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The Ubyssey Jan 27, 1987

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THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX. No. 32
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 27,1987
JuJfe-
228-2301
Grad student
charged
By VICTOR WONG
A UBC graduate student has
been charged with second degree
murder following the stabbing
death of a researcher on campus
Friday.
Zerom Seyoum, 32, was charged
in the death of Minh Trang
Nguyen. Seyoum appeared in Richmond Provincial Court Monday
and was ordered to undergo
psychiatric examination.
He is scheduled to make a second
court appearance Feb. 25.
Nguyen, a graduate chemistry
student working as a lab technician,
was stabbed several times on the
fourth floor of the old chemistry
building at 2036 Main Mall at about
9:15 a.m. Friday morning, said
police. The 32-year-old Vietnamese
immigrant was pronounced dead at
the Health Sciences Centre Hospital
at 11:40 a.m.
Nguyen is survived by a wife and
an infant child.
Campus police have recovered a
butcher knife which they believe to
be the murder weapon. Seyoum, a
fellow   graduate   student   and
laboratory co-worker, was arrested
in the building at 9:32 a.m. according to a police statement.
Nguyen was hired by professors
Richard Pincock and David
Dolphin to work with them last fall
on a National Science and
Engineering Research council
grant.
Over the weekend, Dolphin
described Nguyen as an extremely
competent, thoughtful and independent researcher. "As a person, he was very quiet but very
friendly and polite," he said.
Academic vice-president Daniel
Birch said Seyoum is an international student from Ethiopia who
began studies at UBC in September,
1986.
"This is a very tragic event,"
Birch said. "With a large organization such as ours, we have no way
of predicting or preventing
anything like this."
Administration president David
Strangway said: "It's a terrible
thing to happen, to the people involved and their families. It seems
senseless."
AIDS researchers
receive funding
By SARAH MOSELEY
UBC has received a grant of
$830,000 from the federal government to continue a study into the
transmission of the AIDS virus.
Dr. Martin Schechter, assistant
professor of epidemeology at UBC,
said Monday the main goal of the
study, the largest and longest running AIDS study in Canada, is to
understand the AID'S virus natural
history of infection.
The Vancouver Lymphaden-
opathy-AIDS Study began at UBC
in 1982 to determine why people
become infected, the mechanisms
of transmission, and how AIDS
transmission can be prevented.
The National Health and
Research Development Program
has allocated a total of $1,380,000
to the study since that time.
Schechter said "the study is providing data so people in charge of
education know what to do."
Education is definitely a means of
prevention, he said.
Bob Tivey, director of AIDS
Vancouver, said his organization
supports the UBC study. "I wish
all levels of government saw
prevention   as   important    as
research, since the AIDS virus is
preventable but not curable," said
Tivey.
The study, now continuing into
its fifth year, found that men under
30 are twice as likely to become infected than men over 30. Schechter
said younger people are at higher
risk of becoming infected with the
virus because they are not modifying their behaviour as much as older
people are.
Schecter said there are three
means of AIDS prevention. People
can say "no" to any form of sexual
contact, avoid sexual activities that
have an exchange of bodily fluids,
or use a condom. "The chance of
infection with the AIDS virus is
directly related to unprotected sexual activity," he said. The educational goal of the program should
be to promote the use of
condoms," he added. Schechter advised that anyone who doubts that a
potential sexual partner is AIDS-
free should protect themself with a
condom..
"It's not a question of morality,
but mortality," he said. The AIDS
study will continue for at least three
more years.
-  malcolm pearson photo
SFSA MEMBER MAIMS tree by stapling poster to it.The tree didn't deserve it, as it is a member of Trees for
a Free Southern Africa, but it told us it considers the poster stapling a small sacrifice to help end apartheid.
Government blasted for fee hi
The provincial government is to
blame for tuition fee hikes such as
the one Simon Fraser University
students may be facing if administration proposal is approved,
says the New Democratic Party's
post-secondary education critic.
Darlene Marzari was commenting on a proposal by SFU administrators to increase fees for
undergraduate students by 4.4 per
cent for the next school year.
"Once again students are paying
the burden that the government
should be picking up," she said in
an interview Monday.
Marzari   added   that   it   is   the
"deliberate policy of the provincial
government to downplay universities. They're anti-academic and
anti-scholastic because of the mentality of the people in power."
If approved by SFU's board of
governors in late February, the increase will raise the average cost of
an undergraduate's year to $1,410.
The hike is similar to proposed fee
increases that have been suggested
at UBC and the University of Victoria.
Ernie Scott, SFU's vice-president
of finance, said Monday he
recognizes SFU's fees "are among
the highest in the country."
When asked if the increase will
deter students from attending SFU,
Scott said: "It might. I can't say to
the contrary."
Fergus Foley, a fourth year SFU
communications student, criticized
the proposed fee hike.
"It's the shits, it's a real drag,
totally unfair. Students are
already overburdened and the
Socreds have a lot of gaul to force
the universities to raise fees again."
Some UBC students are planning
to protest the Board of Governor's
proposed four per cent tuition fee
increase at UBC at the next board
meeting on Thursday.
Students to vote on referendum
On Wednesday, Thursday and
Friday of this week, UBC students
will decide whether or not they want
President to speak on fee increase
UBC administration president David Strangway is
speaking in SUB Thursday to discuss the recent tuition fee increase proposals with students.
The open forum taking place in the SUB
auditorium at 12 p.m. precedes the 2 p.m. Board of
Governors meeting on the same day in which the fee
proposal will be put to vote.
AMS president Simon Seshadri said he is encouraging students who are concerned about their
tuition fees increasing to hear Strangway's views on
the matter.
Seshadri said he approached Strangway to address
students after speaking to a student concerned about
tuition fee increases.
"Strangway was cautiously enthusiastic. Naturally
he was concerned about walking into a hostile environment so his action is admirable," he said.
Seshadri stressed now is the time for students to air
their concerns.
"It will give the president a chance to know what's
going on in the mind of students and allow students
insight into how the procedure of setting tuition fees
work."
Some UBC students are planning to protest the tuition fee increase and the athletic fee increase at the
BOG meeting Thursday.
South African-tied products sold at
Alma Mater Society outlets.
The referendum is the result of a
petition presented to student council by the Students For A Free
Southern Africa in November 1986.
"This is a symbolic gesture — we
want UBC students to take a stand
— to send a message that they are
against apartheid and in favor df a
peaceful solution," Mary
McAlister, a member of SFSA, said
Monday.
According to AMS president
Simon Seshadri, "a lot of people on
student council don't want a
boycott, period. But they feel the
issue is important enough to be
decided by a public forum," he
said.
On the referendum question,
Seshadri   questioned   the   way  in
which South African control of a
company is defined by Statistics
Canada.
"I think students should make up
their own minds," he said. "I'm
not going to stop drinking Carling
O'Keefe products."
Carling O'Keefe and its majority
shareholder, Rothmans Inc., are
under review by Statistics Canada
to determine the extent of their current South African connections.
McAlister said that if the two companies can prove they are not South
African owned or controlled they
won't be boycotted if the referendum passes.
"We're not corporation bashers,
we're not trying to lynch Carling
O'Keefe," she said. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27, 1987
Dyer warns against war solution
By CORINNE BJORGE
"If you believe in war as a solution to problems, people are going
to die," is film journalist Gwyn
Dyer's message in his film A Deadly
Game of Nations.
The film, an examination of conflict in the Middle East, was shown
in Buchanan B314 last Friday and
accompanied by a discussion led by
political science and history professor Michael Keren.
Dyer said that Israel and
Palestine must face the reality that
the war in the Middle East, which is
being passed from generation to
generation, is becoming so firmly
ingrained into the cultures of each
side that a peaceful solution to their
problems may soon become impossible.
The film concentrates on the existing political machinery which
enables a state to stay in a constant
state of war.
The rituals that Israel and the
PLO use to initiate their young men
into the fighting forces are different
— Israel sends its young soldiers into battle with a bible, a rifle and a
wish of luck, the PLO shoot bullets
into the air in a less formal, albeit
louder, ceremony. But both
cultures use these rituals to reinforce the idea of "how noble it is to
kill and die for one's country," says
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Dyer.
The film also examines hope for a
future peace in the Middle East.
Professor Keren commented on
what Dyer considers "the illusion
of a final military victory." He said
the PLO doesn't have the military
power to liquidate Israel and said
that the solution is a negotiated settlement.
"In the last two years, when there
were attempts to go around the
PLO, to deal directly with Jorda
nian and Palestinian repesentatives,
it (negotiation) seemed positive, but
it fell through."
Keren indicated that he thought it
might be possible for Israel to deal
directly with the PLO in the future.
"The solution is within the
sphere of politics," he said.
Ooooops
In the Jan. 23 issue, of The
Ubyssey, it was reported incorrectly
that Judy Woodward is running for
vice-president. It should have read
Jody Woodland. The person
responsible has had a sex change.
Last week's editorial in the Friday
edition of the Ubyssey improperly
singled out the UBC hockey team as
culprits in the recent UAC fiasco.
Our editorial erred in lashing out at
a group undeserving of such
criticism. The editorial collective of
The Ubyssey and staff sincerely offer our apologies to the UBC
hockey team.
CAN YOU
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
President ponders library fate
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
UBC's president is worried about
the deteriorating conditions of campus libraries, according to a recently released report.
David Strangway outlines three
major challenges UBC's library
system must face in the future, in a
glossy, 44 page detailed report completed this month. He stresses the
urgent need for more space, increased funding for collections, and
a continuation of committment to
technological advancement.
In an interview Monday,
Strangway said there is a real problem with library shelf space.
"Right now our shelves are 84
per cent full while the useful limit is
85 per cent. Basically, in terms of
space, it will be a couple of years
before we can't cope. It may get to
the point where we start putting
stuff in boxes and nobody will be
able to use it."
The decline of the Canadian
dollar has hurt the purchase of collections   from   Europe   and   the
Pacific, he said.
"A mix of books and an international collection is fundamental.
And if you miss (buying some
books) sometimes you can't pick
them up," he said.
Strangway said the purpose of
the brochure is not to raise money
but to act as an early awareness
campaign.
"There is a positive message in
this report about a really great
library serving B.C. and the people
of B.C. The purpose of the document is for people to read it, take
pride and get excited about our
libraries," he said.
The report opens with a lengthy
and colourful history of the library
from its bare-bones beginning and
nurturing under the watchful eye of
John Ridington, UBC's first
librarian who served from 1915 to
1940.
In many of the subsequent pages
some of the libraries' great benefactors are pictured and described,
such as Dr. H.R. MacMillan and
Dr. P.A. Woodward.
Recession, inflation and retrenchment are discussed in a frank and
open fashion.
Strangway said the university will
be looking for money in the future.
Priorities need to be argued
through, he said.
Nobel laureate lectures
— dan andrews photo
WE'VE HEARD THAT nobody actually reads these cutlines except Phil
Laird, Artsl. Hi there, Phil!
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Today's economists would not
have predicted the great depression
of the 1930's, even with the most
modern methods, a Nobel Prize
winning economist said Saturday.
"I would have been caught by the
1929 stock market crash," said
Paul Samuelson, speaking to more
than 1000 people in five lecture
halls in Woodward IRC at the Vancouver Institute E.S. Woodward
lecture.
Speaking on The Economic
Future, Samuelson, who wrote the
most popular introductory
economics textbook and has made
Candidate runs away with burger
If hamburgers were votes,
Rebecca Nevraumont would be the
next Alma Mater Society president.
Nevraumont is running away
with the third annual AMS
presidential burger poll in the Pit
pub.
As of 9 p.m. Monday, out of a
total 75 burgers bought, 44 were
Nevraumont burgers while 31 were
purchased in the name of her sole
competitor, Blair Longley.
For a measley $1.99, students can
munch a burger bearing the name
of their favourite candidate. The
hamburgers, on sale until Friday,
feature those old standbys,
mozarella cheese, lettuce and
tomato.
Pit kitchen supervisor Bruce
Michael said he is pleased with
burger sales to date, saying it shows
students are willing to express their
opinion in the election.
major contributions to economic
theory, refused to make concrete
predictions. "Keynes and
Schumpeter didn't make correct
predictions so I won't even try," he
said.
He said Canada and the United
States have six per cent of the
world's population and consume 25
per cent of world production.
If you let people in the Third
World move to North America
where their productivity is greater,
world wealth would increase,
Samuelson said, adding that would
cut the standard of living of the
people already here.
He said Canada is now about
equal to the United States in national product per person if price
levels are properly accounted for in
the calculations. By the same
method, Europeans are nine-tenths
as wealthy, the Japanese eight-
tenths as wealthy, and the Russians
only half as well off as the average
Canadian, he said.
He said Canada has caught up
with the United States during his
lifetime: "Just half a century ago
one noticed at the Niagara border a
perceptible dropoff in prosperity."
Free trade would be good for
both countries, said Samuelson.
"We're both going to be better off
if there are plentiful transactions
both ways."
He said the American budget
deficit, while "stoking the domestic
locomotive," has leaked stimulus
abroad. Some of the deficit goes to
Main Street America's job opportunities and increased wealth but it
also goes directly to Canada, the
Pacific nations and Europe, he
said.
And the deficit has helped Latin
American countries to run balance
of payments surpluses which help
pay off their debts, he said. But he
cautioned there is a danger when
Latin American debtors are asked
to pay for the debts of deposed
regimes they no longer want.
"We are going to have to write
off some of the assets of the big
banks who were rashest (in lending
money to Third World debtors),"
he said.
Collins, Rankin insult each other
By RICK HIEBERT
Doug Collins and Harry Rankin
battled it out in a heated debate on
the merits of imposing sanctions
against South Africa in SUB
ballroom Friday.
Collins, a North Shore News columnist, and Rankin, former Vancouver alderman and mayoral candidate, managed to centre the
debate on the general topic of
South Africa, but it quickly
degenerated into name calling contests and shouting matches. The audience joined the debate with cheers
and applause.
"We have to be mad to want to
destroy the one country in Africa
that has an efficient economy and is
part of the Western tradition," said
Collins. "Change (in South Africa)
is possible, and is in fact taking
place. We're in the ridiculous position of trying to push South Africa
into chaos and nothing less will
do."
Collins said he loathed both the
South African government's restrictions on the press and the system of
apartheid. But the press, and
therefore the public in South Africa
are still freer now than they are in
COLLINS
— Jennifer lyall photo
shows audience exactly where his brain is.
the so-called frontline states that
surround South Africa.
Collins said, "we are victims of
the double standard and selective
indignation," as the West does not
impose sanctions or adopt a hard
political line against nations such as
the Soviet Union.
Rankin countered by saying Collins is a skillful talker who panders
to what he thinks the audience
wants. "In other words, the same
kind of style of Hitler."
He refuted Collins' claim that
South Africa has an efficient
economy operating in the Western
tradition by citing statistics
documenting the political and
economic inequality in South
Africa.
"He (Collins) says that the
government of South Africa is officially against apartheid. Then, the
answer to that is end apartheid
now."
Rankin said the ills of Africa may
partially be the fault of "imperialists" who "chopped it up like
so much hamburger."
"The way we can help here
(South Africa), is say we are not going to invest in your country, we are
not going to buy from your country, until you destroy the apartheid
system and let those people develop
their own humanity in their own
ways," said Rankin.
"Look objectively at what South
Africa is and do your part in ending
it. That is all that is being asked of
you. You're university students,
you're the future leaders of the
country. Make that commitment
that this university won't profit
from other people's misery."
RANKIN
matched Collins insult for insult
Jennifer lyall photo
Collins replied that blaming all
the ills of South Africa on the
whites is unrealistic. "We should
stop patting ther blacks on the head
and telling them they were the victims of colonialism. I mean, they're
big boys now and they should surely
be able to look after their own affairs."
Collins said during a recent trip
to South Africa he noticed that
sanctions had already hurt black
workers, especially those who work
in the tourism industry, "and they
have Harry (Rankin) and all the
other Harrys of the world to thank
for that."
Rankin replied that sanctions did
hurt the blacks economically, but
are necessary as they will bring
down the government. "Do you
want to live off other people's
misery?" he asked the audience.
Collins concluded by saying
South African sanctions are designed to not hurt the West as
Canada still imports strategically
important minerals. Rankin replied
that the world was not free of
hypocrisy, yet that didn't mean the
step of sanctions should not be
taken. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27, 1987
Gutless
Students will vote this week on whether or not the Alma Mater Society
should boycott South African-linked products currently sold in SUB. This
should never have been a referendum question.
We are voting on an initial proposal made by an AMS club. Students for
a Free Southern Africa, to our AMS. It is a specific proposal which should
have encouraged the AMS to develop and vote on a series of ideas, including this initial one.
Instead, our tragically inept and out of touch student council took one
specific proposal, pretended it represented all possible anti-apartheid action, called a referendum and said students must vote on it alone.
It appears the students of UBC elected a student council that is so insecure it not only believes it does not have the mandate to take action on
behalf of its electorate (to impose the boycott itself), but feels compelled to
stack the deck against its ever having to take action which mirrors valid and
wide-spread student concern.
Our gutless and apathetic AMS is depending on voter apathy and a
shamefully narrow question to stifle students' abhorance of apartheid.
Passage of this referendum requires that a majority — which must consist of at least 10 per cent of eligible voters — vote "yes" to the boycott. Informal polls indicate that eight out of 10 students favor some action by
the AMS. But do they specifically favor a boycott? And will enough of
them vote? Our AMS is well aware that apathy is usually the big winner in
student elections and referenda.
Let's refuse to accept our student council's irresponsible action. Let's
not allow them to stiff le student rage against the apartheid regime.
Vote "yes" to end apartheid, "yes" to human rights, and "yes" to
solidarity with students in South Africa.
Impotent
The provincial government still refuses to supplement the federal
government's contribution to university education. What's a Board of
Governors to do? Insist that the provincial government assume its responsibility to the people of British Columbia and invest in B.C.'s own students?
No, they prefer to squeeze the bucks out of financially strapped
students. After all, those board members have their own futures to consider. It wasn't the students who put them on the board.
When the federal government calculates its annual contribution to post-
secondary education it does so based on a formula which includes a provincial supplement. But in B.C., home of Expo debts and vote-getting
highways, we have better things to spend our dollars on. Anyway, as Pat
McGeer once said (indicating his financial astuteness) it's cheaper to import the educated from other provinces and countries than to train them
here.
It would appear that a Board of Governors would be in a position to demand a healthy system of higher education, and to represent student concerns over higher tuition to the anti-intellectuals in our provincial government. Instead, our Board of Governors accepts anti-university provincial
dictates, and forces students to pay for the board's impotence.
We urge all students to join a protest outside the Old Admin building at 2
p.m. on Thursday, when the Board will decide on the increase.
Letters
Hockey team defended
If you have a dispute with what
you perceive as an arbitrary and
generally unwanted increase in the
athletic fees I would suggest you
direct your criticism towards the
democratic process involved, and
not try to make your point through
omission of information and expression of your ignorance.
First of all, the hockey team is
only one of many teams which are
funded through the athletic fees.
Some are good and some are bad,
which I would argue is beside the
point, but you chose to single us
out.
Coaches, players, and members
of the athletic office put an extraordinary amount of effort into the
hockey program in order to ensure
that it is the best it can be. These are
good people who I know personally, and believe as I do, that varsity
sport as much as The Freddy Wood
Theatre, and The Ubyssey, (among
other things ostensibly unnecessary
to UBC) help make up the fabric of
the UBC community, and make it a
unique and rich experience.
Bad hockey? In comparison to
what? Outside of the NHL the
CIAU is comparable in quality to
just about any league, including
major junior, minor league pro,
European pro, and American College (whom we consistently beat,
and who attract crowds of between
five and ten thousand).
I find it small wonder that the
author of such crap did not have the
courage to back it up with his name.
I would be loathe to admit to such
an emission of ignorance and insensitivity myself.
Paul Abbott
arts 3
varsity ice hockey
A
THE UBYSSEY
January 27, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977
Mary McAlister stormed into the office with a handful of buttons to sell, and immediately accosted
Steve Chan, Michael Groberman, and Rick Hiebert. Victor Wong walked zombie-like through the
room, striking Paul Penner, Dave Wilkinson, and Steve Neufield as he passed.
Chris Wong, arrived, thank God, just in time explain that "ten' ;s probably "the" to Evelyn Jacob
and Svetozar Kontic. Stephen Wisenthal wrote an economics text, dnd Nancy Rempel, Louise Pan-
ziera, Wendy Morrison, and Sarah Mosely were forced to take   esponsibility for an editorial error.
Ronald Stewart, Cassandra Freeman, and Dan Andrews insisted they be recognized for achievement, and Roger Kanno, Chew Wong, and lan Robertson complained thai nothing was going on. Cor
inne Bjorge went over an important person's head, Milan Djordjevich was disenchanted, and Malcolm
Pearson left early.
Which only left Muriel Draaisma and Adonis.
SVcE93FI/lYoUM& R>UT1ClAr« §ET*lE3
fT5 £ASy/I   TUST MATCH EACH PlCTVWS  WITH THE FOLLOWN& KEY RrRioOs "V
the political calendar.1  <Df>r*t seMcsT-m <2>p*e-election a> fqst-elb^^n
Carling not S. African owned
I have refrained from commenting on a number of articles in The
Ubyssey generated by those
students involved in the anti-
apartheid movement. I have
refrained because I believe the
students are well-intentioned and
that the movement is one of many
aimed at making the world a better
place for all its' inhabitants.
They have incorrectly stated that
Carling O'Keefe is a South African
owned or controlled company.
Carling O'Keefe and its sales
representatives have been part of
your campus and community for
many years. I also believe that the
students of UBC should make an
informed decision based on facts
rather than on misinformation.
I'd like to clear up the misinformation that exists on campus about
Carling O'Keefe. Once the record is
straight and you know the facts,
you'll be free to make an informed
choice.
Carling O'Keefe is a Canadian
company that is not owned and is
not controlled by a South African
multinational corporation.
Carling O'Keefe's majority or
controlling shareholder is
Rothmans Inc. (Canada) and it
holds 50.1% of the shares of Carling O'Keefe. Rothmans Inc. is a
publicly-traded company. It has no
plants, no employees, no operations, no investments in South
Africa.
Rothmans Inc. (Canada) has a
majority shareholder — Rothmans
International pic of the U.K.
Rothmans International pic has no
employees, no investments, no
plants and no operations in South
Africa.
Rothmans International is a
publicly-traded U.K.-based
multinational with business investments in 12 countries around
the world. The Chair of Rothmans
International has stated publicly,
on several occasions, that neither
Rothmans nor its subsidiaries have
any involvement in South Africa.
Rothmans International pic has
10,000 individual shareholders, the
majority of whom are British nationals living in the U.K. Rothmans
International has no majority
shareholder.
Rothmans International has two
large single shareholders — Philip
Morris of the United States and
Rothmans Tobacco Holdings of the
United Kingdom. Rothmans
Tobacco Holdings represents an indirect South African interest in
Rothmans International. But it is
not a direct, majority or controlling
interest.
I will be perfectly honest with
you, at one time the Rembrandt
Group of South Africa did have
considerable involvement in
Rothmans but that has changed
since the late seventies and changed
significantly since 1984.
Carling O'Keefe divested of its
Black Label brand in South Africa
in 1980. It was not sold to a Rembrandt company or affiliate.
You are asked to ban or boycott a
company not for present corporate
structure and activities but for a
past involvement.
Carling O'Keefe is not part of a
South African transnational company. Carling O'Keefe is not a link
in a chain of South African controlled companies.
The submission by Students for a
Free Southern Africa to the AMS
Council is full of misinformation
and factual inaccuracies.
Choose the facts. Freedom of
choice is a precious thing. In efforts
to provide freedom to others don't
deny that same privilege to fellow
students.
Carling O'Keefe is a Canadian
company and its profits do not go
to South Africa but rather to
employing 5,000 people across
Canada and purchasing Canadian
goods and services.
Thank you for the opportunity to
set the record straight.
Dennis M. Reidy,
general sales manager,
Carling O'Keefe
Support or oppose apartheid
I'm sure that any open-minded
person who looks at the facts of
South African ownership of Carling
O'Keefe will support the boycott of
their products.
Though there is no need to dwell
on the situation in South Africa,
there are still a surprisingly large
number of people who  say  they
No to homogenized tripe
So, SAC secretary Don Bobert
thinks that UBC students "are not
interested in alternative music"
(Campus concert calendar curtailed, Jan. 20th). Well, I am a UBC
student, and 1 can tell, this
gentleman that I have never had any
time for the homogenized tripe that
the mainstream business passes off
as music on the unsuspecting
public. What is more, none of the
UBC students 1 know, and talk
about music with, are "interested"
in it either.
University education should
broaden students' horizons in this
respect too. It can only be beneficial
that intelligent young people such
as  UBC students be made aware
that there is life beyond Bryan
Adams (for example), and that it is
usually more rewarding.
I am no fan of Mr. Paisley as a
person, but 1 do think he should be
commended for his efforts in bringing some of the more original and
offbeat entertainers to UBC. Obviously, Mr. Bobert has a distorted
idea of what UBC students are "interested" in, and in light of this, it
is questionable whether he should
represent them and take such
negative, unproductive measures in
their name. Perhaps he should seek
employment elsewhere. I hear
CKLG is looking for a few good
men . . .
Marc Bonko
grad studies
abhor Apartheid, but are
mysteriously unwilling to do
anything about it. The South
African majority have clearly asked
us to impose economic sanctions, a
stand backed by 77 per cent of
black South Africans. Clearly, if we
abhor apartheid, we must support
economic sanctions.
Carling O'Keefe is a South
African owned corporation, period.
It is therefore subject to economic
sanctions. This is an internationally
recognized fact confirmed by
Statistics Canada, which lists Carling O'Keefe as a South African corporation.
Opponents of the boycott have
fudged the issue by stating that
Carling O'Keefe doesn't have any
employees in South Africa. This is
nt the point. Carling O'Keefe is
ov\ d by South Africans, they ob-
viou.-iy wouldn't have a subsidiary
in South Africa.
Despite the disinformation, I'm
sure UBC students will recognize
this vote for what it is. This i.- 1
statement of support or opposition
to apartheid, clear and simple
John Graham
anli-aparlheid network Tuesday, January 27, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Two views to help in your decision on the referendum
Stop apartheid — vote yes
By STUDENTS FOR A FREE
SOUTHERN AFRICA
"Apartheid is a very comprehensive system of racially structured injustice that was instituted by
violence and maintained by
violence."
— Archbishop Ted Scott
"/ have called for total sanctions
. . . Those whose pockets are filled
with gold from Pretoria's coffers
obviously oppose sanctions and
hypocritically pretend sanctions will
hurt blacks. "
— Winnie Mandela
Being black in South Africa
means that you have no right to
vote, no right to own land in 87 per
cent of the country, no freedom of
movement   and   no   freedom   of
assembly; it means that you might
be moved at any time to barren land
set aside as a homeland, that your
child's chance of dying in infancy
may be as high as 40 per cent and
that your income will be on average
one quarter that of a white man.
Apartheid is not simply a
political system. It is an economic
system that depends on the
country's natural resources and
cheap labor for its well-being. Companies that exploit the black majority are the final target of those who
want to force a peaceful yet fundamental solution to the country's
political problems.
The object of sanctions is this:
A principle
• The "No" campaign has focussed on the status of Carling
O'Keefe.
• The referendum does not focus on this question.
• The referendum is about a principle. That principle is: "Do we
wish the AMS to involve itself with companies whose profits flow
back to the apartheid economy of South Africa?"
• If Carling O'Keefe.does not fall within this category, its products
will continue to be sold.
• The question of which companies fall into this category will be
decided on the basis of figures compiled by Statistics Canada, a nonpartisan government agency.
• Your decision should be based on principle, not irrelevant corporate trivia (see below).
external pressure applied to South
African businessmen will and is forcing them, in turn, to pressurize the
Botha government into changing its
racist system. If enough countries
participate in sanctions, the
economy of the white-run regime
will collapse. Sanctions are the one
last opportunity to avoid a bloody
civil war and bring about  social
change.
The majority of black South
Africans support the idea of sanctions. Influential figures and
groups, including Bishop Tutu,
Nelson and Winnie Mandela, the
African National Congress, United
Democratic Front, Congress of
South African Trade Unions, Azanian   People's  Organization,   and
david goldblatt photo
FIFTEEN YEAR OLD youth after release from detention. 1985.
South African Congress of Trade
Unions, have been calling for sanctions for some time and have the
support of the black majority.
Being students of an educational
institution that not only admits international students but also commands the attention of academics
around the world, we should heed
the call of the people of South
Africa and do everything in our
power to establish a democratic and
free society within South Africa.
The vote
and why
A referendum is a decision made
by all the members of a community.
You have the obligation and
privilege of contributing your opinion, and it counts as much as
anybody else's.
By the Constitution and Bylaws
of the Alma Mater Society, ten per
cent of the day students must vote
"yes" for the referendum to pass,
and of course "yes" votes must exceed "no" votes. (Evening students
can vote too; the quorum requirement is for calculation purposes
only). The failure to reach quorum
would result in the AMS continuing
the sale of all products.
REMEMBER, YOU NEED YOUR
AMS CARD TO VOTE.
Only Canada suffers-vote no
By KIRK HANCOCK, BLAIR MERCER
AMS REPRESENTATIVES
IN ORDER TO BE JUST,
WE MUST ACTIVELY SEEK
TO KNOW THE FACTS
The upcoming referendum appears to put the question of apartheid before the students of this
university. If the issue of this
referendum was apartheid, the
following facts would not be
presented, as the question of apartheid has already drawn a consensus
from all of those polled; mainly
that the present system of apartheid
in South Africa is abhorrent and
flies in face of all democratic principles.
Instead, this referendum deals
with "boycotting Canadian companies whose country of control as
defined by Statistics Canada is
South Africa."
There are two distinct issues and
must therefore be separated in
order to avoid acting in the name of
apartheid on an issue that centers
around established foreign control.
A vote for this referendum is not
a vote against apartheid, but instead a vote against Canadians and
the Canadian economy. We all
want to exert what influence we can
against the South African regime.
But in our haste to do so we can err
unfairly. We must recognize the
need to be thoughtful when passing
judgement in order to be just. We
must actively seek to know the
facts.
In order to vote objectively on
this issue you must know the
following facts and be able to
answer the following questions.
THE QUESTIONS
AND THE ANSWERS
Q) How does Statistics Canada
define "control"?
A) Statistics Canada has a clause
dealing with the issue of "corporate
control" and the potential misuse
of that phrase:
"Care should be taken in using
the word 'controlled'. In many
cases where control is said to exist
corporations may still function with
considerable autonomy in their
financial, marketing or operational
activities. Control should be used in
the context of a potential that exists
and is exercised within the
framework of a corporate industrial
society with highly varied management practices." This states that the
use of the word "control" must be
done so carefully. From independent investigations it has been
shown that actual corporate control
in within the United Kingdom.
Statistics Canada uses a simple formula to fit a complex world and this
is not always completely correct.
Q) What is the status of Carling
O'Keefe with Statistics Canada today?
A) At the present moment the
Carling O'Keefe status is "under
review." Some of the previous data
is not correct and Statistics Canada
is looking into it. Serious questions
have been raised by outside, independent, sources as to the validity
of the previous Statistics Canada
listings. Leading corporate indexes
such as Dunn and Bradstreet's
"Who Owns Whom," do not list
Carling O'Keefe or Rothmans
P.L.C. as South African controlled
companies. Therefore, the
previously listed Statistics Canada
information should not be used as a
guideline.
Q) Who actually controls Carling O'Keefe?
A) All business of the company
is governed by the Board of Directors. The leading shareholder control of Carling O'Keefe is
Rothmans Canada Ltd.. Their
leading shareholder is Rothmans
P.L.C. (U.K.); Rothmans P.L.C.
has   no   controlling   shareholder.
T   PP1VATK
 [
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PHILIP                    [
MORRIS
SHAREHOLDEHS
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ROTHMANS   P. L.C.
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CARLING      0'
KEEFE
H
CANADA
f
 _
BY INTERNATIONAL LAW, neither Philip Morris nor Rothmans Tobacco Holdings may in any way control Rothmans P.L.C. (U.K.). Therefore,
the maximum order of control of Carling O'Keefe rests within the United
Kingdom (Britain).
Philip Morris and Rothmans
Tobacco Holdings each have large
shareholdings. However, by international law, neither company is
allowed to control Rothmans
P.L.C In fact, neither company
can appoint a member to the board
of directors. Therefore, the maximum limit of corporate control
over Carling O'Keefe is in the
United Kingdom.
As further independent corroboration, the Financial Post
newspaper analysts studied the control structure of Carling O'Keefe
and Rothmans last fall. The Post
found that Rothmans P.L.C. has
no controlling shareholder. This is
because European law dictates that
neither Phillip Morris nor
Rothmans Tobacco Holdings
(Rembrandt Corp.) can join to
become a majority voting block.
Thus in no way does any group control Rothmans P.L.C. Also, in no
way does any South African
organization control Rothmans
P.L.C. (U.K.).
Q) Do leading South African
representatives for blacks support a
ban on Carling O'Keefe products?
A) The most prominent voice for
black South Africans does not support a ban on Carling products.
S.A.C.T.U., the South African
Coalition of Trade Unions, is a
significant lobby group supporting
economic sanctions against the
government. When the representative for the union was asked
directly if a ban on Carling O'Keefe
products was appropriate, he
replied unequivocally, no. Carling
O'Keefe does not appear on the
S.A.C.T.U. blacklist. Thus, people
at the heart of the black South
African movement state that a ban
on Carling O'Keefe will not help
blacks in South Africa.
Q) Is there Canadian support for
a ban on Carling O'Keefe and
Rothmans?
A) There is no significant Can-
dian support. Many universities
across Canada have been faced with
similar motions and outright
thrown them out. A few organizations have had bans, but when faced with the full spectrum of information have immediately dropped
any bans. Such is the case with the
University of Toronto Law Society.
In a small minority are individual
groups which actively ban Carling
and Rothmans products.
On the labour front, several prominent unions have actively denounced any ban of Carling products. This is all because a ban
would directly hurt Canadian
businesses and workers. The
detrimental effects would be felt
within the Canadian economy. In
the end a fine Canadian firm would
be harmed without any effect on the
Apartheid regime. Faced with the
facts, Canadians do not support
any form of action against Carling
O'Keefe or Rothmans Canada.
Finally, the referendum before
the students of UBC does not address the problem of apartheid. It
instead, suggests punishing Canadian companies for alleged South
African involvement according to
an inaccurate source. That source,
Statistics Canada, openly admits
that its classification could well be
in error and so should not be used
as a base guideline.
The students of UBC should see
the inherent problems with the
referendum before them. It asks us
to forfeit our freedom of choice
based on incomplete and misleading
information. Your freedom of
choice is an extremely important
issue, don't forfeit it without clear
understanding of the problem
before you.
Read the facts and make an informed decision. The obvious
choice in this case is to vote NO on
the referendum. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, J
AJMS student elections  AJMS stu
Presidential
Stories written by Evelyn Jacob, Victor Wong,
Cor'mne Bjorge, Svetozar Kontic, Sarah Moseley.
The president chairs and prepares
the agenda for student council
meetings and ensures the policies of
council are properly implemented.
He or she acts as the official liason
between the student society and is
responsible for the public relations
of the society.
Rebecca Nevraumont
As my first priority, I would try
to funnel more money from
business operations into student
groups, clubs, service organizations
and constituencies.
I think a referendum on the sale
of South African products in SUB
is a good idea. If you remove the
rights of students, and let some 40
council members make a decision
on it, you're functioning in an oppressive situation. I'd support the
results of the referendum whether
or not 1 agree with them. Students
should get as much information on
it as possible.
UBC's sexual harassment committee has no students on it and I
think that's ridiculous because students are often the target of harassment. It does not appear that there
will be student representation on
the committee, and so the AMS
should form a body that performs
that function for us. It could
possibly operate under the auspices
of the ombuds office.
I support an increase in the student athletic fee levy because it is
not a large increase, and we have
one of the lowest athletic fees in the
country. But the athletic department must become more fiscally
responsible. I'd like to see the majority of funds go to subsidizing intermurals so that students can pay
less for intermural sports.
I don't like the idea of the four
per cent increase in tuition fees on
top of past increases, which have
not shown any improvement in
teaching conditions. Classes are
crowded; there are not enough
t.a.'s, labs get cut and courses are
dropped from terms. More money
should come from the government,
not from students.
Blair Longley
I would like to pursue the issue of
whether 18-year-old students have
the constitutional right to vote in
the B.C. provincial election. We
should petition the Supreme Court
for a declaration saying it is unfair.
I'm voting no on the South
African referendum because it infringes on the rights and freedoms of
UBC students. Boycotting South
Africa is more likely to precipitate
genocide than end apartheid.
Racism must be understood from
a military point of view, not a moral
one. Restricting the choice of UBC
students over which beer they can
drink is a ridiculous way to liberate
black people.
It is of extreme importance that
UBC have procedures on sexual
harassment grievances. The AMS
should formulate procedures
because the issue won't go away —
it will only get bigger. Sexual
harassment is not a unique type of
grievance, but it's more delicate and
needs more diplomacy. The ombuds office already exists to handle
grievances, but the AMS should
create a support centre or group
which is made more visible.
The increase in the student
athletic fee levy is yet another ripoff where students get a token
representation and pay and pay. If
students must pay for the increase,
then they should take more control
in decision making.
I don't agree with the four per
cent tuition increase. It would be
better if tuition was rolled back 50
per cent. It's getting to the point
where university education is an
elitist thing — it's totally disgusting
that only the wealthy will have
university educations. Four per cent
compounded forever is infinity.
The director of finance prepares
the financial statements for the
society for presentation to student
council's annual general meeting.
He or she is also responsible for
monitoring the financial affairs of
the society (the disbursement and
receiving of all monies) and must
maintain aU receipts and vouchers.
Director of finance
Speakeasy's expertise.
I do not support the student
athletic fee levy increase. I think the
AMS should be able to take a very
close look at the University Athletic
Council's fiscal plans and operations.
With regard to the university's
proposed 4 per cent tuition increase, there is absolutely nothing
we can do at this level, considering
the recent actions of the Provincial
Government, other than to express
to the Board of Governors how the
AMS feels.
Don Isaak
My number one priority would be
to conduct an analysis and comparison of the student and private
businesses that operate on campus
to see if and how they are being subsidized by student fees.
I do not think an AMS boycott of
South African goods is an issue in
this election because it is being
decided by the referendum.
To deal with sexual harrassment
complaints, the AMS should set up
a committee or allocate resources to
work   through   Speakeasy   to   use
Garth Miller
I would assist constituency
representatives in the utilization of
the Alma Mater Society resources,
and ensure those resources are
managed to the present and future
benefit of the university community.
The AMS should not make a
habit of doing business with any
company, Canadian, Chilean,
South African, which knowingly
creates and perpetuates unsafe
working conditions or violates basic
human rights. I will hot support a
boycott of Carling O'Keefe and
Rothmans until it is clearly shown
that these companies or the
revenues from Canadian companies
are being used to maintain the
status quo in South Africa.
The proposed four per cent tuition fee is high but not
unreasonable. Further increases
should be more incremental and
matched by increased funding for
the less affluent.
The student athletic fee is high
enough. Further increases must be
halted until the level of services provided is improved.
Vice-prei
My first priority is to get the
AMS budget finished earlier.
Without a budget, the AMS is spending money without a mandate.
The referendum on whether the
AMS should boycott South African
products in SUB gives studens a
chance to say how they feel about
the issue. I would take my
guidelines from the results of the
referendum even if it doesn't reach
quorum. That should be the position the AMS should take.
That UBC does not have formal
Jody Woodland
The vice-president keeps track of
the duration of each council
meeting and maintains copies of letters written or received by council.
He or she also approves AMS
budget expenditures and assists the
president.
Carol Pedlar
Don Mustard
I think it's important to improve
relations with, and services for,
constituencies on campus. I also
would like to see the AMS budget
passed on time.
I abhor apartheid, but the question is whether you believe sanctions will help South Africa move
towards a democracy. I'm more interested in what's going on on campus. Whatever the students vote
for, I'll support.
I think UBC's lack of procedures
on sexual harassment is pathetic.
I'd like to see student representation on the presidential committee,
_^_1 anuary27, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
dent elettions AMS student efec
Coordinator  of   external  affairs
Michael Moeti
I would like to put pressure on
the    provincial    government    to
reinstate student grants and look at
the possibility of abolishing student
loans. One of my strategies to accomplish this is to talk to the provincial government and members of
the opposition about student
grants.
It is totally amoral for the AMS
to continue doing business with
South African-tied companies.
Moral and responsible leadership
should be the priority of the AMS,
not only on the question of South
Africa, but on any question affecting students.
We should divest from companies whose parent company is
based in South Africa as defined by
Statistics Canada and the United
Nations.
I think UBC's lack of Sexual
harassment procedures is a reflection of another form of injustice.
Personally, I would like to see
therapeutic centres established on
campus to deal with victims of sexual harassment and to devise ways
of punishing the sexual offenders.
1 don't think the athletic committee should increase any fees.
Any attempts of the UAC
to increase the fees should be
brought before the AMS iii order to
calculate the effects this will have
on the budgets of individual
students.
1 would like to suggest that the
University consult with students in
any attempt to raise tuition costs.
because of increased costs, but
there has to be a realization that the
government can't fund all areas of
education.
I want to increase the cooperation and communication between the students, the AMS, the
government and the community. I
think it has been neglected for the
past couple of years.
If students decide in the referendum that they are in support of the
ban then I'm in full support. There
is some question as to Carling
O'Keefe's and Rothmans' connection to South Africa, but if
Statistics Canada decides they are
South African controlled company
and students support a boycott, we
should have them out of SUB.
I think there should be student
representation on the university sexual   harassment   committee,   as   a
committee will have the ultimate
authority to deal with professors or
students guilty of harassment. The
current Student Council proposes
an open committee, but there's no
way that can happen. People will
always want their privacy.
No I don't support the athletic
fee levy increase. The university
raised the fee a couple of years ago
a tremendous amount and we didn't
get any increase in services. If they
are going to do it, students should
get an increase in services.
There should be more hours
available to students in the pool.
I think it is an unfortunate fact of
life that the provincial government
has cut support for universities. It is
sidential
procedures on sexual harassment
grievances is backward and behind
the times. The ombuds office is one
avenue for handling complaints,
but if it is not adequate, then the
AMS should formulate its own
grievance procedures. Any
grievance committee should have
student representation as well as
faculty.
There is no way there should be
an increase in the athletic fee levy.
UBC athletics has basically no con
trol over their spending, and no one
seems to know where the money
goes. Some sports get little support
compared to football and hockey.
The university athletics council
should prove to us the benefits of
having an increase before we give
more money.
I do not believe in a four per cent
increase in tuition fees. I paid $630
in tuition when I first came to UBC
in 1980. This year, I paid $1,800. I
don't think any student wants an increase.
The first thing I would like to see
happen as vice-president is the
establishment of a food bank at
UBC. Other than that, I haven't
really graded the issues.
Banning South African-tied
goods in SUB should be decided by
a referendum. I can live with any
result if the referendum reaches
quorum. If the students vote yes,
then yes. If they vote no, no.
I'm not personally aware of any
sexual harassment cases at UBC,
but I don't think they don't exist. If
the Alma Mater Society wishes to
formulate grievance procedures, it
should so in conjunction with the
administration.
I don't think there should be a
hike in the student athletic fee levy.
The University Athletic Council has
shown a complete lack of accountability. The way they're acting is
disgusting.
As for a tuition fee increase, it's
not very nice, but the university will
have to get the money from
somewhere. It doesn't look like it
will come from the government.
students being the most harassed
people. The ombuds office should
take care of all student problems.
Perhaps the AMS should create a
grievance committee which could be
tied to the ombuds office.
As a member of the men's
athletic committee, I've seen sloppy
operations and a completely inefficient use of student funds for
athletics. Any increase in the activity fee level should go to intermurals
which is the worst funded area of
athletics. More facilities should be
available for students as they're
paying the bulk of the cost.
I don't think any students like the
proposed tuition fee increase.
We've seen tuition increases by 50
per cent over the last three years,
and now we have one of the highest
in the country. The effect has been
to scare off young people from going to university, especially from
the interior, who will go to university in Alberta where the tuition is
lower. We have to try and get funding from the government instead
of increasing fees; however, it's better to have a four per cent increase
now, than a 20 per cent increase
later.
too late to do anything about it this
year but if I were elected I would be
in a position to rally against it next
year.
Caroline Rigg
The coordinator of external affairs is the liason between student
organizations and must keep council informed of provincial and
federal government educational
policy. The coordinator is responsible for the preparations of briefs or
negotiations concerning higher
education for submission to either
or both the federal and provincial
governments.
Craig Lindsay
My first job would be to form a
committee that is widely representative of all students, develop some
plans with input from students, and
work towards implementing them.
There are a lot of diverse views
but I find apartheid, to be particularly abhorrent.
I personally do not believe
that a boycott would be successful
to any great degree, but perhaps it is
our best avenue for showing our
disapproval.
UBC's sexual harassment committee is not looking for student input. This obviously has been a problem swept under the rug for a long
time. There
should be an AMS committee to
look into it. Student views would be
less biased than faculty's because
students would be more willing to
look into grievances against professors .
I would have to find out exactly
where the student activity fees are
going. I have heard rumours that
funds are being misappropriated. I
have been an active participant in
intramural sports — perhaps there
could be more funding in this area,
because a greater number of
students would benefit.
The four-percent tuition fee hike
is a much more agreeable number
than the increases we've had in the
past. A lot of students are suffering
Brett Clippingdale
What pisses me off is that the
AMS Business Manager makes
$76,000 a year. Let's make it more
reasonable: $48,000 a year is still
very competitive, and it would save
us $28,000 a year. And what about
AMS student executives who make
$1,760 a month during the summer?
Most students are lucky if they can
make $700 a month, so let's make
executives' salaries more fair:
$1,500 a month at most. With five
executives, that'll save us $5,000 a
year.
Other things that bother all of us
are expensive bus passes, high student loans, and a small summer job
market. Let's get a $23 concession
bus fare pass for students.
This won't be easy. These are
challenging goals. And they can only be accomplished by someone
with the excellent business and
government conncections which I
have. I'm active in political groups,
and have friends who work directly
with the Minister of Advanced
Education.
And as vice-
president of the Debating Society, I
have the ability to persuade government, media, and community
groups to see things our way.
Director of administration
The director of administration is
the chair of the student administration commission, and acts as liason
between SAC and student council.
The director must regulary inform
SAC about the use and
maintenance of the student union
building, and ensures the policies
of SAC are properly implemented.
Nindy Duggal
I want to balance the AMS
business with the AMS student
resources. Students booking spaces
in SUB can have a maximum of
three hours time and I think it
should be expanded to five or six
hours. Clubs should get new furniture and the AMS should utilize
the ombuds office more.
The referendum will say what the
students believe in and we should
abide by that.
The sexual harassment issue is extremely sensitive. Dr. Strangway is
forming a committee to work out
procedures which is fine. Those
procedures will be given out to
studens and the AMS to review. If
the AMS tried to set up its own ad-
hoc committee it wouldn't work
because it doesn't have the
resources. We should make sure the
students that sit on the committee
are mature enough.
On the athletic fee increase, collegiate sports- are always in defecit
but the president's office made up
for it in the past. That isn't the case
anymore so students should ask if
collegiate sports are important
enough to pay for. The student
body should decide to support the
fee increase.
The tuition fee increase is fair in
relation to inflation and the GNP.
It is hard on the students but we still
only pay about 15 per cent of the
total cost of university. We have to
look at things realistically; if inflation rises tuition will also rise.
iWLVr     -Mm
Tim Bird
I've heard people say that tuition
increases are a necessary evil. I
believe these people are only half
right. Large increases are not
necessary. A four per cent increase
is reasonable; however, I don't
want to see 10-15 per cent increases
as we've had in past years.
I wouldn't like athletic fees increased for two reasons: they are
not at a level that is necessarily
high, and there is a question as to
how well the fees are being managed.
The decision on the AMS
referendum on the sale of the South
African goods is now in the hands
of the students where it should be. I
trust the students will give the issue
serious consideration and would
like to urge a good turnout on Jan.
28, 29, 30.
It seems that 10 per cent of the
student body turns out for 90 per
cent of UBC student activities.
Clubs days is an effective medium
for students to get involved. This
can lead to memorable experiences
but many students avoid these activities.
Where can you start to get involved? By coming out to vote this election. From there your interest will
grow. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27, 1987
Letters
How'd you feel?
On April 16th, 1985, I am drugged and robbed on a train in India.
Back to Delhi for the refund of my
traveller's cheques (U.S. $2,220),
American Express gives me $100
right away. On April 30th, I am
asked to wait for three more weeks
and refused any other refund. It is
only on June the 5th, i.e., 51 days
after the robbery, that I will receive
the full refund. The reason? The
stolen amount, too large, requires a
complete investigation.
Back in Vancouver, on
September 4th, 1985, I take steps to
claim from American Express US
$2,000 in compensation. I am offered US $472 with the assurance
that "American Express truly cares
about each of its customers individually." I refuse. With the help
of the UBC Legal Clinic I then take
legal action. I obtain a second offer
of Can $1,000. 1 still refuse. On October 31st, 1986, five days before
the date set for the trial, the
multinational makes a final offer of
Can $1,430. I accept. On January
9th, 1987, I receive the said
amount.
So much time and energy have
been spent in order to arrive at this
concrete result. Was it worth the effort? Hardly. To their "Think how
you'd feel if they weren't American
Express" I reply, "Think how I felt
knowing they were American Express, left with just $100 for . . .
1,128 hours."
Jean-Claude Boyer
graduate student
All letters must be hrit-t and typed
on a triple-spaced, 70-character
line. They must be delivered in person with identification shown by
4:30 p.m. the Friday before
publication to the Ubyssey office,
SLB 241k.
The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit for brevity, spelling and grammar, and libel. Sexist, racist, and
homophobic letters will not run. If
you have any questions or comments, or jusl want to shoot the
breeze, drop by SUB 241k, or call
us at 228-2301/05.
GRAND OPENING
Saturday, January 31st
LADIES SHOES
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Quality Leather
Fashionable Colours
Wide Range of Sizes
Three Unbelievable Prices!
$21.99 $24.99 $27.99
Opening Soon in Richmond
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2680 West Broadway, Vancouver
731-6774
\ Super Photo S
avings
FOR    U.B.C.    STUDENTS    AND    STAFF    UNTIL
FEBRUARY  28   WE   OFFER   FOLLOWING   WINTER
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PROCESSING:
(1) Develop and print 2 rolls — second one for half price
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OR
(3) Konica replacement film for half price with every dev.
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OR
(4) Free second set of prints (at first printing)
Bring us this ad and select your special. Ask about our
Photo Club Benefits — Monthly Photo Contests and
Special Club Prices.
FAMILY PHOTO
Your Friendly One-Hour Photo Stop
3522 W. 41st Ave. —Across from Safeway
266-3755
Open 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. except Sunday
Advertising questioned
I am fascinated by the
Ubyssey's practice of selling
advertising space to companies
like "Research Assistance" and
"Snappy Term Papers Ltd."
Doubtless the policy decision to
accept such accounts was reached after some consideration of
the moral and intellectual implications of assisting these
businesses. I have quite a good
grasp (I think) of the arguments
against participating in a com
mercial endeavour founded on
academic fraud. Perhaps you
could shed some light for me on
what some of the arguments in
favour of publishing the advertisements might be.
The Ubyssey is clearly free to
decide whose business to accept
and whose to refuse, just as the
University itself is free to, say,
seek new investments in South
Africa or commence a process of
gradual   divestment.   Having
freely chosen to assist companies
whose earnings derive from
enabling students to misrepresent others' work as their own,
the Ubyssey should expose the
reasons behind that choice so
that old-fashioned types like me
who have moral qualms about
such matters might better
understand the paper's position.
Thomas S. Woods
law 3
UBC BOOKSTORE
^SWEOTLER DAY
WED., JAN. 28th 8:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
ONE DAY ONLY
40-50
ALL STAEDTLER PRODUCTS
%
OFF
3S
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard 228-4741
Notice of A.M.S. Executive Election
Evening Polls: Wed., Jan. 28 - 4:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Totem Park — Common Block
Place Vanier — Common Block
Walter H. Gage — Common Block
Sedgewick Library
Student Union Building
Day Polls: Wed., Jan. 28 to Fri., Jan. 30 - 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
S.U.B Hebb Theatre
Law Computer Science
C.E.M.E. Sedgewick Library
Scarfe Woodward Library
Angus War Memorial Gym
Buchanan MacMillan
Poll locations and times are subject to availability of poll clerks.
BALLOT:
A.M.S. PRESIDENT
LONGLEY, Blair
NEVRAUMONT, Rebecca
A.M.S. Director of Finance
A.M.S. VICE-PRESIDENT
PEDLAR, Carol
WOODLAND, Jody
MUSTARD, Donald
A.M.S. COORDINATOR OF
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
CLIPPINGDALE, Brett
LINDSAY, Craig
MOETI, Michael
RIGG, Caroline
CRAIG, Brad
ISAAK, Don
MILLER, Garth
A.M.S. DIRECTOR OF ADMINISTRATION
BIRD, Tim
DUGGAL, Nindy
Notice of AMS Referendum to be held concurrent
with the A.M.S. Executive Election:
REFERENDUM QUESTION
"Should the AMS, after the liquidation of existing stock, stop the purchase and retail sale of
products produced or distributed by corporations whose country of control (as defined by
Statistics Canada) is South Africa?
Note: Products which will no longer be sold include:
CARLING    O'KEEFE
DRAUGHT
Toby
Miller Lite
Miller High Life
Extra Old Stock
Toby
Miller
Miller Lite
Fosters Lager
ROTHMANS
Rothmans:     King Size Filter
Extra Light KSFT
Special Mild KSFT
Dunhill: King Size Filter
Number 7:      Lights Regular
Regular
King Size Filter
Craven: Ultra Light KSZFT
Regular Filter
King Size Filter (M)
King Size Filter (A)
Special Mild KSFT (M)
Special Mild KSFT (A)
Students Require Their AMS Card To Vote Tuesday, January 27, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
O'Keefe employee says information distorted
As an employee of Carling
O'Keefe Breweries and a full-time
student, I am very interested in the
outcome of the upcoming referendum on apartheid sanctioned by
Students for a Free South Africa. I
have listened to allegations of control of Carling by South African interests and the concomitant link of
this company to apartheid. I have
been dismayed by the misinformation being circulated by the students
responsible for the referendum —
the distortion of facts and
misrepresentation of Carting's side
is incredible.
The facts as  presented by the
Financial Post (Nov. 10, 1986 edition) are as follows:
—There is a 15.3 per cent indirect
interest in Carling held by South
African Dr. Anton Rupert. This
indirect   interest   occurs   as
follows;
—European based "Rembrandt International   (whose   majority
shareholder is Rupert) has 44 per
cent voting control of Rothmans
International   PLC.    Rothmans
International has a 71.2 per cent
interest in Rothmans Canadian
operations".     "Rothmans
Canada owns 50.1  per cent of
Carling."
—Rembrandt has no representation
on  the  board  of  directors   of
Rothmans holdings.
The South African connection is
remote and in no way resembles the
state of affairs indicated by the individuals proposing the referendum. The situation appears to me
to be a smear campaign not unlike
the recent scandal wherein Proctor
and Gamble were linked (via their
logo) to bizarre religious cults.
Similarly, a few years back,
Labatt's sales were affected when a
rumour was circulated that they
were controlled by (East) Indian interests.
The alleged relationship between
Carling and apartheid does not exist. The whole question of South
African control of this company is a
non-issue that has become an issue
by distortion of facts. The referendum on which students will be asked to vote includes on the ballot a
list for Carling products to be banned (presumably to send a message to
the South African interests). I
maintain that this company is an innocent victim of a misdirected
movement. I believe most of us on
campus would like nothing more
than to see an end to an evil and unjust  regime  (viz  apartheid).   Few
FREE COMEDY
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JANUARY 28th-12:30 p.m.
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people (given the correct information) would be in favour of making
a Canadian-based company such as
Carling (employing thousands of
Canadians nationwide) the
sacrificial lamb with which to make
that statement.
Iters
In my experience with Carling I
have found them to be an excellent
employer of high integrity. The last
thing that I would want to see is
Carting's good name tarnished by
the passage of this referendum. The
worst possible effect of a ban on
Carting's products would be a local
one — possible layoff of workers if
the demand dropped sufficiently.
The message to South Africa's
apartheid regime would be nonexistent.
I urge my fellow students to vote
"NO" on this referendum since it
unjustly links Canadian-based Carling O'Keefe Breweries to apartheid.
Similarly, I urge you to remain true
to your convictions against apartheid and to look for meaningful
ways of addressing this problem.
Perhaps the AMS should sponsor a
student referendum proposing an
official position on the topic of
apartheid.
G. J. McAnulty
medicine 1
The
Price
is Right
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featuring
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Friday, January 30
8 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
Tickets: $5.00
No Minors
on sale in
SUB Concourse
at lunch
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OFFER EXPIRES JAN. 31/87
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{ NEW YORK SELTZER presents *
i PUNCHLINES!! I
MANS
CHEWIIMG GUM
IS PLEASED TO SPONSOR
"THE GREAT UBC/CANUCK SHOOT-OUT"
T**
"FEBRUARY IS UBC
MONTH WITH THE CANUCKS"
UBC Faculty, Staff and Students can by $15.00
tickets for $9.00. One dollar of every ticket will go to
Rick Hansen's Man In Motion Fund.
SUPPORT YOUR FAVORITE FACULTY!!
$$$ WIN CASH $$$
—Faculty group selling the most tickets wins $1,000.00.
—Faculty   group   whose   shooter   wins   the   "Great   UBC/Canuck
Shoot-Out gets $1,000.00.
-Champion of the Great UBC ICanuck "Shoot-Out" wins $1,000.00.
This is a great opportunity for UBC to show some school spirit, raise money for
Rick Hansen and a chance for faculty, staff and students to join together with a
common goal and even win some cash. Those faculty, staff and students
not included are eligible to be "drafted" by any of the faculty groups
competing in the "Shoot-Out" contest.
GET INVOLVED! CONTACT ONE OF THE FOLLOWING FACULTY
REPRESENTATIVES:
MEDICINE, DENTISTRY AND LAW NIGHT:
Sunday, February 1 (vs Minnesota North Stars—7:05 p.m.)
ENGINEERS NIGHT:
Wednesday, February 4 (vs New York Islanders—7:35 p.m.)
COMMERCE NIGHT:
Friday, February 6 (vs St. Louis Blues—7:35 p.m.)
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND EDUCATION NIGHT:
Sunday, February 8 (vs Calgary Flames—7:05 p.m.)
AGGIES, FORESTRY AND NURSES'
Friday, February 20 (vs Washington Capitals —7:35 p.m.)
CHAMPIONSHIP FINAL:
Sunday, February 22 (vs Toronto Maple Leafs—7:00 p.m.)
Dr. Chuck Slonecker—224-2498 Medicine
Tony Bell -228-5632 office Education
738-6350 home
Conrad Frisse—228-6175 school  P.E./Education
879-8748 home
AlHaji—263-8093 Commerce
or Brian Graham-224-8333
Brad Audette—224-6688 home Engineers
or 228-3818 school
Marny Balkan-228-3818 school
Dr. Jim Richards-228-2536 Agriculture
or Jeff Baerg-228-5085 office
228-0976 home
Pat Bryant-732-6064 home Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27, 1987
tween classes
TODAY
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Drop-in practice, 7 p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre,
HAMSOC
Guest speaker, YE7BC on ham radio in China, 7
p.m.. Brock Annex Room 358.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Regular meeting, 6 p.m., SUB 215.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Hot lunch, 12-2 p.m., Hillel House.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Jazz l/lt at noon.  Stretch and Strength from
12:30-1:30 p.m.,  Jazz I from 1:30-3 p.m.,  ali
classes in SUB  partyroom except Stretch Er
Strength in SUB plaza south.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship and discussion, all welcome,
noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
PRE-MEOICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on Obstetrics, Guest speaker Dr. Effer,
noon-1:20 p.m., Wood #1.
LAW STUDENTS LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, noon-2:00 p.m., SUB 215.
SUBFILMS
Taylor   and   Burton   in   "The   Taming   of   the
Shrew?'   12:40 and 7:00 and 9:30 p.m.,  SUB
auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Anson's Amiga Activists group, meeting, noon,
SUB 111.
WEDNESDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7 p.m., 1868 Knox
Road.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Andre's Atari Users group meeting, 4:30 p.m.,
SUB 212A.
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
A chance to ask questions or voice concerns to
Point Grey MLA, Darlene Marzari, 11:30-1:30
p.m., table in SUB concourse.
STUDENTS FOR CHOICE
Informative meeting, 12:30 p.m., SUB 205.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet ll/lll from 8:30-10 a.m.. Beginners Ballet
from 12:30-1:30 p.m.. Ballet I from 3:30-5 p.m.,
Jazz I from 5:30-7:30 p.m., all classes in SUB
partyroom — Jazz I in SUB Plaza South, Beginners Ballet in SUB Plaza South.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Dinner, 5:30-7 p.m., Hillel House.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Movie — "Take the Money and Run" — Woody
Alten, 6:30 p.m., Hillel House.
IRISH PRISONER OF WAR COMMITTEE
Video strip searching of women prisoners in Northern Ireland, noon, Grad Student Centre,
Garden Room.
AMS ROCKERS
Major meeting re: Ballroom Bash, noon, SUB
241 A.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
General meeting (new members welcome),
noon, SUB Room 130.
SAILING CLUB
Meeting for all those interested in going on the
Spring cruise to the Gulf Islands, 7 p.m., SUB
205.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
McKechnie Cup game, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird
Stadium.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner and discussion, all welcome, 6
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
CINEMA 16
(Part of the UBC Film Society.) Film presentation, "Antonia — Portrait of the Woman," 7
p.m. and 9:30 p.m., UBC SUB auditorium.
THURSDAY
STUDENTS FOR LOWER FEES
Protest rally against tuition fees and athletic fee
increases being voted on at the Board of Governors, 2 p.m., Old Administration Building.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting and discussion of projects, noon, SUB
237.
MARANATHA CLUB
Meeting, 12:30 p.m., Brock Hall 304.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Commodore members' pre-election rally,
nominations accepted by Donald, 12:30-2:30
p.m., Buch B319.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Apple core meeting, topic of discussion — How
to get most bytes from your Apple computer,
12:30-1:30 p.m., SUB 213.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting to vote on new constitution —
copies available from executive members, 12:30
p.m., SUB 212.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Jaz* l/ll from 8:30-10 a.m..Dancercise at noon,
tap from 1:30-3 p.m., all classes in SUB Plaza
South, Jazz l/ll in partyroom.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Col. James Irwin — Apollo 15 Astronaut film and
talk, "Man's Highest Flight," noon, Hennings
201.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
"Close Encounters of the Intermarriage Kind" —
session 2, noon, Hillel House.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
A talk given by Bill Porter entitled "The Signs of
the Times — What Are the Signs of the 80's,"
noon-1:20 p.m., Buch B225.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting to vote on new constitution —
copies available from executive members, 12:30
p.m., SUB 212.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Guest speaker Francis McQueen speaks about
refugees in the 80s (non-members welcome),
noon, SUB 211.
DISABLED STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, 12:30-1:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
Robb Powell will speak on "Confronting  Fear
and Anxiety. ' noon, SUB 205.
Recreation UBC presents
SHOTOKAN KARATE
Monday and Wednesday
8:00 - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday, 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Gym E, Osborne Centre, UBC
Beginners classes starting NOW
For further information
Call Rec. UBC 228-3996
"T. Ohshima - Shihan"
Tower
3616 W. Broadway
738-9520
THE PLACE TO BE FOR SUPER UBC SPECIALS
SUN.
MON.
TUE.
WED.
THUR.
25% OFF
25% OFF
25% OFF
BURGER
BBQ OR ROAST
GREEK
ENTREES
PIZZA
PASTA
&
A PINT
CHICKEN
$6.50
Special Coffees
Margaritas
Shooters
Import Beer
25% off
$1.99
$2.25
S5.95
$2.25
PLEASE PRESENT AMS CARD DINING IN ONLY 4-9 P.M.
PRIOR TO ORDERING VALID TIL FEB. 12/87      N0T VALID WITH OTHER SPECIALS
LAST DAY TO RETURN
YOUR WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS IS...
JAN. 31st
UBC BOOKSTORE RETURN POLICY
Course Books - Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by original receipt)
for full refund any time up to JANUARY 31,1987 for WINTER SESSION TEXTBOOKS. After
this deadline all course books will be NON-RETURNABLE.
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR SALES RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND - NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
a'S
STjP
Canadian Friends of Hebrew University
and
Beth Israel Congregation
Cordially invite you to an	
INFORMATION EVENING
of
Programs for Canadian Students
at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
With Professor Dov Friedlander
The Director of Academic Affairs of Overseas Students
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28th, 1987
7:30 P.M.
Congregation Beth Israel
4350 Oak Street Maccabee Room
Hebrew University will offer vou a uniaue opportunity to further your
education and carrier objectives, while enabling you to experience Israel at its
finest. For more information call 263-0413
The Hebrew University's Programs for Canadian Students
THE CLASSIFIEDS
I RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional]
lines, 60c. Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, addi-l
tional lines,  .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and  .65c.I
| Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day]
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
FREE MOVIE PASSES to "Dead of Winter"
available in AMS Business Office. Date of
showing: Thurs., Jan. 29, 8 p.m.
11
FOR SALE — Private
20 - HOUSING
30 - JOBS
SOUNDS FISHY? BUT ITS NOT. I need
promotion-oriented people for my enter-
tainment company. You can work in your
spare time &■ make extra income the funest
way possible. If you are a social organizer,
have lots of energy, and enjoy people, give
me a call. Eran 261-FISH.
40 - MESSAGES
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, Brian Toy. All the best
of the years ahead. Love and best wishes,
JOJI.
60 - RIDES
CARPOOL DESIRED —From N. Vane, to
UBC —return if possible. Will share ex-
penses. Call Patricia 985-2860 (eves).
228-2783 (days).
65 - SCANDALS
TO MY HONEY: You're the meaning in my
life, the inspiration, the sweetness.
Remember your Valentine in the Ubyssey's
special Valentine issue — send a message.
$2.75 for 3 lines. Forms available in SUB
Rm. 266.
70 - SERVICES
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m.. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 1
following the service,
A string recital by
Alice Waterman
&
Lisa Moody
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
70 - SERVICES
EXPER. SECRETARY with home typewriter,
will do research, in library or archives, of
any facts, historical or otherwise, required
by writer of university books or theses
732-0701.
STEREO AR turntable, Sansui receiver,
Avant 3 way speakers, $300 obo. Call Hugh
734-8719 before 0900.
80 - TUTORING
LGE. 1 BR. & extra study rm. Gd. floor
& own entrance. Close to UBC. Feb. 1st,
$485. 669-7788.
ROOM FOR RENT: UBC Village, 1 blk. from
campus. Non-smoker. $230 & $20 util.
From Feb. 1st. 224-2662 (John).
41st & SELKIRK. Femal share 3 bedroom,
2 bathroom house. 5 appl. & furnished. On
41st  bus  route  to  UBC.   $185.  266-2636
(Tom).
25 - INSTRUCTION
INTENSIVE HANDS-ON instruction in word
processing (WordPerfect, WordStar,
Word). 2 per class. Wordpower 222-2661.
SPANISH LESSONS. Beginners, Intermediate & Advanced. Call 224-2447 after
5 p.m.
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(PH.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m. $10/hr.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing, UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.
WORDPOWER- editing, proofing & word
processing — Custom, self-serve in eves.
Stud, rates. 3709 W. 10th at Alma.
222 2661.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a professional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing & writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud of! 324-9924.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M/C & Visa accepted.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write,  we type,  theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING $1.50 per page.
Letter quality. Theses my specialty.
Call Cathalynn 324-5921.
THE ORIGINAL fast accurate typing. $1.25
a page. Dunbar area. Ph. 228-1517.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING - essays, theses
Resumes, etc. UBC Village, behind Kinko's
Copies, 224-0763. Student rates.
LEGAL TYPING SPECIALIST, speed and
accuracy. Students discount. Near UBC.
Phone ET. 224-TYPE.
RESUMES PROFESSIONALLY prepared-
$5/pg. - student typing $2.25/dble. spaced pg. Westend Office Services, 684-9952.
JUDITY FILTNESS
Quality Typist
263-0351
WORDPROCESSING on Macintosh.
Reasonable Rates —Graphics.
Call Jack Eves - 224-0486.
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
USE UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
FOR FAST RESULTS Tuesday, January 27, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Birds end 30 yr. jinx vm
iM'^B^ii)    ON THE BOULEVARD
The UBC Thunderbirds defeated
the Lagers of Puget Sound for the
first time in 30 years in a dual meet
this past Saturday.
Both men's and women's teams
were ailing the past two weeks but
managed to recover in time to beat
their respective opponents (67-38)
and (84-26).
The women were led with wins by
Alison Gilbert (100,200m freestyle),
Anne Martin (50m freestyle),
Stephanie Brown (100m
backstroke) and Jen Good (100m
breastroke).
The   medley   relay   of   Brown,
Volleybirds
stuff Pandas
The UBC women's volleyball
team played three games in three
cities this weekend and have come
back with mixed reviews.
On Friday night the team played
in Edmonton and defeated the
University of Alberta in four games
10-15, 15-10, 15-10 and 15-7. The
win didn't come easy as UBC had to
adjust to Alberta's slower paced offence.
Saturday afternoon UBC was in
Saskatoon against the University of
Saskatchewan. The teams were involved in a few rallies, but
Saskatchewan seemed to finish
them off as they beat UBC 15-5,
15-8, and 15-11.
The statistics for the game show
that UBC had 44 kills, 12 blocks,
and four aces against Saskatchewan's 54 kills, 12 blocks, and
ten aces.
In an exhibition match against
Regina on Sunday, UBC won in
four games 11-15, 15-6, 15-8, and
15-5. Sheila Jones hit smartly in the
game using Regina's blocks to get
seven wipe-offs, and setter Amy Ku
also performed well in the match.
Sheila Jones played strongly all
weekend and had a total of 51 kills,
nine blocks, 40 digs and plenty of
aggressive serves. Rhonda Sampson
had 34 kills, 47 digs, 5 ace serves,
and Heather Olafsson had a total of
25 kills, 14 blocks and 38 digs.
Pam Walker came in for UBC
against Alberta and "shone" with a
75% average hitting efficiency.
Christiane Martin was also a big
help to UBC putting in a good
defensive performance against
Alberta and Saskatchewan with 15
digs in each match.
Despite the mixed reviews, UBC
coach Dona Baydock said UBC is
improving all of the time with its
strong areas being serving, passing
and defensive play.
^   -#  i%  f& /£   ^
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Good, Janet Oakes and Martin and
the freestyle relay of Gwen
Chambers, Angie Haveman, Oakes
and Gilbert also won.
In women's diving Melody
Smeaton took the one meter event
while Trish Murphy was second.
Murphy won the three meter board
with Smeaton second. Darlene
Travis placed third on both boards.
The men took 11 of 13 events
from the visiting Americans. Chris
Bowie (400,800m freestyle),
Turlough O'Hare (100,200m
freestyle) and Michel Hameury (1
and 3m diving) were double winners.
Steve Nordstrom (100m butterf
ly), Geoff Donelly (400m individual
medley) and Kevin Draxinger (100m
backstroke) rounded out the list of
individual winners.
Draxinger, Rob Traynor, Nordstrom, and Donelly also won the
medley relay while Clint Hirst,
Nordstrom, Draxinger and O'Hare
won the freestyle relay.
"This is the first time in 30 years
the men have defeated UPS in a
dual meet so I'm very pleased with
the results. On the women's side,
we had one more swimmer
(Stephanie Brown) qualify for the
CIAU championships. We now
have 12 of 14 women qualified,"
said head coach Jack Kelso.
FOR DELICIOUS
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Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
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OPEN HOURS:
Mon.-Fri.     11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
Sal.. Sun. & Holidays   4:00-9 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
(in The Village)
v      Phone: 224-1313      >
1st YEAR ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL!
Valid Mon.-Thurs. 'til Mar. 26/87      a
Vegetarian Dinner   $5.95    ( ~~l
Non-Vegetarian Dinner .  $6.95    feVW
(Chicken, Lamb, Beef or Fish Curry) J^A ]
Flavour of India ^
2953 W. 4th Ave.
(at Bayswater)
Open 7 davs a week from 5:00-10:00 p.m.
738-2122
S151515HI
FEN
by Caryl Churchill
A New Play by the Author of Top Girls and Cloud Nine
Directed by Roderick Menzies
(Preview) JAN. 27
Opens JAN. 28-31
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Two Shows Sat., Jan. 31 @ 5:30 &8:30 p.m.
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
The University of British Columbia
Doors Open 15 Minutes Before Curtain
FREE ADMISSION
hair and suntanning co.   i
\°    PERM SALE $
A (includes shampoo, cut, cond.)
Reg. $70, NOW  _
I -LONG HAIR EXTRA- I
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j (in UBC Village) Vi Blk. away 224-9116 |
■ 'Offer valid with presentation of this ad! Exp    Feb   13   I
I .—.:.*-- —'
LSAT/GMAT/GRE
EXAM TRAINING
Taught by Professionals and Educators
Application Essay Assistance
Local Offices & Staff
Lecture Format
Tape Library
Practice Tests
Low Tuition
Weekend Courses (Fri. evening, all Sat. & Sun.)
CI
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(604) 684-4411
ALBERTA
(403) 278-6070
oexton
Educational Centers t
414-1200 Burrard, Vancouver
FOR MEN
For smartly classic or
uniquely original clothes for
all occasions from casual to
formal wear.
The consignment shop with a difference.
5581 Dunbar St. at 40th Ave. Ph. 266-3393
Open Seven Days A Week
MOVIE NIGHT
AT HILLEL
TAKE THE MONEY AND RUN
Woody Allen
Wednesday, Jan. 28, 6:30 p.m.—FREE
DINNER: 5:30 P.M.-$3.00
UPCOMING:
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE INTERMARRIAGE
KIND— Session 2
—led by Rabbi Daniel Siegel
—Thurs., Jan. 29, 12:30
MOTOWN MADNESS—at the Montgomery Cafe
—Saturday, Jan. 31, 8:30 p.m.
—For more information, phone 224-2512
Send a message to your
sweetheart in The
Ubyssey VALENTINE'S
DAY special message
issue. Feb. 13th. $2.75
for 3 lines. Deadline for
ads Feb. 11th, 4 p.m.
SUB Rm. 266. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 27, 1987
Hoop group beats hornheads
By CHEW WONG
On Saturday night the UBC
men's basketball team crossed the
oily waters of Georgia Straight and
defeated the University of Victoria,
the   defending   national   champs,
76-72.
"It was a great win," said UBC
head coach Bruce Enns. "UBC
hadn't won there in 11 years."
Paul Johansson led the UBC attack with 19 points. Al Phillips and
Lloyd Scrub tallied 22 and 20 points
respectively for UVic.
Victoria smelled a blow-out in the
early going as they jumped out to a
quick nine to two lead. But neither
the    Vikings   highly   regarded
freshman centre, Spencer McKay,
nor the packed house of 2,600 could
dney the Thunderbird victory. UBC
closed the Victoria lead to three
points by half-time, 41-38.
The 'Birds controlled the entire
second half of the game and led by
as many as 10 points with five and a
half minutes left in the contest.
"We controlled the game from
the second half on," said centre
Mike Clarke. "We capitalized on
all of our opportunities."
UVic rallied and closed to within
two points with 15 seconds left in
the game. But two clutch free-
throws by co-captain Paul
Johansson in the din of a packed
Victoria gym, with 12 seconds on
the clock, iced the game for UBC.
"It was so noisy in there (the Victoria gym) while Paul was shooting
his free-throws you couldn't even
hear," said guard Maurice Basso.
Eric Kristiansen played an exceptional game — shooting a pure five
for five from the field, bagging
seven rebounds, and limiting the six
foot nine inch Mckay to only eight
points.
It was Kristiansen's best game of
the year according to coach Enns.
The victory ups UBC's conference record to three and two —
good enough for third place in the
tough Canada West basketball race.
Birds dig victories
UBC men's volleybirds returned
from a gruelling Prairie road-trip
with two wins out of three matches.
Unfortunately, the one loss was a
severe three to nothing pounding at
the hands of the first place Huskies
of Saskatchewan. Saturday night in
Gymnasts soar
- Steve chan photo
"LOOK PEOPLE, I can fly," says one of UBC's amazing young gymnasts.
Flying upside down is latest fad among the avant-garde crowd.
Jumper joins elites
By DAVE WILKINSON
Jim Gamlin joined an exclusive
club this weekend.
On Saturday, at the Golden Bear
Open track meet in Edmonton, the
fourth year UBC zoological student
high jumped 2.13m, the metric
equivalent of seven feet.
This height has traditionally been
the standard by which elite jumpers
are determined. Gamlin's previous
best in competition was 2.07m. No-
one else at the meet cleared more
than 2.01m.
"I couldn't have asked for a better start to the season," last year's
Canada West champion said. "The
world record (2.41m) was in jeopardy if someone had been there to
push me."
Gamlin punctuated his technically superb winning leap with a sorry-
looking flip in the pit and a warm
hug with coach Carmyn James.
James, who also coaches former
CIAU and national champion Jean-
nie Cockcroft, wasn't surprised by
Gamlin's performance but made no
predictions as to his prospects for
later in the season.
Head coach Lionel Pugh described UBC's overall team performance
as "polarized, ranging from exceptional to abysmal." Fortunately,
there were other exceptional performances besides Gamlin's.
Cockcroft, coming off an injury-
riddled season, easily won the
women's high jump with a leap of
1.78m. John Wong survived a five
hour marathon long jump event
Friday and recorded a personal best
and CIAU qualifying standard surpassing jump of 6.78m.
"I was inspired by a premonition
of Jim," he said.
Geoff Hansen was so disappointed by one of his leaps in the
triple jump that he almost walked
through the pit, which would have
disqualified the performance. He
didn't, and when the measuring
tape was stretched, Hansen had a
personal best 13.74m, 5 cm past
CIAU standard.
Team captain Kevin Godden re-
achieved standard in the triple
jump, with 14.01m while three-time
Canada West champions Boyd
Mason and Dave Wilkinson easily
achieved standards in their
specialities.
Mason won the pole vault by
clearing 4.80m, only one cm off his
personal best. Wilkinson, despite
demolishing the last two barriers in
his 60m hurdles final, finished in
8.44s, qualifying for the CIAUs by
0.30 seconds.
Frustration was the order of the
day for other Thunderbirds. High
jumpers Graham Day and Heather
D'Oyley barely missed attempts at
CIAU standard in their respective
events for the second time this
season.
Hurdler Leigh-Anne Merlo missed standard by only 0.03 seconds.
Malcolm McNeight, regularly
achieving over seven metres in practice, could only long jump 6.65m in
Edmonton. UBC's middle distance
runners were stuck in slow heats
and were not pushed; none achieved standard.
The Thunderbirds will get their
next taste of competition February
14-15 at the Canada West preview
meet, again in Edmonton.
By PAUL PENNER
A strong UBC women's gymnastics squad triumphed over
Spokane Community College in a
meet at Osborne Centre Gymnasium Thursday night.
The Thunderbird squad finished
16 points ahead of the Spokane
team in the overall standings while
Jennifer Dong (33.36), Bev Beres
(33.07), and Cheryl Ormond (32.76)
were the top three individual performers.
Spokane coach Rick Harrison
believes the UBC team is the
"strongest in ten years".
The improvement over last year
stems from a growing mental
toughness, another year's experience, and the addition of
talented newcomers Cheryl Ormond and Chrissy Mitterndorfer.
All the women have already made
the qualifying scores for the CIAU
national championships on March
sixth and seventh.
UBC coach Alena Branda said,
"the team will have a strong showing if it can remain healthy."
At the nine team Seattle Pacific
Invitational on Saturday Branda's
worst fears were confirmed as
Cheryl Ormond was injured after
falling from the uneven bars. The
extent of her injury is not known.
Seattle Pacific won the event with
the UBC team finishing sixth.
Significantly UBC did beat the
University of Calgary team who are
considered to be amongst the top
three teams in Canada. In the individual standings Bev Beres had a
strong performance to place eighth,
Jennifer Dong took the 12th spot.
Kevin Seburn and Steve McGuire
made strong comebacks from injuries as the men's gymnastic team
travelled to Edmonton and Saskatoon over the weekend. Both
Seburn and McGuire were competing for the first time since they
sustained injuries on January 10th
in Seattle. On Friday night the men
Thunderbirds won the Klondike Invitational in Edmonton as Seburn
and McGuire finished first and
sixth respectively. At the Tasio Invitational in Saskatoon on Sunday
Seburn was third individually while
McGuire placed third in the floor
exercise. Upcoming gymnastic
events will have the women's team
taking on York University and the
highly respected University of
Calgary this Friday at six p.m. at
the Osborne Centre Gymnasium.
Saskatoon, the Birds were plagued
with poor hitting, unimaginative
setting, and weak blocking. This,
combined with a well prepared and
fired up Husky squad, resulted in a
straight set loss of 15-6, 15-7, and
15-12. The Birds were led by Greg
Williscroft (15 kills), Phil Bolden
(14 kills), and Kevin Hooge (12
kills).
Bird coach Dale Ohman said,
"The loss of middle blocker Kelly
Bukowski due to an ankle injury the
night before we left really was evident against the Huskies."
On Friday night in Edmonton the
Birds opened their Prairie swing
with a hard fought three to one victory over the Golden Bears of
Alberta. After losing the opening
set 8-15, the Birds rebounded to
close out the match 15-6, 15-10, and
16-14.
Sophomore sensation Greg
Williscroft dominated this match
with 28 kills. Back-up middle
blocker Doug Penner came off the
bench to replace the injured
Bukowski, and chipped in with 7
kills, 4 stuff blocks, and 8 digs.
Ohman said, "It was nice to see
Penner display some confidence on
the court. He will be very valuable
during our stretch-run." In Regina
on Sunday afternoon, the road-
weary Birds hammered the hapless
Regina Cougars three to nothing
(15-10, 15-5, 15-13), as coach
Ohman emptied the bench. Rookie
British setter, Neil Withington,
directed the Birds attack, giving
veteran Walter Janzen 10 kills, and
Phil Boulden 9 kills. Middle blocker
Kevin Hooge came to life and
registered 5 stuff blocks.
"Nords" tops on alpine slopes
The SkiBirds had their best
results this season last weekend at
the Northwest Ski Conference meet
at White Pass, Washington.
Both the men's and women's
teams won the alpine events and the
alpine-nordic combined.
The women's team finally beat
rival SFU in the alpine combined,
mainly on the strength of their
slalom results. Elke Socher and
Michelle Johnson of SFU captured
first and second places respectively
in the slalom, but all five 'Birds
placed in the top ten.
Wendy Morrison led the Birds
with a third place finish, Marianne
Kasper placed sixth and Susan
Hagen seventh.
In the giant slalom event, Morrison finished a disappointing second, only one-tenth of a second
behind SFU's Johnson. Hagen and
Andrea Jaegli contributed to the
team score, finishing fifth and
sixth.
UBC swept the men's slalom.
Sean Jaegli won his first race this
season in 88.66 seconds, beating
fellow Birds Stu Gairns (88.97) and
David Buckley (88.13) in a close
race. Gairns won his second straight
GS title, with a time of 70.22
seconds. Buckley was second with
70.89 and Robert Bartsch of
Western Washington was third in
71.68. Rookie Bird Gerry Haag
placed a surprising fifth despite
starting in the last seed.
The Men's nordic team won both
their events. In the 3x10 km relay,
their combined time was 1:31:27,
over 2 minutes ahead of 2nd place
Pacific Lutheran. Terry Delong led
the Birds in the 15Km Individual
event, capturing third spot behind
Eastern Oregon State College's Kip
Drobish and PLU's Oystein Hagen.
Jaime Cathcart (UBC) was fifth
and Simon Koch ninth.
The women "nords" finished
2nd overall behind PLU. Siri Gjessing was 2nd behind Ase Bak ken
(PLU), while Susan Hagen placed
fifth in the lOKm event to win the
Skimeister title.
Island rvggers thrash UBC lads
This past weekend UBC's
rugby lads succumbed to a 30-0
thrashing at the hands of the
Vancouver Island team.
Captain Roy Radu joined the
ranks of UBC's sidelined first
stringers before the end of the
hard hitting contest. Starters Bill
Petrovas, Jeff Knauer, and
Craig Brumwell are also lost to
the roster, putting a sizeable
dent in the strength, depth, and
game strategy of the team.
Despite such a lop-sided score,
Coach Barry Legh was pleased
with his team's ball handling.
"Unfortunately we did not
win the bait often enough to
score, and by the second half,
the size and weight of the Reps
wore us down."
The loss leaves UBC with a
zero and three record in the six
game double round robin competition. Vancouver Island
should win the title as they
presently possess a five and zero
record.
UBC next sees action at Home
against the Fraser Valley Reps.

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