"No one was hurt," she said,
"the car was parked and we
were  lucky."
David Balins, 26, a student
doing graduate work at
Princeton is from London,
England.
"Don't you feel you are intruding in the affairs of another country," I asked.
"No, this is a universal
problem.    It's    the    duty    of
By Richard Simeon
Muslims: militant Negroes in the north
NEW HAVEN—"We want
all black children educated,
taught and trained by their
own teachers.
"We believe that inter-marriage or race-mixing should
be prohibited."
Sounds like a member of
the KKK or a White Citizen's
council? In fact it's the creed
of the Negro nationalist quasi-
religious movement called the
Elack Muslims.
•    •    •
The creed is the word of
the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, the Messenger of Allah,
as printed in the sect's newspaper Muhammad Speaks
which the smartly dressed
Negro in Greenwich Village
was pleased to sell me for 20
cents.
It makes strange reading.
It contains a grandiose plan
for a "Black National Reserve
Bank" serving Negro industries, stories of lynchings and
violence in the South, personal  testaments   from saved
Muslims and a long article extolling the virtues of Egyptian
president Nasser.
"Islam has given me life. It
has given me the chance to
work in behalf of my fellow
American black man and
woman here in the hells of
North America," says Capt.
Clarence X. Gill in one testament.
Author of this article,
Richard Simeon, w*as last
year's Assistant City Editor
of The Ubyssey. He is now
at Yale doing graduate studies in Political Science. He
will be contributing to the
paper once a week. This is
his first article.
He describes how he was a
thief and a drug addict. "I
went all the way down into
the pit of hell."
Then he went to a Muslim
meeting.
"Hearing the teachings of
the Honorable Elijah Muham
mad knocked me out. I began
to jump and holler and shout
because it was the truth! I
felt good! It made me want to
meet this man, to know this
man, to work with this man,
to serve this man."
Muhammad himself, in a
story outlining the three-year
savings plan for the bank
urges all Negroes to "join us
and our program for a united
black nation, so that we may
free ourselves from our oppressors with whom we cannot get along in peace."
•    •    •
He raps Negroes who hope
for integration. "You are now
forcing yourself to remain in
slavery by trying to force the
white man to allow you to remain with him and provde
ior you as he has always done.
"I am appealing to you to
seek separation from such
people on some part of this
earth that we can call our
own, away from a people who
openly show you and tell you
that they hate you."
A picture shows "heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali" presenting a replica of a mosque to Elijah at
a Harlem rally.
Recently Malcolm X, a leading Muslim, quit the group because it was not militant enough. Several stories criticize
his "vicious scheming and
treachery".
•    •    •
Another story relates how
Harrell Chancey and Stanley
Johnson sold 1,200 copies of
the paper. Johnson's prize: a
scholarship to the "University
of Islam", where he will study
industrial engineering.
The Muslim program calls
for exemption of Negroes
from all taxation, release of
all "Believers in Islam" now
in prison, and establishment
of a separate black nation.
"We believe we are the
people of God's choice," they
say.
people   to correct  these  horrendous wrongs," he said.
And the Negro. How does
he feel about all this "progress" to make him equal?
Elijah Thorn is a case in
point. A 40-year-old Negro
who has no intention of
claiming to be equal.
Absolutely no intention of
voting. He says he might lose
his job.
That means a lot. The pine-
mille where   he  works   pays
him a little less than $1,000 a
year.
Heat is a big problem in
Mississippi.
• •    •
There's no air conditioning
for the Negro. No running
water in 75 per cent of the
rural Mississippi Negro
homes, according to COFO
surveys. And 90 per cent have
no indoor plumbing.
The white "Mississippian has
it better. Air conditioning
helps. Sometimes it helps too
much. Many white Mississip-
pians catch colds from walking from an air conditioned
house into the sun and back
into an air conditioned store.
This is the State of Mississippi.
It seems hard to believe.
Those who have been to jails
tell you they're hell-holes.
They tell you people are beaten and brutally treated.
• •   •
You start to believe it when
your camera is snatched away.
You know it when a chippy
waiter   won't  tell  you street
directions and his eyes gleam
with contempt.
It's a grim story.
Next: Voter Registration
and Other Jokes for the Mississippi Negro.
wmn " ■ -
EDITOR:   Mike   Horsey
News   Tim  Padmore
City   Tom Wayman
Art   Don Hume
Sports   George Reamsbottom
Asst. Managing    Norm  Betts
Managing   Janet  Matheson
Asst. City   Lorraine Shore
Associate   Mike Hunter
Associate   Ron Riter
Magazine  — Dave Ablett
List for today has Art Casperson,
Corol Smith, Mona Helcermanas,
Rick Maynard, Al Francis, Carol-
Anne Baker, Brent Cromie, Al
Birnie, Joan Godsell, Don Hull, Sharon
Rodney, Ian MacDougall, Frank Lee,
Bob Burton, Paul Terry, Robbi West,
Lome Mallin, Paul Wood, Carole
Munroe and don't forget the party
people.  #%■;*■;
pf
OCT. 9, 1964
ON THE COVER: Angela Gann
and Bob Howay doing what
comes naturally in a still shot
from Larry Kent's Sweet Substitute, now playing at the
Auditorium.
Editor: DAVE ABLETT
Current Affairs Peter Pen*
Criticism John Kelsey
Films   Graham Olney
SHAVER
In case you're wondering about that composite
name with the composite
photo on last week's Page
Friday, it was unintentional.
The photo wasn't by
Paul Handy III but by
Paul Clancy, the pride of
Totem. The two faces on
the cover — John Handy
III. Squared away now,
group?
This week of PF is
Sweet Substitute issue.
The man above, Rev. Jack
Shaver, United Church
chaplain at UBC. He
agreed to look at the
moral aspects of Larry
Kent's campus-made film
—plus whatever else
came to mind.
Rev. Shaver*s review
is on Page 7, along with
one by E. H. Don't ask us
what the initials mean—
we promised not to tell.
Elsewhere in PF, you'll
find Mike Hunter's article
on press-agentry and public images at and of UBC.
It's on this page.
On Page 4, you'll find
the first part of Tony
Hudz' anatomy of a jazz
festival and Jackie Foord's
discussion of prints and
paintings at the 16th Contemporary Exhibition and
Sale at Vancouver Art
Gallery.
On Page 5, Dena Balva
reviews Ring Around the
Moon and Man and Superman; on Page 6 are Robbi
West's review of Irving
Layton's anthology of
Canadian love poems,
Ethel Bloomsbury's look
at the Loneliness of the
Long Distance Runner,
and Dave Nordstrom's
assessment of the Deller
Consort performance.
ARGUMENT
Fumbling press agentiy is
making a hash of UBC's
public image where it
really counts — at
the student level
By MIKE HUNTER
Hold your bankbook, Joe
College — here we go again
down the garden path of administration subterfuge.
This time it's residences.
Last time it was student fees,
and before that, the plight of
higher education generally.
Regrettably, we're smack
up against the same old policy of double-talk, secrecy,
meaningless figures, and
muddling, fuddling press
agentry.
And alarmingly, we're
once again faced with that
seemingly impenetrable
damn-the-students attitude of
our new regime, an attitude
which bitter student experience and a backlog of administration backfires apparently hasn't busted.
• •    •
We're being given the
gears on the costs and operation of student residences
this time, as you have probably surmised from the accounts in the papers this
week.
The problem, unfortunately, goes much deeper than
the idiotic press statements
and inane "letters of clarification" spewing from the
newest wheel in the Big
Machine.
To many students, especially those who have been
around since the beginning
of the Macdonald Regime,
the administration's practice
reflects a basic policy which
they feel is thwarting not
only the aims of the students,
but those of the university
as well.
Count me in as disturbed,
alarmed, and mostly, puzzled.
Disturbed and alarmed because it's my opinion that
most students don't think
much of their administration, and what's more, they
have all told their parents
and adult friends, the taxpayers about it.
• •    •
Puzzled   because   I   don't
think the administration
realizes this is happening,
and because I'm sure they
are trying their hardest to
achieve the exact opposite
result — namely the cultivation of a warm and understanding public attitude toward the university.
Dr. Macdonald many
times, most recently in an
excellent Cairn ceremony
address, has expressed this
desire.
We can believe this desire,
but we are baffled by the
countless ways in which the
administration carries on, in
obvious and flagrant conflict
of this philosophy.
Let's start with the present.
PF Two
The current smokescreen
issuing from the Main Mall
is using a new vehicle: the
office of the director of information services (an ominous title if I've ever heard
one).
The university, urged on
by Dr. Macdonald's personal
pledge to let all the facts be
known — to be open-minded
and forthright :— has departed from its insulting practice
of super-secrecy, or so they
would have us believe.
• •    •
We no longer get the blanket "no comments," and "I'm
sorry, it's not university policy to release facts on that,"
and "I'm sorry, Dr. X is
booked up until next Friday."
We now get our faces
slapped, our credulity
stretched, professionally —
in the form of sophisticated
•"information bulletins" from
the office of the director, one
Mr. Ralph (May I Correct)
Daly.
I don't know about you,
but I've read at least three
of Mr. Daly's latest missives
and I'm already forwarding
his name as my nomination
for Yo-Yo of the Year.
He has ired every education reporter in the city with
his blathering "May I correct
one small fact . . ." letters.
(If you want publicity and
a receptive press, you don't
pick lint off every story you
are fortunate enough to receive — rule one of common
sense and public relations.)
• • •
Worse, I get the impression as a reader of these let-
ters-to-the-e d i t o r , as I'm
afraid many members of the
public do, that whoever's
running that university must
be a confused and hypercritical idiot.
I also get the impression,
as do most students, that Mr.
Daly really wants us to read
what he, as the administration's official secret-keeper
and image-builder, would
like to have written himself.
Sheathed, of course, in the
devious language of the press
release, with the facts that
hurt a bit or which are hard
to explain buried in the bottom of the story or not told
at all — and the irrelevant
tripe and double-talk — (as
in Mr. D's letters) at the top.
• •    •
How does the administration inform us about their
housing policy? In a press
release, presumably prepared by Mr. May-I-Correct himself. Dealing with the horrendous 50-year, $10-million
interest matter in one brief
paragraph, the 12th paragraph at that (a paragraph
which, judging from Mr.
Daly's alarmed letter to The
Ubyssey, he had intended
newspapers to skip over and
MAY WE CORRECT . . . ?
ignore,   as   indeed   The   Sun
and The Province did).
So UBC houses the most
students on campus in Canada? In tarpaper shacks?
Our average charge is third
lowest among nine Canadian universities, eh? Which
nine?
The student president,
Roger McAfee, phoned administration money-man William White for an explanation of the residence financing. He was told, officially,
that it was not university
policy to release any information on housing.
It's the same with the
bookstore, food services,
traffic and parking — and
yes,  that  most  horrible  ad-
THE WRITER
Mike Hunter is a first-
year law student and former editor of The Ubyssey.
Last year,
his editorials
_«» b^h      wer*    judged
^l^lfX^ best in Cana"
da in the Canadian Uni-
versity Press
competitions.
In five
years with
The Ubyssey he was sports
editor for two years, news
editor, and editor in chief.
He also edited the last edition of Campus Canada, the
national student magazine
published  at UBC.
Hunter   is   now   associate
editor  of  The   Ubyssey.
ministration bungle of all —
last spring's tuition fee raise.
Mr. Daly's residence pitch
is merely a new wrinkle in
a rather shrivelled-up procedure of dealing with students — a procedure which
often appears to have dried
up altogether.
Is it really any different
from the tight-lipped "no-
comments" we got last fall
when we asked about rumors of a fee raise?
Then, when the administration finally got around to
"admitting" the raise, did
they come out and tell us?
No — it was a nicely-colored brochure prepared by
some downtown PR boys,
with fuzzy lines and lots of
"average Canadian" figures.
Did this mean a fee raise?
Well, yes and no, and maybe. Students must carry their
responsibility. Look at the
Canadian average figures
(recognize last week's statement on housing?).
How about the Back Mac
campaign? The students, refused the facts on the university's financial plight,
went ahead anyway and
gathered 230,000 signatures,
demanding increased provincial support. How did the
administration react through
it all? Indifferent, at best,
and downright cold-shouldered at times.
What does this all mean to
the students? They've never
failed to pay when it's been
shown to them that they
must. Students didn't kick
about last spring's fee raise
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE:   MORE ARGUMENT Administration is not an end
in itself, says president,
it implies consent, support,
leadership at all levels
By DR. JOHN MACDONALD
. . . An important
event of the year was the
great debate concerning the
financing of the University
of British Columbia.
The press and radio presented this as an argument
between the university and
the government of the province. In fact, however, the
discussions were of more
profound significance and at
the same time far less sensational than much of the public comment implied.
What was the real significance of the debate? The Carnegie Corporation Quarterly
made the point when it observed that the notion that
politics and education should
not have anything to do with
each other is based on a misunderstanding both of politics and of the role of education in a democracy and how
that role is determined. Public education is paid for by
public funds.
The decision about how
much of the public purse is
to be devoted to education is
ultimately a political decision. Any society, be it
county or country, must decide how much it will spend
oil public benefits and how
much it will allocate of the
total to each area.
How should a society
make these decisions? How
much for education? For hospitals? For welfare? For
roads? For industrial developments? For family allowances? For transportation
services? For pensions?
A society makes its decision wisely by seeing that its
members are well informed
and well educated about the
implications of all the decisions that must be made.
The educational process goes
on in the public forum.
This essay has so far concentrated upon higher education in the province, the
public debate, and the academic effects of what has
often been referred to as the
crisis.. But the impact of
change has also been experienced by the members of the
faculty and has led to adjustments in administrative
machinery.
THE WRITER
Dr. John B. Macdonald's
article is excerpted from the
July-August edition of UBC
Reports.
It is part of
his report lo
the university Senate
and Board of
Governors on
his first year
at UBC. Earl-
~ ier in the re>-
port, the university president discusses his report on
higher education in the province.
UBC Reports is the publi-
, cation of the university's information office and is distributed free of charge to
graduates and friends of the
university.
The modern large university, into which category the
University of British Columbia falls, is a complex organism, a far cry from the
traditional "Groves of Academe" and the ivory tower.
Many older members of the
faculty can look back wistfully to the good old days
of the quiet campus, the
scholarly retreat, and the
measured pace. Those days
are gone.
"Bigness" has become a
characteristic of the university and the pace of life on
the campus has quickened.
We must ask ourselves how
we may live with bigness.
How can hundreds of members of the faculty, dozens
of departments, numerous
schools and faculties, all
with specialized outlooks,
work together most effectively?
How should we best devote our efforts to academic
achievement? How are we
all to be cognisant of the
worth-while ideas being generated and how are we to debate them effectively? How
shall we develop and maintain loyalty to an institution
in a day when more than
one professor is behaving
like an itinerant preacher,
rootless   and   responding   to
the call of golden opportunity?
The obvious initial answer is that we can accomplish none of these things unless we think they are of the
utmost importance. Happily,
most members of the faculty
of the University of British
Columbia, in my short experience, do believe in their
importance.
Now it is the task of the
administration to organize
the activities of the university in such a way as to place
in the forefront what is truly
important. Administration is
not an end in itself; it should
have no independent existence; it should be the servant of the primary goals.
I suggest that the key to
good administration is individual leadership, at every
level.
Leadership in academic
administration is not to be
confused with dictatorship.
Leadership implies consent
and support. It implies consultation, persuasion, open-
mindedness, and forthright-
ness.
Dictatorship is synonymous with an authoritarian
approach, lack of consent,
lack of consultation, and, usually, some form of devious-
ness, often intended to give
the illusion of democracy.
If the university can respect
and use the traditional and
legal structure for administration made available to it,
by the Act, we shall all find
ample room for leadership,
for consultation, for widespread discussion, and for
that all-important intangible
quality — the feeling of belonging.
MORE ARGUMENT
(Continued  from   Page  2)
—they kicked about the way
it was thrust on them by
our jdwn, supposedly sympathetic, administration. No
consultation, no information,
just a kick in the pants.
Is it to be this way with
the residences? Apparently.
We're in the snow-storm now
—can the fee boost be far
behind? How do we know if
we're not told? If the administration can't get the money
to build residences, perhaps
the students can? (We've already built a gym, Brock
Hall, the stadium, and part
of the permanent residences).
•    •    •
And it's more than these
big issues at the root of the
students' worry.
A letter to The Ubyssey
said it very well. "Does Dr.
Macdonald realize that the
majority of the student body
would willingly support him
in his efforts to make UBC
a great university if he
would only keep the students informed on major
policy matters?" the letter
said.
He might have added that
Dr. Macdonald might consult the students, too—after
all, if the students have been
allowed in on the planning
of residence or fee policy,
they can hardly turn around
and criticize it. They would
also be far better prepared
to explain it to their parents.
The letter continued:
"Does Dr. Macdonald realize it is in his best interests
to get to know the students,
if for no oher reason than
the fact that students rapidly turn into alumni who are
supposed to support their
university financially?
* •    •
"I realize that Dr. Macdonald is a very busy man.
However, a few hours a
week spent meeting students
and engaging in student activities . . . How about attending a football game, visiting undergrad labs, having coffee in the Brock?
Tuum   Est,   Dr.   Macdonald
It seems to me this student, and many like him,
are disappointed and disillusioned with regard to the
university. They haven't any
real feeling for it — particularly for the policies of its
administration. It's not a -
matter of liking or hating.
This attitude toward the
administration—spawned by
the administration's often
thoughtless attitude toward
the students — worries students. And their feelings are
being communicated to parents and friends out there
in the public, the Great Target of all PR men.
• •    •
I'd suggest that a citizen
forming his opinions of the
university does so from his
casual chats or dinner-table
conversation with a college
student — not from stodgy,
critical "letters of information" or manipulated articles
in the press.
Tuum Est, Dr. Macdonald
When a munitions ship blew
up in Bone Harbor, WUS
students turned nurses
to sew up survivors
By  SHEILA DYER
The night of July 23 will
always be remembered by
the Canadians participating
in the World University Service Algerian Seminar. That
was the night an Egyptian
munitions ship blew up in
the Bone Harbor.
In the stifling Mediterranean heat of Bone we were
engaged in a quiet round of
terminal discussion and evaluation. Into the uneventful-
ness, on the night of July 23,
exploded an Egyptian munitions carrier, the Alexandria.
OVERSEAS
I was in the improvised
library at our headquarters
— revamped French army
barracks — looking over
newspapers when I heard a
violent roar. Its impact flung
the shutters into the room
and sent me bolting out the
door  into  the  open.
Outside, I saw the eastern
sky, colored red and orange,
hanging ominously above
me. I joined the others, who
had been standing about
chatting, in a mad dash in
the opposite direction.
Judging ourselves at a safe
distance from the cloud of
fire, we stopped and asked
ourselves — what it meant?
Was it counter-revolution?
The caprice of some anti-
government forces?
That was not unfounded
speculation in Premier Ahmed Ben Bella's unpredictable and still unstable republic.
Within minutes of the initial explosion, the road skirting the beach by our barracks was crammed with
men, women and children,
inhabitants of the port area,
on foot and on bicycles,
carrying or pushing the few
possessions they had hurriedly salvaged.
Their ranks were swelled
with Algerian soldiers. From
one of the migrants we
learned that an Egyptian
munitions ship had exploded.
The Bone port, the busiest
in Algeria, was threatened
with complete destruction.
During the exodus from the
port area, the sky above the
ship lightened and darkened
again and again with each
succeeding detonation.
Fine shrapnel fragments
whipped through the air and
heavy mortar shells fell into
the streets, gouging craters
in the asphalt, a half block
from us.
Our fear soon became concern — and the concern
action when it was decided
unanimously by students and
professors to offer services
in the municipal hospitals.
I had no first aid training
although more than one half
of the students were qualified.
With the aid of the police
and the army, we flagged
down cars. They were ordered to transport us to the
three city hospitals.
In true James Bond fash
ion, with Klaxon blaring,
we sped down the dark
streets and around corners
where groups of Algerians
huddled anxiously. The hospital loomed before us. We
jumped from the car and followed a nervous little orderly up three flights of blood
stained stairs.
We passed milling crowds
of children and their veiled
mothers, there to be treated
or to comfort wounded relatives and friends. Before we
had realized it, we were in
the operating room witnessing a leg amputation without
anaesthetic. A man black
with burns lay prostrate
• while doctors and technicians fumbled stupidly in
the tiny room.
The scene was chaotic —
orderlies and volunteers,
children and wounded, running every which way. We
found employment. That
night we carried stretchers,
dug bullets out of stomachs,
amputated limbs, and sewed
mutilated skin together.
By morning, the fire had
been snuffed out and Bone
began to count its dead.
Two hundred fifty men died
in the explosion; 100 more
were still unaccounted for
in the immediate vicinity of
the ship.
Three days later they were
still being carried off in
stretchers, poor fragments of
human beings. The dock area
stunk with the stench of
death.
Although most of the Algerians I talked to were
convinced the cause of the
explosion was purely accidental — perhaps a careless
docker who forgot and lit a
cigaret during unloading
operations — the suspicions
of a counter-revolutionary
plot were not dismissed.
Some swore they saw a
plane fly over the ship moments after the explosion.
Government officials prudently clamped martial law
on the city.
In any case, there was
something strange in the fact
that the ship was carrying
detonators and explosives together.
And why had it been unloaded in the inner harbor?
Such cargoes were to be unloaded only at safer distances.
Somewhere, perhaps, there
is an answer to what hap-
pened that night.
Sheila Dyer was one of
three students from UBC
who toured Algeria this past
summer with the World University Service.
She and other WUS students were near Bone Harbor
when a munitions ship blew
up. And during the long
night thai followed they took
part in caring for the wounded.
This is her eye-witness
account.
PF Three HUDZ' JAZZ
*/•'/#&&
STAN GETZ
Jazz scored
summer success
by gritting
teeth, working
By TONY HUDZ
The whole thing started in
January of 1963, during a
conversation in a record
store about the unfortunate
position of jazz as an active
art form in Vancouver. It
was decided that one way of
making it such would be to
investigate holding a one-
day festival in Stanley Park.
And so it -was.
A meeting of potential
sponsors was arranged, and
regardless of the less than
optimistic turnout, the nonprofit Summer Jazz Society
was formed. The first move
was to appoint Dave Rob-
bins as musical director.
Then, the Parks Board was
approached, and rental of
Malkin Bowl was finally approved with the stipulation
that no dancing be allowed.
Shades of the Newport Riots!
Money was raised somehow,
multi problems, hesitancy,
reluctance, and small-time
thinking overcome, and the
First Annual Summer Jazz
Festival was at last a reality. '
J. J. Johnson was invited
as guest artist, and was superb, the local artists were
at their best — in short, the
first festival was a resounding success. In the happy
aftermath, it was decided to
hold a second Festival in
August, 1964.
Having thus far sounded
very optimistic, let me quote
the more realistic statement
of Jack Wasserman: "Nobody ever believed there'd
be a first one. But, lo, and
behold, the Second Annual
Summer Jazz Festival is
scheduled for August 9, built
around Stan Getz and Ast-
rud Gilberto."
Benny Green called jazz
"The Reluctant Art." As a
director of the second festival, I fully agree with his
description. The enthusiasm
of the few does not compensate the apathy of the many:
note  the  number of extinct
PF  Four
jazz clubs as evidence.
Reluctant or not, though,
jazz is a legitimate art form.
As such it deserves a place
in the artistic life of the community: hence the annual
summer jazz festivals.
The Second Festival was
a bit more difficult to bring
to reality than the First.
We originally planned to
bring in the Oscar Peterson
Trio. Then we found the
Trio was booked into Mr.
Kelly's in Chicago Aug. 9.
We found out, however,
about four weeks before the
prospective date of the festival that Stan Getz/Astrud
Gilberto were conveniently
booked into the Penthouse
in Seattle about this time.
Rapidly, we decided to bring
them up, and we booked the
Don Thompson Sextet and
the Dave Robbins Big Band
as complementing attractions. And on Aug. 9, the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
(Why the QE? Simple. No
chance of rain.) resbunded
with some very fine jazz
indeed.
My very sincere thanks to
Dave Robbins, who again
acted as musical director,
and again did an outstanding job. The same to Wally
Lightbody, our chairman,
and the other directors and
hundreds of people who donated their services in the
form of free advertising,
time and trouble, interest,
suggestions, and just plain
co-operation.
The moral, I suppose, is
this: if there hadn't been a
second festival, there would
not have been a third. Or a
fourth. What to me was the
most heartening and encouraging reaction to the second
festival came from the pen
of William Littler: "Let us
now hope that next year.. ."
That "next year" may appear trivial, but it is genuinely worth its weight in
gold. The prospect of many
people (other than the seven
enthusiasts comprising the
directorate of the Summer
Jazz Society) truly caring
about jazz is indeed comforting.
Watch for us next year.
We'll be back.
And watch this space next
week for a more critical analysis of the second festival.
ART
Prints outshine
paintings in
contemporary
exhibition
By JACKIE FOORD
The aim of the Annual
Contemporary Exhibition and
Sale at the Vancouver Art
Gallery is to bring Canadian
art into B.C. homes and this
year's show, which closed on
Sunday, offered a wide and
varied choice of art works.
The most exciting area in
the show was the Canadian
print exhibit. Here, it seems,
was art with not only a
strong Canadian flavor but
with direction, for the Canadian prints showed vitality
and boldness.
Pat  Martin  Bates'  metal-
collage-intaglio print To See
(Continued   on   Page   5)
SEE:    MORE ART
WEST  POINT  GREY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Eleventh   Ave.   at   Sasamat
Rev. A. J. Hadley
9:45 a.m.—Elective Study Course*
11:00 a.m.—"Grace, Gratitude and
Glory"
7:30 p.m.-"You're Out!"
8:45 p.m.—Young  People's
Fellowship
A PROTAGONIST for HUMANISM
ontheAvenue KEN    McALUSTER
Make  Your
"Thanksgiving"  Practical
Worship this Sunday ....
11:00 a.m. "Forget Not
the  Lord"
7:30 p.m. "Festival of
Rejoicing"
Dunbar Heights
Baptist Church
West   17th  at  Crown
For transportation phone
224-9620 or 228-8423
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Open Friday Nite Till 9 DRAMA
Plain and simple
—fling Around
Moon wasn't
at all rosy
By  DENA BALVA
Ring Around The Moon,
one of Jean Anouilh's sweet
French meringues failed to
rise even an inch off the
boards at the Queen Elizabeth Playhouse Wednesday
night.
If we abandon the metaphor, we notice many people
who ought to have known
better, lumbering through
the play. Notable among
these was Dorothy Davies
as Madame Desmortes, one
of Anouilh's 'grandes dames.'
These are witty, outrageous, wise, cynical and suffer
from a kind of subtle gallic
Weltschmerz. Miss Davies'
make-up allowed her to appear not more than forty,
and her actions had the vitality of the captain of the
girls' grass-hockey team. Her
performance consisted of exaggerated mugging at the
audience, and extreme and
sudden shifts of volume, relieved by a dash of Our Miss
Brooks.
Marlene Dixon as Diana
Messeschmann gave only one
dimension to her role. There
was no hint of the poor little
rich girl behind the brittle
mask.
Diane Nyland as Isabelle
walked about abstractedly
until she was required to express anger. Only then did
she really become vital and
interesting.
Otto Lowy as Messeschmann seemed to be hearing
his own lines for the first
time as he spoke them. He
couldn't have made a worse
botch of the part if he'd
been handed the script five
minutes before the curtain.
The scene in which he and
Isabelle tear up handfuls of
money was so bad it was received in grim silence. For
a moment, near the end of
the play, Lowy gave us a
glimpse of the true character. He comes in wearing a
shabby suit and coat and a
pathetically tender, happy
smile. He shakes .hands all
around and says "I am
ruined". This was the only
line, for some reason, which
Lowy didn't mangle.
Lee Taylor as Hugo, started weakly but steadily
gained strength during the
last two acts. As Frederic,
however, he was softly melancholic throughout. Rae
Brown, as Isabelle's Mama,
although she threw away
many good lines, got just the
right mixture of lovable old
tart and inspired gentility.
Dorothy Fowler, as Capulet
gave a virtuoso display of
mincing. Her gestures, her
walk, her eyebrows, even
her voice, minced.
Good supporting performances were also given by Edward Greenhalgh who did a
masterly job as Joshua, the
butler, and by Robert Clothier as Romainville who has,
undoubtedly, the most expressive knees in town.
The highlight of the evening was the tango, brilliantly   danced   by  Lady  India,
Messeserschmann's mistress,
and Patrice, his private secretary. This fantastic creation and the superb timing
of Daphne Goldrick and
Gavin Payne almost made
the rest of the play worth
sitting through. Miss Goldrick, in fact, was the only
member of the cast who
gave the correct stylized performance.
Malcolm Black's direction
was extremely uneven. His
use of the stage was good,
and his 'choreography' marvellous.
He failed, however, to impose a single style of acting
on his performers. There
was no suggestion of a theatrical "bubble" — the existence of which is occasionally threatened by Isabelle's
outbursts into "real life".
Only when Miss Goldrick
and Mr. Payne were onstage
did we see how it ought to
have been done.
The costumes were attractive, although they somewhat hampered the actresses'
freedom of movement.
Charles Evans' impressionistic set was just right. He
got carried away, however,
with his lighting effects.
The play opened with a midnight-blue cyclorama which
gradually became a greyish-
pink dawn. In a single three-
minute scene, the sky would
change from indigo to orange to lemon yellow to
blushing pink and back. One
imagined Evans at the control board spinning dimmers
with abandon, his wild eyes
gleaming.
Ring Around The Moon
may be worth seeing for the
tango scene.
Maybe.
Lights, music
mar production
of Shaw's Man
and Superman
By  DENA  BALVA
Man and Superman, subtitled on the program as "a
comedy and a philosophy"
opened to an amenable audience last Friday. Cliff Robinson's chic Edwardian decor
and Joyce Sobell's properties enhanced a series of
striking stage pictures, while
Jessie Richardson's costumes
were worthy of Cecil Beaton
himself.
The lighting, however, for
the most part adequate, was
sometimes inept. For example, actors were lit occasionally from the mid-chest
to the knees only. The music
sounded as if it was coming
from a scratchy long-play
record. It was.
Shaw's original version
was intelligently cut to a
fairly reasonable playing
length of three and a half
hours. The cuts meant omitting large chunks elaborating Tanner-Shaw's philosophy and slightly impoverishing the parts of Ramsden and
Straker. The resulting script,
nevertheless, was coherent
and smooth.
Patricia Gage, as Ann
Whitfield, Shaw's Every-
woman, was  charming in  a
(Continued   on  Page   8)
SEE:   MORE DRAMA
MORE ART
(Continued  from   Page   4)
Yet Not Be Seen Like Kay-
osk the Gull in the Mist is
representative of the Canadian character of the prints.
Subject matter, composition
and color have a striking
northern quality.
Texture is explored in the
works of Dumouchel, Char-
bonneau and Partridge. Yves
Gaucher's composition Pli
Selon Pli, a relief on laminated paper, points to the experimental tendencies among
Canadian print makers.
The watercolor and acrylic compositions, although
few in number, were of consistently high quality. Shad-
bolt's ink and acrylic Emblems North No. 6 was dynamic in its strong horizontal
movement and explosive use
of color. In antithesis to the
boldness of Emblems, was
Ciccimarra's beautifully-subtle The Toy, a watercolor in
muted tones and delicate
shapes.
The European prints contained some fine offerings
as well, particularly Zoa Nou
Kio's Paysage Hiver and
Curell's Miners.
Unfortunately, the paintings do not fulfil the promise
of the prints. The paintings
hung showed an amazing
lack of quality: in color,
workmanship and intensity.
The   color   quality   of   Reg
Holme's Painting and Gordon Smith's Red Night was
much below the standard one
would expect from artists of
their calibre. The Kiyooka
and Molinari experiments in
pure color were sound in
composition but grating in
total effect. The Don Jarvis
had a disappointing unfinished quality.
However, there were some
redeeming features in the
painting   exhibit.   Godwin's
Stainless Steel in the Woods
on sized, linen canvas
achieved a rich, fabric-like
effect.
Otto Roger's Landscape
on hardboard (unfortunately
unsized) was a mobile, vigorous composition. Dorothy
Cope's Quintana in rhoplex
and watercolor gave the impression of a framed ceramic
with transluscent colors and
rich textures.
If the Canadian painting
was a disappointment in this
particular show, however,
the vitality of the prints was
sufficient to make the exhibition one of significant qual-
ity.	
This  Friday,  Saturday, Sunday
from 9:30 p.m.
RON PROBY QUARTET
Featuring DON THOMPSON
Student Prices
(No   membership   required)
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Thanksgiving Weekend
October 10-12
"Advance to Live"
Hollyburn Ski  Lodge
Leaving from
Lutheran Student Centre
Saturday,  1:00 p.m.
(Bring  own  bedroll)
Cost: $4.50
Call 224-3328
for reservations
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COLLEGE SHOP
802 Granville St. MUSIC
The single
pertormance
made season
memorable
By DAVE NORDSTROM
One could soon exhaust
any supply of superlatives
without adequately describing the concert given last
Friday evening in the Q.E.
Playhouse by the Deller
Consort.
Through the last decade,
this ensemble's recordings of
capella Renaissance vocal
music have been the salvation of many a musicologist.
It has been instrumental in
a revival of interest in the
musical gems of this era;
the Consort's appearance in
Vancouver certainly must
have a comparable effect.
The first thing obvious to
the near-capacity audience
(after the presidential introduction, and the stage manager's hurried removal of a
water jug and glasses from
the centre-stage table) was
the naturalness and group
feeling of the five master
singers who appeared, seated
themselves, and proceeded
to unaffectedly scratch,
grimace and fascinate.
Then followed the overwhelming effect of pure,
gloriously - controlled sound
from five perfectly matched
voices, which blended and
defined appropriately, and
effortlessly created the exact
atmosphere for every song
they read.
Whether in such sonic de-
lights as Weelkes' "The
Nightingale", in the emotional profundities of Monteverdi's "Ecco Mormorar
l'Onde", in the plebian frolic
of Purcell's "Fie, nay, prithee John", or in the strained
sentimentality of L a s s u s '
"Bonjour, mon coeur", the
projection was excellent, the
ensemble complete, the effect devastating.
With this one performance
the sponsoring Vancouver
Woman's Musical Club has
made its season memorable;
one can only sympathize
with the talented artists who
must follow the Consort to
complete the season.
CINEMA
Tom Courtenay's
acting saves
'Runner' trom
a prat tall
By ETHEL BLOOMSBURY
Loneliness of the Long
Distance Runner, directed by
Tony Richardson, is in the
tradition of the relatively
new English "kitchen sink
drama." The trademarks of
the genre are all there —
mom washing dishes in the
slightly dirty pantry; a slow
PF   Sir
TOM COURTENAY
pan across the dirty railway
tracks.
Richardson has made this
type of film before — "The
Entertainer," "Saturday
Night and Sunday Morning"
and "A Taste of Honey." Although 'Loneliness" is much
like his other films, it is a
complete change in other respects. It is a story set in
drab surroundings, but the
emphasis is always on the
character of Colin Smith.
Richardson and his excellent
cameraman, Walter Lassally,
never let the film wander
into the self-pitying attitudes
of earlier kitchen sink films.
When Richardson has to
make a point, he does it precisely and does not stay to
belabor it.
Another aspect of Loneliness which separates it from
its counterparts is its steady
rhythm and pace. Part of this
can be credited to Lassally's
energetic camera-work and
part to the editing. Cuts
from the dreary life in Borstal prison to the almost
idyllic runs in the countryside work very well.
Colin Smith, a young delinquent, spends most of his
time in Borstal prison. He is
unable to cope with or come
to terms with the society he
lives in. He steals simply
because he does not want to
suffer the same fate that his
father did. He balks at the
• old British tradition of playing the game and keeping a
stiff upper lip. At the end,
Colin stops before the tape
in the championship run
against a public school. He
has finally given up any pretense of playing the game.
Enmeshed with the social
problem aspect of the film—
Colin Smith is a misfit in his
society — is a subtle love
story. It is not thrown in to
provide a romantic interlude but instead supplements
the social aspect of the film
and emphasizes Colin
Smith's lack of communication with society.
One cannot write a complete review of Loneliness
without mentioning the brilliant star of "Billy Liar"—
Tom Courtenay. Without
him, as Colin Smith, the
film would have fallen flat.
Courtenay manages to reveal Colin Smith to us almost as clearly as if he had
dissected the character and
laid him before the audience.
Altogether, the three —
Richardson's direction, Las-
sally's camera work, and
Courtenay's acting — combine to make "Loneliness of
the Long Distance Runner"
the best film of its genre.
BOOKS
Layton sings
Canada's swoon
song tor the
unromantic
By ROBBI WEST
"Always   I   shall remembtt
you,   as   my ear   moved
Away from the station and
left you alone by the gate
Utterly   and   forever   frozen
in time and solitude
Like   a   tree   on   the   north
shore  of  Lake Superior."
F.  R.  Scott.
Canadian love poems have
come a long way from the
days of Pauline Johnson's
Victorian lyrics. In Irving
Layton's anthology Love
Where The Nights Are Long,
readers of contemporary
poetry at last have the opportunity to read their own
Canadian love songs.
Layton's introduction sets
the collection's . mood with
such references as "Love is
surrender, concern, ecstasy."
He warns the reader that
this poetry is not for the
prudish and "censorious
prigs" with which our country abounds — and indeed
it is not. The true feelings of
the lover and the loved are
portrayed here.
From tender adolescent
love, through obscene, to
brutal animalistic hunger,
love is portrayed without
shame or sentimentality.
Yearning   and   futility,   per-
Love Where The Nights
Are Long. ed. Irving Layton
(McLelland  and  Stewart).
feet loves lost, capricious one
night fancies are all there.
Flower pots, clothespins,
hazel boughs and goldfishes
remind the reader of his
own past — actual or imaginary.
Poets represented range
from editor Layton to Bliss
Carman, Milton Acorn to
F. R. Scott, George Bowering to Earle Birney. They
write with sensitivity and
awareness; their themes do
not bully. Instead, they gently persuade, and thereby
achieve their deserved success.
Harold Town's drawings
breathe an air of opaque
sensuality enveloping the
reader in the aura of sexual-
ity's earthy mystique and
blending superbly with the
mood of the collection.
Sometimes cynical, sometimes painfully introspective,
this anthology offers every
deviation  on love's theme.
These poems are meant
to be read by those who are
in love with life's sensuality,
not recommended to the
Wordsworthian romanticist.
"If you're really serious-
minded.
It's the best advice you can
take;
No   rumpling,   no   sweating,
no nonsense.
Oh   who   would   not   sleep
with a snake?"
J. Maepherson
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FREE   PARKING   BEHIND   STORE It's a film
about sex—
but it's more
than that
By REV. JACK SHAVER
Larry's right. It's a film
about sex.
But that's not all it's
about.
It drew predicted leers
and laughs from a self-conscious student audience.
It also shocked students
into genuine feeling and
this was no mean feat Tuesday night.
By the time Sweet Substitute started, the campus exhibitionists were in full cry
as a result of a program
opener, during which 50,000
British trains flicked by —
silently, to the dismay of
Film Society technicians.
The exhibitionists provided
an impromtu sound track.
Any movie reaching for
more than leers and laughs
in this atmosphere was in
for a long reach.
Yet Sweet Substitute pulled something off. Tuesday
night's audience was suddenly subdued, and most of
it  went away thinking.
The advance bally-hoo,
and who knows what else,
made me wary of Larry
Kent, but Tuesday night's
showing made me take him
seriously.
Larry has an eye for reality and an ear for dialogue.
(It was not until after writing a first draft of this review that I learned the dialogue  was  not  scripted.)
The good spots, by being
so good, showed up the bad
spots. The family dialogue
was mostly a bust, especially in the mother-daughter
ecene.
Missing in the film was a
feeling for just what, parents are. Larry can put a
despicable person on the
screen, make him believable,
and observe to the end what
this person causes others to
do and be.
His eye for what is deeply and personally cruel
glimpses the human  fact to
LARRY KENT
a compelling dimension. The
fantasy nature of male teenage sexuality is caught magnificently.
It is easier to know what
Larry Kent has eyes for,
than what he is trying to
say. The fact that I was left
making this separation may
be an indication that the film
fell just short of art. But
one feels a work is not great
only when it is good enough
to invite the comparison.
Kent's movie has teased
me into trying to discover
the line between an author-
p-oducer who wants to be
taken seriously and one who
writes a message play. Certainly Larry lets the story
itself bear the message and
'-e rets marks for that.
And certainly what he has
eyes for is a key to what he
is trying to say. Tom and
Kath's relationship is not
there for nothing. The irony
of Kath's hope to visit a
place not corrupted by Coca
Cola is no accident.
Tom's failure to write
creatively for his English
teacher is delightfully ambiguous. Is this because of
his preoccupation with genital sexuality, or because of
his failure heretofore in this
regard?
One point is clearly made.
The human male wants to
make a rootin'-tootin' success of his genital sexuality.
But this realistic observation
would have sent no one
away shocked and silent.
Something more was observed.
Sweet Substitute offers an
ugly glimpse into what happens when sex is separated
from human relationship and
confined to the genitals. I
don't want to spoil Kent's
creation by putting my
words to his art, but I've got
some.
Sweet Substitute is mostly
about situations, some of
them stock, like the fantasy
nature of teenage sexuality.
It is more about stock people
than about persons.
Now and again Tom, and
especially Kath, come very
close to being persons. But
this is a tough age to write
about persons. Who is doing
it? Anyway, where are there
any? What reason is there
to hope for a miracle?
Nevertheless, I am going
to see Kent's next movie.
Bitter Ash's
melodrama is
nearly gone
—thank God
By E. H.
I suppose I'm deviating
from the local non-conformity, but do high school students really talk that much
about sex? However, courageously assuming they do,
Larry Kent has made a
movie about it- Sweet Substitute is about three times as
good as "Bitter Ash."
The camera work has a
bit of 'French Flu,' probably
picked up by Larry in Quebec, but it's good, and usually well conceived. The creaking melodrama of "Ash" is
nearly gone, thank God, and
nobody grimaces ad lib into
the camera any more. At the
same time, the actors, the
men anyway, are tremendously peppy, even if it doesn't always jell.
There are some troubles.
The sound is in sync but decidedly poor; the famous improvisatory approach turns
out to be a mixed blessing.
Yet the film is full of genuinely entertaining bits and
I'm not sorry I went. My
principal complaint is Larry's story, which I simply
can't believe.
As I watched the film, I
was willing to believe in his
larrumping, rather oldish
adolescents as entertaining
creatures (the women are
less successful), but I just
gave up when these engaging
idiots became capable of
great villainy and stood
around in Theatre 400
groups looking grim.
This is the great problem
with the loose plot approach:
you gain in reality, but you
get into things you can't get
out of.
It would help if Kent were
skilled in planting lines and
in obligatory scenes, but
such things seem to be his
special weakness.
The actors will be jawing
away happily, accompanied
by some lively camera work.
Then Angie Gann has to say
'All a man wants is sex,' and
the cast holds its breath
while Bellamy splits the
frame dead centre with poor
Angie.
There are a couple of
scenes with a high school
teacher that just should have
been left in the bin.
Actually, I can forgive a
lot of this for the few unmistakable signs of developing film style, particularly the whole scene with
Mitzi Hurd: everyone glum
in the corner or leaning on
the TV set, Mitzi herself,
Bob Silvermann, all lantern
jaw and mugging like mad.
There's no detectable improvement in acting or technique, but it works, and
when the scene works, faults
and all, then you've got a
style.
This show has its faults:
poor sound, some bad dramatic pacing, some pointless
dithering in the action. It
has adequate picture quality
and the cinematography is
pushing the local professionals.
It's often entertaining and
shows real style for about
10 minutes. It never quite
pulls itself together.
Go see it anyway.
PF Seven
"Going to make it to the Ark
tonight?"
"What for? It ain't raining!"
"Not THAT Ark, Meaihead!
The Ark  COFFEE  HOUSE!
On Broadway. It's a
A CAMPUS
CAMPUS TRADITION!!"
"Yeah?    Since when?"
"Eight-thirty."
"I'm underwhelmed.   Who's
playing?"
"JON YORK.
He   does    risky    songs   and
patter and like that."
"The word is RISQUE."
"Separatist!"
IheerfL
3607 West Broadway
(One Block East of Alma)
Doors 8:30; 1st Show 9:30
Reservations: RE 6-6011
NEXT WEEK
TUES. - SAT. ONLY!
Capitol Recording Star
BARBARA DANE
"Meanest  Old  Blues
in Town"
SONGFEST  EVERY  SUNDAY
CLOSED MONDAYS
(Note: Since you've read this tar,
might as well bring this ad with
you.   It's  good  for a  free  coffee!)
LARRY    KENT
Maker of the earthy BITTER ASH
presents his new movie
SWEET SUBSTITUTE
A story of the driving sexual
urges of an adolescent
FRIDAY, 12:30 & 8 p.m.
SATURDAY - SUNDAY - MONDAY
2:30 & 8 p.m.
UBC  AUDITORIUM CALENDAR
Man And Superman, in
Freddy Wood. Last times tonight and Saturday, 8 p.m.
sharp.
• •    •
Hootenanny Revisited/
QET, Sunday, 8 p.m. Featuring Don Crawford, Jubilation Singers, Tom Northcott.
• •    •
Ring Around the Moon,
QET Playhouse. Oct. 7 to 24.
The Playhouse Theatre Company.
• •    •
The Wise Have Not Spoken. Metro Theatre. Tonight
to Oct. 17. Produced by Emerald Players.
• •    •
Picture Loan Collection,
on display this week, Vancouver Fine Arts Gallery.
• •    •
Harold  Town's   Paintings,
Oct. 6 to Nov. 1, Vancouver
Art Gallery.
• •    •
Metro Theatre Concert
Series, debut Sunday, Oct.
11, 8 p.m. at Metro Theatre.
Director, Alex Ustimovich.
$1.50.
• •    •
The Ark. Broadway and
Dunbar, Jon York, "folk"
songs and risque humour,
through to Sunday. Barbara
Dane for five days only,
Tuesday Oct. 13 until Saturday.
• •   •
Bunkhouse, Tom Northcott
with Jean and Eileen
Deonch, Wednesday, Oct. 14
until Saturday.
• •   •
Flat Fire, next to the Ark:
The Ron Proby Quartet featuring Don Thompson. Students $1.25.
• •    •
Espresso, Nield Longton as
usual, as well as anyone else
who drops by.
MORE DRAMA
(Continued from Page 5)
perhaps too studied manner.
Her timing was often calculated rather than vital and
spontaneous. John Sparks
somewhat indulged himself
in playing Tavy rather
broadly but was, nevertheless, splendidly silly. Sam
Payne, as Roebuck Ramsden,
relying    heavily    on    stock
PF   Eight
business — apoplectic stuttering, throat clearing,
muted chuckles — portrayed
a doddering old ninny rather
than a man who prides himself on his 'advanced' ideas.
John Wright, as Straker,
surprisingly failed to steal
the show, considering the
juiciness of the part. As a
man who "takes . . . trouble
to drop his aitches," he was
natural more than stoutly
class conscious.
Michael Rothery as Men-
doza came up with an unbelievable hybrid accent, so
'cosmopolitan' as to defy an-
aylsis. This actor's excellent
voice, however, was at times
a disadvantage.
In the Devil in the 'Hell"
scene's ideological debate,
for example, instead of losing the argument, he appeared to be winning. Considering Shaw's purpose, this is,
to say the least, disconcerting.
Derek Ralston, as John
Tanner, was ill-suited to this
demanding role. His slim figure and graceful gestures
were inappropriate to the
solid, imposing, slightly mad
philosopher the playwright
imagined. At times, he
seemed like a superior kind
of Tavy, especially in the
trite 'Anglo-saxon male terrified of sex' attitudes. Ralston was weakest in the "Don
Juan in Hell" scene, where
most of his ammunition was
needed. It was most evident
here that what was lacking
was not only the physical
presence, but also a compelling intellectual power.
At many points he was incapable of sustaining the
emotional and intellectual
pressure of the longer
speeches. His voice was
tremulous and breathy, and
at times, seemed almost to
approach hysteria. It was
difficult to see him, in short,
as one of the "masters of
reality."
Notable among the supporting cast were Eric
Schneider as Hector Malone
and Bice Caple who appeared briefly as Miss Ramsden.
John Brockington's direction struck a good middle
ground, avoiding the extremes of both pompousness
and frivolity. Pacing was
snappy, and, the audience's
interest never flagged. From
a purely visual point of
view, it would be hard to
improve.
With few reservations, one
doesn't hesitate in calling
this a beautifully executed
production.
HOUSE OF  STEIN  LTD.
THE BAVARIAN ROOM
(MODKICN   CAFE)
EUROPEAN and CANADIAN CUISINE
3005 W. Broadway
Phone RE 6-9012
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Fujiya 771—2 speed,   2  track.
79,50
199.50
139.50
Tondberg 74—Stereo,  4 track,
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Calrad—12" trioxial stereo speaker.
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Lafayette—44 watts. Solid state
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demos     , ,
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TrJ^—36 watt stereo amplifier and
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Stare demo	
Reg.
17T50
448.00
169.95
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139.00
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68.88
Empire stereo magnetic cartridge^
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Pick or ing stereo mag. cartridge,
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diamond	
Bulk tap*
Demagnetizer	
Tap* Haad demagnetizer.   A  must
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Mono tap* or phono
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Foot Switch
for tape recorders	
Professional Studio Micro-
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Dynamic Microphone — Complete with desk stand	
Crystal Dosk Microphone — For
P.A. or tape recorders	
Midland Multi-Motor — Ohms,
volts, amp	
Midland Professional Typo
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Professional Typo Transistor
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Powerful 2-station Push-button  Intercom — Complete  with
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SO Only — Top Quality 8-transistor Radios — Large speaker,
easy tuning, with leather com, earphones, battery	
Lafayette— 1200'Mylar recording tape. Absolutely top quality:    .
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AT  949  GRANVILLE  ST.
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LAFAYlTTt—4 Track Stereo. Record
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track. Used. Snap. .	
Saba—Stereo, 4 track, Record and
play. 2 only '. .j	
Dual—Stereo, 4 track, Ext. speakers.
Dwno  	
Talafunkan—4 track, 3 speed.
Ster«o play. Demo. 1 only	
Naat—Professional 4 track stereo
deck, with pre amps. Outer case
damaged *	
249.95
399.50
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HI-FI STEREO
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229.95
TRANSISTOR UNITS
Dofcorder—2 speed, 5" reel. Re-
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Carsen—Tapetone, top quality. 2
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Ideal  for  Lecture*.
Mlnlcorder—4 trans. Ideal tor
speech. 1 only	
Steehnan—Made in U.S.A. Semi-
professional, 2 speed, with leather
case. Ideal for reporters, university
students	
Sanyo—Smallest made transistor
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Bargain — Trio W-45 full  stereo
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34.50
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Graetz — AM-FM-SW. Beautiful
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STUDENTS!
10% Discount with this Ad.
Easy Credit Of Course
HOUSE OF STEIN  LTD
1005 Granville
MU 3-6120       MU 3-6311
2 STORES
949  Granville
MU 5-5611 Friday, October 9, 1964
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
Says McAfee
Buying a car not
like Education
Victoria College's chancellor Judge J. B. Clearihue's plan
for a $100 fee increase is unrealistic, says student president,
Roger McAfee.
Donor bleeds
Red Ctoss
has goodies
for givers
Free coke, coffee, orange,
cookies, a card saying I Gave,
a pin shaped like a blood drop,
and a red cross decal for your
car.
You get all these if you donate blood at The Armory and
today is your last chance.
Red Cross officials said there
is still hope of making the 4,000
pints quota for UBC as the
week-long Blood Drive goes into its last day.
To accommodate you they
have 26 beds, nine gorgeous
nurses and many, many empty
pint bottles.
"The Judge is out of touch
with reality," said McAfee in
an interview Wednesday.
"I don't see how anyone can
equate a university education
with buying a car."
Judge J. B. Clearihue has
proposed a $100 immediate fee
hike. He proposed a scheme
whereby students would sign a
promissory note to cover the
increase.
Students would repay the
interest-free note at $100 per
year after graduation
The Judge said students
should pay for their education
the same way they pay for
their automobiles.
"The Judge's proposal doesn't
at all solve the immediate problem of getting more funds,"
said McAfee.
"There will be no profit on
the money for five years or
more. The money is needed
right now."
McAfee said he feels the
Judge's plan is inadequate for
the future as well as the present.
"The suggestion is merely a
stop-gap solution," he said.
"We've had enough of interim measures. Long-range
financing procedures are necessary."
Clearihue justified his stand
on grounds that students themselves pay no more than one-
third of their university costs.
"Actually, • we only pay
25%," said McAfee.
"But we must guard against
turning wealth into a requirement for admission to UBC,"
he said.
McAfee said Council's Means
Survey, part of a brief to the
provincial government, will reveal the facts about student finances.
Nude bugs boys
at Manitoba U
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Students of St. John's College
at the University of Manitoba are trying to get rid of
a nude on a bicycle.
They say the painting,
which was donated to them,
is a monstrosity.
The St. John's boys stormed the College Library and
left the painting there. They
haven't heard anything since.
Sends books
UBC sends books and drugs
to developing universities.
RESERVE
YOUR CAR
NOW
WITH
Type of Car
Overnight
24 Hour Day
Weekly
<   Vauxhall
I    Volkswagen
$1.95+5c
$3.95+5c
$10.00+5c
\   Acadian
js   Chevy II
v   Valiant
<-   Falcon
$3.00+5c
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$12.00+5c
<<!   Parisienne
>   Galaxy
';   Impala
Mustang
$5.00+5-
$8.00+5c
$16.00+5c
1021
Men suit selves
while girls fume
By JOAN  GODSELL
Ubyssey Women's Angle
Men don't know what's good
for them. At least that what
most women think and I agree,
being a woman.
It all started when an advertisement from a downtown department store in Thursday's
Ubyssey stated eight rules for
men to follow when buying a
Great Natural Shoulder  Suit.
The first rule said: "Leave
the girl-friend at home. She
doesn't know a thing about
men's suits."
"Ridiculous," I thought to
myself. "Down-right ridiculous.'
So I took an impartial survey
to find out where women think
they belong when a man goes
shopping for a suit and vice
versa.
Most women were shocked
at the advertisement's naivette.
Horsefeathers, they said.
Men NEED us when they go
shopping, they said.
Everybody knows women
have better clothes sense than
men, they said.
But most men—misguided
creatures that they are—agreed
with the ad.
When I asked: "Do you leave
your girlfriend at home when
you go shopping for a suit?"
Most males nodded triumphantly.
like
Some comments were:
"Bloody   right—it'd  be
taking your mother."
"I   always   take   my   mom
along."
"I wouldn't take a woman
shopping for a dogleash."
One male said bravely: "I
would leave my girlfriend at
home because she thinks I need
her and a fellow has to assert
his independence somehow."
BUDGET RENT
W. Georgia
OPEN
7:30   a.m.
8:00  a.m.
\- CAR
Phone  685-0536
7:00   p.m.   Monday   -   Friday
6:00  p.m.  Saturday  and  Sunday
PHILIPS
PRESENTS
for Campus or
Home
BATTERY-POWERED TRANSISTOR
PORTABLE RECORD PLAYER
MODEL AG4126
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only $69.95
NOW AT
|   CARR'S
1037 Granville
Easy Terms        Open Fri. til
Phone 685-7425
Free Customer Parking
STUDENTS!
Hush
Puppies
Breathin' Bmhed Pigskin •
THE  WINTER   SPORTS  SEASON   IS   HERE!
SO
GET YOUR COZY  FLEECE  LINED  PIGSKIN
STADIUM  BOOTS —By GREB
NOW
AT
MEN'S
WOMEN'S
13.98
12.98
Campus Shoe Store   u   Clapp's Shoe Store
4442 W. 10th Ave.
CA 4-3833
Charge Accounts Invited
Also at 2431 Main St.
;&<p*as
cutunt
For beautifully
tailored w e ;
weather protection a coat by
Aquascutum is
a must. Price a
pleasant surprise!
Clinton's
MEN'S WEAR
742 Granville St.     681-5625
Happiness
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sharing!
When you're enthusiastic
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Tell your friends how wonderful it is!
Tell them how Tampax internal sanitary protection
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poised, sure, secure, happy,
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carry on from there.
Just he sure you tell evcr\> obit's wonderful!
CANADIAN
TAMPA
CORPORATION  LIMITED, BARR Page  14
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1964
AROUND
THE
CAMPUS
By ED CLARK
When UBC mastered McMaster on Saturday last, a
meagre total of eight hundred
students witnessed the onslaught.
That's a pretty flimsy figure
for any statisticians notebook.
Eleven hundred the first game;
eight hundred the next; at this
rate, by the end of the season,
the 'Birds may as well play
behind closed doors.
It cost the UBC Athletic budget $5,000 to bring McMaster
to this spirited University. It
is certain the attendance didn't
help pay for this cost.
SEX OVER FOOTBALL
If I may bore you with some
higher mathematics, I will indicate how strange this campus
really is. UBC has an enrollment of roughly 15,000 students. Let's say that a total of
2,000 students attended the last
two games; this works out to a
round figure of 1,000 heads per
game and a ridiculous 6V_% of
the student body.
According to my calculations, more students will attend
Sweet Substitute in a week
than the total attendance to the
football games will be for this
season. This proves one thing.
More people go for sex than
they do football.
Who would have believed it?
EASTERN SPIRIT
I hear the same old story
that collegiate football can't
compete with the Pro's. Nonsense!
Let's take, for example, McMaster University which is
located in Hamilton, Ontario—
home of the Grey Cup Champions. This small campus employs only 3300 students. Three
days before they were humiliated in the 'Birds nest they played Waterloo Lutheran before
2,000 home fans. If you take
time to figure it out that is
nearly two-thirds of the total
enrolment. What's the gimmick? Well for one thing, Eastern students have more spirit
and it seems they are football
crazy.
FREE ADMISSION
The main reason is that the
students are admitted free at
game time.   ,
When they pay their tuitions
they also pay a set amount for
all athletic activities and benefits throughout the year. Consequently, most students, having paid to see a football game
beforehand, will naturally attend them.
WHY NOT UBC?
There is nothing stopping
UBC from developing the same
system. Anything would improve the present situation.
However, I don't think that
this is the true reason why McMaster has such a large attendance percentage. You see, like
McMaster, most universities
have a little word called pride,
and plenty of it. When their
boys win or lose, they want to
share victory or defeat with
them.
UBC lost their pride awhile
back, it's about time they found
it again.
SPORTS
'    .- »-ji 'Bf *£' !.*'«-.' Ii * * , <*'• '**
.  . . j-fA,   - .1'    .-•• _   ».
. "V '.-'    '
'■'' V** **',__/**  * * *      *    "* *•_. ■     " *
''-oktitiSaig&i3*  ?WV*	
—don hume photo
SWIMMING THE BREAST-STROKE in intramural competition for women are these energetic co-eds who are quickly attracting an large number of male sports fans to
Empire Pool at noon hours.
In Football
Birds psyched up for PSC
Slacks for College
Traditionally
Styled
Wash N' Wear
$13.95
41st at Yew
In Kerrisdale:
Men's Natural Clothing
By JACK  McQUARRIE
UBC's Thunderbird football
team is mentally and physically
prepared for this Saturday's
contest in UBC stadium against
Portland State College Vikings.
The Birds came out of the
McMaster game injury-free and
with a new outlook. Drubbing
a highly rated-team by a 47-zot
score proved to be good therapy.
PSC is a club that last year
won the Oregon Collegiate
championship with a 6-2 won-
lost record. This year their
lone victory in three ballgames
is a 21-16 win over Oregon
Tech.
The Vikings will feature two
top performers in fullback Al
Berkis and offensive end Jim
Hollingsworth.
Hollingsworth is a 6'4" All-
American who weighs in at 220
pounds. He was instrumental
in PSC's 1963 march to the
championship, snaring 30 passes for 568 yards. He also scored 10 touchdowns.
Berkis' credentials are just
as impressive. He ranks as the
number two ground-gainer in
PSC history.
SEE  BETTER
LOOK  BETTER
WITH
CONTACT LENSES
At a  Reasonable Price
LAWRENCE CALVERT
Call: MU 3-1816
70S  Birks  Bldg.
9:30 a.m. -5:30 p.m. Saturday till noon
We
<$*»*
w**
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3573 W. 41st Ave. AT DUNBAR AM 6-5920
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Charge Accounts Accepted    •    Free Parking At Rear Friday, October 9, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
FOR THERIRDS
By GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Ubyssey Sports Editor
"Who gives a damn?"
"No athletic scholarships."
"Nothing, and if I did what could I do about it?"
"We've got one?"
The above are a few of the brilliant comments given
in answer to a question I was asking various students
shuffling in and out of the Brock one noon hour this past
week.
For the record the apparently unstimulating question
was "what do you think is wrong with UBC's extramural
athletic program?"
The wording of the question inferred negatively, of
course, that something is wrong. And I was curious to
see if anyone would take exception to this somewhat
sneaky approach and insist that our extrmural sports program was indeed as nearly perfect as we could hope for.
• •      •
However, besides general indifference, the prevailing
attitude was reflected in the existing assumption that
there is much room for improvement. The points most
often made by students in expressing their dissatisfaction
were: the need for a new sports stadium; institution of
reasonably applied athletic scholarships; and the lack of
promotion for most events.
Then there were the usual wisecracks such as the
need for pub on campus and the cheerleaders having
one too many uniforms.
So I'm back where I started. What is wrong with our
extramural athletic program?
• •     •
UBC is involved in almost thirty extramural athletic
activities. Few American or Canadian colleges can compare with this variety offered to the student as a spectator
or participant.
No less than 7,000 students are directly involved in
the combined intramural and extramural sports programs.
Which is a paradoxical answer to the criticism that UBC
students don't support campus sports because they don't
cram into our dingy stadium to watch the various T'Bird
clubs perform.
Perhaps students here have so much spirit and energy
that they prefer actually participating to just standing
around watching others having all the fun.
It would be nice if this was true but my ever cynical
mind just won't believe it.
Like the guy said, "who gives a damn."
• •     •
Even Mister Congeniality, head football mentor Frank
Gnup, is developing a permanent frown from the strain
of the Bird's peculiar football schedule.
Its peculiarity arises because of the varying extremes
of competition supplied by UBC's opponents. Two weeks
in a row we.have seen teams that won their respective
conferences two out of the last three years. The first,
Linfield crushed us 42-zip, much in the manner that we
walked over McMaster 47-0 the following week.
And to make matters worse Gnup has almost no idea
what to expect next. Saturday we play yet another
championship club, Portland State College, who won the
Oregon Intercollegiate Conference.
I think I'll go just to see what the hell does happen.
And I won't be surprised when it does.
So what else is new?
• •     •
In their first two home games the football Birds have
played before a. grand total of 2,000 fans. Meanwhile, in
their only two games of the season, both away, the
varsity soccer club has played before over 3,000 fans.
But few of the soccer spectators were off this campus
and after watching Joe Johnson's team in action it conies
to me that they deserve better local support. It would be
nice if the Athletic Office would give help by hiring a
bus, and arranging to have the cheerleaders and band turn
out for some of their games.
Problems in Contemporary Culture
A Series of 10 Lectures _-Sponsored by The New School
First  lecture,  Thursday,  October   15  —   D.   B.   Brown   on   Existentialism
Others include:       Lionel  Tiger on  Homosexuality
Warren Tollman on  Modern  Literature
Jack Shadbolt on Contemporary Art
Meeting: Every  other Thursday  at  8:30  p.m.
In The  New School  building,  3070 Commercial  Drive
Tickets: Series - $15 (2 for $25)      STUDENTS   $10
Single — $2 Single    $1.50
Information:    Phone AM 1-8308
Western Canada's Largest
FORMAL WEAR RENTALS
Tuxedos
White - Mae Coata
Full Dress
Shirts & Accanofiei
Morning Coata
■hie Blazers
Directors' Coata
Sales ft Rentals
OVER 2,000 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
E. A.  LEE  Formal Wear Rentals
«23 HOWE (Oownstairs) MU  3-2417
260* Granville (at 10th)      4«I3 Kingsway (Bby.)
 RE 3-6717 (by Scars) HE 1-1160
GEORGE HRENDICOFF
. . . back in goal
birds thirsty
for Canadians
I'm not much of a soccer fan
but there's a "familiar" ring to
that name, commented Joe Student.
He was referring to the Vancouver Molson Canadians who
provide the opposition for our
Thunderbird soccer team this
Saturday afternoon at Callister
park.
After winning the Pacific
Coast Soccer League two out of
the last three years, the Canadians—led by their playing
coach Dick Whitehead, a former pro with the Glasgow
Elearts—tlo indeed have a famous name.
They have also three PCSL
All-Stars in forward Normie
McLeod, halfback Bill Nickols
and left winger Ken Ferrier.
Bird's head coach Joe Johnson plans two changes for Saturday's game. George Hren-
nicoff ■ is expected to start in
goal replacing Ed Wasylik who
will be used at either a fullback or halfback position.
Sports shorts
New champions
to represent UBC
UBC's sailing team —which won the North American
Intercollegiate Sailing Championship during the summer-
is off to another Regatta, this time in Montreal	
Two  members  of  the   club
Colin Park and Alex Folyey,
leave today for Montreal where
they will take part in the Canadian Intercollegiate Sailing
Championships.
When UBC won the Championships, held in Vancouver
this year, they became the first
Canadian or West Coast team
to ever do so.
FIELD  HOCKEY
Three teams will be fielded
by UBC for the first matches
of the year in the B.C. Field
Hockey League, this Saturday
at Spencer field behind Brock
Hall.
The Varsity club will suffer
from a player shortage for the
initial games of the season,
since two top players, Pete
Buckland and Lee Wright, are
in Tokyo playing for the Canadian Olympic team.
But the Varsity team, which
won the First Division last
year, has a young and experienced side including some
promising new talent, and expect to hold their own until
Buckland  and Wright return.
Grad Photographs
NOW BEING TAKEN
MOBILE  STUDIO   AT   STADIUM
Hours: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m .
Limited Time Only - Don t Delay
This service covered by your Grad Fee
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard RE  1-6012
Game   times   are   1:15   p.m.
for  the  Varsity   club   and 2:45
for the Blues and Golds.
RUGBY  ACTION
A full slate of rugby action
is again scheduled for this Saturday.
Here are the games, times
and places.
Birds vs. Barbarians at Ambleside park      2:30
Braves vs. Meralomas I at
Wolfson field 2:30
T'Hawks vs. Meralomas II
at  Wolfson     1:30
Totems vs. Barbarians II
at  Ambleside 1:30
Ukeleles, from  $ 3.99
Guitars, from   $10.99
Tuneable   Bongos,  from     $16.50
Baritone Ukelele   $14.99
Used   Banjo    $39.95
Drum Outfit (English) ....$149.95
ARNOLDS
PAWN SHOP
986 Granville MU 5-7517
ffu&^meer student mrnecl ¥ettjty,
tetmetd abridge qf great hmty,
Jfofc a recites yomig man,
J>rwe Ms ear on
J)oim mm, car,
dom came biidf
dowu came ¥eurtaj
Penny-wise and dollar-wise,
The student who would like to rise,
' use this saving stratagem—
A bit each week in the B of M!
10 3 MillI0H C/UUDMK
Bank of Montreal
CanatUiA *pin&t SeutA fryi Student*
U4-61
The Bank where Students' accounts are warmly welcomed
Your Campus Branch:
The Administration Building: MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager Page 16
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, October 9, 1964
DR. JOHN FRIESEN
... to Rajestan
Extension
director
India-bound
Extension department director Dr. John Friesen, has been
named director of a Columbo
Plan project for adult education.
The project wilt be operated
jointly by UBC and the University of Rajastan in Northwest India.
Dr. Friesen will leave Vancouver Saturday to start organizing the pilot extension department.
He will help train technical
staff, organize an evening college and recommend Rajastan
students for study in Canada.
A joint grant of $180,000
from the governments of Canada and India will finance the
three-year project.
Dr. Friesen will be especially
concerned with direction of the
adult education courses, seminars, curricula and facilities.
The idea for the project was
conceived in Feibruary, 1962
when Dr. Mohan, vice-chancellor of the Indian University,
Dr. Mehta and Dr. Friesen met
in India.
'tween classes
Song and dance at IH
International House presents
folk songs, dancing and refreshments tonight at 8 p.m. Admission is 25 cents.
There will also be a tea today
at IH from 3 to 5 p.m. Free admission.
• •    •
CLUB  CREDISTE
Today at noon in BU 204.
Hear our stand on the Queen.
Executive positions still open.
• •    •
UN   CLUB
Movies today at noon in the
upper lounge of IH. Everyone
welcome.
• •    •
EAST ASIA SOC
Social evening tonight at
8:00 p.m. Phone CA 4-6965 for
place and details. Membership
meeting Wednesday noon in
Bu. 218.
• •    •
NCF
General meeting to elect executive  at noon  today   in  Bu.
204.   All  natives  urged   to   attend—all others welcome.
-   " ' '    if    if'   if
CINEMA  16
Italian series opens Tuesday
night with Antonioni's L'Auv-
entura. Tickets at the AMS.
• •    •
VCF
Faith: Heirloom or Discovery, a talk by Dr. Ian Sowtan,
U of A Dept. of English, in Bu.
106 at noon today.
• •    •
UBC SQUASH CLUB
General meeting noon today
in Bu. 202.
• •    •
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
French films in Bu. 205 noon
today. Regular meetings are
Mondays and Wednesdays in
Bu. 1221.
• • •
THEATRE STUDENTS ASS'N
General meeting in Freddy
Wood 206 today at noon. Report of program committee.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $ 75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST — Theia    Sororily    pin    ecl^ed
with pearls: also black onyx ring.
Reward offered, call FA 5-2482.
LOST — Girl's black framc<rglass~es
far   <'iid   C   Lot   Tuesday.    Phone
Hl'l-72!i2.
FOI'.Xn — Girl's black ?????? in
niu'hanan washroom Tues. 3rd.
I'hone Judy at 2'i.r<-6S64 after !» p.m.
FOITNi>—line Science sweater coated Willi honey. Owner claim in person   K.l'.S.  Office.
Transportation
14
Ixl I >K wauled from 200 block East
14t h, Xorlh Vancouver. I'hone Fred
VI'   8-2572.	
iill >)-: NICEPKD from New Westminster (Sih Ave and 12th St. area).
I'hone 522-0395.
UIDKRS WAXTKD from Broadway
and Macdonald area Monday to
Friday for 8:30 lectures. Telephone
RE 8-4Sl!l.
It!OF. WANTED from 4th and Alma
S::'.0 classes. Telephone Sandra
731-21164.	
RIDE WANTED for 8:30 classes
from 35th and Granville. Phone
AM  1-1164 after 7 p.m.
Wanted
15
HOOKS WANTED, math. 302, 306,
308. 110. German 100. Economics
300.   I'hone   224-5603   or   922-05133.
AUTOMOTIVE   &    MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1*158 SIMCA Aronde, 4 dr., blue, low
mileage, good condition. Best offer.
I'hone 738-7909, anxious to sell.
1950   DODGE,   blue:   good  condition;
new tires.    Phone 738-4295 after 7.
Autos For Sale Cont'd.
21
>2 MERCURY. Radio, good tires,
$125 or reasonable offer. Call Dave
Stubbs. Union College. Phone 224-
">214, evenings.
1960 ALFA ROMEO Sprint, $2,200.
Contact D. Hennelly, 224-9054 between  7:30-8:30 p.m.
BUSINESS   SERVICES.
NEW DEMOCRATS
General Meeting. Convention reports and election of executive members noon today in
Bu. 202.
•    •    •
BIOLOGY CLUB
Short general meeting today
in Bio. Sci. 2321 at 12:30. John
Shelborne   will   speak   on
Typewriters & Re-pairs 42
STUDENT TYPEWRITERS^ all
makes, all prices. Free delivery.
Modern Business Machine Corp.
Ltd. 461 E. Hastings. Phone 682-
4016.
Typing
42AI
HOURLY rates. Thesis, etc. Typing.
Fast, accurate, reasonable. Will
give estimates. 254-1440.
INSTRUCTION SCHOOLS
Music
63
CLASSICAL GUITAR tuition to advanced level. Segovia technique.
W.   Parker,   682-1096.
Tutoring
64
TUTOR   wanted.   Italian   100.   Phone
CA 4-9957. Ask for Richard Cairns.
Leave  message.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
DESK AND HOOKCASE. like new.
Contact Chuck Campbell at Union
College. CA 4-5214 or UBC Local
642.
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus, student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited number. Order
from the Phrateres Club. Only 75o.
TOTEM   PRE   SALES   now   at   the
AMS office.
Diamond claims
staked at McGill
MONTREAL (CUP)—The
McGill University Geology
Club has staked the lower
campus for diamonds.
The claim follows rumors
that one of the world's largest diamond dealers is willing to build a Humanities and
Social Sciences building in
exchange for the lower campus property.
Schooling Behaviour in Fishes.
• •    •
ARTS U.S.
Arts Council urges all arts-
men to attend the bloody conference in the armories this
week.
• •    •
CHINESE VARSITY
First general meeting noon
today in Bu. 205. Coffee Party
follows.
• •    •
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Informal Russian conversation groups Monday noon in
Bu. 2208.  Beginners  welcome.
• •    •
AAC
The English 496 seminar
will meet Friday noon in the
conference room, Brock Hall.
• •    •
SCIENCE SYMPOSIUM
Meeting all Science Symposium delegates Saturday at
the home of Dr. Hugh Demp
ster, 4248 West Fourteenth
8:30 p.m.
Prairie campus
plans FM radio
SASKATOON (CUP) — The
University of Saskatchewan
plans an FM broadcasting station on campus.
The station will be run by
students but policy will be set
by faculty and alumni.
Planners are preparing a
brief to present to the Board
of Broadcast Governors for station approval.
Fall Campus
Special
Raincoats by
CROYDON
$19.95
— Many Styles —
Regularly $29.95 — lake advantage
of this manufacturer's clearance by
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH WOOLLENS
549 Granville    MU   1-4649
Open   Friday Till 9
L
Adopt the gentle new feminine look
for Fall with these sophisticated
separates by CASUAL TOGS: plain
wool Jacket, 14.95, Terylene-cotton
blouse, 10.95, and checkered wool-
skirt, 12.95, in green, sizes 8-16.
The Bay Collegienne Shop, third floor
Use a PBA for yours.
Tk^on^l^ (Kirotpattg.
INCORPORATED   2«»  IMAY   l«70.
GEORGIA AT GRANVILLE

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