UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Dec 4, 1981

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128288.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128288.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128288-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128288-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128288-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128288-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128288-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128288-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128288-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128288.ris

Full Text

Array ^^^^r^^^m
A Life in
imbo
Eduardo Contreras will spend seemingly
endless hours in contemplation this
weekend, flirting with the kind of future
only the condemned can imagine. It will be a
restless time. He barely has room to pace in
his converted storefront apartment on Main
Street, cluttered with snapshots of his wife
and son still in Chile. But there he will wait,
until a telephone call interrupts the roar of
the Monday morning traffic.
Nine learned men will make a decision
that morning, in an august chamber thousands of miles away. At best, the justices of
the Supreme Court of Canada will grant a
reprieve by agreeing to hear an appeal of
Contreras' case. If
they decide not to
. . . well, that's
what Contreras
has all weekend to
mull over. It is his
last legal recourse, except for a last-minute
reprieve from the federal immigration minister.
Contreras' only crime has been his failure
to convince an immigration appeal board
that he has reason to fear persecution in his
native Chile. The board decided not to grant
him refugee status, meaning he could be deported to Chile. Meaning the nightmare is
not yet over.
Contreras was raised with his three brothers and three sisters in the Pacific coast city
of Valparaiso. At 15, he became active in
the Chilean Socialist Party, putting up
posters and electioneering. He continued his
studies, earning a diploma as an industrial
The Agony o^
Eduardo Contreras
BY TOM HAWTHORN
mechanical technician. After graduation
Contreras became more active in union matters, working as a steel fabricator and
welder for the city's port administration.
All that came to an end on Sept. 11, 1973.
The military, led by General Augusto
Pinochet, staged a bloody coup. Socialist
president Salvador Allende was killed. The
army began mass arrests.
Contreras was caught in an early sweep.
He was interrogated several times. He saw a
soldier who refused to punish a prisoner killed as a warning to other soldiers. At one
point Contreras faced a firing squad. A gun
was levelled. On the command, "Fire,"
Contreras was struck, not by bullets, but
with a rifle butt to his face. He came to on a
truck on its way to the Maipo, a ship docked
in Valparaiso harbor. There he was beaten
with rubber batons. One of his friends on
the ship was murdered. After five days he
was taken to a military academy on shore,
where he was again beaten and tortured.
On his release he visited several friends in
the Socialist party, destroying whatever documents linked them to the party or union activity. He was again arrested a few weeks
later and, again, beaten.
Contreras was sometimes strapped to a
metal bed frame with electric prods on his
fingers and genitals. Released, he went
underground, finally escaping by bus to Argentina. There he successfully applied for
refugee status with the United Nations in
1974.
Contreras decided to return to Chile in
February, 1976, even though it meant relin-
See page 5: EDUARDO
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIV, No. 32
Friday, December 4,1981
228-2301 Page 2
THE   U BYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1961
Cut Your Study Time
By 2/3!
□
We'll show you how...free.
Would you like to:
□ Raise your grade average without long hours
over texts.
□ End all-night cramming sessions.
□ Breeze through all your studying in as little as
1/3 the time.
□ Have more free time to enjoy yourself.
□ Read 3 to 10 times faster, with better concentration, understanding, and recall.
Evelyn Wood works — over 1 million people,
including students, executives, senators, and even
presidents have proven it. A free 1 hour demonstration will show you how to save hundreds of
hours of drudgery this year (as well as how to
increase your speed immediately with some simple
new reading techniques).
It only takes an hour, and it's free. Don't miss it.
SCHEDULE OF FREE SPEED READING -LESSONS
You'll increase your readinq speed
up to 100 % on the spot!
CALL 985-9594
ANYTIME
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS
© 197B EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS A URS COMPANY Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
One maid-a-weeping, loudly
By EVE WIGOD
Dec. 25.
Dear Diary. V$r\fr w&jf *&0
Today mine own True Love hath sent me a
partridge, replete with pear tree. Although
'twas postpaid, I received a notice advising
me to retrieve it, as home delivery was not
possible. P faith, I felt rather a spectacle as I
carried the gifte through the streets of the
towne. Ne'ertheless, I was delighted by the
softly clucking creature. By my troth, I have
already spent several hours hearkening to its
strange soliloquy, which remindeth me of my
dearest Charles' own pleasant banter.
Dec. 26
Dear Diary, tatty **$!*/? Vir\fr
Received on this day the kindly giftes of
another partridge and pear tree as well as two
wond'rously enchanting turtle doves, from
my True Love. Albeit my Love is mistaken
about my int'rest in ornithology, I do truly
appreciate these thoughtful presents. With
two doves and two partridges, my home doth
ring with sweet, melodious birdcalls which
divert me from the drudgery of keeping
house.
Dec. 27
Dear Diary, v&p Vfty k*&0
My Love's present was the same as yesterday's, but with the addition of three
beautiful French hens. Dear Charles! I know
he meaneth well, but methinks he is
something misguided in his intentions. O
misfortune to both of us that he thinketh still
of Daphne, his former love. She was indeed
an appreciator of birds, and eventually wedded a plumed ostrich.
Dec. 28
Dear Diary, iHty Vlty vfgf
Today Charles hath sent me four calling
birds, in addition to yesterday's sum. I now
possess four partridges in pear trees, six turtle
doves, six French hens, and these newly-
received calling birds. The latter do call out
dreadful things, to each other, to hapless
souls who pass by, and to me. Why, earlier
today, I did hear them proclaim unto each
other the latest scores of the Grande Game
which took place in Fairfax Meadows. To a
couple passing by the window did I hear them
call to him: "Thou base and vile villain!"
and to her: "Thou deceitful, ugly wretch!'
And truly did I hear them refer to me as an
"ill-bred wretch!" And truly did I hear them
refer to me as an "ill-bred slattern." In sooth
I know not what I have done to bring such
vengefulness upon me!
Dec. 29
Dear Diary, ta&fUMtyVtty
Went to the post office today with a goodly supply of bird cages, expecting Charles'
theme to be the same as the preceding days.
There were indeed many winged creatures
awaiting me, but I was pleasantly surprised
by the addition of five, highly-polished, 24
carat golden rings. On the way home, I
visited ye olde jeweller, who hath assured me
that the rings are not sham; e'en that, in
faith, they are truly worth a minte.
My house is in a constant uproar. What is
more, 'tis frightfully hard to clean, and I
must labour several hours together to banish
the doul smell from the place. Tho' I try to
keep the creatures in their cages, they will
often escape and fly about. That silly Charles
hath many a fine, romantic notion. I cannot
help but muse apace, howe'er, upon his lack
of practicality.
*nfyn*tfyr Vlty
Dec. 30
Dear Diary,
Woe betide me! Charles, that knavish
rogue, hath sent me six geese a-laying. A
plague o'er his house! As if 'twere not
enough to have six partridges (in six pear
trees), ten doves, 12 hens, 12 calling birds,
and ten golden rings (Well, the latter per-
turbeth me not so much). You may be sure
that I have tried to notify that foolish
Charles, to beg him send no more giftes, but
it seemeth that his number is unlisted.
Dec. 31
Dear Diary, W&pvtty wty
Alas, the winged creatures are restless, and
I   cannot   bear   to   keep   them   confined.
Therefore, I have freed them, and they have
not ta'en to each other. O how unnatural
deeds do breed unnatural troubles! Along
with this day's expected accrual of fowle, I
have yet received more! Seven swans
a-swimming were sent to me by that scoundrel, Charles. 'Tis a pity the nearest lake is
wagon to pick up one partridge in a pear tree,
two turtle doves, three French hens, four
calling birds, five golden rings, six geese
a-laying, and seven swans. In addition to this
motley company, I was met by eight maids,
who were, simultaneously, a-milking eight
very obese cows. I ordered them to walk with
several miles hence, for I am forced to set     their beasts to my home, as there was not
them a-swimming in the bathtub, and they
tend to o'ercrowd it.
Jan. 1
Dear Diary, Vlty Vlty vf$f
Rode to the post office today in a hay-
room enough  for the  16 of them in my
wagon.
The gentle, bovines are far kinder to me
than the insipid calling birds, but their maids
are all evil and malicious women. They
possess the audacity to set up their milking
stools anywhere in my house, including the
kitchen, the dining parlour and the lavatory.
More oft than not, there is one maid and cow
in each room, and I can obtain no privacy
whatsoe'er. The lowing of the cows, bickering of the maids, ridiculing of the calling
birds, cooing of the doves, 'singing' of the
partridges, honking of the geese, and clucking of the hens doth nake a firghtful dinne, as
well as a colossal messe of my abode. What is
more, the pungent odor of livestock is quite
overwhelming! The devil take that
rapscallion Charles!
Jan. 2
Dear Diary, Vlty *W*V **&.*
Today that contemptuous Charles hath
cursed me with nine ladies dancing, as well as
yesterday's quota of creatures and rings.
These women accompanied the maids on
their pilgrimmage to my home. The ladies, I
fear, are not admirable dancers; they spun
awkwardly across the towne in the manner of
whirling devishes, and continue to do so in
my home. Mercifully, they utter nary a word.
Unmercifully, though, they nary cease their
"dancing".
Jan. 3 ■ ■
Dear Diary, W^W**"*iV W-V
O weladay! O woeful day! Charles, the
wretched, rash, intruding foole, hath
presented me with ten lords a-leaping! In
sooth, the lords are quite handsome young
men, but methinks their rambunctious leaping a trifle hyperactive. The have ta'en affection to the nine dancing damsels (tho' none
dare go near the churlish milkmaids), and the
tenth has ta'en to a-leaping after me,
throughout my abode. By my troth, I have
tried to escape, but the fat, heavy cows
blocketh   both   my  doors,   and  refuse  to
budge!     See page 12: TWELVE
The legacy of Ebenezer
By CHARLOTTE OLSEN
The night was quiet, huge flakes of snow
wafted slowly to the already white streets,
and fireplaces crackled with friendly fires —
it was a perfect Christmas Eve. The four old
men, business acquaintances, were sitting in
the library of their club, sipping cognac and
reminiscing about times gone by.
"Nights like this," said one, "always remind me of a Christmas long, long ago, when
a man I knew had one of the strangest experiences. This man, Matthew was his name,
was well-established. He had a wife and two
fine children, and a very successful business.
He worked long hours and rarely took a
vacation — probably the secret to financial
success.
"This particular Christmas Eve, Matthew
had worked late into the night as usual. On
his way home, he passed an old woman who
was selling roasted chestnuts. She looked
cold and weary and a little strange in the
head. 'May the spirit of Christmas be with
you, Sir,' she said.
"Now, Matthew was not one to carry on
conversations with street people; he believed
one should give them money, but one didn't
try to have an intelligent conversation with
them. However, this night Matthew decided
he'd humor 'the old bat' as he said. So he
asked her what the spirit of Christmas was.
" 'Surely you know Sir,' she replied. 'The
spirit of Christmas is what made Scrooge
become a wonderful man.'
" 'Fairytales, that's all you ever hear at
this time of year,' Matthew scoffed. 'You
should speak of the spirits of Christmas, the
ones everyone drinks to the point of excess.
That at least would be realistic'
"Well, the old woman looked at Matthew
somewhat strangely. Somewhere Matthew
heard wind chimes — or he thought it was
wind chimes, but the night was still just like
tonight. The old woman began to speak
again and as she spoke, her voice seemed to
grow softer and softer.
" 'I know you,' she said. 'I know all about
you. You are a man of today, someone who
has succeeded in life and who will become
even richer. You are reaching for the gold
ring and you may even catch hold of it. Ah
yes, I see nothing but financial success for
you.'
" 'I also know,' she went on, 'that you
provide the best of everything for your family. The finest house, the best clothes, lavish
gifts at Christmas and birthdays. Your
children will go to the best schools in the
land. No one can say you don't do your
duty.'
" 'That's right, old woman? Matthew
said. 'I do what's right, I take care of my
family and I have never forgotten an important date. You can't accuse me of being a
Scrooge.'
" 'Ah, Sir, but who was Scrooge but a man
who lost sight of the meaning of it all? You
are so caught up in succeeding that you have
forgotten to share. It's more than giving
lavish gifts, it's more than putting fine food
on a table. You don't share yourself with
your family, they don't know you at all. You
don't have any real friends, do you? Just acquaintances.'
" 'You don't play with your children, do
you even know how old they are? You don't
share your thoughts with your wife, do you
even tell her you love her?'
"Matthew was beginning to feel dizzy.
This old woman had to be crazy, or maybe he
was the crazy one — she looked younger than
she had before. And there was that wind
chime again. What in blazes was going on?
" 'What do you know, crazy woman,'
Matthew yelled. 'My life is fine. You are the
one who should be worrying about life. Look
at you! You're poor, you have to stand on
corners selling chestnuts in the cold.'
" 'Yes, I'm poor but I have a better life
than you. For I have known the warm love of
a family, I have shared rny life with many
good friends. It's the quality of life that matters, Sir, not whether you are poor or rich.
And the kind of life I'm talking about cannot
be bought, even with all your money.
" 'To have the kind of life that's worthwhile,' she said softly, 'it means you have
to give of yourself.'
" 'You don't know anything,' Matthew
argued. 'I'll still be here long after you're
gone, I'll be living the good life for many,
many years.'
" 'I know more than you can imagine,' the
woman said. 'I too will be here for many,
many years. It's true that you will live what
you call a good life for a long time. You will
have money, more than you need. And you
will be warm and comfortable in your fine
home.
" 'But your children will not know you
and you won't know them. They will leave
you one day, as will your wife, and when you
finally see that what you have now is not
what makes life worth living, it will be too
late. There will be no one there to care.'
"Matthew had had enough. He turned on
his heel and started to walk away. A little way
down the street he glanced back, but the old
woman had gone. The night was very quiet,
just the snow falling and the sound of a wind
chime somewhere in the dark."
"Good Lord!" said one of the other men.
"Tell us, Mr. Capson, do you know what
happened, or is that the end of the story?"
"Well," said Capson, "Matthew thought
about the old woman for a while and decided
that she was one of those crazies who seem to
come out of the woodwork during religious
holidays. Who would believe a tale like that?
"So Matthew lived his life the way he
always had. And he became very rich, a
leading citizen one might say. Funny thing
though, his wife died about ten years later
and by that time his children had grown up
and gone away. He hasn't heard from them
for years. They don't seem to care."
The clock on the mantle struck the hour,
and Capson said he must be getting home.
The men finished their cognacs and said
goodnight. Capson started walking home.
Down the street he came upon an old woman
selling roasted chestnuts.
He heard a wind chime.
"May the spirit of Christmas be with you
Matthew," the old woman said.
"And with you," he answered softly.
"Merry Christmas."
I Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1981
SE SuperN&lu
Friday, Dec. 4 to Sat., Dec. 12
CLOVER LEAF RED
SOCKEYE SALMON 220g
KRAFT PEANUT BUTTER
750ml
UNICO STUFFED
MANZANILLA OLIVES 250 mi
CHRISTIES ASSORTED
SNACK CRACKERS
MAYFAIR SLICED
BACON 500g
PAR KAY MARGARINE
3 LB.
3250 W. BROADWAY
Y-W.lwTIN
$2.99
79c
10%OFF
REGULAR PRICE
$1.35
$2.19
INTERESTED IN
MANAGEMENT
CONSULTING
Arthur Andersen & Co.
Arthur Andersen & Co. is seeking 1982
graduates preferably with backgrounds
in commerce, science or engineering,
for the management consulting division
of the Vancouver office. Our consulting
division deals mainly in management information systems for both large and
small businesses. Submit an original or
photocopy of your personal resume
(UCPA form is suitable) by January 15,
1982 to the Canada Employment Centre
on Campus, Brock Hall.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You
will be contacted around the end of January regarding interviews. Additional
information is available at the U.B.C.
Canada Employment Office.
.Arthur
Andersen
<&»
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Vancouver • Calgary • Winnipeg • Toronto • Ottawa • Montreal Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Bargaining unit
backs TAU
contract demands
TEACHING ASSISTANTS . . . 400 vote at International House
-srnold hedstrom photo
By ARNOLD HEDSTROM
Teaching assistants strongly supported strike action to back contract demands with the university in
a strike vote held Thursday.
But the positive vote does not
mean teaching assistants will be
walking of the job, said Teaching
Assistants Union president
Jonathan Katz.
Negotiations resume today and
the union, armed with the support
of the bargaining unit, will ask
university negotiators to come up
with an offer either tomorrow or on
the weekend, according to Katz.
"We are looking for a settlement
and that has always been the line,"
said Katz. He added he hoped
union members would have their
retroactive pay in time for
Christmas.
But three issues remain unresolved. The union is asking for $7,200
each eight month school year, compared to the university offer of
$5,835.
The TAU is also demanding
quality of education and union
security clauses for the 1981/82
contract.
The university opposes the union
security proposal which makes
teaching assistants and markers
members of the union after a
specified period of time if the prospective member does not sign a
form presented at registration
declining membership.
The only unresolved issue during
contract talks last year was the
union security clause. The union
held a strike vote which was narrowly defeated on the issue.
"I  don't think  I could justify
signing a memorandum of agreement without union security," said
Katz. Katz said if the university
agrees   to   union    security   the
membership will likely accept a
lower wage offer than $7,200.
But he said a good wage offer
from the university may entice the
union to drop union security until
next year.
After negotiators bring the university offer back to the union
there will be a general meeting of
the membership Katz said."
If the university's offer is unacceptable the union has not ruled out
the possibility of strike action and
has the support of other campus
unions, he said." If they (the
university) say 'so what,' there are a
lot of people who want to give them
trouble."
But Katz told teaching assistants
in physics Wednesday that job action does not seem likely.
"Hopefully we can fulfill our objectives without a strike," he said.
Meanwhile, a petition to decertify the union gained minimal support from 400 bargaining members
who cast ballots at the International
House polling station.
Petition organizers set up a table
at the polling station because of difficulties in contacting teaching
assistants.
Physics graduate student, John
Affinito started the petition because
of union security.
Affinito objects to taking the initiative to not join the union rather
than totally voluntary membership.
"What I object to is all these free
riders riding on the back of our
work," said Katz.
The TAU ran an extensive campaign to assure the positive vote,
which included publication of a
four page tabloid newspaer, information tables in the graduate student centre and contacting by
phone or in person members of the
bargaining unit.
The Agony of Eduardo
From page 1
quishing his refugee status, because word
had reached him that party members had
destroyed his file at the Intendencia (city
hall). He married Andrea Cortes Ovando,
and they had a son. He found work with
Empresa de Transportes Colectivos del Es-
tado, the national transportation company.
Meanwhile, Contreras continued his political activity in secret, the Pinochet regime
having outlawed the Socialist party and all
non-government unions.
Some workers at the transportation company formed a secret parallel union, deciding to go public by offering to buy the company and operate it as a cooperative after
rumors circulated that the government
planned to sell the firm to private interests.
Contreras was one of seven the workers
elected to make the representation.
Three months later, on April 30, 1979, he
was arrested and held without charge for
three days. Again, on Aug. 20, he was held
without charge. Security officers visited his
wife while he was under arrest, asking her
whether he had stayed in Argentina. Contreras says he was severely beaten and tortured. "They made me go in a small room
where there were three policemen, civil
policemen," Contreras told the immigration appeal board. "They had their faces
covered; they started to interrogate me only
about the meeting we were going to have on
May 1.
"They were very careful when they were
beating me up, they were trying not to leave
any marks on me. The system they use more
is a wet sack and on top of that they beat us
up; to run with that, applications of electrical shock."
Released on Sept. 25, Contreras decided
to flee. He was convinced the government
had discovered his former refugee status in
Argentina. With the aid of a friend in the
passport office, plus some borrowed
money, Contreras boarded CP Air's Oct.
27, 1979 flight to Vancouver. Refused visitor status, he applied for Convention refugee status under the 197(f Immigration Act
as someone with "a well-founded fear of
persecution for reasons of race, religion,
nationality, membership in a particular
social group or political opinion." This,
too, was refused and the case was taken to
the immigration appeal board.
In a stunning decision, board members
CM. Campbell and W. M. Hlady ruled it
"perfectly reasonable" for the Chilean government to detain Contreras without charge
on volatile historical dates — May Day,
Chilean Independence Day and the anniversaries of Allende's election and the coup.
"In the atmosphere existing at the time,"
Campbell and Hlady wrote, "it is reasonable to expect authorities to exercise control
over dissidents on those national political
anniversaries. As a union activist who surfaced making an offer to buy the transportation company, it was perfectly reasonable
to expect his detention at such times." As
well, the two members rejected Contreras'
claims of torture during the 1979 detentions
since he bore no scars.
"The whole regimen of torture has become sophisticated," says Vancouver lawyer Stan Guenther, who represents Contreras and will appear on his behalf before
the Supreme Court on Monday. "I mean,
you're just not going to have scars — 'hat's
the reality." the board decision was
'ludicrous," a "travesty," he said, which
reflected the members' ignorance of the
Chilean state of affairs.
Immigration minister Lloyd Axworthy
has received requests from the NDP, the
Canadian Labor Congress and the B.C.
Federation of Labor for a ministerial permit allowing Contreras to remain in the
country. "I am appalled at the decision
taken by the appeal board," NDP justice
critic Svend Robinson wrote to Axworthy,
"particularly in light of certain sentiments
that were expressed by members of the
board which fly in the face of cherished
principles of civil liberties and democracy as
we know them in Canada." The decision,
he added, sets "a very dangerous precedent." CLC president Dennis McDermott
told Axworthy that to refuse Contreras a
permit "is to accept the standards of a universally condemned dictatorship as those of
our own country."
The appeal board ruling was not unanimous, though. Member Bruce Howard argued in a long dissenting opinion that Contreras — "a young man with a cause . . .
consistent with what some men have always
done in such circumstances" — indeed
faces further detention and possible torture
if returned to Chile. Howard describes
Chile as "a country of the damned where
the sane are periodically immured in government-run asylums and madmen keep the
keys."
A bizarre twist to the case, which raises
serious questions about the role of the Canadian embassy in Santiago, involves a
statement signed at the embassy in 1980 by
Contreras' wife. The declaration, throughout which Contreras' name is misspelled,
states that he didn't participate in political
activity, suffered no persecution, and came
to Canada to find work. Contreras testified
before the board that he had told his
wife to always deny knowledge of his political activities to avoid persecution herself.
The declaration was a major factor in the
board's ruling, although its acceptance as
evidence had Ovando testifying against her
husband. And Canada's refusal to grant
her visitor status — which is why she originally went to the embassy — meant that
Guenther was unable to cross-examine her.
On Oct. 7, the federal court of appeal upheld the original decision after a hair-splitting discussion about whether Contreras
was detained for his opinions or his actions.
The Immigration Act does not mention actions. When lawyer Guenther recounted
how Contreras was detained at the time of
political anniversaries, Justice David Ver-
chere asked, "Isn't it done in all countries
all the time? Even in Canada it's done, isn't
it?"
*     *     »
The living room is no more than six feet
across, looking very much the store display
area k once was. This Mount Pleasant
apartment was once a florist's shop. Now
the only flowers are two Remembrance Day
poppies, each holding up a corner of a color
poster of Salvador Allende.
It is not a good day for Eduardo Contreras. He has just been laid off from his
job as a crane operator at Burrard Yarrows
shipyard. That means the monthly cheques
he sends to his wife, Andrea Cortes Ovando, and his two-year-old son back in Chile
will be smaller for the next while. He has
been laid off because of another bureaucratic hassle with the immigration people —
since his case is not in court under appeal,
although it has been applied for, Contreras'
work permit has been revoked. It is not the
first time he's had this problem since he arrived here two years ago. He'd really like to
find a job welding, but he will not be able to
get his ticket until the immigration problem
is solved.
Contreras looks much older than his 33
years, but it is hard to know if that is because he has not seen his wife and child for
two years, or because of his tortures, or because he does not know from one day to the
next whether he will be allowed to stay in
this country.
Contreras has dreams of rescuing his
wife, but he doesn't share them for fear of
endangering her life. He would like to go
back home, like the time he returned from
Argentina. "I could have left for any country (from Argentina), but I decided to go
home," he says through an interpreting
friend. "At that time I was single and I was
very concerned about the Chilean situation
— as I am now. My wish is always to be
close to my people.
"If necessary I will leave the country. But
there is something that really enrages me,
because Canada says it is a democratic
country that is censoring the violation of
human rights, but in my case, in the courts
. . . they recognize the torture, the imprisonment, they recognize every persecution
from the junta that I had, but they accept it
because it only happened around historical
dates. It is very important to try and break
the hand of the Canadian government in
this decision."
There are at least another dozen known
cases of Chilean refugees in the same predicament as Contreras, and he is aware of
the significance of his battle. But if he loses
. . . what country would take him? asks his
interpreter. Maybe Nicaragua, since he
knows a trade and would like to aid the
revolution there. But no other comes to
mind. Chile would be certain imprisonment, or worse. And there is always the
thought of waiting, like some condemned
murderer, for a ministerial permit to arrive
at the last hour.
And so, this weekend Contreras will consider his options, while waiting for Guen-
ther's call Monday morning about the Supreme Court decision. For better or worse,
it seems the uncertainty — of working, of
his family, of living — will soon be over. He
will not much longer be, as he calls it, a
"limbo person." Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1961
THE UBYSSEY
December 4, 1981
"What's it going to be then, eh?"
There was me, Mark Leiren-Young, and my three droogs, that is Arnold Hedstrom, Scott McDonald
and Craig Brooks, Craig being really a babbling brook, and we sat in the Lethe Milkbar making up our
rassoodocks what to do with the evening. The Lethe Milkbar was milk-plus mesto, and you may, 0 my
siblings, have forgotten what those mestos were like, newspapers not being read much these days.
Well, what they sold there was mHk-pkis, that is plus something atte, there being no law against prodding the old moloko with some of the new vesches, so you could p-eet it with Kootnikoff in a moloko
Lawrence, or you could have a Draaisma of Muriel in your Duncan Alexander, or you could have
venloon in a Bloody Marianne, which is what wa were drinking.
You could beet it in your Kathy Collins with sundarajan or corinna or one of two other vesches which
would give a nice quiet horror show 15 munttes admiring Eve Wigod and All Her Holy Angels and
Saints in your left shoe with lights bursting all o^er your mozv- Or you could peet milk with knives in it,
as we used to say, and this would sharpen you up and make you ready for a bit of the old ultra-bad
taste. It wasn't too many minootas before wa ittied out of the mesto to slooshy some starry veck
creeching under a bridge. We viddied it waa a burbling old pyannrtsa, or drunkie, howling away at the
filthy songs of old CUP conferences and going blerp blerp in between as though it might be a filthy
staff meeting in his stinking rotten guts. I could never stand to see a moodge all filthy and rolling and
burping and drunk, whatever his age might be, but more especially when he was really starry like this
one was.
"Can ye spare some cutlines, me borthers?" Verne McDonald rasped, and I rammed by em-ruler
cane into his guttiwuts. "Go on, do me in, you bastard cowards, I don't want to live anyway, not in a
stinking office like this one."
"Oh. And what's stinking about it?" I said. He croaked, "It's a stinking world because it lets the
young get on to the old like you done, and there's no consistency of style no more. What sort of world
is it at all? Freds banning, Margarets copping, Gregs all over Fjetland while sheriffs are shaffin at the bit
and Gene Long spinning around the room like he might be a midge round a lamp and there's not no attention paid to consistency of style no more." Then he started singing again, so we got hold of him and
cracked him with a few horrorshow t ole hocks and a Carl Kochak or two, then went our merry way into
the nochy.
It was round by the condemned casino that we came across Glen Schaefer and his four droogs, who
were preparing to practise a bit of the old garbage in, garbage out on the copy of a weepy young
devotchka, Kate Friesen. The moloko was working real horrorshow and we were feeling less miriam
sobrino than sandra goodey and were ready to vred or oobivate some chellovecks, the knives making
us more than a malenky bit Marting Strong. This would be real, this would be proper, this would be the
nozh, the brrtva, the Dirk Sion, not just fisties and boots.
I said, smiling very wide and droog ie; "Welt, if it isn't stinking Glen Scheafer in poison. How art
thou, thou globby pot of John Boyling chip oil? Come and get one of in Tony Jochlin, if you have any
Robguzyks, you Al Banham, thou." There were four of us to five of the, like I have already indicated,
but poor old Craig, for all his dimness, was worth two of the others in sheer inertia and dirty copy. Hee
soaked Chang, while Arnold with a shive of his nozh made Charles redden with kroovy and Scott broke
a piece of mickwood over Dale's keim. Lawrence panyched and ran off real skorry, leaving grahzny
Glen to me. I felled him with a telephone book and we were soon doing horrorshow, putting boots to
gullivers, when I slooshied the sirens and know the millicents were coming, with pooshkas pushing out
to the carla pavans' windows st the ready, but we had ookadeeted before the rozzes could lovet us.
It was time to do some autocrasting, so we checked the neil parkers outside a sinny where a Stanley
Kubrick film was playing. We passed over a Steve Morris grabbed a lowslung Roseanne Morgan. Soon
there was a nice warm vibraty feeling grumbling all through my guttiwuts. We fillied round with other
travellers of the night, playing hogs of the road, hearing evan mcintyres creeching as people smashed
through fences into lan Timbertake to join Bog and his Angela in the Pat McLeods. Soon it was winter
trees and dark, my siblings, with a country dark. What we were after now was the old surprise visit.
That was a real kick and good for smacks and lashings of the old ultra-bad taste. We came to a house
with a sign outside saying TRUTCH, a gloopy sort of name, and I ordered my droogs to shush their giggles and act like serious.
Bill Tieleman sat at the typewriter, putting the final touches on his magnum opus. The doorbell rang,
its tones being the first chords of Inna-godd-a-da-vida. "Who can that be?" he asked while the camera
slowly panned over to Julie Wheelwright. "I'll go see," she said. Inna-godda-da-vida rang out again.
Julie came to the door and opened it a crack. "Who is it?" A gentlemanly type goloss answered,
"Help, please, Mizzus, there's been a terrible assignment. My friend is lying in his lege and is in need of
quotes. Could we use your telephone?" Julie hesitated, then said, "I'm sorry, we don't have a
telephone, you'll have to go somewhere else." The voice became more urgent. "But Mizzus, it's a
matter of libel and death."
Bill called from his desk, "What is it?" Julie turned from the door. "It's a young man, or maybe a
leiren one. He says there's been an assignment. He wants to use the telephone. "Bill felt another of his
periodic attacks of liberal guilt. "Well, I suppose you'd better let him in." The door burst open and the
four droogs charged into the room, smashing furniture, crashing into people, spitting, drooling and
vomiting. It was several minutes before Bill and Julie notices. "We're not having a party tonight, are
we?" Julie said, then the droog with the exaggerated nose (the others were wearing masks) spied the
desk and typewriter. Mark read the slug on the top sheet of paper.
"It's a feature you're writing," he said, making his goloss very coarse. "I've always had the greatest
admiration for them as can write features. "Alumni chronicles 60 years of vilest rag." That's a fair
gloopy title. Alumni being plural, it should be 'chronicle' and no other word, O my sibling." The nadsat
chelloveck scanned with his glazzles over the page and began to smack. "The Ubyssey? What sort of
gazette is that?" He began to razrez the pages with the em ruler in his cane and Bill creeched from
where Scott was holding him on the floor with his rookers behind his back, platching that his life's
work was ruined and boo hoo hooing while Craig and Arnold forced Julie to put on more and more
clothes. Mark halted the homing and guff ing of the others and snapped his fingers in time to a different
drummer. "A one, and a two . . ." the four sadistic malchicks started with a barbershop harmony of
Listen to the Rhythm of the Falling Rain, then switched to a falsetto version of Raindrops Keep Falling
on my Hear. Bill and Julie tried to scream through their gags, their eyes wide, but Mark only liered and
guffed at their struggles. "Slooshy welt, my little siblings, slooshy well," he grinned and began booming out My Love Comes Down Like Raindrops. For Bill and Julie, the night became one long hell.
We were all feeling that big shagged and fagged and fashed and commiebashed, it having been an
evening of some small evergy expenditure, my siblings, and we repaired to the Lethe Milkbar intending
to get some spatchka soon after, for we were grosing malchicks and had classes in daytime. The
milkbar was fuller than when we had gollied out and there were a few starry vecks and cheenas among
the nadsats, laughing and govereeting and not caring about the wicked world one little bit.* There was
Helen Yagi, Greg Mittag, Craig Yuill, Ross Burnett and some other sophistos from the darkroom
around the corner. Just then the disc on the stereo twanged off and one of these devotchkas, Alice
Thompson, suddenly came with a burst of singing, and it was like for a moment, O my siblings, some
great turkey had flown into the milkbar, and I felt all the malenky hairs on my plott standing endwise
and the shivers crawling up like slow malenky lizards and then down again, then a little lower and then
up a touch and to the right, aaahhh. Because I knew what she sang. It was Gimme Dat Ding, eight
choruses, second through fifty lines.
But old Craig made with lip-music and I broughnt the em cane down across his beeper-answering hand
real hard and skorry, so his smacking turned into a creech. "Why'd you do that?" he platched.
"Because not having the dook of an idea how to comport yourself, publicwise, 0 my sibling," I
answered, "I don't like you should do what you done then. And I'm not your sibling nor comrade no
more. Kroegers. Great hairy Paul Kroegers to you. I'll meet you oozy or drippy anytime." I spoke quiet,
viddying him carefully. "Watch that. Do watch that, Craig, lest I nominate thee to the AMS executive
again." The anger on his Ittso faded and his rot drooped, then he skazated slowly: "Right, right.
Doobidoog. Carl Lum. Rubadub. Billybeer. Best not to say more."
Where I lived was with my dada and mum in the flats of Laputa Fat block 18A. It had been a wonderful evening, and as I put on my gorilla costume and readied myself for bed, I knew just what I wanted
to make it complete. I took the tape of the music of Brian Jones out of the stereo and put in I'm Going
to Buy Me a Dot by the Monkees, first album, twelfth song. Oh, bliss, bliss and heaven. It was
gorgeousness and gorgeousity and Gary Brookfield made flesh and I knew such lovely pictures, Brian
de Groos painting Janet Whyte against a background of Wendy Cumming to the forest of David Mar-
wood in a frying saucer amid a nuclear holocaust while in the foreground John did a Kula dance in a
weed skirt. It waa like one Hot Flaah after another, it was a bird of like rarest spun heavenmetal, or like
silvery wine flowing in a spaceship or Steve McClure's head, gravity and newstyte all nonsense now.
My pee and em, being a veck and devotchka named Tom Hawthorn and Debbie Wilson, knew
enough to take their sleepers when I put on my malenky concerts of Jackson Five and Herb Alpert, but
they arose before me, my siblings, to be off to their jobs at the Ministry of Truth and the propaganda
factory. My dada often wondered what I did nights, but my mum would sooth him with soft slovos of
how I was "probably doing odd firebombings here and slogan painting there, and smashing the state a
litte, like he says." I got up much later to what I thought was an empty house, but was surprised to vid-
dy Keith Baldrey, the socialist worker who'd been assigned to me.
A real gloopy nazz, that one. "I hear that you've been involved in some unpleasantness, yea?" He
tried to pull my leg out from under me and I countered with a hold behind both his knees. "The
millicents have nothing on me, sir." I twisted around to try getting him in a half nelson but he ducked
and caught me on his hip. "Oh, no sources will identify themselves, everything's off the record, there's
no decent quotes; but word got to me through the usual rumours. I'm warning you, Marie, next time
it's not going to be the NDP club. Next time it's going to be the barmy place, the inkstained hole, and
all your education gone to waste." He pinned me and got up, breathing heavily through his rot like he's
just been lubbilubbing. Reaching without looking at a glass by the bed, he drank it down, then gagged
and choked. The glass contained nothing but water.
I goolied over to Sedgewick in my best horrorshow platties to pick up the Donny Osmond disc I'd
put on hold. While Kerry Regier went away, grumbling, to get it, I saw two ptrtsas flipping idly through
the W'section. "Who are you going to get?" Sylvia Berryman asked Helene Littman. "The Wongs,
Chris, Joe and Mina, or Clear the Track, Here Comes Shack by Kent Westerberg?"
I took them to my room and played my Cowsills and Partridge Family records until, begging for mercy, they were forced to riddy The Brady Bunch and Eight is Enough with me until my unusual needs
were satisfied. I was feeling relaxed and horrorshow when I proceeded down the stairs to itty out into
the coming notchy. To my surprise, my droogs were waiting for me. It seemed they had been hatching
some plans in their gullivers and no mistake. Scott explained while Craig nodded and worked furiously
at his calculator. "It's the big big big big money we're talking about," said Scott. "I was talking to Sue
the Cadney and she told me about restaurant reviews and big big big big sports and big big big big ads.
We go around shopcrasting and commiebashing and the like, and what do we get for it? A pitiful
Continued on page 8
THE DINER
Serving U.B.C. and West Point Grey
for the last 23 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices — including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sundays B- Public Holidays
4556 W. 10th Ave. - 224-1912
We accept Chargex ■
i
\
1
I
r
i
i
i
i
i
In SUB
Basement
• Varieties of Sandwiches
• Hot Snacks
(Including Samosas)
• Pastries
• Cheeses
• Juices, Milk, Yogurt
#
Wild
Yup, it sure is something,
right? But hold on, buster,
there's none of that stuff here!
Just 15 blast-my-socks-off
burgers, fair prices, and tons of
other great stuff. So keep
your hands to yourself!
2966 West 4th Ave., open
from 11:30 a.m. seven days a week.
Opening soon corner of
Georgia and Hornby. (Yuk, yuk.)
Hairlines gives
students a break!
1A0/n OFF our regular prices
ii /0 Monday - Wednesday only
%
(Student I D   required
Combining top professional hairstylists
with a very comfortable atmosphere.
Cuts  -    Men S15 00     Women S22 00
Perms -   Men $35 00     Women S40.00 and up
Streaks.color, hennas and conditioners also competitively priced
2529 Alma St   at- Broadway Mon -Fri   — 9 00-7 30
^Telephone: 224-2332 Sat   - 9:00-5:
H  AQIA  SOC
UBC   Scuba   Diving   Club
■pi  Courses   Start:
Jan 12* Feb 8*9
Course Fee: $155 (plus Aqua Soc Membership). Includes text, workbook,
NAUI log combo, Dacor dive table, min. 6 open water dives, 6 lecture and
6 pool sessions.
SIGN UP FOR COURSES AT THE AQUA SOC CAGES IN THE BASEMENT OF SUB
SNUGGLE UP TO GREAT SOUNDS
THIS CHRISTMAS
At a Special Holiday Price!
AM/FM portable stereo receiver. Quality workmanship, light weight design, with rich stereo sounds
just like your home unit.
You've got to hear it to believe it!
This is a limited offer available on a factory-to-you
basis. So don't miss these spectacular savings.
Factory warranty included.
We guarantee our price is the best. If you find a
comparable unit at a lower price, we will gladly refund your money.
Enquire about the other fine Martin-Tone sound products including AM/FM Stereo Cassette, Stereo
Cassette Player, and FM Stereo Cassette.
ONLY
$42.95
PRICE INCLUDES
HEADPHONES
MARTIN TONE
A SOUND COMPANION
A Division of Byblos Enterprises Inc
#220-1070 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C. V6H 1E7
Phone 738-7727 Friday, December 4,1981
THE    U BYS S EY
Page 7
Findley is not compromising
By CORINNA SUNDARARAJAN
Timothy Findley, author of The Wars.
That's how he is introduced these days, and it
is an important distinction. He has written
one of the best novels of the decade, a critical
and popular success, and now with his fourth
work, Famous Last Words, he is in the
peculiar position of having produced another
first novel, another test. If it succeeds, he will
be a confirmed literary leader; if it falters, he
will have to fight his way back again from the
literary wastelands of his first two works.
"It's like learning to dance," he confides.
"You work for years killing your body and
you think 'I'm not getting anywhere.' Then
one day after all that hard physical labour,
there comes a moment when suddenly it all
falls into place and you are a dancer."
He sees The Wars as that moment, when
sweat produces a triple pirouette. "After
each performance, you face the unknown. I
don't know, maybe this time I've hit a
quadruple!" He is sitting on the edge of his
chair, waving acrobatics of cigarette smoke
into the air, and laughs at his own animation.
Findley is a conscious artist, willing to
sweat at his craft. He wrote two different versions of his recent novel and was beginning a
third when he realized he needed a narrator,
a unifying force. He chose Hugh Selwyn
Mauberley, a prefabricated persona from
Ezra Pound's 18 suite poem of the same
name. "The astonishing thing," explains
Findley, "is that the poems contained a lot of
the elements of my novel," including the
decisive creative act of etching words into
plaster.
This image of conscious craftsmanship —
not scurrying writing but deliberate etching
— characterizes Findley's art. Maclean's
.William Casselman once praised Findley:
"In a forum ringing with the clack of easy
typewriters and the back-thumping of glitzy
cynics, where words like style, art and committment are booed off stage . . . Timothy
Findley still cares about his work."
Findley hesitates. Disappointed by the
failure of his first two novels to elicit critical
response, he once explained "I was saying
what I had to say, but not in a way that was
capturing anyone's attention. The Wars is
more deliberately crafted to get read."
"I don't see that as a compromise. I
haven't altered my impetus or style. I've
clarified them," he adds.
He sits back in his chair, thinking over his
response. He has to be more careful now.
Successful writers aren't trusted, especially in
Just clarifying
Canada. He leans forward again. "You see,
my job as a writer is to be read. But I'll go on
saying what I have to say until I drop."
This seems to be a sensitive issue for him,
because he has finally achieved recognition in
a profession epitomized by the starving artist.
But although he defends his success, he does
not indulge in it. He is open and genial, obviously at ease with the frantic pace that has
become his daily routine for the last month:
readings, luncheons, autographing sessions,
and three interviews a day, from hotel room
to hotel room across Canada. It is his second
run through the publicity gamut and he has
changed — gone is the slightly affected curly
coiffure and the soft-spoken reserve of his
first tour. Timothy Findley, author of The
Wars and now Famous Last Words, speaks
confidently with a humorous awareness of
his reputation as a 'serious' writer.
In short, he feels he has earned his success,
and having disciplined himself to continue
earning it, he is hurt by sceptical criticism
aimed not at his works, but at his motives.
"I think of the money cynical people like
the Rolling Stones make. They sit back and
say 'I think it's time we roll in more money.'
And all they have to do is flick their fingers
and millions of dollars come at their beckoning."
Surprisingly, he is not so much infuriated
by the Stones' minimal labours as by their
cynical attitude. "Jagger's attitude it literally
'Fuck off!' That somehow we, having given
him his millions, have done something terrible to him. But when he wants more, he just
comes back and says 'Fuck off again and we
all go screaming."
Findley stops and smiles at his own
vehemence. "What if I did that? I could have
millions. No, not just millions — 1 could
have an audience."
But he looks down at the book in his lap
and continues in a serious tone. "So there
you've got my dilemma. If I were to do that,
I could have an audience grovelling at my
feet, who probably wouldn't understand,
what I was really about, but that wouldn't
matter. They'd be there and they'd be mine."
As it is, he earns his living the hard way.
Facing a near capacity crowd of 200 students
at UBC last Tuesday, Findley sallied his own
introduction as an icon of Canadian
literature with a bland "Hi. And who are
you?"
The audience tittered nervously. Then with
brisk professionalism he launched into his set
speech, but just as the audience settled in
comfortably, he stopped, turned and dug into his coat pocket for a long ragged green
scarf, setting it carefully around his neck.
"I'm very affected" he explained, blander
still. He began wearing the scarf at his first
readings because it was cold, but now several
hundred miles later it has become a moral
necessity.
Findley is, then, both confident and hesitant, as though he disassociates himself from
his works in a way that allows him to frank!)'
admire his past accomplishments but decline
coasting on their impetus. Each novel is a
new test. "I want to be a writer," he states,
and it is revealing that he speaks in future
terms. "I want to roam little worlds of fiction
and sound alarms."
Alarms sounded later that evening as
Canadian literature specialists assembled al
the faculty club to nibble on wine, cheese and
Timothy Findley. He arrived late from an
autographing session downtown and never
did manage to penetrate through the crowd
to the centre of the room. Instead he was interrogated on the threshold all evening.
His Famous Last Words ("I hope not" he
joked) has been criticized for its similar
threshold state: neither fact nor fiction. Asks
one professor "How do you reconcile
Mauberley's omniscience as a fictional narrator with his limited knowledge as a
historical participant?"
Findley tips back on his heels as if to
muster authority and explains "I suppose I
could have added a passage where Von Rib-
bentrop explains all to Mauberley, but that's
a cop-out."
"To reality?"
"To the reader. It's an insult to the
reader's creative imagination that he cannot
reconcile the problem for himself."
A satisfied murmur ripples across the
scholarly crowd who turn from Findley back
to the cheese. He seems relieved, admitting
he has learned more about his novel by
defending it than by writing it.
"I've written about fascism because it's
here and it's threatening us again. But I'm a
novelist, not a historian. A documentary
history is parenthesized between two dates,
but a fiction novel is never over — that forces
people to understand its wider implications."
Findley writes episodically not, he claims,
because of his experience in theatre and
television, but because: "That's how I see.
People walk in and out of my novels like they
walk in and out of life." His writing suits the
cinematic style so he feels as comfortable
creating several episodes of The Newcomers
and The Whiteoaks of Jalna as his novels. It
appeals to his sense of accomplishment that
having written The Wars he was also commissioned to write the screenplay for the film,
which will be released this spring. Recalling
his 15 years of acting experience, with actors
such as Alec Guiness, Ruth Gordon and
Tyrone Guthrie, he jokes: "I'll also be playing the title role of Robert Ross."
It's not such a far-fetched idea. Findley
has been involved in nearly every field of
Canadian arts, including ballet. And now, at
51, he is touring the country in the role of
author.
He admits to feeling on display, but he insists "You have to live in the real world,
because that is where your book has got to
survive. Writers used to be able just to write,
but now they have an obligation to their
publishers to help sell." For emphasis he
adds "The cost of this entire tour would pay
for two full-page ads in one newspaper. End
of story."
Nonetheless, Findley is not a glitzy seller.
"If he had his way," laughs Bill Whitehead,
close friend and co-scripter with Findley of
the television version of the National Dream,
"he would sequester himself entirely on our
farm." Whitehead is a large and friendly
figure, a talented radio broadcaster who on
this tour is happy to shadow Findley,
remembering names, times ana room
numbers to help unclutter his friend's
spotlight. He also tells humanizing anecdotes: "Tiff is in trouble with the management of the Bayshore Inn. He keeps feeding
the seagulls breadcrumbs from the patio and
now the hotel's overrun with them."
This kindly image gives a student courage
to push through the crowd, clutching a copy
of Famous Last Words, and ask for Findley's
autograph. He signs "Timothy Findley" but
then with a characteristic clarification he
resigns the title page "Hugh Selwyn
Mauberley." Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4, 1981
Short storv
The Sunken Hatchet
By DIRK SION
If you were to be a guest at my
house and if you were to stay there
long enough, you would eventually
slip down into my basement to see
what it is like.
It would be an unpleasant visit:
you would smell rotting and decay;
your eyes would rest upon dust and
filth everywhere they turned; and
there would be rats all about you,
all moving with slow, sluggish steps,
their tails leaving thick marks on
the dusty cement.
But in the middle of all the rot
and existence, surrounded by this
scene of fascinating horror, a
sunken hatch would present itself to
you. About one edge of the hatch,
imprinted on the dust covering its
rotting boards, you would see hand
marks, suggesting to you that someone had lifted the creaking lid
and searched its womb. Perhaps
you would be adventurous enough
to open the hatch yourself to learn
its secrets.
But to open the hatch would
mean death, for there are three dogs
down there that would maim and
kill you. Only I can go down there
unharmed.
When I open the hatch and slip
past the threatening dogs, 1 sink in
warmth and euphoria. My house
disappears; the dogs melt; the world
becomes mist and shimmers into
oblivion. It is wonderful, like a bottomless tunnel that has no boundaries. Naked I swim through this
sensuous sea.
Suddenly I am in a balloon of
light, walking through an infinite
museum of miniatures. I nod a
greeting to the faceless usher there
and move from display to display,
examining everything there is to see,
from you undressing to the next
universe. I do this, all the while
laughing, grinning, frowning, crying, but never really caring.
However, there is one thing that
interests me more than anything
else in that museum: a velvet-like
bag that lies in a shadowy corner.
What is in the bag, I do not know,
for the faceless usher never lets me
come near it, saying, "There is
Nothing in that bag, only Nothing.
You do not want to see." And
when I plead with him, he simply
takes a pin and bursts the balloon
of light and 1 drown in euphoria
Frustrated and disappointed, I
swim back to the hatch, past the
now sleeping dogs, and drag my
dripping body onto the dirty cement. Utterly wretched with the
agony of returning to the rotting
and the rats, I moan and tear my
hair, until, unable to move and
physically exhausted, I fall asleep.
But one day I shall open the
hatch and go down there armed
with a knife, and I shall kill those
dogs and kill that faceless usher and
look into that bag and see.
Your hairs
on fire
Okay, so the headlines a lie.
But while you Ye here
just imagine our 15 monstrous,
gigantic, scrumptious, creative
burgers; our huge, crunch}*
salads, and other great stuff, too!
Yummy.
2966 West 4th Avenue at
Bayswater. Open 7 days a week,
from 11:30 a.m. till God knows
when.
Sow the truth: there's a
hamster in your pants.
From page 6
rookerful of cutlines." I could see there would be trouble, but I kept my thoughts to my oddy knocky.
"And where do we get the big big big big money?" Scott's litso split into a grin. "There's this place out
near the uni, it's like a Wheelnouse and during the mushroom season there's no one there but this one
baboochka and these white cats. The house is like full of storylists and like features on leisure sports
and like treasures beyond Mary Prioce." After some senseless but tastefully slow motion violence
caused by my hearing the glorious third verse of They Call Him The Streak through an open window,
we were off to the crast.
Yvette Stachowiak heard the doorbells play the chorus of Snoopy's Christmas. "Doug Schmidt?'
she said clearly and distinctly and distentangled herself from the exercise bicycle, striding to the door
across a carpet of cats humming Hooked On A Feeling. Ooga chugga ooga chugga. John Knowles
what happened next, but the outcome of it all was your humble narrator, my siblings, found himself
tricked by his grahzny droogs, left tolchocked and creeching on a doorstep, moloko mixing with the
red red vino coming out of my rot and litso, while the rozzes closed in and charged me with conspiracy
to sing Bobby Sherman songs to helpless animals. But that was not all. Barry Steben and Mike Hirsch
were giving me the routine editing when Baldrey arrived. "This is the end of the road, Mark. The end of
the road, yes? I've just returned from the Wheelhouse, yes? Your victim is sitting listening to Sylvia's
Mother." He spat in my face. "It's the indstained hole for you."
So it was your hero found himself in Staja 241k and a nasty vonny place it was, too. It was full of
criminally lefty vecks who'd like to get their hands on the malleable gulliver of a young malchickiwick
like your author. There was Keith, who'd as soon Lovatt you as look at you, and hardbitten types like
Nancy Chew. On arriving, Mike McLoughlin, the merzky head chasso, took pains to inform me there'd
be no ftllying and that I wasn't there to have a choodessny time. Seeing I must get out of Staja 241k, I
played up to the prison charlie, a George hermanson, govereeting to him a much as I could how much I
doubted the Good Book of Bog and His Angels and saying "I have tried to be right thinking and collec
tive, have I not?" But still he would not help me to get into a program I'd heard of, the Campbell technique, which would cure you of individualism. It wasn't until a member of the cooperative coordinating
collective polttburo came to inspect the reporters in my cellblock in the Staja that I got my chance.
"Look at them. They'd as soon see their stories killed as run, every one of them," said Eric Eggertson
as he strode down the ranks. "You're a slime licking goat turd," I bellowed.
"Shut your stinking gob," shouted Pat Burdett, but Eric offered him a joint and persuaded him to
mellow out. He looked me over. "Purple prose. Undisciplined. You'll do fine." After two years in the
Staja, I was told I would soon be writing freestyle. Mike ushered me into the press club to hand me
over to a mild mannered man in a lab coat. "Watch this one," he told Charles Campbell. "He's a right
brutal writer and will be again, in spite of his sucking up to the chaplain and reading the style guide."
Campbell took me to a room where I was fed on nice limticks of pizza and had some beer to peet, then
he gave me a bunch of mushrooms. "Vitamin-enriched, will they be?" I asked. "Something like that,"
he answered, he told me the treatment was that I'd viddy some bound volumes. He opened the first
one and as he did no, Bruce Campbell threw a fiendish device around me that would not allow me to
focus my glazzies on any vesch but the yellowed pages of the gazetta in front of me. All the time I was
viddying, he held a veer in front of my mouth, letting me have a drop every now and then.
At first the volumes were horrorshow, with an atrocity on almost every page. But soon I began to
feel dizzy watching the dreariness of "Air, Air," I gasped, but they ignored me. Then I noticed while I
was looking at a Pango Pango in an issue on concentration camps that the CITR speaker was on and
the music was a Bay City Rollers mnarathon. "No, no, no, no. You can't do this to me," I creeched,
thinking I'd bo bezoomney. I heard Nancy Campbell's voice behind me. "What is the matter?" she asked, "the music," I managed to govereet. I heard a murmured conference, then nancy called to me
again. "You call that music?" My mozg was bursting and my yahzick was stuck to the roof of my
mouth. "Yes, Yes. You can't do that to lovely, lovely Saturday Night." There was another murmured
conference. "Believe us, this is for your own good."
I told Nancy when she brought my pizza and mushrooms about the sickness that came over me. "I
don't understand it. I never used to feel bolnoy when I viddied the old ultra-bad taste in newspapers. I
used to feel real horrorshow." Nancy told me to eat more muchrooms. "It's not natural to like things
that aren't run strictly as a collective," she said. "You're learning that. Your body's learning that. Soon
you will look on all non-collective decisions with revulsion. Then yo'll be cured and can leave the Staja,
a Heather Conn no longer."
It was soon after, O my siblings, that my graduation took place. I was led out in front of a bunch of
starry, vecks and baboochkas and Eric made a nice speech, then Glen Sanford came out on the stage.
He pulled out a piece of paper. "Is this > ~m story?" he said grinning real droogy. "Why, yes, sibling," I
answered. 'By due process of the staff and cooperative coordinating collective politburo, your story
just happens to have been killed. Scratched. Right, right?" He tore it up in front of me, and when I tried
to object my gulliver spun again and all I could say was "Yes, of course. It's a piece of shit." Everyone
applauded, then Nancy Campbell came out. "Say something sexist, you idiot worn," she purred, but 1
couldn't speak and it seemed my guttiwuts might come up through my rot. Everyone applauded again
and Nancy got a curtain call when I brosayed my cookies all over my nogas.
Suddenly George, the Staja charlie, leaped to his feet. "This cannot be hailed as good. The young
man, and a leiren one at that, has lost his ability to choose between right and left. Is this God's way?
Does God have any particular way to do things? Probably not, I think. God likely knows there's more
than one way to skin a cat, especially if the Diety has spent much time at it and I believe we can
postulate a Diety to have eternity at its disposal, that is, if we accept an a priori Diety, summa cum
laude, cognito ergo transit gloria. At any rate, supposing free will exists, a daring choice in itself, then
dissent must necessarily occur, not only within society but also within the communities, companies
and collectives that make up that society." Some of us, including your hero, were disturbed by what
he said, but Eric passed around some joints and everybody mellowed out. Then I was let out of the
press club and into the wicked wicked world.
But my jeezny did not go horrorshow, for I found that my pee and em had taken in Erica Leiren and
there was room no more in my domy for a Young chelloveck. Then Verne McDonald recognized me in
the Pit and when I tried to get away, gagging at the sight of him, Kevin McGee got his noga between
my legs tripped me. Maurers and Fords and Gainors and Bockings creeched and spit at me. It was old
age having a go at youth as represented by your humble narrator.
They were finally pulled off by whgo but my old droogs Craig and Scott, who had a good smeck viddying me in my razrezed platties. "Baby Huey," I crie. "It's not Baby Huey no more," said Craig. "It's
city desk to you now. And this is the sports editor," he said, pointing to Scott. They began criticizing
my ideological matrix and cutting wrong thinking from my copy, laughing as I retched helplessly on the
ground. I crawled away, not noticing in my spoogy state that I was passing a sign saying TRUTCH.
Inna-godda-da-vida chimed throught the room. "Who could that be?" said Bill Tieleman and the
camera panned slowly over to Steve Rive, the new live-in houseboy. Steve went up to find your hero
nearly snuffed at the door, but soon I was in a hot bath, happily singing Baby the Rain Must Fall while
Bill shook with homicidal rage outside the door. That night Bill brought some friends to see me. Rob
Whittome and Charlotte Olson smiled while Geof Wheelwright asked questions. "And how would you
describe your present state of mind?" I munched on a lomtick of spaghetti while Bill tried to shove a
glass of obviously heavily drugged Trutchkyite wine down my throat. "Confused. No, silly. No, I feel
like a mollusk. It's a feeling a lot like sitting in an hugh ballroom watching a fat couple tango while untying the shoelace of the man at the next table." They noted it down. "And we understand that you have
also been conditioned against what you might call music?" I nodded. "Yes. Particularly the Bay City
Rollers, Lawrence Welk and the Archies. Also certain songs by Tommy James and the Shondetls."
Suddenly my glazzies went dark and my listso pitched forward into my plate.
Continued on page 20
TheMiiror
DIRECTOR: Andrei Tarkovsky
Tarkovsky creates his autobiographical essay
of private and collective memories. The use of
flashbacks, dream sequences and newsreel
footage makes probably the most complex and
hermetic film ever produced in the Soviet
Union. A truly astonishing film.
DECEMBER 4-9 ONLY.
(MATURE) RUSSIAN W/ENG. SUB.
SHOWTIMES: 7:30 9:30 plus 2 p.m. Sunday.
STARTING December 10-15 the
Russian epic
SIBERIADE.    Showtimes:    8
VARSITy
224*3730
4375 w ioth      p.m. only plus 2 p.m. Sunday.
It was a cold snowy night when a little grey box shuddered and unfurled its
delicate typeset to tha crisp winter air. A passing em ruler wept in awed delight but
a belligerent dummy sheet, mocking its esthetic sensibilities, suffocated the beauteous wonder banaath a 20 par cent screen. The philistina typewriters clacked in applause.
Announcing a . . .
SOCIALIST
CALENDAR 1982
was $12.00 NOW $9.00
and the
Social Credit
Scandal Calendar
was $7.00 NOW $5.00
Great Christmas Gifts!
Available from the UBC-NDP Club
SUB 237 A
fDEC. 4 FROSH DANCE
sub party room
dec. 4   Murray Mclaughlin
QUEEN E.
DEC. 7 ROD STEWART
COLISEUM
DEC. 10 ELVIN BISHOP
COMMODORE
DEC. 11 DOUG & THE SLUGS
SUB BALLROOM
Dec. 21 TAJ MAHAL
COMMODORE
Dec. 31 DOUG & THE SLUGS
HOLIDAY INN HARBOURSIDE
DEC. 31 COMMANDER COPY
COMMODORE
All Tickets available at
YOUR AMS Box Office.
AND
AMS
TICKET
OFFICE
AMS PRESENTS
UPCOMING EVENTS
JAN. 2 COMMANDER COPY
COMMODORE
JAN. 2 SWEET COMFORT
JOHN OLIVER AUDITORIUM
JAN. 19 & 20     JOHNNY MATHIS
ORPHEUM
JAN. 20 FOREIGNER
COLISEUM
JAN. 20 LEONPATILLO
VINCENT MASSEY AUDITORIUM
MAR. 6 PETE SEEGER
QUEEN E. PLAYHOUSE
FEB. 3 SYMPHONIE CANADIANA
NORTH SHORE CENTENNIAL
bcgin c^eresave
56XSON
Wtrtj^
CRXbltlONXL
SUBWAY
CWlStCDAS D1NNCR
(~s 11 am-I )0pm * ^ptn'b-^
uoxsxz
CURKCY „
<Md all trimmings
eatad-Bajr i hcvcraoej)
not mcdudedL   /
)9pm * ^om'b-)otnn^ Friday, December 4,1961
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
(CH3CH2)2NOC
Andrew Weil's apparently radical ideas on
the use of hallucinogens, on the placebo effect and on the medical practice in general
have earned him a somewhat controversial
reputation. But his background as a medical
doctor, a Harvard research associate and first
hand observer of medical practice among
many primitive cultures gives his ideas authority that can not be denied. Author of two
books, The Natural Mind and The Marriage
of the Sun and Moon, Andrew Weil spoke to
Ubyssey staffer Charles Campbell on campus
last month.
You've written about vomiting as a way of
altering consciousness. Now at first that
sounds like a very strange concept. Perhaps
you could explain it and relate it to your ideas
about keeping the mind and body in harmony.
I'm interested in finding a general psychological model to explain altered states of
awareness. Now I don't think that we know
enough about the brain to answer any really
interesting questions about the brain and the
mind; our knowledge is just too primitive.
But I find I've moved toward a model based
on a change in the relationship between the
conscious and unconscious parts of the
brain. I think that when people experience a
high state it's because there's some sort of
freer interchange between those parts of the
mind.
Now vomiting is controlled by one of the
most vital part of the brain called the medulla
which connects the brain and the spinal cord.
There are techniques in yoga for getting control of vomiting. Now I think that by doing
that you can not only acquire a practical tool
that can help you get rid of headaches and allow you to purge yourself, but you can get a
conscious foothold in an area of the brain
that is normally considered to be involuntary.
There are people who get a high from
vomiting, in fact there are people who get addicted to it. It's particularly a problem with
people who have a condition called anorexia
nervosa who often become completely emaciated because of their addiction to vomiting.
If you talk to some of them, one of the things
that has become fascinating to them is the
physiological rush (which is not necessarily
unpleasant) that's associated with vomiting.
You believe that psychoactive drugs can
also be valuable tools. Yet for most people in
our society the taking of drugs seems to be an
end in itself. People take drugs to become socially acceptable. What do you see as being
the idealized role of psychoactive drugs?
They have the potential to show people
ways of using your mind and body that you
otherwise wouldn't have thought possible.
The problem with them though is that if
you rely on them to achieve certain states
they very quickly don't work for you as well.
Their great advantage over other techniques
is that they work. Ideally they make you see
that things are possible that you otherwise
wouldn't have believed. But once you've
done that I think you have to look for other
techniques to achieve those things.
The prevalent attitude in our society toward psychoactive drugs other than alcohol,
tobacco and caffeine seems to be one of fear
and that appears to be fairly deeply rooted in
our culture. Are you optimistic about the
possibility of these attitudes changing?
In some ways I think I was more optimistic
some years ago. But I don't think we're that
much different from other cultures that way.
Most cultures accept some drugs and prohibit
others. We always seem to create taboos
around things that have a strong emotional
connection for us; sources of pleasure, food,
sex, drugs. People create these taboos because they have a fundamental psychological
need to divide the world into good and evil.
As a result I don't think they change very
easily.
When a new drug begins to be used in a
society, one for which there's no tradition,
there is usually some disruption caused by it.
Usually its use is taken up by people who are
deviant in the eyes of that society and that reinforces   society's   fears.   Certainly   that's
Weil talks drugs
what's happened with psychoactive drugs in
recent years in North America.
As for attitudes changing, I think it's possible but I think it's going to take time. I think
that one positive sign is that growing numbers of people have learned about psychoactive drugs and how to use them. Certainly
there's more information around now than
there was 10 or 20 years ago. Even the admission that alcohol, tobacco and coffee are
drugs is more widespread.
Yet we still seem to have bad relationships
with those drugs. , .
One drug that we have a really bad relationship with is coffee. People don': realize
that it's a strong drug that can become quite
addicting. You don't have to look very far to
see people who can't function normally without it. Caffeine doesn't create energy it just
makes your nervous system release stored en-
Now he was a great tree climber and he
climbed up on this log that had fallen across a
ravine and fell of and hit his head on the
rocks below. Not knowing whether he was;
dreaming it, or remembering it or what, he
felt a compulsion to keep repeating that act.
He did it seven times in a row, and finally the
seventh time he hit his head and cut his scalp
and was bleeding all over.
Someone was watching this and did nothing jntil he hurt himself when they took him
to the emergency room of a hospital. The
people that took him there had no fears of his;
mushroom eating, their only concern was.
whether or not he'd fractured his skull. But
as soon as mushroom was mentioned the
doctors went into their drug panic mode and
gave him a large dose of atropine. In those
days; atropine was advertised as the antidote
for Amanitas.  The truth is that atropine:
ergy. Once you've done that you have to give
your body a chance to replenish those stores
of energy. Our problem with coffee has to do
with our failure for the most part to acknowledge it as a drug.
Now there are South American Indians
who take a drug called yoco that contains up
to six per cent caffeine. But they only take it
when the sun comes and that way, because
their bodies have time to store energy, they
never become addicted to it. They have a very
positive relationship with their drugs and
they don't have any problems with them.
In Port Townsend in 1977 you told a great
story about the mushroom Amanitas and
misinformation. . .
I had a friend who was living out in the
woods in Oregon and he had heard that you
could get high from eating Amanita pan-
therina. He ate some of them and became
very  disconnected   from  ordinary  reality.
makes the effects of the mushroom even
stronger. So he had a much more intense experience than he would have had if they'd
just left him alone.
That's typical. I could give you many more
examples about misinformation about
psychoactive drugs in the medical profession.
Doctors generally, unless they've taken pains
to teach themselves about it, it's not something that they're prepared to deal with.
One of the common myths is that women
who take LSD will have deformed babies. . .
Or that LSD breaks chromosomes. That
myth grew out of some incredibly bad research. When the research that showed that
LSD has no effect on chromosomes was done
it didn't get any publicity because that's not
what people wanted to hear.
This is still happening today. The head of
our National Institute of Drug Abuse just
testified before congress that actual research
shows that marijuana smoking leads to heroin addition. Here it is 1981 and that kind of
stuff is still being repeated. It's true that a lot
of junkies will give you a history of other
drug use, but they probably drank alcohol
before they smoked marijuana and people
don't run around saying alcohol leads to
heroin.
What are the real physical and psychological dangers of LSD?
LSD and its close relatives, "the true
hallucinogens," are, I think, the least toxic
drugs known to medicine. There is just not a
shred of evidence that those drugs are
medically harmful either immediately or in
the long term.
That doesn't mean that they're safe. The
dangers of LSD relate to its psychological
toxicity. Problems of that sort usually stem
from taking them in bad ways; either taking
too high a dose or taking them in a bad setting or with people who are inexperienced.
All those things can combine to create a bad
trip.
By the way I'm not talking about marijuana here. I think that marijuana is a relatively more toxic drug that has a great potential for abuse.
Most people think that hallucinogens are
among the most dangerous of psychoactive
drugs and that's really an example of how
people's attitudes are shaped by fear and ignorance.
Could you elaborate on what you see to be
the positive uses that LSD could have in our
society?
I'd love to see more research into the
positive potential of hallucinogens. There is
essentially no research being done on possible
therapeutic uses. They have a lot of potential
not just in their ability to show us things
about the mind that we didn't know before
but in physical medicine as well. It's very disappointing that there is nothing being done.
That's due to a whole variety of factors, prejudice and institutional fears of sponsoring
that kind of research.
There are large areas that just cry out for
research. One has to do with the striking disappearance of allergies in people that have
taken psychedelics. I've seen people who can
walk on sharp stones under the influence of
hallucinogen and not only not feel pain from
them but not have any marks on their feet.
Now there are all sorts of way that you can
explain their not feeling pain in strange mental states but the lack of marks on their feet
implies that nerves and muscles are working
in a different way. I think there's a possibility
with the use of psychedelics of producing
states of tremendous relaxation and freedom
from tension that it is important for medical
science to find out about. It's especially important given their absence of physical toxicity. We use so many drugs routinely in medicine that are much more toxic than hallucinogens.
Do you see the failure to alter our states of
awareness as being a dangerous thing?
Yeah, I do except I think we all alter our
awareness in one way or another, whether it's
through athletics, the rush of downhill skiing
for example, skydiving, scuba diving, sex,
music, dancing, being out in the wilderness if
you grew up in the city, yoga, meditation,
there's no end. But yes, I think that if you are
prevented from doing that it would be similar
to being prevented from dreaming at night. If
you stop people dreaming they become an^
xious and depressed.
I think that what we have to do in this society is teach people ways of doing this that are
safe and that aren't anti-social.
In cultures where hallucinogens are used
profitably the people depend on a great deal
of ritualization and mental training. How do
you see that happening in our culture?
Well first of all by finding people who are
analogies of shamans in our society. People
who by their own experience are qualified to
teach other people how to use hallucinogens.
The advantage of having people like that
around is that they can reassure you that
nothing has gone wrong. Most bad trips are
See page 10: DRUG Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4, 1981
Drug users have
to have confidence
From page 9
not going crazy but thinking you're
going crazy. You feel the drug acting on you and you misinterpret it
and get upset about what you feel.
The great advantage of ritual is
that it minimizes the risk of a bad
reaction by standardizing the setting in which you take a drug. It
also shapes your expectations and
helps to channel them in a positive
direction.
Another important thing in creating a good experience is having a
source of drugs that inspires confidence. I think our attempt to regulate drug behavior through prohibition has driven better forms of
drugs out of circulation — more dilute natural forms — while at the
same time encouraging highly concentrated black market forms.
Variable doses and fears of not
knowing what you are getting have
deterred a lot of people from taking
psychedelics. That's why I feel that
the dissemination of information
about psilocybe mushrooms is important because for the first time in
North America people have access
to a pure natural form of a psychedelic.
You've said that people who collect their own drugs have a better
relationship to them. Do you think
that legalizing the cultivation of
marijuana but not the sale of it
would encourage people to develop
a good relationship with that drug?
Absolutely. If you look at people
who grow their own marijuana they
tend to use it more carefully and
thoughtfully than people who just
buy it. That's true of all drugs. If
you go to all the time and trouble of
growing your own plant it's going
to be more special to you and therefore you're going to think more
_■   ■   ■
0 MONDAY
DECEMBER 7, 8:30 PM
COMMODORE BALLROOM
VANCOUVER
^TUESDAY
DECEMBER 8, 8:00 PM
ROYAL THEATRE
VICTORIA /r
0PERRYSCOPE PRESENTS
AN EVENING WITH     ■/
STEVE
HACKETT
3
COMMUNITY SPORTS
DECEMBER SPECIALS
CCM Super Tacks  $199.50
Di Trani Down Ski Jackets  $129.50
Gortex Rain Jackets  $79.50
Nunatuk Sleeping Bags  $79.50
X-Country Skis,
Poles, Bindings   $59.50
Dunlop Maxply Tennis Frames $59.50
Synthetic Leather
Basketballs  $49.50
Men's and Ladies Down Vests . $44.95
Pig Bristle Dartboards  $44.95
Indoor Court Shoes  $34.95
Osaga Track Suits  $29.95
Adidas Waterproof
Soccer Balls  $27.95
Bauer Lightfoot
Jogging Shoes  $27.95
Kawasaki Badminton Frames.. $24.95
CCM Hockey Helmets  $24.95
Leather Soccer Boots  $19.95
Victory Squash Racquets  $19.95
Wilson Racquetball Racquets.. $17.95
Grey Sweat Pants  $11.95
Hockey Jerseys, from  $11.95
(and up)
AND HUNDREDS OF OTHER
WELL PRICED ITEMS A T
3615 West Broadway
733-1612
carefully about the ways in which
you use it and why. Marijuana is a
low impact drug and so there's always a danger that you'll use it
casually.
For a medical doctor you have a
rather novel attitude toward
disease. Do you think that all diseases are simply manifestations of
psychological states?
Well, that's too simple. I think
that I said all disease is psychosomatic and I'll stick by that. That
doesn't mean it's not real. It's become a popular attitude that if you
get cancer it's because you didn't
express your anger. I don't believe
that. Psychosomatic is a badly used
word. It simply means mind/body.
What I'm saying is that all disease
has a mental component and a
physical component. There are
physical causes of disease, bacteria,
viruses etcetera, but you don't get a
disease because you meet up with
one of them; you get a disease because you meet up with one of them
in a susceptible state. Now a susceptible state can originate in the
mental sphere.
There is a psychological component to disease and it's something
that western medicine has not really
explored. We're overbalanced in
our preoccupation with the physical
side of disease. Major changes in
people's psychological attitudes can
produce   major   changes   in   their
health — for better or worse.
I think that psychedelic drugs can
show us that we can solve a very
real physical problem just by chang-
See page 12: PLACEBOS
SUBFILMS presents
The Power Behind The Throne
Thurs. El Sunday 7:00 — Fri. & Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
SUB AUD
Make
this Christmas
really memorable with
the best sounding stereo
components from the Sound Room. Many
items now reduced so everyone can afford to enjoy
the best sound!!!
harman/kardon hk740
Mini AM/FM receiver
..        PC-5 Mini port-
JVuable system
Combines the best sounding
electronics in a compact slim
line package. The hk740 not
only sounds good but looks
beautifull ■-- ,A
WOW! $349"
IWf-1   KDD-2 Dolby
WWW   cassette deck
Totally metal compatible, with
Dolby, LED meters. Why pay
super!      s169"
AIWA
AD-3200
DOLBY
Cdeck
Variable bias to fine tune to
specific tapes. Dolby C, soft
touch push button controls.
AMAZING!
$399"
harman/kardon
hk400XM
-**g***g!™^^
Dolby HX 3 head deck
Digital read-out. 3 head, direct monitoring, auto scan. 2
motors. Unbeatable specs
for the money.
SPECIAL!
$699"
n*^3
&m
Enjoy home stereo quality in
this portable system and take
it anywhere. (fM aa
UNBEATABLE! I)!)!)-88
R-70
Receiver
W0@$0@&?&&00W®$0>
65 watts RMS X2. DC Amp.
Tape to tape dub and more.
A fabulous receiver at an unbelievably low sale price.
SALE!
$379-99
B&W
From the world's
most highly regarded manufacturer of the most
accurate speakers come the
new DM-10.
Gourmet sound
on the budget.
REDUCED
DM-10
speakers
*1W»
model 7B speakers
(Stands optional)	
Perhaps the best
value in speakers. The Polk 7B
offers open, accurate sound with
a wide response
range.
REDUCED
$299-99
**    UAnci    in «ual
MODEL 10 speakers
Open, three dimensional sound.
The Polk Audio
Model 10 is top
rated for its amazing true to life
sound. SQQQ.99
REDUCED ^-J"
each
1200 SMT speakers
Compare to
Klipsh. Bose. JBL
etc. at twice the
price, you'll still
come to the conclusion that these
Sound Dynamics
sound better and
are better constructed. Come
listen!
NOW
$449-22
KLH CB-6 speakers
What can you
expect from a
compact
speaker? Big
sound with a
tight bass if you
listen to the
KLH CB-6. _
Mof exacrry as illustrated.
NOW ONLY
$991?
Visit the SOUND ROOM and find out
why we're so Highly Recommended.
MORE CUSTOMER CARE: Every Sound Room salesperson is an avid music lover who has gone through
our rigid customer service and sales training program.
They'll be glad to discuss your requirements in detail
as well as audition equipment with you in one of our
many listening studios. .
MORE SERVICE: You'll find a service laboratory in
every Sound Room location. Our expert technicians
handle thorough repairs in days, not weeks because
we only service what we sell. These fully equipped
service labs are for the exclusive ""
use of our clients. ^^^^^^^^
When you're Serious about   ^^^^^^^-^T \
HIGH FIDELITY .
GIFT IDEAS
Disc Kit complete record
stylus cleaning system by
Disc Washer
now $69"
Walkmate   personal   cas-
sette'     now $99"
same as above but with
AM/FM
Coquitlam: Dec. 1 to 23
9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
Kits: Dec. 14 to 23.
10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Except Saturday^
IN KITSILANO:
2803 W. Broadway
at MacDonald   736-7771
"2 NEW STORES IN COQUITLAM CTR.
AUDIO CAR-FI
Lower mall next
to Woodward's
464-3922
Lower maM
next to Eaton's Friday, December 4, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
'Birds wipe SFU in classic
By JOHN BOYLE
The UBC Thunderbirds ended
their 1981 football campaign with a
convincing 33-1 whipping of the
Simon Fraser University Clansmen
in the Shrum Bowl Saturday night.
The win 9,300 fans witnessed in
Empire Stadium, gives the 'Birds
an 8-3 overall record for the season
while SFU ends up 3-7. Since the
Shrum Bowl's re-inception in 1978
UBC has won three and lost one,
though the Clansmen dominated
UBC with a 4-0-1 record from 1967
to 1971.
The Thunderbirds dominated
SFU both offensively and defensively. Led by the defensive player
of the game Dave Singh, the 'Birds
consistently foiled the Clansmen's
air attack and shut down their
ground game. The Clan had only
176 total offensive yards and six
first downs as the UBC defence put
pressure on quarterbacks Jay Prepchuk and Dave Amer all night.
Singh was sensational with an interception, a fumble recovery and
an electrifying 60 yard punt return.
Solid hitting caused two fumbles
resulting in turnovers for UBC.
Bird coach Frank Smith said his
team controlled SFU physically.
Meanwhile the offense managed to
capitalize on the excellent field position the defense provided for them
and created some opportunities of
their own. The 'Birds had 164 yards
Photos by
Craig Brooks and
Arnold Hedstrom
Gears go overbowld
By SCOTT McDONALD
When an article last week suggested you imbibe a little and act silly at the Shrum Bowl, it did not
mean make a spectacle of yourself.
It meant yell, scream, sing and
maybe throw up on the person
below you at the end of the game; it
did not mean go out on the field at
half-time to fight with Simon Fraser
(freestyle)
fans and steal volleyballs from
several wheelchair volleyball players
who were putting on a demonstration.
While a lot of people go to the
Shrum Bowl to see the game and the
engineers, the gears once again went
overboard. The United Way, who
were receiving the proceeds from
ticket sales, put on a half-time
presentation with wheelchair
athletes to show where some of its
aid goes. But the engineers and
other UBC students decided to invade the field for their own fun.
Pouring flour on the SFU fans was
a good stunt but the field
manoeuvers ruined it.
The scheduling of the game posed
problems. Mike Emery, Glen Steele
and Jason Riley were supposed to
attend an award ceremony in
Toronto where they were named to
the all-Canadian team. Steele was
also named the rookie of the year in
Canadian college football and
Emery outstanding linebacker.
This no show was criticized by
Toronto press and by the Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Union.
Emery explained that each player
individually decided that it would
be wrong to travel to Toronto and
back just before such an important
game. The general feeling of the
athletic department is that the
players should have gone and
represented the school. UBC
athletic director Bob Hindmarch
said there was pressure on them not
to go.
The only thing worse than the
performance by the engineers was
SFU's offence. In the balloting for
the outstanding defensive and offensive player for each team, Vancouver media's first choice was Bob
McKechie, the Labatt's pubic relations man at the game. The eventual
winner was Robert Reid.
Although UBC coach Frank
Smith said the game does not have
that much effect on recruiting, the
Monday after the game he had a
suit on and was off visiting local
high schools.
rushing and 146 yards passing for a
310 yard total offense.
Fullback Peter Leclaire was the
game's UBC offensive star scoring
all four 'Bird touchdowns. The
scores came on runs of five, 15 and
three yards and on a five yard pass
from quarterback Jay Gard.
After an even first quarter, the
'Birds marched 83 yards for a major
by Leclaire midway through the second quarter. A Don Moen fumble
recovery immediately afterwards set
up a Ken Munro field goal to make
the score 11-1 UBC.
On the very next possession,
Gard hit Leclaire in the end zone
and suddenly the 'Birds led 18-1. A
35-yard completion to tight-end
Rob Ros set up the score.
Saturday's effort was certainly
the most complete 'Bird game of
the season. The offense continually
capitalized on the opportunites the
defense provided for them,
something they had not always
done the past season. Smith agreed,
complimenting his players on a
great all-around performance.
In the third quarter, Leclaire
went 15 yards for his third
touchdown and the 'Birds were
clearly in control.
A three-yard fourth quarter major sealed SFU's fate and confirmed
Leclaire as UBC's offensive player
of the game.
Leclaire's backfield mate, runn-
ingback Glen Steele, was also impressive, picking up 71 yards
rushing and several big gainers on
screen passes, though he was still
hurting from an ankle injury.
Quarterback Jay Gard was only
10 for 24 but most of these were for
sizeable gains. Rob Ros, Laurent
DesLauriers, Mike Washburn and
Dave Pechalko all came up with big
receptions.
A two point conversion made the
final score 33-1 UBC and one had
to wonder at this point whether
Frank Smith was rubbing the
Clansmen's noses in the dirt.
Would UBC have rather been
playing in another game a few thousand miles away on Saturday,
namely the College Bowl in Toronto? "Sure, but you can't look back.
We were happy to be ending off our
season on such a high note as the
SFU win. You couldn't ask for a
better finale," said Smith.
And such a finale gives promise
to even better things next year. The
'Birds will return with all but six
starters in 1982 and perhaps even
some promising newcomers the
likes of Glen Steele, Jay Gard, or
Rob Ros. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1981
Placebos 'real meat'
From page 10
ing somebody's psychological state.
You would say then that the use
of the hallucinogen yahe in curing
rituals by South American Indians
is not only beneficial in terms of its
purgative action but in terms of the
changes it produces in the psychological state of the diseased?
Absolutely. I'm also a great believer in the placebo effect. I think
that hallucinogens are what I call
active placebos in that they don't
have a direct pharmacological effect but they create psychological
states that influence our physical
states.
I'm interested in something called
the Lourdes phenomenon which is
the result of a statistical study done
on people who have visited miracle
shrines. What they found was that
the likelihood of somebody being
healed at a miracle shrine is directly
proportionate to the distance of the
pilgrimage.
Now add to that pilgrimage the
taking of a drug that is going to
make you feel different than you've
ever felt in your life and you've
created the optimal circumstances
for a dramatic placebo response.
Doctors are all going around
thinking that placebo effects are
less important and less real than the
effects of drugs. But that's not true,
you can die of placebo effects, you
can have total remissions of cancer
because of placebo effects. I think
that placebo effects are the real
meat of medicine. They're the pure
healing without the drug-induced
side effects. We should be trying to
induce them more of the time in
more people. I think that these yahe
shamans are masters at that.
The
Bradfield
Graduate
Fellowships
*15,500
Inrhc 1982-83
.Master's or Hoc-
Twelve days totalled
per annum
academic year, rural decree in the
the John R. Bradfield Education natural and applied sciences,
Fund will sponsor for the third mathematics, economics, husi-
year up to five Fellowships, ^iven ness and commerce.
From page 3
Jan. 4
Dear Diary,
Charles, thou art an insidious
swain! Every day thou daffest me
with ill device. Thou keepest me
from alLconveniency. Eleven pipers
hath appeared, and hath trailed me
through the village, piping high pit-
chedly and attracting all the village
rate. I dare not leave my giftes at
the post office, for the County
Moronio hath admonished me that
'tis against the law, and that if I did
attempt it, I should be condemned
to plague worse than income taxe.
Alack the day and dread the morrow! What misfortunes crave acquaintance at my hand, that I yet
know not? The noyse of my
domicile keepeth all my neighbours
awake, and causeth them to complain to me continuously. Charles,
thou unmerciful beast, I prithee
take these troublesome giftes back!
Jan. S
Dear Diary,
The idiot hath sent me 12 drummers, who are, oddly enough,
drumming. God have mercy! The
house now containeth: 12 part-
tridges, 12 pear trees, 22 turtle
doves, 30 French hens, 36 calling
birds, 40 golden rings, (which, by
new, redeemeth my spirits only
slightly), 42 geese (a-laying, so that
there are actually four more at present), 36 swans (a-swimming in a
highly congested bathtub), 40 maids
(a-milking forty cows), 36 ladies
"dancing," 30 lords a-leaping, 22
pipers piping, and 12 drummers
(drumming, you may be sure). To'
this numerical pattern by interesting, I am not at all amused.
Alack the day that e'er 1 was born!
The calling birds do call at me
abuses such as "Thou silly
trumpet!" and "Get thee to a
sanitorium!" I fear I must heed
their counsel. Farewell, dear diary.
HAriel
A Women's Bookstore
Feminist Theory, Personal and
Political, Fiction, Poetry, Plays, Art,
Children's Books, Canadian
Herstory, Journals, Records
MAIL ORDER THROUGH
CATALOGUE
2766 West 4th Ave.
Vancouver, B.C. (604)733-3611
Statistics     Statistique
Canada      Canada
I*
Writing
a paper
or doing
research?
Finding & Using
StatiStlCS a 60-page
booklet from Statistics Canada, will
guide you to almost any economic
or social data you seek
Cost: $1 to cover handling.
For your copy, visit or write
Advisory Services
Statistics Canada
1145 Robson Street
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 3W8
Canada
to encourage research collaboration between the universities of
Canada and the Noranda Group
of companies.
The Bradfield Fellowships
are open to Canadian graduate
students who are registered full
time in a program leading to a
The Fellowships are valued
at $1 5,500 pet annum, with
$15,000 going to the student
and $500 to the university for
incidental expenses. If you wish
to learn more about these Fellowships, contact your university's Dean ot Graduate Studies.
noranda group
Mining • Forestry • Manufacturing • Energy
IT'SA
MATTER OF
NATIONAL
PRIDE.
From the very beginning,
John Labatt was preoccupied
with quality. He used only the
finest ingredients along with the
highest standards of his brewer's
art. His exclusive quality control
system alone required 93 analytical and taste
tests. John Labatt wanted to make the
finest beer in Canada.
of a
Today, John Labatt's small
brewery has grown to become a
company owned by 11,000
Canadian shareholders and
operated by 10,000 Canadian
employees. His beer is the toast
nation. What started as a personal
challenge has become a matter of
national pride.
WHEN CANADA GETS TOGETHER OVER A BEER. Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Russian
tragi-comedy
a masterwork
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
"Oh, how dreadful he felt when there
arose in his mind a clear and vivid idea of
human destiny and the purpose of a man's
life, and when he compared this purpose with
his own life, and when various vital problems
waked one after another and began whirling
about confusedly, like frightened birds
awakened suddenly by a ray of sunlight in
some dark ruin . . . Something prevented
him from launching out into the ocean of life
and devoting all the powers of his mind and
will to flying across it under full sail. Some
secret enemy seemed to have laid a heavy
hand upon him at the very start of his
journey and cast him a long way off from the
direct purpose of human existence."
—Ivan Goncharov,
Oblomov
Pre-revolutionary Russian literature, Anton Chekhov's in particular, frequently takes
an ambivalent attitude towards the new
emerging order of the middle or business
class, and the death of the old order. It is as if
the author realizes the inevitability — and importance — of change, yet cannot help
celebrate one last time the poetic beauty of
the dying system. In Russian tragi-comedies
such as Chekhov's the Cherry Orchard, the
old and the new order do not synthesize at
the end. They remain two irreconcilable
halves of the same social unit.
Ivan Goncharov's 1859 novel, Oblomov,
expresses some of the same discordant
thoughts. There is humor in a man's inability
— or unwillingness — to take any active part
in society; but there is tragedy also, because
of an increasing realization that his way of
life and innocence has no place at all in society. The current adaptation of Goncharov's
novel, by Soviet director Nikita Mikhalkov,
is a perfect rendering of this bittersweet internal struggle.
Oblomov
Directed by Nikita Mikhalkov
Even at a running length of two-and-a-half
hours, Oblomov has a smooth, fluid feel of
an impressionist painting. Periodically,
watercolor canvases occupy the frame and
fade in and out with the celluloid reality.
There is also an omniscient narrator in the
film, A. Romashin, who remains off-screen
but elaborates extensively on Oblomov's
thoughts.
Ilya Illyich Oblomov is a dumpy, lazy man
who spends practically all his time sleeping in
his St. Petersburg apartment. An ennui has
struck Oblomov, a fatigue that is symptomatic of his class and age. Oblomov had
come to the city "expecting a great deal from
fate and himself," the narrator tells us. That
is possibly Oblomov's greatest flaw (and appeal) — expecting far too much from life and
from himself. Having accepted the impossibility of realizing his vision, Oblomov
has rejected society, keeping only a few
friends for company.
During his 'free' time, Oblomov engages in
vitriolic verbal matches with Zakhar, his ser
vant since childhood. When Zakhar tells him
that they have been served an eviction notice
and must move as others do, Oblomov is genuinely offended. "Am I like others? Do I
want the same things? I've never earned my
living," he tells Zakhar. "Why, I've never in
my life put a stocking on myself. You know
I've been gently reared. How could you compare me to others? How could you insult me
so bitterly?"
Oblomov goes back to sleep after this exchange, yet he cannot forget the incident. His
eyes open in the dark, dusty apartment.
"Others?" What were those 'others' like?
The concept of what human destiny was
awakened in his soul. "Sharp pangs of consciousness stung him," the narrator tells us.
Concept of human
destiny awakens
in Oblomov's soul
It is one thing for Oblomov to be aware ot
his condition, quite another for him to act.
Oblomov is virtually incapable of fulfilling
what is expected of him, unlike Stolz, a
childhood friend. Stolz is logical and practical. And compared to Oblomov, his is dull.
Ironically, it is Stolz who exemplifies the new
order, his life "filled with business, visits,
and society."
Stolz is, paradoxically, Oblomov's key to
the new world as well as his nemesis. Stolz is
everything Oblomov cannot be and does not
wish to be. The film does not celebrate
Stolz's practicality. It remains true to Goncharov's ambivalent sentiments about
Oblomov and his role in society. Stolz keeps
offering Oblomov "now or never" propositions, not realizing that Oblomov cannot
make such decisions.
Whenever Stolz convinces him to participate in a social function, Oblomov either
falls asleep or cannot integrate himself.
Oblomov is an anomaly not only because he
cannot fit in, but also because he realizes that
he can never fit in. Society accuses him of
falling asleep and letting life pass by. But
society, in turn, is guilty of the same crime.
"Why am I more to blame for lying abed?
They are concerned about how they live, not
why. Why are you here? Does anyone need
you?" he asks Stolz. Stolz has no answer.
Oblamov is continually asking such questions. There is an intellectural awareness of a
life that lacks answers. Because Oblomov
cannot find answers to nagging existential
questions, he sees no reason to participate actively. "If we live, there must be a reason for
it," he says, "but if you ask me why, I
couldn't tell you."
But Stolz does not ask him. Such questions
do not occur to him. When he comes back
from France near the end of the film, his
presents for Zakhar indicate his personality.
"Neckerchiefs and bedbug poison. It's
French."
Oblomov's realization is, finally, of a
discordant universe, one that religions ... all
disconnected," he says. He strives to find an
order in the nature and the universe, rationalizing life by comparing human existence to the cyclical quality of nature.
Looking at dead leaves in the forest, he rationalizes human morality as being a part of
an order. "When I realized this I wept.
Sometimes I feel as if I were a part of a great
whole."
But then he says, "I'm ashamed. I could
weep sometimes from shame. Why am I like
this? I don't know the answer." Middle-
aged , Oblomov comes to feel a necessity for
personal change not only because his friends
plod him, but also because of his own realization of a personal inadequacy.
Part II of Oblomov opens in the countryside where Oblomov meets Olga (Velina
Solevei), a woman who defies an earthy,
pastoral spirit of Mother Russia. The
character of Olga could be seen allegorically
(as Goncharov may have imagined her), as a
complimentary half to either Oblomov or
Stolz. For the first time, we see Oblomov
without Stolz, who is away on business. He
has, for the most part, given up with sleepy
reclusive habits, and has taken up reading
books and history.
If Stolz did not exist, Olga would be
perfect for Oblomov. But despite his temporary absence, Stolz looms over the picture.
He has left instructions for Olga to cure his
friends' "illness — Oblomovism." Olga has
a comforting, graceful demeanor, and
Oblomov is enchanted by her. (Solevei
reminds one of Diane Keaton: both have the
same winning charm.)
"Oblomovism" is a brilliant catchword
that   connotes   passivity   and   inertia   —
'Oblomovism' a
brilliant catchword
for passivity; inertia
everything Oblomov signifies. Oblomovism
afflicts not only the main character, but also
the whole class system of feudal Russia.
Oblomov continually dreams of the past,
when he and Stolz could live without any tension.
There is a humorous, satiric scene early in
the film when Oblomov dreams of his
childhood and imagines his father having a
conversation with the serfs about steps. They
were always off-balance, says one serf. No,
they weren't, says the master and all nod in
agreement. There is a gentleness and passivity
about the harmonious servant-master relationship that Oblomov finds so comforting.
Oblomov rejects Olga not because he
doesn't love her, but because he realizes that
she prefers Stolz. Olga is offended and accuses him of vanity. "You weren't thinking
of me, but your own pride," she says.
Oblomov, the narrator tells us, "was struck
by this suggestion." Once again, the world
has misunderstood him.
A magnificent moment occurs near the
end of the film, when Stolz returns from
Western Europe with an early model of the
bicycle. Olga is fascinated with it and runs
off to try the bike with Stolz. Oblomov, seeing them happy together, stands still, with
tears rolling down his cheek. With Stolz's
return, Oblomov has lost once again. Despite
their friendship, Oblomov and Stolz always
seem to be in some kind of personal competition, and Oblomov is always the loser. The
narrator too comes to realize that Stolz and
Oblomov are irreconcilable. "(Their) existence was a flagrant violation against each
other," he says.
Director Mikhalkov uses a simple style and
technique in Oblomov — there are no
elaborate cross-cuts or constant camera
movements. The simplicity of style matches
the simplicity and grace of the characters.
The first part of the film is filled mainly with
medium shots, while the use of vast
panoramic shots are more noticeable in the
second half of the film.
Oblamov is an evocative cinematic poem.
It is, quite obviously, a keen and clear satire
of gentry life. But more importantly, the
lyricism of the film captures, quietly and effectively, rare moments in the cinema when a
character's thoughts — abstract as they may
be — evoke in the viewer a simple, wonderful
feeling. At such moments, the music of
Bellini and Rachmaninoff works to great advantage (as Rachmaninoff s music did in last
year's vastly overlooked romance, Somewhere in Time).
Oleg Tabakov's performance as Oblomov
does justice to Goncharov's narrative and
Mikhalkov's subdued style. The script, co-
written by Mikhalkov, often verges on the
absurd. Characters often speak without communicating with each other. But the audience
that captures every nuance, every contradiction in the characters' words and actions.
This absurdist tragi-comedy may very well be
a masterwork of the Soviet cinema, even
more so than the recent Moscow Does Not
Believe in Tears. Page 14
THE. UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1981
Writer explores Canadian Marxist roots
By GLEN SANFORD
Canadian Bolsheviks, by Ian Angus, should be force fed to all members of today's fragmented communist groups.
This study of the rise and fall of a
credible Communist Party of
Canada depicts how an exciting,
vibrant workers' party was
transformed   into   a   bureaucratic
Canada's major social ills — the
lack of a coherent left-wing.
The first Communist Party of
Canada was born in the midst of
anti-socialist mania sparked by the
Russian revolution. While the
RCMP were rounding up various
outlawed revolutionary groups, the
roots of a united party were being
formed.
EARLY LEADERS . . . William Moriarty, Tim Buck, Jack MacDonald
sloganeering group of pro-Soviets
who lost touch with the Canadian
working class.
Canadian Bolsheviks
By Ian Angus
Vanguard Press, 280 pages,
Canadian Bolsheviks is an important work, and contains many
significant documents from the early communist years. It will probably
never hit the bestseller list or gain
wide recognition, which is a tragedy
because    it    addresses    one   of
Angus says the CPC's first traces
can be found in 1919, but because it
was an underground movement,
most historians acknowledge 1921
as the date of the CPC's birth.
The CPC was designed to unify
Canada's left-wing, which as it
stood was considered too unorganized to overthrow capitalism. It
soon became Canada's largest leftist force, and was closely linked to
Canadian workers.
Canadian Bolsheviks outlines the
ups and downs of the early CPC,
internally and externally. It analyses
major battles won and lost, and
provides a complete, although not
widely accepted, history of the party's growth.
And it describes the party's
death.
Angus says his book is not
designed to provide a comprehensive history of the first 10 years of
the CPC, but "is devoted to one
central topic: the making and unmaking of a revolutionary party."
Angus relates the CPC's alienation from its original goals to the
rise of Stalinism. His book clearly
shows that at first the CPC concerned itself primarily with the
needs and concerns of Canadian
workers but after a decade had
transformed into a mouthpiece for
the Kremlin.
Furthermore, by the 1930s the
CPC was setting out to smash
various unions and became itself a
major influence for splintering
Canadian workers.
The CPC's fall was dramatic. In
a two'year period three quarters of
the party left its ranks and almost
all of its founding leaders had been
expelled. Says Angus: "When the
crisis was over, an organization
with the name 'Communist Party of
Canada' remained, but it was not
the party that bore that name
through the 1920s."
Instead, it was isolated "in a
mindless binge of sectarian ultra-
leftism that deprived it of all allies
and left it wide open to attack."
An attempt to condense Angus'
arguments into the space of a
review would be pathetic. But there
Runners World
XMAS SALE
This Christmas come to Runners World in Kitsilano
to get the perfect gift for the athlete in your family.
Now you can make someone very happy and share
in our Christmas Sale savings too. Right now we
have special low prices on RUNNING SHOES,
COURT SHOES, RACQUETS, SPORT CLOTHING
and SWIMWEAR for example:
Nike Yankee   Reg.39.98 SALE 31.98
Nike Racquette   Reg. 43.98 SALE 38.98
Nike Firecracker (kids) ...  Reg. 23.98 SALE 18.96
Puma Madrid (soccer)   Reg.24.98 SALE 19.98
Rucanor Hi Top Leather ...  Reg. 49.98 Sale 42.98
Puma Fast Rider   Reg. 59.98 Sale 29.98
Black Knight Tennis Racquets  25% OFF
Dunlop & Slaz Oversize Racquets... 25% OFF
Rossignol Graphite Tennis Reg. 124.98 Sale 94.98
Penn Racquetball Racquet.  Reg.28.98 Sale24.98
Running Shorts and Tops   10% OFF
Soccer-Volleyball Shirts   20% OFF
Swimwear — Men's and Ladies  30% OFF
And many more specials—gift certificates too!
Runners World
3504 W. 4th Ave., Kits      _^^^__
are   two   important   points   which
should be noted:
First, he states the importance of
his book by saying "Today, when a
new generation of radicalizing
youth are attracted to Marxism in
their search for an alternative to
crisis-wracked capitalism, it is all
the more necessary to prove and
understand the. achievements and
failings of those pioneers who set
out more than 60 years ago to build
a   mass    revolutionary   party."
Second, he says "I have no sympathy for those who use the rise of
Stalinism as a text for rejection of
Marxism ... As a Marxist, I am optimistic about our future."
Notice to all staff of Ths Ubyssey. You've been working hard this term so the management has
decided to declare a Christmas bonus, in addition to a bonus of fifty per cent of your current salary
level. aH staff will be given an extended holiday. The paper wiH not publish again until next January. So
gets lots of rest and be back in good literary and photographic shape for another productive term.
Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. (P.S. Mark pick-up your airplane ticket at CUTS.)
headroom in
the bedroom.
- ■"»'-v*****"""
Bedrooms are crowded enough. Usually. Add a
stereo system and a mess of tapes, and it's
cramped confusion.
But aud » Caaaett-O-Matic tape storage system,
and you've added neatness. Organization. And a
safe home for your precious tapes.
Each Cassett-O-Matic holds five cassettes
securely, ready for you to use at the flick of a
finger. And every Cassett-O-Matic locks together
with any other Cassett-O-Matic at top, bottom
and sides. Click! and you've doubled your
storage. Click! Click! Click! and you have a
modular storage system.
Cassett- 0 -Matics
are also available
with an optional
click-in, click-out,
under-dash car
bracket.
Cassett-O-Matic.
The possibilities
are endless.
Cassett-O-Matic
fri-lei associates limited
■372 Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
A Socred scandal a month
By JULEE WHEELWRIGHT
So, you want to buy your friends
and family a politically correct
Christmas gift. You're looking for
something with a political statement, from a company sans
multinational corporate ties, made
from recycled materials perhaps.
Well have I got the gift for you.
Yes, the Social Credit Scandal
Calendar slices, dices, minces, em-
harasses and humiliates your
favorite cabinet ministers and
premier. It's also published by a
small struggling, independent company, for a reasonable price.
Sounds good doesn't it? It is.
Researched and compiled by Lanny
Beckman and ex-Ubyssey staffers
Stan Persky and Kathy Ford, the
calendar includes newsclips with
cartoons of the B.C. Socreds from
such notable cartoonists as Bob
Kreiger, Rand Holmes, Bonnie
Beck woman and Bob Bierman. You
can chuckle over Bill Bennett's dirty
tricks scandal, or his BCRIC scandal or the embarassment of Grade's
Finger.
Relive the days when you would
find phoney letters from Socred
party members in your local
newspaper, remember Bennett's
promise that you would get rich
quick with BCRIC shares, snicker
over Flyin' Phil's family trips to
Dallas on government Lear jets.
It's all there and for the year 1982
you can have a daily reminder of
the incompetence of the Socred
government, in the news and on
your wall.
Each month has a cartoon illustrating a particular government
embarassment. January starts with
a Delta farmer watering his rows of
condos and oil wells. The days of
the week below carry more detailed
descriptions of the Socred blunders:
for example, Old MacSpetifore had
a farm (1981):
"The provincial cabinet removes
KRIEGER
8,240 acres from the Agricultural
Land Reserve, including 523 acres
in Delta owned by prominent
Socred supporter George Spetifore.
Spetifore, who plans to grow condos and shopping centres, bypassed
the Agricultural Land Commission
in quest of a $50 million bonanza."
And to further jar your memory,
the authors have included news
clips from local papers and
headlines just below the cartoon.
The whole effect of the page captures the embarassing evidence
against the government with a sarcastic chuckle.
For anyone with a car, February
is bound to be a popular month. A
Krieger cartoon depicts a then Insurance Corporation of B.C.
minister Pat McGeer in a Marie Antoinette style dress, holding his
severed head in one hand.
"Jacking up auto insurance
(1976)," reads February 1, "Aeon-
Dope on Belshaw
By KATE ANDREW
Author Ellen Godfrey admits in the closing pages of her recent
book on the Cyril Belshaw murder trial that the laws of libel prevent
her from presenting a case for Belshaw's guilt, or his innocence. For
those who go to the book to have either of these scenarios presented
will be disappointed.
But the book is by no means disappointing. Considering the fairly
major limitations which libel laws place on an endeavor such as this,
Godfrey has done a skilful job of presenting the facts of former UBC
English professor Betty Belshaw's mysterious disappearance and
death and her husband, UBC anthropology professor Cyril
Belshaw's consequent ordeal with the Swiss judicial system.
Starting with Betty Belshaw's January, 1979 disappearance in
Paris, Godfrey follows the threads of the mystery through to Cyril's
murder trial in a small Swiss village almost a year ago.
By Reason of Doubt: The Belshaw Case
By Ellen Godfrey
Clarke, Irwin and Co.
The Vancouver newspapers diligently followed the story,
culminating in their front page coverage of the sensational trial (and
resulting in a legal suit being brought against The Vancouver Sun.)
Anyone serious interested in the story will probably know most of
the facts and the book offers no startling new revelations. This is not
'The True Story,' but Godfrey tells the story in a thoroughly
systematic and well written fashion, allowing the casual newspaper
reader to fill in the occasional gaps left by the news reports. Particularly interesting to the serious Belshaw aficianado are the brief
but generally honest character sketches of the drama's main protagonists.
The most dramatic part of the story is Godfrey's account of the
truth and she did not overlook this fact. On occasion she is in danger
of losing some of the drama by re-presenting parts of the evidence
that the reader has already had presented only a few pages earlier, as
we are led step by step through the extensive year-and-a-half long
police investigation.
Ellen Godfrey has done a more than competent job in her
documentation of 1'Affaire Belshaw, as it came to be known in the
Swiss press. By Reason or Doubt provides good, enjoyable and at
times thought provoking reading for people interested in what happened to Betty Belshaw and the ordeal Cyril faced. It will be a
popular item at the libraries, as the price of this slight volume will
keep the curious from investing a portion of their student loans in the
purchase of what is well written voyeurism.
. . cartoon depicts Bennett and BCRIC
voy of cars rolls down Vancouver's
Hastings Street to the PNE
Agrodome where 10,000 indignant
motorists protest ICBC hikes.
'What demented person did this?'
asks Aid. Harry Rankin. "It was
Marie-Antoinette McGeer.' "
And captured for eternity are
McGeer's famous words:' 'I can say
quite bluntly that if you can afford
a car, you can afford insurance for
it. If you can't afford insurance for
it, sell it."
Who could forget yet another
memorable   quote   from   another
Socred MLA, Agnes Kripps who
was horrified that the word "sex"
was being used in public schools.
Kripps said in the legislature that a
term more suitable for use around
impressionable young people might
be "Biology of Life Today," or
BOLT. "But what about the nuts'
" enquires one of her fellow
Socreds.
Then there is the BCRIC affair.
Krieger succinctly sums up the sentiments of many B.C. residents with
his cartoon. A father sits before a
fireplace, decked in tweeds and slippers,  reading  to  a  freckled  face
child. The book is the Three Little
Pigs and the father recites the
familiar passage, ". . . So they
went to their brother's whose house
was made of BCRICs." The child
in his lap says to himself, "...
they're doomed."
Under the heading Capitalism
101, the authors chronicle the rise
and fall of the Bennett scheme. On
April 24, 1981, "The Sun reports
that stock market analysts are advising clients to dump BCRIC
shares as they plummet in value. 'I
feel absolutely sick to my stomach
and (so) absolutely fed up that I
don't like to even talk about it
anymore,' says Peter Julesberg of
"Yorkton    Securities,    a    former
f BCRIC booster."
OB
«    Then the Socreds became cones
•c cerned about their image last spring
a and hired Doug Heal to polish the
* politicians' tarnished public face
Under the heading, Hooray for
Hollywood, we get gems like this;
"Doug 'Achilles' Heal arranges a
camera crew to film a day in the life
of Bill Bennett. Bennett's press
secretary Hall Leiren, upset by the
instrusive camera, says 'Cut,'
unaware that the crew is there on
Heal's orders. 'It makes us look
stupid to have this sort of thing go
on,' moans a Socred higher-up."
The list of scandals and screw-
ups is seemingly inexhaustible but it
certainly makes for an enjoyable
calendar. For politically correct
friends or Socreds with a great sense
of humour; at your local leftie
bookstore now.
Messiah reHandeled
By KERRY REGIER
One of the perennial problems of
the annual performances of
Handel's Messiah in Vancouver had
been the lack of adequate vocal
soloists; and finally someone is doing something about it.
The Vancouver Chamber Choir
under the direction of Jon Washburn is importing four world-
class British soloists to sing with the
choir in its performances this
weekend of Messiah, and all but
one of them will be singing in
Canada for the first time. Audiences will be able to hear soprano
Felicity Palmer, countertenor Paul
Ess wood, tenor Martyn Hill, and
baritone Michael Rippon.
RIPPIN . . . featured baritone
Asked about why he felt the need
to import his soloists, Washburn
said he "didn't very often use outside soloists. But Messiah is a good
seller, gives a good income, and we
could, I suppose, just pocket the
money for the future, but it gave us
an opportunity to put it back into
the production."
Washburn went on to comment
that "it does the choir a lot of good.
Many of them are young aspiring
soloists, and it gives them a chance
Soloists featured
in Xmas fave
to work with world-famous soloists
in workshops and lessons which
they will be giving while they're
here." In addition, Washburn mentioned the publicity aspect: "If the
performance goes well, word goes
back where they came from," and it
becomes easier to attract world-
class talent to the choir's performances.
Washburn said he will be using
the Watkins-Shaw edition of
Messiah, saying it "gives the conductor opportunities to choose
various versions of arias," with
reference to settings for different
voices and instrumention. "1 chose
the solo assignments to give them as
far as possible equal exposure, and
to balance the first half with the second half."
Washburn has made a few cuts of
lesser-known movements and combined the second and third piarts to
make only one intermission.
"You're not doing anyone a service
if you're going beyond reasonable
modern performance times, what
people can now stand." Washburn
feels that three hours is a long time
to sit, and to cut it to two and a half
is fair.
Does Washburn have a favorite
chorus or aria? "It's so hard to say
because they're all so good, but I
think the chorus "He trusted in
God that He would deliver Him" is
my favorite. We talked in-staff
about cutting it because of the
balance between the first and the second half of the oratorio, bat they
all said, 'Aw, keep it in, Jon!' so
we'll be singing it."
Asked about the tradition of
standing   during   the   Hallelujah
Chorus, Washburn said "I don't
mind. I don't know if I would if I
were in the audience, but they can
stand if they want to — if they feel
good. People like to do it. You
could ask, 'Why do the Messiah at
all, every year?' People like it."
PALMER
soprano
Soprano Felicity Palmer is very
well-known for her recordings of
French art songs, and has sung roles
in operas by composers as diverse as
Handel, Mozart, and Wagner.
Countertenor Paul Esswood is a
baroque specialist perhaps most
renowned for his recordings of
seventeenth and eighteenth century
opera, oratorio, and cantata, including an extremely fine recording
of Messiah with Charles Mackerras.
Tenor Martyn Hill has been
heard in Vancouver before; here at
UBC in recital. He is noted for his
performances of renaissance and
baroque works, but has performed
music by Michael Tippett, Hoist,
and the romantics. Baritone
Michael Rippon has toured with the
BBC Symphony        under
Rozhdestvensky, has sung various
repertoire from Fledermaus to War
and Peace, and premiered Peter
Maxwell Davies' The Lighthouse
this season. Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1981
r
tkl^mM^M^i^ik-^t^A^M^+t**^
i
i
i
i
f
i
i
CALL FOR
NOMINATIONS
for A.M.S
Executive Positions
President
Vice-President
Director of Finance
Director of Administration
Coordinator of External Affairs
Close of Nominations:
330 p.m., Friday, January 8
Nomination forms can be obtained from the A.M.S
Executive Secretary, SUB 238
Submit Nominations to the A.M.S. Vice-President, SUB 252
i
i
i
{
I
i
t
i
Ey«»i^>»/<VMM^*,djl^.^»,^*.«fr*»,^.» Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 17
A lost writer remembered
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Jane Bowles was a writer who led
an extraordinary life. And even
though she published very little in
her 56 years, everything had her
unique touch.
A Little Original Sin is a
biography chronicalling the life and
work of this little known American
writer. Author Millicent Dillion
has amassed 458 pages of interviews, letters and articles about
Bowles that successfully convey her
character.
A Little Original Sin
by Millicent Dillion
Published by Holt, Rinehard
and Winston
458 pages, $21.95
Jane Bowles' work has recently
been revived by feminists interested
in lost or forgotten works. What
Bowles had to say about women,
like all of her messages, is difficult
to decipher. But in her best known
novel, Two Serious Ladies, she captures a pain and confusion in vivid
tones.
Whatever her critics said about
her (and most said they couldn't
understand her), they respected
what she wrote for its originality.
This theme, that Jane was an unforgettable woman to her friends,
husband, and loves, resurfaces
again'and again in Dillion's book.
Born Jane Auer, she began life in
Woodmere, Long Island. She terrorized the neighborhood with her
cousin Mary Jane and once painted
all the clothes on nearby lines
brilliant blue. As Mary Jane recalls:
"The sight of these sky-blue
shirts and sheets dancing in the
breeze whetted our appetites. We
headed for the garage. I swear that
not a word was spoken. We were in
luck. More cans of paint, a shiny
sedan to decorate, bottles to break!
"All that day we wandered over
the countryside. No garage was
safe. We pillaged and painted,
smashed and destroyed property in
the amount of $280."
The two girls left a note warning
neighbors to repent of their sins, for
the day of judgment was nearing.
Indeed, Bowles' sense of sin seemed
to plague her all her life, and like
her character Miss Goering, in Two
Serious Ladies — she felt the need
to confront what was most frightening to her, and it was often pain.
Jane was born with a stiff knee,
THE
and at 16 developed tuberculosis in
her knee. She had to spend two
years in Switzerland fighting it. In
an autobiographical fragment, she
recalls: "When I was little I had to
imagine that there was some limit
to physical pain in order to enjoy
the day."
A year later, she had an operation to stiffen her knee joint permanently. Back in New York, Jane
began her first novel, in French. In
a mock-naive style, it satorized the
Greek myth of Phaethon. But, like
details of much of her early life, the
manuscript is now lost.
At 19, Jane met her future husband, composer and author Paul
Bowles. According to Dillion, the
two decided on marriage as a great
joke and were wed a few weeks
later. Theirs was an unusual marriage in that Jane lived with Paul on
and off but continued to have affairs with women.
This aspect of Jane's life provides
a fascinating glimpse into the New
York gay scene in the 1940s. Jane
made no bones about her sexuality.
She once told her friend Miriam
Levy about going to a dinner with
two young bachelors from Minneapolis   and   a   lovely,    proper
BOWLES' . . . outside Tangier 1949
woman who had come along as a
date for one of them.
During dinner, Jane followed the
woman into the washroom and
said, "Now I'm going to count to
10 and if you're not a lesbian, get
the hell out of here." The woman
ran out of the room, tears streaming down her face.
Jane would arrive at dinner parties with a woman and say, "Hello,
I'm Jane Bowles, I'm a lesbian, and
this is my lover." She would giggle;
the dinner guests would blush.
When Jane and Paul moved to
Morocco in 1948, they lived almost
separate lives; Jane with Arab lover
Cherifa and Paui with Ahmed
Yacoubi, a young Moroccan artist.
They would see each other daily and
friends commented they were very
close and loving with each other.
Jane and Paul broke off sexual
relations early in their marriage,
each finding and occasionally living
with other lovers. But they were
dedicated to each other, and Jane
said that Paul was an excellent
teacher. In fact, she would shrug
off the success of Two Serious
Ladies, saying "Paul practically
wrote it anyway."
Dillion points out that while both
Jane and  Paul  wrote,  and Paui
received more critical success, it was
Jane who broke away from the conventional novel, creating a more
original structure.
One of Jane's plays, In the Sum-
merhouse, was produced on Broadway. But critics charged the play
was too complex, and it closed after
a short run.
Jane wrote throughout her life,
but she had great problems overcoming blocks and demanded that
all her work be completely original.
She would spend hours writing,
crossing out and revising her work.
"Well, we can't have two writers in
the family," she would tell her
friends.
Unfortunately, little of Jane's
work has been published. This book
about her recalls her vibrance,
although at times the account seems
to repeat itself and rag, even though
the story itself is fascinating.
In 1957, living in Morocco, Jane,
suffered a crippling stroke. She who
had once dubbed herself "crippie,
the kyke dyke," was left unable to
read and could write only with great
effort. She fought her illness for 16
years, considering it, punishment
for not having written more.
After treatment in England and
New York, Jane regained some of
her ability and returned to Morocco. But she never published a completed work after her stroke, and in
1967 was admitted to a psychiatric
hospital in Malaga, Spain.
Of the time leading up to Jane's
breakdown, Dillion writes: "When
Jane was younger a great part of
her beguiling charm was the sense
she gave other people that through
some force in her they were
liberated.
"Now that she was out of control, that force had become terrifying. She had become a thing of embarrassment, a thing of shame, a
thing to be avoided."
Before she was readmitted to the
sanitorium, Jane lived in a bar called The Atlas, in Tangiers. She had
become known as an eccentric, a
sort of bag woman who drank a
great deal and tried to amuse people
with her antics. But she knew that
inevitably Paul would come to take
her back to Malaga. On the last
evening before her readmittance, an
old friend, David Herbert, went to
visit her.
To his suggestion that he throw a
party for her, Jane replied: "if you
do, you'd better give it in the
cemetery, because I'm dead."
At the end of her stay in the
clinic, she was blind, unable to
move, often unable to speak. According to the Catholic nuns caring
for her, she accepted conversion.
Jane died in May, 1973, after
another stroke. When World
Authors wrote to her asking for a
short autobiography, all she would
write was; "I started to 'write'
when I was about 15 and was obliged to do composition in school. I
always thought it the most
loathsome of all activities and still
do. At the same time I felt even then
that I had to do it. It was only after
the end of World War II that I came
to Morocco. Paul had come ahead
of me and bought a house in
Tangier. From the first day, Moroc-
.co seemed more dreamlike than
real. I felt cut off from what I
knew. In the 20 years that I have lived here I have written only two
short stories and nothing else. It's
good for Paul, but not for me."
Dillion's book does capture Jane
and the tragedy of her life. But the
questions about her enormous problems in writing and the root of her
compulsions are never answered.
Jane's story is well worth reading,
however, and it is clear her death
marked a great loss to the world.
By EVE WIGOD
Radclyffe Hall (1883-1943)
was not the sort of writer to
quail at criticism. With a
courage possibly unparalleled
since her time by any female
author, she undertook to write
what is now the classic story
about love between women, The
Well of Loneliness (1928).
Hall's earlier novel, The Unlit
Lamp (1924), has now been
reprinted. Although it is her first
novel, and not as well known as
The Well of Loneliness, it is better written and hence more
palatable. It lacks the high-
flown, convulted sentence structure of her later prose, and contains several skilful descriptive
passages.
The Unlit Lamp
By Radelyffe Hall
Lester and Orpen Dennys,
320 pages, $6.95
Hall's writing is not subtle; in
fact, it tends to be embarrassingly melodramatic at times. But as
Canadian novelist Jane Rule
commented, "if she had neither
the craft nor the power of insight
of   her   contemporary   D.H.
A woman undaunted
Lawrence, she shared his zeal for
educating the public."
The Unlit Lamp is a strongly
feminist novel. Joan Ogden is
the clever daughter of tyrannical
parents living in a small,
claustrophobic English town in
the turn of the century. After the
despotic father dies, Joan is left
to care for her nagging,
hypochondriac mother. Mrs.
Ogden's need for Joan is so intense that she can barely allow
her daughter out of her sight.
Into this oppressive atmosphere comes Elizabeth, a
former Cambridge student, to be
Joan's governess. As Joan grows
older, she and Elizabeth develop
a passionate friendship, of
which Mrs. Ogden becomes inordinately jealous.
Under Elizabeth's devoted
tutelage, Joan begins to nourish
the hope of becoming a doctor,
in spite of her mother's disapproval. She is further encouraged in her studies by Richard Benson, an amiable medical student
in her neighborhood, who pro-
HALL . . . invincible
poses to her many times only to
have his offers rebuffed
Elizabeth and Joan make
plans to share an apartment
together in London. But these
plans are thwarted by Joan's
mother who, by burdening her
daughter with monumental
guilt, manages to keep Joan in a
paralyzing dilemma. Joan is torn
between a dutiful love for her
mother and a longing to share
her life with Elizabeth.
Eventually, Mrs. Ogden's
power over Joan proves; too
strong for even Elizabeth's
determination, and the former
wins the tug-of-war.
Years later, Benson describes
Mrs. Ogden's triumph: "She's
like an octopus who's drained
you dry. You struggled to get
free, you nearly succeeded, but
as quickly as you cut through
one tentacle, another shot out
and fixed on to you."
When Joan and Richard are
middle-aged, Richard takes one
last shot at a marriage proposal.
Joan replied, "I shall never
marry anyone. I'm not a woman
who could ever have married.
I've never been what you'd call
in love with a man in my life; but
I think if I'd been different,
Richard, I should have wanted
to marry you."
Although Joan's lesbianism
determines the plot of The Unlit
Lamp, it remains an undercurrent throughout the novel. A
more important theme is the appeal for equality in what was
then a wholly patriarchal society; a society in which any father,
told of his daughter's wishes to
become a doctor, would have
responded as Colonel Ogden
did:
"Not one penny will I spend
on any education that is likely to
unsex a daughter of mine. I'll
have none of these new-fangled
women's rights ideas in my
house . . . You will marry; do
you hear me? That's a woman's
profession! A sawbones indeed!
Do you think you're a boy?
Have you gone stark, raving
mad?"
On the other end of the spectrum is Richard Benson, completely isolated in his reflections
on the women of the future:
"They fascinated him, these as
yet unborn women, stimulating
his imagination, challenging his
intellect, demanding of him an
explanation of themselves."
These, too, are the women
who fascinated Radclyffe Hall.
And though the heroines in her
novels had to yield to the society
which preyed on them, in order
for her message to retain a tragic
impact, Hall herself fortunately
remained invincible. Page 18
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, D
By STEVE McCLURE
Robert Fripp sits off to the side
of the Commodore's stage. He
holds his Gibson guitar purposefully, surrounded by an array of guitar
synthesizers and electronic gizmos.
While the rest of the current incarnation of King Crimson hop about
the stage Fripp remains calm and
motionless.
Then he starts playing a series of
intricate and hauntingly repetitive
riffs. The rest of the band joins in,
adding to the dense layered sound
that is the new King Crimson's
trademark.
Fripp then starts playing the
heavy atonal chords that were the
trademark of the old King Crimson.
The crowd cheers in recognition but
Fripp is expressionless.
Throughout the concert he and
fellow guitarist Adrian Belew play
some of the most amazing and
creative electric guitar seen recently
in Vancouver, but while Belew was
animated and full of life Fripp remained seated off to the side like an
elderly rock patriarch.
King Crimson was formed, according to legend, in the summer of
1969 at the Rolling Stones' free concert in Hyde Park held to commemorate Brian Jones. The band's
first album introduced the world to
'mellotron rock' and began the long
saga of progressive rock.
The band went through many
changes but Fripp was always at the
helm, dominating the band through
his eccentric and basically
egotistical   musical   vision.   When
king Crimson eventually split up in
1975 it seemed the band had packed
it in for good. Fripp reappeared on
the music scene in 1979 and in a
typically pretentious manner announced his three-year 'drive to
1981' during which he would release
three albums. In 1981, something
amazing and significant was supposed to happen, according to the
self-described 'small, intelligent and
highly mobile unit.'
Well something amazing did happen. Instead of helping usher the
world into a new era of Gurdjief-
fian wonderment (Fripp has in the
last few years been at pains to
publicize the teachings of the Russian sage/philosopher), King Crimson was re-formed. So the drive to
1981 became the trip down memory
lane to 1969.
But that's not entirely fair. The
new edition of King Crimson has a
lot going for it. Fripp and Belew are
a tight musical duo whose guitar interplay is unique. Both have
mastered the guitar to such an extent that the band could get away
with having no keyboard player.
Screeching banshee wails, hard-
driving and relentless chording,
together with delicately expressive
melodic solo lines were all played
with consumate ease by the two
Crimsonites.
Drummer Bill Bruford was true
to form, providing a tight and imaginative backup to the musical
ramblings of the three frontmen.
Bassist Tony Levin played a ten string 'stick' most of the time and his
rambling bass style suited the
overall sound of the band rather
well.
What was noticeable about the
new King Crimson was the sheer
variety of the band's songs. The
two or three vocal numbers Fripp
and Co. played Tuesday night were
beautiful and well-executed.
Overall the band was a tight,
precise, powerful unit that left the
listener with no standards against
which to compare. Except for Jimi
Hendrix, no other band or individual could have hit the heights
King Crimson did Tuesday. Full
marks.
Spud boys are still
By PAUL KAIHLA
Devo was first greeted on the music scene three years ago with a mixture of amusement and enthusiasm.
But serious music critics found that
each of Devo's next three albums
confirmed that the formula that
made the band the 'no wave' sensation of 1978 was becoming diluted
and bland by the repetition of the
same musical format and ideology.
The yellow-suited, robot-gyrating
boys from Akron, Ohio were becoming increasingly commercial.
Listening to the recent albums is
equivalent to a numbing brainwashing loop in a Clockwork Orange-
type scenario. But not being a serious critic of music, I still love the
idea of Devo and a Devo concert.
Monday night's show at the Coliseum proved the band still possesses
the raw energy and determination
which characterized its 1978 shoestring tour. But things have changed.
The lighting and props, major
elements in Devo's presentation,
are much more sophisticated and
elaborate. The old garbage bag-
plastic covered stage that replaced
by conveyor belts, and scaffolding
laden with multi-colored neon
lights. The audience is composed
less by university types and more by
young teens. And the band seems
more settled into the 'show biz' of
rock and roll, rather than affronting it.
The concert began with a half
hour of Devo's short films which
ranged from the humorously weird
Whip It and Love Without Anger,
to the tongue in cheek Beautiful
World (which was a newsreel montage of chorus lines, wars, and civil
unrest, over "It's a beautiful world
we live in . . . beautiful people
everywhere, the way they shew they
care"). The classics Satisfaction
and The Truth About De-evolution, were included.
When the curtains parted to
reveal Devo in their 'new traditionalists' uniforms playing Going
Under, the front section of the audience rushed the stage without any
hassle from security. This was
done, evidently, to increase the effect of the performance, with lead
singer Mark Mothersbaugh later
crawling over the first couple of
rows of fans offering his microphone to them to answer "we are
Devo" to his "are we not men?",
during Jocko Homo.
It was Mothersbaugh who gave
the show its intensity, doing his antics and racing from one side of the
stage to the other with sweat pouring off his face, while the other
members walked on conveyor belts.
At times the audience would be
blasted by bright lights aimed out at
them from the stage. Near the end
of the show scented smoke bellowed
forth to provide cover for the costume change before Working in a
Coal Mine. In that song the band
wore coal miners' lamplight hats
and Mothersbaugh and Gerry Ca- :ember4, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 19
-ross burnett photo
nutating
sale were on top of the scaffold doing the vocals. A tape provided the
instrumental, and the other three
members swung shovels on the conveyor belts.
Mothersbaugh, perhaps not anticipating the punk tendencies of a
Vancouver audience, was plainly
angry about all the spit he was being
showered with. At one point he furiously gestured to someone on
stage, and added particular vengeance to the words ". . .got a gut
feelin', feelin'. . ."
But near the end of the show
when Mothersbaugh came out as
the mutant 'booji boy,' he squeaked in a falsetto voice "we were
wondering what all you spuds in
Vancouver would be like — now we
know ... we love you."
Here lies a sad irony. Even
though Devo's presentation is the
most thematically sophisticated and
the most powerful, well-coordinat-
:d multi-media rock show on tour,
their message just isn't permeating
the audience (or Devo themselves).
The point that we should all ob-
iectively scrutinize the myths of
technocratic society and our actions, is missed.
Perhaps all us kids just go to see
Devo for the gimmicks and couldn't
;ive a shit about anything else but
jetting wasted, making noise, and
winging stuff at the stage. In such
in event Mothersbaugh should repeat to himself . . . "love without
inger."
Holidays: Mitchell as ever
By ERIC EGGERTSON
Reading W. O. Mitchell's latest
book is like hearing a close friend
tell a favorite joke yet again; you
still laugh at the punch line.
How I Spent My Summer Holidays bears a resemblance to Mitchell's, earlier prairie tale, Who Has
Seen the Wind, but has a wit and
personality of its own. Set in a
southern Saskatchewan town, Summer Holidays is a man's look back
at the summer of 1924, when a series of events led to the loss of his
youth.
How I Spent My Summer Holidays
By W. O. Mitchell
MacMillan of Canada
224 pages
Mitchell manages to keep the
story from lapsing into saccharine
nostalgia, yet offers what is essentially a nostalgic look at growing
up. Summer Holidays is a tribute to
the children on the prairies who
built up their own society, separate
from adults. It is also a tribute to
the icononoclasts who, like the nar
rator Hughie, constantly question
the established order.
Hughie finds himself drawn first
into the schemes of his neighborhood friends, then into a First
World War veteran's plan to hide
Bill the Sheepherder, an escapee
from an insane asylum on the outskirts of town, The Mental. His
friends' plottings begin in harmless
naivety and escalate into hilarious
cruelty as Peter Deane-Cooper
races to save someone's grandfather
from being blown up by dynamite
on his way to the outhouse.
In the aftermath of the explosion
a new plan emerges to dig a secret
cave in the middle of the prairie.
When Bill the Sheepherder takes
over the cave the plot thickens considerably, and war hero King
Motherwell orchestrates the chaos.
In between rum running and playing pool, King sets the perfect example for opposing authority.
Mitchell describes the familiar
splits in society between the children, "moral" adults, and low-life.
It is a reassuring step into the ter-
Bowering never again
to write "norma!" book
By ERIC EGGERTSON
Conversation between Vancouver
author George Bowering and his
publisher:
GB: Here's the manuscript.
Pub: Very good, George. There's
only one thing. This title, Dead
Sailors, just has to go. Such a
depressing title for a book. Can't
you think of something with a bit
more zip in it? Something a bit
more positive?
GB: But it's not supposed to be a
positve title. That's just the point, I
wanted the title to suggest that these
sailors who charted the area are
now little more than names to some
people. After all, it was my first
name, George that started me
writing about George Vancouver.
Pub: That's all very well, George,
but you don't have to sell your
books, I do. No one's going to give
their kids a Christmas present about
dead sailors. We need something
with some flash to it. Something to
capture the swashbuckling nature
of the British ships exploring B.C.'s
coast, meeting all those Indians and
Spaniards . . . something like Blazing Galleons! Yes, I rather like that.
GB: (to himself) Oh, God, (to
pub) Okay, I'll come up with
something else. How about Burning
Water? That still leaves the unreal
aspect to the book. After all, it was
a bit unreal to the Indians to see
these crazy Europeans in their boats
Pub: Not bad, George has a nice
ring to it. Yeah, maybe I'll give my
daughter a copy for her birthday.
Oh, there's just one more thing,
George. What's this I hear about
Vancouver having some sort of fling with a Spanish sailor? You
don't mean to tell me there's
homosexuality in your book,  do
you? We run a family-oriented
business here.
GB: (groans to himself) Oh,
that's no problem. Homosexuality
is becoming quite popular these
days.
Pub: I'll have to take your word
for it. Come to think of it, that's
just the kind of thing that would appeal to the Governor General's
Award people — telling it like it is,
gutsy stuff. Yeah, I like it. But I
don't think I'll give my daughter a
copy. Have you got any of your old
books of poetry I could give her?
* * *
After George Bowering's last
"novel," A Short Sad Book, it was
clear he would never write a "normal" book with a beginning, middle and end. The book represented
such a total departure from a progressing, continuing plot; Bowering
seemed determined to destroy the
idea of plot. Totally episodic and
absurd, it was a delightful departure, if difficult to comprehend.
His latest work, Burning Water,
is a healthy reversal of intent. In
Burning Water he gives the reader
the comfort of a continuing, fairly
comprehensible story. Moments of
clouded vision intrude on the story
of George Vancouver's voyage to
the B.C. coast, making sun: the
reader remembers this is fiction, not
fact. Yet Bowering surrounds the
rest of the narrative with detail, trying to convince the reader that Burning Water could be a true story.
Burning Water
By George Bowering
Musson books
258 pages, $14.95
And Bowering the author appears from time to time to tell the
story (an equally important story?)
ritory of Who Has Seen the Wind
and many novels like it. His characterizations and caricatures find
the sense of the absurd in pompous
civic leaders and delinquents alike.
King is the perfect flawed anti-
hero who attracts Hughie's respect.
And Hughie's other friends are a
young cross-section of society. Arriving back in town years later,
Hughie finds that his friends have
gone on to form their own adult
community. King, the idealist and
humanist, has little place in that
community of contented adults.
It is for King that the narrator has
journeyed back. He searches for the
innocence he lost, but also for the
point at which he and King were irrevocably cast apart. Their reconciliation comes near the end of the
story, though perhaps not in the fashion one would expect.
One is left with Hughie's feeling
of loss, and an overriding sense of
dissatisfaction, not with the book,
for Mitchell is a consumate storyteller, but with life. He tells us people achieve stations in society, but
the most we can hope for is to find a
little bit of peace in personal relationships, and to accept life's tragedies.
Mitchell says that Hughie will
never fully undestand all the elements leading up to his rites of passage, but he can at least come close.
Summer Holidays places us on that
cutting edge between the explained
and the unexplained, and leads us
away, not with easy answers, but
with a sense that life can be frustrating. It is usually worthwhile to
stay with it.
Neither Hughie nor King fit
properly into their intended societal
roles. King is always close to despair, while Hughie only dimly
understands what there is to despair
about. In the end Hughie feels that
he can share King's despair for the
injustices heaped upon war veterans, mental patients, children, and
numerous other misfits, yet Hughie
alone transcends the despair to arrive at a hopeful attitude toward
life. Yes, it is nostalgia, but nostalgia well worth exploring.
of the writing of the book. It is a
challenge for the reader to pi;ece
together the mix-up and madness of
the voyage, and come up with some
sort of conclusion about voyages of
discovery.
While Vancouver charts the jagged coastline, Bowering charts the
equally frustrating regions of the
mind. He takes the myth, or lack of
myth about Vancouver the man,
and creates a psyche torn between
duty, pride, loneliness and lust. Just
as Vancouver's pride feeds on the
performance of his duty, so does his
loneliness feed on a few short interludes of sexual satisfaction. And
all in a land that he will chart
flawlessly, yet never understand.
Burning Water is the first time
Bowering   has   gone   far   beyond
caricature to detailed character
development. The result is a
fascinating study of a tiny shipful of
men travelling around the world
naming islands, rivers, mountains,
straits, coves and points after
obscure members of the British
navy.
Bowering got the Governor
General's Award for fiction for
Burning Water, partly because it
conforms to our expectations of a
novel, and of "good" writing. His
characterization is excellent, and he
manages to recreate the futility of
the voyage taking place in the rain
and fog of the West Coast.
Finally, and perhaps most important, is the homage Bowering pays
to his historic namesake and the
history of the coast. Page 20
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4, 1981
Santa Claws
We at The Ubyssey have lobbied strongly to see that everybody gets the
Christmas presents they deserve.
For human resources minister Grace McCarthy who's looked after all the
single mothers in B.C. so very well, a month living on welfare. And Grace,
no cheating, stick to the miniscule budget, have fun, pretend it's a diet.
For another Socred minister, our university's very own tinman Pat
McGeer, Santa has a heart.
For UBC administration president Doug Kenny (it seems you're always in
the doghouse Doug) Mr. Santa 'Anti-Retrenchment' Claus has a brand
new food bowl, a leash and a one year membership in the SPCA.
And for arts dean Will we've taken special pains to see that you wil get
your very own notebook to cover faculty association meetings.
The campus chaplain, George Hermanson, will be blessed with the second coming. Something to resurrect some real religious faith on the
campus, George.
For all the first year students at UBC we have a folding chair so that you
will have a place to sit in the lecture halls.
As a result of our genuine affection for the People's Front Against Racist
and Fascist Violence we've seen to it that you will get a lumberyard.
For Nelson 'Knock 'Em Down' Skalbania we've managed to bargain an
option on the Toronto Argonauts.
Now that Pierre Trudeau's 'raison d'etre' has passed parliament we're
sure he'll l>e pleased to know that by Christmas Day he will be provided
with another ca:i?e.
For Rice Broocks a complete set of the beautitudes including 'Blessed
are the meek.'
The teaching assistants will have to be satisfied with our negotiated settlement — a gross of Kraft dinner.
For the faculty at UBC Santa has a flashlight so that you can find your
way out the door in the dark.
But for all the truly deserving people in the world, the starving and the
homeless, we weren't able to negotiate anything at all. Money's tight this
year.
* Creator hypothesis' should not be last resort
Richard O'Grady (Nov. 19) certainly goes part of the way toward
outlining the requirements which
"creationism" must satisfy to be
considered a scientific theory. He
suffers, however, from an ignorance widespread among
biologists today regarding the true
nature of the scientific endeavour.
Empirical science, as formulated
by Bacon and Hobbes does not
simply submit observations to "the
elucidation of critical argument,"
as O'Grady seems to suggest.
Rather, the scientist experiments
with nature according to a plan or
hypothesis of his own design.
Theory and practice exist in a
dialectic, and theory remains essentially hypothetical. But as observation becomes more and more
technological, more groping, theory
must take greater flights of creativity in directing research. That Niels
Bohr's theory of atomic stucture
came to him in a dream is a case in
point. So are Einstein's theories of
relativity which went far beyond the
experimental data available to him.
The same may be said for the
hypothesis of evolution which has
directed research into the origin of
species for many years.
The result of this astonishing process in physics has been the for
mulation of reality, through
mathematics, as no longer truly
speakable or imaginable. Words used to describe the reality which
mathematics unlocks, without explaining, remain mysterious or
metaphorical: "field," "horizon,"
"force," "charge," "energy,"
"spin," "straighter than straight"
and so on. In accordance with Hobbes' foundation, modern empirical
science cannot attain the reality
which is only dealt with through
mathematics. Even if the absolutely
fundamental quark is located, no
one will know what it is — only
more or less what it does. So far
biologists have worked with more
manageable units than have nuclear
and astro-physicists, but the
method is the same in each case.
Therefore, it is unreasonable for
O'Grady to demand empirical
evidence for creation "that could
not be interpreted in any other
way." The process of empirical
science is too mysterious to satisfy
such a demand. Why must the
hypothesis of a creator be considered only as a last resort? In this,
O'Grady continues the evolutionists' ideological prejudice
against creation. Evolution was
maintained even before such
evidence  as Darwin  found.   Dar
winism was seized on ideologically
as the refutation of creation, not
considered as a hypothesis offered
tentatively — a possible explanation
for observed phenomena. Even
though academic biologists are now
disagreeing fundamentally on how
evolution is to have occurred, there
seems to be complete agreement
among those biologists that evolution must be true. In fact many
Christians today seem to find it
necessary to take on faith that
evolution is the way God has caused
species to be.
Apparently O'Grady has no
desire to enquire into the matter
himself but is content to have the
case for creation offered to him for
his judgment.
Anyone claiming to be a scientist
cannot excuse his own prejudices by
pointing to those of his opponents.
As a non-specialist, I may point
out this much which may be said for
creation: as a scientific hypothesis it
seems to me to be, at its best a version of the old (but complex) argument from design for God's existence: That the universe's order is
such as to indicate a creator. It is
generally believed that Kant and
Hume buried all such natural
theology; but I believe that if the
issue were reconsidered, the scien
tist would have concede that it remains at least an open question
scientifically whether the universe,
and especially the origin of species,
is the work of a god. A scientific
case for creation, however, cannot
be expected of all creationists; for
many argue only that there is
nothing in paleontology or embryology which refutes creation, a
belief which they hold first of all on
non-empirical grounds.
Jonathan Mills
Regent college
Now 'anti-anti-choice
. . . Just an attack on freedom
In his criticism of my Oct. 30 Perspectives article, Andrew Labun
manages to make almost all the major philosophical and scientific
blunders which are so common in
creationist literature. It is kind of
frustrating to write an article pointing out the fallacy of these blunders, and then see a kneejerk response such as Labun's which simply reiterates these exact same blunders. As they say, it's like arguing
with a brick wall.
The only valid criticism Labun
makes concerns the inaccurate title
(Christians want indoctrination
schools) that was given to my article. It should be obvious to anyone who read and understood my
article that I had nothing to do with
the title. Most Christians don't
want indoctrination schools, since
most Christians don't want crea
tionism taught in the science classroom. They feel creationism would
give children a very distorted view
of the valid concept of creation.
The fact that the editors of this
respected newspaper made such a
critical mistake in their headline
emphasizes how easy it is to be confused on this issue. Labun's letter
demonstrates how easy it is to be
misinformed on the issue.
Citizens Against the Undermining of Science Education (CAUSE)
are trying to do something about
this confusion and misinformation.
We have bothered to take the time
to spend the last year poring over
massive amounts of pro- and anti-
creationist literature. After weighing all the arguments, we feel that
there is a very strong case against
the teaching of creationism in the
science   classrooms   of   public
schools.
Based on the evidence we have
accumulated, the obvious conclusion is that the creationist movement is a deliberate and well-planned attack against scientific inquiry
and religious freedom. If Andrew
Labun was aware of the gross intellectual dishonesty of the creationists, I doubt he would be so
willing to parrot their arguments.
Members of CAUSE are manning an info table in SUB at noon
on Mondays and Fridays. We
would be glad to defend our position or to answer any questions
about creationism. We are also circulating a petition to counter a creationist petition given to the minister of education last spring.
Gary Marchant
grad studies
I am not a strong supporter of the
pro-choice movement Stephen, but
articles like yours provoke me to
take sides. If your attitudes reflect
those of the anti-choice movement
then I would have to say I am, if
nothing else, anti-anti-choice.
First, I have yet to meet any girl
who has ever encouraged me to be
irresponsible towards her. I just
meet the wrong kind of girls.
You call abortion "a cop out for
men" and you also say that "it is a
twisted logic that would kill an innocent unborn baby for the crimes
of the father." In both cases Steve,
you have neglected one tiny detail
— the women involved! Sorry to
disillusion you but there is a woman
involved. She is the one who wants
the abortion — remember? Now, I
do not claim to know whether abortion is right or wrong. But let us not
focus so hard on the rights of an unborn child that we neglect the rights
of a breathing, thinking ana feeling
woman.
Also, without question, practised
birth control is far preferable to
abortions. Nobody has an abortion
for fun.
Whether during the stages of embryo development a fetus is or is not
part of the mother's body, or is in
fact even alive by a modern moral
definition, is a highly debatable
question. It is not fact although you
have found it fit to present it that
way.
Finally Stephen, I would like to
assure you that I too have eyes,
ears, brain cells and a conscience
and I use these things to the best of
my ability to form my opinions that
are not only morally satisfactory to
me but also as fair to others and as
applicable, to modern society as
possible.
And I think that you should forfeit some of your moral righteousness in exchange for having a little
more consideration for others and
being slightly more practical.
Gord Martin
science 1
THE UBYSSEY
December 4,1981
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout
the university year by the Alma Mater Society of the
University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the
staff and not of the AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241k of the Student
Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
From page 8
I awoke in the press club. Sugar Sugar was blasting through the speaker from CITR. I creeched and
kicked the walls with my boots, but the music only got louder. Crimson and Clover came on I saw thjen
that I must snuff it. I got into the refrigerator and closed the door.
But I did not snuff it. I came to slowly in a room where Dave Fraser and Jennifer Ryan were doing
the old garbage in, garbage out on some Friday copy. Nancy Campbell was feeding me something on a
mirror through a straw while Eric Eggertson and Glen Sanford snapped pictures. When You're Hot,
You're Hot was blasting away on some bolshoy stereo speakers and I felt real horrorshow, having a vision of singing Yummy Yummy Yummy, I've Got Love In My Tummy and Itsy Bitsy Teeny Weeny
Yellow Polka Dot Bikini to a cringing Julie Wheelwright. I was cured all right. Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 21
Beware religious dogma
By VERN TOMPKE
Recently there was an article in
The Ubyssey which stated that creationism is nothing more than a push
for religious indoctrination by some
Christian Fundamentalist 'zealots'.
What is more, I was told that we as
university students "should play a
leading role in exposing the creationist's true intentions." Well
what are we waiting for? I think
that despite our colleague's claims,
the issues between evolution and
creation are not as cut and dry as
his model of scientific theory versus
religious meta-physics would have
us believe.
EVOLUTPN
OF MAN...
CtfT)W*v*HitMut
perspectives
It is obvious that the occurance of
evolution cannot be scientifically
proven since the origins of life or
the origin of man cannot be
repeated. Scientific facts are
verified by tests, measurements,
and confolled experiments which
can be repeated with consistent
results. So while evolution is in fact,
not fact, it is a valid inference based
on certain data obtained from fossil
records and comparative biology.
By the same token, the creation
model also rests upon circumstantial evidence taken from paleontology, biology, and other scientific
investigations. It can also be used to
predict situations that are difficult
to account for in the evolution
model (for example the relative
absence of transitional forms between apes and man). Nevertheless
creationism, as with evolution,
must be rejected as scientific fact.
Could evolution or creation be
called a theory then? If you, as one
leading evolutionist does, define
theory to mean a structure of ideas
to explain and interpret facts, then
both evolution and creation would
classify as theory.
and woman.
Scientific theory, however, must
have as its primary criterion, the
potential to be proven false. With
this restriction, neither evolution
nor creation would classify as
theory. This observation has been
made by several evolutionists (such
as K. Popper, D. M. S. Watson,
and N. Heribert-Nilsson). What is
especially ironical is that while
groups like CAUSE claim that creationism is no more than a
metaphysical theory, well known
evolutionists such as Popper has
himself declared that Darwinism is
not a testable scientific theory, but
a metaphysical research program!
(Unended Quest 1976). If this is the
case then a two-model approach in
science class instruction would seem
appropriate. But this is where we
run into another problem. Isn't
creationism also part of a religious
belief and are not people sponsoring this two-model legislation doing
it for religious reasons?
I think the answer is obviously
yes but we must be careful not to
cry 'Religious Indoctrination'
before we look at the whole picture.
A belief in special creation is part of
some religions (Christianity, Orthodox Judaism, Islam et al.), just as
belief in evolution is also part of
some religions (Evolutionary
Humanism, Religious Humanism,
Unitarianism, Buddhism et al). Yet
evolution is not exempted from the
public school system on the grounds
that it constitutes a religious belief!
I think everyone can see why. It is
because evolution's religious doc
trine (eg. there is no need for personal salvation) can be separated
from its scientific evidences which
are permissable areas for scholastic
instruction. While creationism has
its religious doctrine (eg., Christianity says god is Triune), these
may also be distinguished from its
scientific evidences.
You see the problem with both
evolution and creationism is they
have the same capability for becoming religious doctrines. The problem with the present one-model
approach is that this tendency is
often the case. Without consciously
attempting to do so, the present
one-model approach a) promotes
those religions which are consistent
with evolution and b) opposes those
religions which are consistent with
creationism. Sound far-fetched?
Well ask any of the many students
who have felt compelled
throughout their school years to affirm on test questions, term papers,
and in class discussions, statements
regarding the origin of life which
are contrary to their religious
teaching. It is clear that evolution is
more than strictly science. It has the
potential of promoting religious
teaching that God is not necessary
to explain life on earth. This inequality could be remedied by including the creation model or . . .
(gasp) remove the evolutionary one.
The thing that keeps people from
looking at the question from both
sides is the paranoia that Jerry
Falwell is hiding under every bed.
The key is to set biblical creationism
(Adam and Eve and all their fun)
from scientific creationism which is
trying to enter the school system as
legitimate scientific model. The Bible will be just as forbidden as the
Bhagavad-Gita. Before crying "indoctrination" one should listen to
the words of Clarence Darrow, the
famous agnostic lawyer who was so
instrumental in getting evolution into the school system. During the
famous Scopes 'monkey' trial, he
stated that it was "bigotry for
public schools to teach only one
theory of origins." It seems ironic
to me that today I am told to "expose the creationists' true intentions." Now that the shoe is on the
other foot, it seems many evolutionists are trying to maintain the
unbalanced position that they
fought so bitterly against.
Perspectives is a column of opinion, analysis, humor, or almost
anything else you can think of. It is
open to members of the UBC community who are not staff members
of The Ubyssey. Vern Tompke is a
UBC student. That is all we know
about him.
Marchak ignores the legislation on abortion
On Nov. 5th Richard Marchak
treated Ubyssey readers to a rather
dubious lesson in logic using the
abortion debate as illustration. If,
as he claimed, his main motivation
was to clear up ambiguities, I'm
afraid his explanatory style needs a
little work.
Seemingly more interested in
simplification than understanding,
Mr. Marchak has presented a very
one-sided analysis of the abortion
issue.
Indeed, as he has identified, at
one level the issue concerns whether
or not abortion is an acceptable option for a pregnant woman. Several
religious and philosophical groups
have given considerable attention to
this issue and are readily willing to
present their views to those searching for their own decision on this
issue.
Surprisingly, considering his law
studies, Mr. Marchak ignores the
aspect of the abortion issue which is
most controversial — legislation
concerning abortion. Because laws
are passed in the legislature, controversy over what those laws
should be is bound to involve all the
politics inherent in influencing
legislators.
Anti-abortion groups see the
preservation of fetal life as primordial and want to severely limit or
eliminate the situations where a
fetus is destroyed. As their view emphasizes that  the preservation of
fetal life is the key issue in the whole
debate they have adopted the term
pro-life. It is when they press for
legislation which forces their view
on all Canadian women that problems arise as not all Canadians
share their opinions.
Other groups see the main issue
to be the extent to which the state
can legislate over the reproductive
functions of women. Rather than
have one position enforced by
legislation, they would rather leave
it to the woman to choose to either
have an abortion or carry the fetus
to term. Supporters of this position
accept that the woman's rights take
priority over any fetal rights.
Because this  position  emphasizes
Ubyssey joke issue for forestry
On Thursday, Nov. 19, Nancy
Campbell from The Ubyssey attended the Forestry Undergraduate
Society council meeting to answer
questions regarding the paper's upcoming "push" for autonomy.
During the discussion, Ms. Campbell stated that all quotes attributed
to persons in The Ubyssey were in
fact actual quotes made by that person, and were not the imaginative
work of the author.
Immediately following the
meeting, it was discovered upon
reading The Ubyssey that the article
by Al Banham entitled Records
destroyed in freak accident, directly
quoted Universities Minister Pat
McGeer, administration president
Doug Kenny, and vice president
Michael Shaw, among others.
When it was realized that the article
was false, it became clear that
Campbell had somewhat stretched
the truth concerning the validity of
quotes in The Ubyssey.
How can The Ubyssey ask us for
autonomy and a fee levy to support
publication of the paper, when they
misrepresent their facts like this?
How can we be assured that the
money will in fact be used to improve the quality of the paper? It is
not that we do not appreciate the
humour, but rather, we do not appreciate being misled concerning an
issue as important as autonomy and
fee levies.
In conclusion, we hope that all
students on campus will consider
this incident when addressing the
forthcoming question of autonomy
for The Ubyssey.
Gail Terepocki forestry 4
Philip LePage forestry 4
Carmen Baker forestry 4
Jonanne Cook forestry 4
Robert Kennett forestry 4
John Howe forestry 4
Dave Waddell forestry 4
Brenda Hanson forestry 4
that the issue is the right of a
woman to control her reproductive
functions, they have adopted the
label pro-choice.
Unlike Mr. Marchak, I am not
writing under the guise of objectivity concerning an issue on which I
have an obvious "parti pris." My
own values are implicit in my
analysis, as are Mr. Marchak's in
his. But I don't choose to denigrate
the intelligence of sincerity of those
who are against abortion. The
rights are theirs to promote public
debate concerning the morality of
abortion, to attempt to convert individuals to their point of view, or
to limit membership of their
religious organizations to chose who
share their views.
But I am concerned over their in-
sistance on legislating their beliefs,
thereby demonstrating a disregard
for the beliefs of others and a willingness to use the power of the state
to enforce this disregard.
The implications of such a posi
tion go beyond the immediate situation. If it is acceptable to legislate
control of a woman's reproductive
functions in the case of abortion,
the forced sterilization programs of
Kurt Preinspurger seem less farfetched. As well, those who think the
present situation is acceptable
might consider that a change in
composition of a hospital's board
can lead to all abortions in that
hospital ceasing.
So, Richard Marchak, it is this
situation and this analysis of that
situation which leads some people
to adopt the term pro-choice. I
doubt I've changed your opinion on
the moral acceptability of abortion,
but such was not my purpose.
Trusting your obscuring of the
issue in your letter was due to innocent ignorance, not intentional ob-
fuscation, I hope your understanding of the abortion issue now has
another dimension.
Gayle McGee
graduate studies
r
Archuk's questioned
k
The article in Tuesday's Ubyssey, on Libyan students refused entry to Vancouver Community College, quoted Elias Archuk, a Canadian Palestine Association spokesman, as saying that the board's
decision was motivated by "Zionist lobyists." This is not true. At no
time was there any Zionist lobbying concerning this issue. This can
be confirmed through Hillel House's Daniel Siegel, the Jewish Student's Network, and the Vancouver chapter of the Canadian Jewish
Congress. I invite Mr Archuk to substantiate his claim.
Dana Penman
arts 4 -ma        Page22
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4, 1981
Faith has no place in science
In his letter critical of an article
denouncing "scientific" creationism, Andrew Labun raises a
number of issues with a clarity and
honesty I have seldom seen from
creationists. Nonetheless, he shows
a confusion which suggests 'hat he
has not analyzed his thoughs very
deeply.
Labun points out that "one purpose of creationism is to point out
some of the grave weaknesses" of
evolution. Whether or not these
"weaknesses" are grave (he echoes
objections met years ago), peculiarly creationist purposes are not involved in pointing out these
weaknesses. An evolutionist scientist should be happy to have genuine weaknesses revealed so that
he can modify his theory to overcome them. It is standard procedure
in science to look for the most
rigorous tests of a theory's central
claims, and attempt to prove the
theory wrong. Peripheral claims,
the sort the creationists usually attack and use to support their own
theory, are much less important.
Science is intrinsically falsifiable,
and any theory whose central claims
are not open to some doubt is simply not scientific. It is therefore a
strength, and a necessary one at
that, that a scientific theory have
areas of weakness.
Creationists often act as if they
can prove their theory if they can
show some version of evolutionary
theory (often not the currently most
widely accepted one) false. This is a
case of the fallacy of the false
dichotomy. They presume that the
only alternative to the theory they
attack is their own. There are a
variety of evolutionary theories,
some yet unthought of, which compete with each other as well. Falsifying one version of evolution does
not falsify all the rest. These different theories are by and large
similar, but differ on details of
observable fact and mechanisms. It
is a sign of a healthy science that it
embraces contrary hypotheses
which might explain anomalous
observations. I would be much
more impressed with creationism if
it spent more time trying to test
their own hypotheses by attempting
to falsify them, and less time minding   the   evolutionists   business.
Labun admits that mechanisms
of creation cannot be defined. If
they cannot be defined, they cannot
be tested. If they cannot be tested,
they are not scientific. I know of no
conception of science which does
not require testability in some fairly
strong form. If Mr. Labun, or any
other creationist', knows of a well-
worked-out philosophy of science
which does not require testability, I
would be eager to hear of it. As it
stands, though, the central claim of
creationism is untestable, and hence
unscientific.
I lament, with Mr. Labun, the
separation of the disciplines inherent in the structure of modern
academics. Nonetheless, physics is
not metaphysics, and they should
not be confused, even if they can
have a profitable dialogue. To teach
physics as metaphysics, or vice ver
sa, is either confused or dishonest,
and teaches by example either confusion or dishonesty. Creationists
want certain changes which would
give their beliefs the label "scientific". Presumably this is because
the label has, perhaps due to unjustified enthusiasm over the success of science, become honorific.
If creationists want this label, they
should earn it by showing how their
central claim is testable. Any other
approach is intellectually dishonest.
The recent surge of creationism
should serve as a warning to scientists. The wise scientist will remind
himself that certainty is for the
faithful, and has no place in
science, in which every claim is
open to doubt and revision. Any
mechanism which cannot be defined and tested by recognized
methods is outside the realm of
science, whatever value it might
have in other areas of human life.
Consequently, science is inherently
limited by its rigour, and much is
outside its domain.
John Collier
philosophy lecturer
Al likes his own story
As the Al in Al Banham, I just
want to say how much I enjoyed
your Records Destroyed article on
Nov. 19, and how much more I enjoyed Master Schomberg's letter in
Friday's Ubyssey. To be told that
one's fiction was "too well done for
anyone to know it was a fake" must
be indeed satisfying, especially
when one is told so by a divinity student from the Vancouver School of
Theology.
As. for the "flippant remarks
made by UBC administrators,
government ministers and others in
supporting the prank," I can say
only that such persons will have to
answer for themselves.  I certainly
did not interview those persons, and
colleague Jim Banham assures me
that neither did he.
But Master Schomberg's unchristian concern about the chaplain
who doesn't believe in God in the
Biblical sense, I find disturbing.
Given the choice of a chaplain who
doesn't believe in God in the
biblical sense or an embryo
chaplain without a sense of humor,
I am afraid I must opt for the
former. Al Hunter
Information services
PS: Please tell whoever did write
that story that in my opinion it is
the best "put on" piece the Ubyssey
has done in a good many years.
NOW YOU'RE 19.
N0W1OU
HAVE A CHOICE
IN TOMORROW
m
•••
... you're on the Provincial Voter's List.
To have the right to choose,
you have to register to vote.
It's easy Just contact your nearest
Registrar of Voters or Government Agent.
But don't put it off. Do it today.
And have a choice in tomorrow.
REGISTER
Province of Chief Electoral
British Columbia   Office Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 23
Library spring survey tells all
A recently completed report is
going to prove useful in library
planning at UBC. Based on a survey
undertaken in spring 1980, it reveals
a great deal about library users'
needs and attitudes.
More than 6,000 students, faculty
and staff, representing 20 per cent
of the UBC population, completed
the 20-question form distributed in
all libraries during the second week
of March, 1980.
The busiest libraries are Main,
Sedgewick, and Woodward libraries, in that order. The most popular
activities are borrowing or using library books and other materials,
studying and photocopying. Of the
large faculties, nursing, law and arts
perspectives
students are the most frequent users
of UBC libraries. Except for studying, engineering and commerce students use the libraries less frequently than those in other faculties.
Most of those who answered the
survey liked the library: 80 per cent
thought its holdings and services
good or excellent. Only about 100
people judged the library as poor.
Analysis showed that the people
who liked the library were the ones
who tended to do more library research, ask more frequently for
help, or make use of its services
more often than the people who
judged the library adequate or
poor.
If the library's staff and collections were well regarded, it is also
true that users were occasionally
frustrated by the many library branches on campus, and insufficient
numbers of books and periodicals
needed for course work, study
space, and copy machines. Some
also felt hours could be longer.
Slightly less than half of those
who answered the survey liked the
decentralized  library  system,  and
about 20 per cent said they were actively inconvenienced by it. Not surprisingly, the unhappy people came
largely from nursing, planning,
education and home economics.
The materials for these disciplines
are widely dispersed through the
system. Nursing students, for example, must use Woodward, Main,
Social Work, and Sedgewick libraries. Education students need to
use both Main library and the curriculum laboratory.
At the same time, written comments suggested that a totally centralized system would be too massive, too congested and too impersonal. Given the size of the UBC li
braries, some decentralization was
acknowledged as necessary.
When respondents were asked to
judge the library's collection in
their subjects, about a quarter
thought it was excellent. Another 40
per cent thought it good. Students
in law, music and the medical faculties were happiest with the library's
collection.
However, it is clear tha-: students
were often frustrated by not finding
needed books on the shelf. For example, 20 per cent of respondents
said that at least once a month they
wanted a book that wasn't on the
shelf. Another 40 per cent were un-
Andrz«l Dudzlnskl
successful in a search for a book a
few times a term.
Journals missing from the shelves
caused even greater dissatisfaction.
A number of students suggested
that journals should not be loaned.
Others thought that magazines were
being sent to the bindery at awkward times or not being returned
fast enough.
At the same time comments indicated that students often gave up
their search too quickly. Many did
not know what alternatives to pursue when a book was not on the
shelf Eind assumed it was not available instead of continuing their
search.
Copying machines are used nearly as much as the books. Forty per
cent of the respondents said they used copy machines at least once a
week. Law and nursing students
were the heaviest users, with over 65
per cent using copy machines once a
week or more often.
Students who use Sedgewick,
Woodward and Main libraries were
most frustrated by long waits to use
machines, and machines being out
of paper or out of order. Dissatisfaction with copying machines is indicated by the number of written
comments, "aggravating" and
"poor" being some of the terms
used to describe the situation.
The libraries are the chief study
halls on campus. About half the
students who responded to the survey thought there wasn't enough
study space. Sedgewick, MacMillan
and curriculum laboratory users
were most unhappy with the crowded conditions in these libraries.
Almost all were unhappy with the
noise level in library study areas.
Although building noises and staff
were sometimes mentioned as the
source of the problem, many comments pointed towards other students as the main culprits.
Surprisingly, students generally
seemed satisfied with hours of
opening. Only eight per cent said
open hours were poor, and 70 per
cent thought them excellent or
good. But those who are unhappy
about libraries being closed felt
strongly enough to add many comments, asking them to be kept open
later, especially on weekends or
during exam time.
Many students, especially those
who use the larger libraries, rarely
consult staff. Many feel that they
know how to use the library: 40 per
cent said they rarely asked for help
because they didn't need it. However, those who did ask were pleased with the service they received.
See page 26: BUDGET
letters
People's Front reveals THE TRUTH to world
The perspectives column of the
Ubyssey recently published a letter
from some law students about the
People's Front and the BCOFR.
The authors weren't present when
the actual violence broke out between these two groups, and so their
account is mostly second-hand and
hearsay. I was there in the park on
Oct. 4 and Oct. 17 and would like to
recount what took place before my
eyes.
On Oct. 4 the People's Front
went to a public rally organized by
the BCOFR to protest the murder
of a young East Indian. After the
BCOFR leaders had spoken, the
People's Front which had been
standing there for over 40 minutes,
asked permission to speak too. One
BCOFR leader agreed, but he was
overruled by Charan Paul Gill, the
head of the BCOFR. Instead of
granting permission to speak, the
BCOFR security force attacked
the People's Front leader with a
baseball bat. The People's Front
defended itself, routed the attackers, and presented its views to
the people gathered there.
Later during the afternoon I
spoke to a neighborhood resident
who had also witnessed the attack
by BCOFR. He wanted to know
what all the fighting was about. I
explained to him the respective differences and pointed out that the
BCOFR had attacked to prevent the
People's Front from being heard.
The man, a German immigrant,
said that the BCOFR position was
the same as that held by the German
social-democrats during the pre-
Nazi era when Hitler's goon squads
were beating and murdering people.
He said that the German people
listened to these social-democrats
who spread the dangerous illusions
about the state. They went to sleep
while the courts, the police, the prosecutors, the parliamentary
representatives, this state, which
was supposedly going to deal with
the Nazis actually assisted and protected them. "When we awoke
from this sleep," he said, "Hitler's
noose was already around our
necks."
Within a few days of Oct. 4, the
BCOFR announced another rally
plus a demonstration to be held at
the same park on Oct. 17 against
the Ku Klux Klan, and "the disrup-
tors" meaning the People's Front.
The People's Front right away
issued a public statement entitled
"Unite in Action Against Racist
and Fascist Violence" and called on
everyone to unite against the racist
gangs. Not only did the leaders of
the BCOFR spurn this appeal for
united action, they made angry and
bellicose threats over the radio and
TV that they would never unite with
the People's Front and that
People's Front had better stay
away.
At the park on Oct. 17 I saw
about 90 men from the BCOFR
wearing hockey helmets, face
masks, hockey gloves and similar
makeshift   riot   gear.   This   goon
squad carried 2x2 poles which they
waved in a menacing manner. These
bully boys tried to prevent Charles
Boylan of People's Front from
speaking by chanting and yelling
but, in spite of their efforts, he gave
a speech calling on the BCOFR to
give up this childish behaviour and
to unite against the dangers facing
the people.
When the march formed up to
leave the park, this BCOFR homemade riot squad took up their position between the body of the march
and the People's front contingent.
They didn't move out of the park;
they buckled up their helmets, uttered threats and racial insults, and
made it clear that they were
staying behind to keep the
People's Front from even leaving
the park. The rear of the
demonstration had reached Fraser
Street, some two blocks away, while
the goon squad remained in the
park, aggressively blocking the way.
This is what the law students call
"defensive action" in their letter!
The People's Front overcame this
blockade and made it to 41st Street
where they had to fight numerous
skirmishes with these "defenders"
who were attempting to keep the
People's Front from marching in
the demonstration and distributing
leaflets to the watching crowds. At
this point, the police intervened and
tried to accomplish what the goon
squad had failed to do: keep People's Front out of that march. They
also failed.
The People's Front is proud
to be associated with CPC(M-L)
because it recognizes that
CPC(M-L) members have always
been in the forefront of the
struggle against repression and exploitation of the people. The People's Front blames the rich and their
state for racist and fascist attacks,
and is organizing the people to
develop resistance to these attacks
based on their own strength. The
BCOFR and its apologists have a
very cozy and friendly attitude
toward the state. They seek money
from this state. To them, neither
the state nor racist attacks have any
class basis. BCOFR propagates the
harmful illusion among the people
that the state of the rich, in spite of
its sordid and burtal history, in
spite of its current feverish preparations for an aggressive inter-
imperialist war on the side of the
U.S., is not the instrument through
which the billionaires maintain their
rule, it is above classes and will actually protect the people. The
BCOFR and its friends must explain why they are using these profound differences to split and divide
the  people. Allen H. Soroka
UBC committee against racist
and fascist violence
TAs deserve a wage increase
"University won't pay!"
"TA's and markers are being offered an amount of money which
the university itself admits is fai
below a decent living wage."
"... markers (are paid) at a
rate comparable to that given to
candy-sellers in SUB."
Incredible! Surely such exploitation of grad students does not go on
at UBC? But yes, the university is
only paying, for example, a GTA 2
$4920 for an eight-month period.
This is certainly not a "decent living
wage".
The fact that a GTA 2 does not
perform a "decent living wage-
earning job" is, of course, irrelevant. The fact that he or she is paid
$13-.66 an hour has nothing to do
with  the  current demands  for a
wage increase. The fact that TA's
may schedule much of their work to
fit around their academic program
while candy-sellers must attend
evening classes to further their
education can also be disregarded.
The fact that TA's are receiving a
government-subsidized education is
neither here nor there. They are entitled to a wage increase amounting
to a cash handout from the university, aren't they? After all, it was a
printing error that removed the
words "the university guarantees
sufficient financial support to all
grad students" from the letter of
admission, wasn't it?
TA's   deserve   an   increase   in
wages . . . don't they?
name withheld by request Page 24
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1981
Letters
TAs becoming overpriced
After reading in last Tuesday's
Ubyssey the respective salary positions of the university administration and the Teaching Assistants
Union (TAU), I sat down with my
calculator and generated some interesting figures regarding the
salary debate.
The university offer of $5,835
over 8 months translates into
$729.40/mo., which means that
TA's would be earning $15.20 /
working hour. The union demand
of $7200 over the same period of
time means $900/mo., or an earning of $18.75/working hour (based
on an average of 12 hours labor per
week). An additional calculation
showed that if the university and
union salary positions were
translated into a full time, year-
round job, TA salaries would be approximately $32,000 or $36,000 per
year, respectively.
The point that was made very
clear to me, based on the above
calculations, is that teaching
assistants represent a very expensive labor pool from which the
university need not tap for teaching
positions. Consider that in
biological sciences, full-time sessional instructors currently make
only $ll-13/hr., and have the added advantage to the departments of
providing continuity of education
— not only from lab to lab, but also
on a year to year basis.
Only a strong committment to
help support graduate students has
restrained various faculties from
replacing TAs with sessionals.
However, if pressed to the cut-
budget wall, TAs should be aware
ffl[=HQ£P
SH3HQ
SQEHS
that their position'in the paid staff
is tenuous at best. My own department, botany, has already seriously
considered this option, but for this
year chose to support grads, but
with no promises for the next fiscal
year.
The issues of union security,
quality of education, and TAU irresponsibility (vis-a-vis the Chilean
telegrams) are topics hotly debated
and individual positions on these
areas depends on where TAs line
up politically. However, the bottom
line in the issue to be voted on Dec.
3 is the salary level TAs perceive
they deserve for services rendered to
the University. TA's have been asked by TAU supporters, via letters to
the University TAs have been ask-
fortunate and those future TAs. I
maintain that the high salary level
demanded by the TAU jeopardizes
the number of paid positions
available to present and future
graduate students.
Timothy Thompson
teaching assistant, botany
AMS CONCERTS
presents
DOUG Sc THE
SLUGS
GET ONE
NOW!
Your own free ticket
to a taping of the
NEW BUNDOLO SHOW
Thursday, Dec. 10 at 7:30
at the CBC's downtown
studios. Tickets at:
Sub Box Office.
.oki.   cbc
<*KC>r!   British Columbia
'«ffr    2/Cable 3
with
SPECIAL GUESTS
Just In Time!
CHRISTMAS SALE
Of* m+n m+m dm+m M+n 0fn M+m 4fm tM#n M+ti 0+n 0+« 0+* M^rn
fiPTgQ99
SEHHD
SDHES
CANTERBURY RUGBY
Pants • Jackets
Shirts •  etc.
Sweaters
SLIGHT DEFECTS AND RETURNS
SELLING FOR 50% OFF
Limited Quantities!
SHOES - UP TO 30% OFF
1  Nike •  Adidas
Osaga        •  Pony
Autry •  Leather Deck Shoes
Puma
TENNIS RACQUETS
UP TO 40% OFF
ATHLETIC CLOTHING
UP TO 50% OFF
Track Suits
Sweat Shirts and Pants
Swim Suits
etc.
10% OFF ALL
SKI EQUIPMENT
Skiis •   Binding
Boots •  Poles
ACCESSORIES UP TO
40% OFF
ffl
999
Lower Mall SUB
"Across from The Pit"
999
SHSHD
[^hi'llZll-^   Open 9 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Monday through Friday    Ee3QHH@ Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 25
AMERICAN
'CDurcT
WHOLE
V), A*. 4   i .
. •* \ ■* i "*•*
■C-*-*-r-
J it if
DG3W A§0®
LKJ
FOR YEARS, CAMBODIA, UNDER THE
LEADERSHIP  OF  PRINCE NORODUM
SIHANOUK, HAD MANAGED TO STAY OUT
OF THE NIGHTMARISH   WAR IN NEIGHBORING VIETNAM   BY SUCCESSFULLY
PLAYING THE SUPERPOWERS OFF ONE
ANOTHER. AS THE WAR DRAGGED ON, THE
NORTH VIETNAMESE USED THE FAR
EASTERN  PART OF CAMBODIA TO TRANSPORT
AND STORE SUPPLIES.   THE U.S. DEMANDED  THAT  SIHANOUK  USE  MILITARY
FORCE TO REMOVE THEM.  SIHANOUK,
UNWILLING  TO EMBROIL   HIS PEOPLE
IN THE WAR, REFUSED.
LADS
THAILAW0
CAMBODIA
NORTH
VIETNAM
SOUTH
..VIETNAM
Y
THE NEW NIXON ADMINISTRATION
DECIDED TO   PLAY TOUGH. IN THE
EARLY   HOURS OF MARCH 18, W6--7,
AMERICAN 8-52 BOMBERS LEFT
GUAM TO BOMB NORTH VIETNAMESE. SANCTUARIES IN THE NEUTRAL
CAMBODIA.
*/•
Wn
*^.\N
y.
THE BOMBINGS ARE IN VIOLATION
OF BOTH US. AND INTERNATIONAL LAW.
x
3i
•y
THE U.S. CONSTITUTION SAYS THAT ONLY
CONGRESS MAY DECLARE WAR, CONGRESS
NEVER  HEARD ABOUT THE BOMBINGS,
LET ALONE APPROVED  IT.   MOST
STATE AND DEFENSE OFFICIALS   HAD
NO KNOWLEDGE OF THE BOMBINGS.
ELABORATE DOCTORING OF FLIGHT
PLANS AND OTHER STATISTICS WERE
MADE DAILY TO PROTECT THE
SECRET. TWO OF THE  CAMBODIA
POLICy'5  BIGGEST SUPPORTERS
WERE THEN-NIXON AIDES* HENRY
KISSINGER AND   ALEXANDER HAIG.
HAIG WAS INTIMATELY    INVOLVED
BOMBINGS.
THE JOINT CHIEFS WARNED NIXON
THAT CIVILIANS WERE VULNERABLE
IN THE BOMBINGS. THE WHITE
HOUSE APPARENTLY FELT THE CIVILIAN CASUALTIES  DIDN'T OUTWIEGH
THE BENEFITS   OF BOMBING THE
VIETNAMESE.  ABOUT   10,000 KHMER
(CAMBODIAN) CIVILIANS WERE KILLED.
gtC
A YEAR TO THE DAY AFTER
THE ILLEGAL BOMBINGS
WERE  STARTED, A COUP
OVERTHROWS  SIHANOUK. HIS
PRIME MINISTER, LOW NOL,
HEADS THE NEW GOVERNMENT,
WHICH THE U.S. IMMEDIATELY
RECOGNIZES. UNLIKE SIHANOUK,
LON NOL IS EAGER TO  RECEIVE  U.S. MILITARY AID
AND BEGINS TO CONSTRUCT
A CAMBODIAN ARMY TO
ATTACK   VIETNAMESE   ON
CAMBODIAN  TERRITORY.
MEANWHILE, THE KHMER
ROUGE, A MARXIST EXTREMIST
GUERRILLA ARMY, HAS BEEN
GROWING RAPIDLY.
SIX WEEKS LATER, NIXON APPEARS
OH US. TELEVISION...
W WWVWWV^VA/VvTvW
"IF, WHEN THE CHIPS ARE DOWN,
THE WORLD'S MOST POWERFUL
NATION, THE UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA, ACTS LIKE PITIFUL,
HELPLESS am. THE FORCES OF
TOTALITARIANISM AND ANARCHY
WILL THREATEN FREE W\T\(MS AND
AND FREE INSTITUTIONS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD."
A,
a A- A-
■^V     A,
t
I**!
M
lAwW
—^"TaT
WITH THOSE WORDS-AND
WITH   TWO WHITE HOUSE
SHOWINGS  OF THE MOVIE
"PATTON-12,000   US.
TROOPS WERE UNLEASHED
OH CAMBODIA.
TT&fe^VvVv   .V-WSS^gsre-r
THE DAY AFTER NIXONS
ADDRESS, DOZENS OF U.S.
CAMPUSES SHUT DOWN IN
PROTEST. AT OHIO'S KENT
STATE, THE NATIONAL GUARD
FIRED ON UNARMED STUDENTS,
KILLING FOUR AND WOUNDING
THIRTEEN. TWO STUDENTS
WERE ALSO KILLED AT MISSISSIPPI'S JACKSON STATE.
THE INVASION DOES NOTHING
TO IMPROVE THE U.S. MILITARY
SITUATION. IT MERELY DRIVES
THE VIETNAMESE  DEEPER
INTO  CAMBODIA.
IT ALSO PUSHES THOUSANDS
OF ENRAGED   CAMBODIAN
PEASANTS  INTO THE
RANKS OF THE KHMER ROUGE.
yminimmnm.iit.M
AN INCREDIBLY  FEROCIOUS
FIVE-YEAR CIVIL WAR
FOLLOWS. THE  U.S.
POURS MILLIONS OF
DOLLARS AND MILITARY
HARDWARE INTO LON
NOL'S CORRUPT ADMINISTRATION AND ARMY. BY
W-VTHE KHMER ROUGE
ARE WINNING. ON APRIL
17, WS- THEY CAPTURE
PHNOM PEHN, THE
CAPITAL. LED BY POL
POT, THEY EMBARK ON A
PROGRAM TO ELIMINATE
THE MORAL DECAY  AND
CORRUPTNESS OF THE
LON NOL REGIME.   THE
CITIES ARE EVACUATED.
0
THE KHMER ROUGE'S INSANE
CREED WAS THAT A PERSON
CORRUPTED   COULD  NEVER
BE   REHABILITATED   AND
HAD TO BE KILLED.  ONE TO
THREE  MILLION KHMERS DIE
IN THE PURGES AND RELOCATION, OUT OF AN ORIGINAL
EIGHT MILLION.
WELL KIDS, THE BEST £
READING THAT YOU CAN
GET ON THIS SUBJECT
IS "SIDESHOW: KISSINGER,
NIXON AND THE        J
DESTRUCTION OF CAMBODIA"
BY WILLIAM SHAWCROSS.
HAPPY READING. Page 26
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4, 1981
Budget limits
UBC's library
users, staff
From page 23
The survey showed that the real
sources of irritation were lack of
adequate study space, not enough
functioning copy machines, and
books not on the shelf when they
were needed. Unfortunately, the
current financial cutbacks make it
less likely that the library will be
able to improve these services.
Budget restrictions limit possibilities for improving copy services. It
is not likely that funds will be available to provide more machines in
busy locations, and more frequent
servicing is possible only if staff can
be reassigned from other duties.
But planning goes on even now.
The proposed Main library building, under consideration by the
Universities Council, incorporates
suggestions from this survey, such
as reducing the number of branch
libraries, increasing study space,
creating better copy facilities, and
providing better ways to control
magazines. The good response to
the survey makes it a valuable aid in
planning the UBC library system
for the '80s.
The complete report of the 1980
survey can be consulted at the
Sedgewick information desk.
Jocelyn Foster and Keith Bunnell
are hard working members of the
UBC library staff. Perspectives is a
column of information, opinion,
wit and abuse open to any member
of the university community.
Invest your graduate
degree wisely
You're looking for a high return on your
education and work experience. We're
looking for high performance on our people
investments.
People who are analytical, decisive,
people-sensitive, persuasive & ambitious.
People who'll move quickly to our middle
& senior management positions.
Could be we should be talking to each
other when we visit your campus in the
next few weeks.
Contact your Campus Placement Officer
for further information.
The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal
Why do
you think
they're
catedWes?
Condoms manufactured by Julius Schmid-can help keep you safe from
an unwanted pregnancy When used properly they can help keep you safe from the
transmission of venereal disease. And they can keep you safe from side effects
associated with other forms ol 'birth control.
All Julius Schmid condoms are electronically tested to assure dependability
and quality. So you'll be safe. __.
.ilius Schmid.
CONCORDIA   JL
UNIVERSITY  1&
Concordia University Graduate Fellowships
Master's level $6500 Doctoral level $7500
David J. Azrieli Graduate Fellowship $8000
application deadline:February 1, 1982
announcement of winners: April 1, 1982
commencement of tenure: September 1982 or
January 1983
For details and application forms, contact the Graduate Awards
Officer, S-305, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W.,
Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8. Tel.: (514) 879-7317
l'u\hMs wnudi) lit,'pen.I on. piocHu K tor people who re.ilK care
RAMSES
JULICS SCHMID OF CANADA LTD. W METROPOLITAN ROAD. TORONTO, ONTARIO MIR 218 MANUFACTURERS OF RAMSES SHEIK. WORM. EXCITA, FETHERLITL. FIESTA ANDFOUREX BRAND CONDOMS.
ON DECEMBER 4th
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS
WARREN BEATTY
DIANE KEATON
EDWARD HERRMANN
JERZY KOSINSKI
JACK NICHOLSON
PAUL SORVINO
MAUREEN STAPLETON
Photography by VITTORIO STORARO
Edited by DEDE ALLEN
ORIGINAL Music by STEPHEN SONDHEIM
Additional Music by DAVE GRUSIN
PRODUCTION DESIGN BY RICHARD SYLBERT
Costume Design by SHIRLEY RUSSELL
Written by WARREN BEATTY AND TREVOR GRIFFITHS
PRODUCED AND DIRECTED BY WARREN BEATTY
ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK ON COLUMBIA RECORDS AND TAPE?
SUBJECT TO CLASSIFICATION   Theatres Branch. Ont.
STARTS TODAY AT
A FAMOUS PLAYERS THEATRE NEAR YOU Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 27
AMS axes programs head
By DOUG SCHMIDT
There was an unpleasant
Christmas surprise for Alma Mater
Society programs and concert coordinator Meral Aydin this week.
Aydin, who had held the position
for two years, was fired Tuesday by
AMS general manager Charles Redden.
The vacancy left by the dismissal
was quickly filled by former AMS
vice president Peter Mitchell who
resigned in September.
However, the termination was
part of the AMS's overall plan to
trim its budget, according to a termination notice sent Aydin.
"I was presented with a notice of
possible termination of my position
on Nov. 24 by Redden," Aydin
said. "The next day the budget
(which would have eliminated her
position) was tabled by council and
I continued with business as normal."
"On Monday I returned to my
office after doing some off-campus
work to find that my office had
been cleared. There was a notice on
the door briefly stating that my services had been terminated due to a
lack of performance."
Redden had posted the notice,
she said.
Aydin questioned the rational for
cutting the programs committee.
Since she took the position, the
programs committee has made
$18,000 in profit, she said. "Why
would they want to get rid of a profitable organization?"
"The AMS budget committee
couldn't pass Commerce 101," she
said.
Although these funds were to be
refunnelled into capital purchases,
such as stating and lighting equipment, and into a broadening of the
while programs operation, Redden
refused to give release any of the
profits for such allocations, Aydin
said.
"It was scary, I didn't know what
was going on," she said.
Redden refused to deny any of
Aydin'5 allegation and declined
comment Thursday.
Aydin said she had no clear-cut
plans for the future, "it's all come
'as such a shock to me, I am certainly not going to accept the terms of
my termination."
ASSININE STAFF of vilest rag west of Blanca grin idiotically while trading
idioms and syntaxes for dangling modifiers and vituperative articles.
Shown disconnecting video display terminals, staffers finish job of wiping
out university's student records.   Usually urbane germalists exchange
—deb wilson photo
underwoods for olivettis in latest phase of modernization for glorious
newspaper. Staff, many of whom are ghost writers for UBC Reports, have
month off to contemplate falling grades and failing intellects.
'Another American tar-baby
By BRIAN JONES
American intervention in El
Salvador is responsible for the oppression of the people there, according to a Salvadorean student and
FDR representative who spoke at
UBC Nov. 27.
"There is only one reason why
the Salvadorean people do not obtain their liberty — U.S. intervention," Raul Pineda, speaking
through an interpreter, told 300
people in the SUB auditorium. "I
can see, we can see, the growth of
the help to the junta from the
Reagan administration," he added.
Pineda, who was an engineering
student at the National University
in San Salvador before it was closed
by the junta 18 months ago, condemned the American government
for sending economic aid and
military advisors to El Salvador.
This involvement is largely responsible for the turmoil in his country,
he said. "American advisors teach
everything from torture to major
military strategy," he charged.
The U.S. has no justification for
intervening in the affairs of any
Central American country, but they
are actively looking for an excuse to
intervene in El Salvador, said
Pineda. "It seems like Reagan is
willing to create another Vietnam.
He does not seem to understand
that in El Salvador there axe human
beings, and not laboratory rats who
will bend to his will."
But the American-backed junta
has not succeeded in quelling the
unified and increasing opposition
against it, said Pineda. "They have
not been able to stop us because we
are a whole nation."
Salvadorean students are active
in the liberation movement, and
have carried out health and literacy
campaigns in the countryside,
Pineda said.
He asked the audience, and
Canadians as a whole, to take action to stop U.S. intervention in El
Salvador. "This way the victory will
Coffins carried for unknown student
Canadian   University   Press   —
They carried coffins for the
'unknown student' through campus, padlocked a college administration building and burned a
mock federal budget.
Or they staged panels and forums
with administrators and badgered
provincial politicians.
Across B.C., post secondary
students condemned inadequate
funding and staggering tuition increases.
Students at Douglas College in
the' Vancouver suburb of New
Westminster padlocked the administration building doors at 7
a.m. Nov. 17. Said student council
president Kevin Hallgate in a
telegram to provincial education
minister Brian Smith: "we have
done in advance that which both
the federal and provincial governments are attempting. We have
denied access to an educational
facility."
The telegram, sent to Smith at the
provincial Social Credit party convention in Downtown Vancouver,
invited the minister to unlock the
doors with his choice of two keys.
One was marked "I am for education cutbacks." the other read: "I
am against cutbacks."
According to college council vice
president Seana Hamilton, the protest intended to publicize proposed
cuts in Douglas college's funding
and put Smith's position on cutbacks on record.
College principal Bill Day told
the assembled crowd of about 300
who picketed the administration
building and later packed the
cafeteria that he, at least, opposed
reduced funding to the college.
"There is no such thing as a
bureaucrat in favor of cutbacks,"
Day said.
One week later, about 100
students at nearby Surrey's
Kwantlen College marched through
the area's business section and torched a mock federal budget.
Student society president Bob
Powell criticized tuition increases
which could reach an additional
$370 next year. He now pays about
$150 each term for his second year
accounting program, but if budget
cuts are imposed he could pay more
than $1,000 at the University of
B.C. next year, he said.
Reduced transfer payments to the
province announced in the Nov. 12
federal budget "sounded the death
knell for post secondary" institutions," said B.C. Students' Federation deputy chair Rhonda Lavigne.
"It will mean disaster for the
community college system in our
province," she said.
At Simon Fraser University 15
members of the student society anti-
cutbacks team carried a coffin
through campus to a rally billed as
the funeral of the unknown student: one who can never attend
university because of prohibitive
costs.
The student society asked the
university board of governors considering a 22.7 per cent tuition fee
increase, "to moderate that increase and, more importantly, to
undertake a long term program to
protect the quality of education and
accessibility at this university."
The board approved the fee hike.
While faculty and staff pledged
support to student anti-cutbacks efforts university and college administrations are toeing the provincial government line. At Capilano
College board chair Hilda Rizen
told 80 students at a Nov. 17
meeting the board would continue
to work with the province.
And unlike an earlier faculty
association speaker who felt student
and faculty concerns "dovetailed,"
Rizen was; not interested in joining
the college's anti-cutbacks team.
"We must step in line with the
government thinking," Rizen said.
SFU president George Pedersen
told 120 students at a forum Nov.
19 that despite government non-
support of education, attracting
publicity to underfunding and to
pressure the province would be
useless.
He said he wanted to improve
SFU's poor image in B.C.'s
business and political community,
and "prove that SFU is of real
value to the province."
not be only our triumph, but will be
shared by all the people of Canada
and of the world."
The forum also featured Armando Paredes, who was a medical student at the National University
before it was ambushed and. occupied by the National Guard.
Paredes only recently arrived in
Canada and has joined Pineda for
the last leg of his cross-country
speaking tour, which so far has included 28 university and college
campuses.
Paredes said students are playing
a very important role in El
Salvador. "The university has been
closed for a year and four months,
but the students are still working
with the people," he said.
"Salvadorean students have a
history of being on the side of rights
and justice."
Paredes, like Pineda, condemned
the American-supported military-
civilian junta. Only about one per
cent of the people support the junta, he said, adding that anybody
who opposes the junta is killed by
the paramilitary groups or the army.
The forum was part of Solidarity
With Central America Week, which
was organized and sponsored by the
UBC's Latin America Solidarity
Committee.
Doug gone it all
He doesn't bark. He doesn't like to use the word 'cutback.' And
now he is leaving his post as UBC's beloved president.
Yes, the inevitable has happened. Doug Kenny, after six years as
president, is preparing for retirement.
He will be relieved of the nasty issue of funding shortfalls as of
June 30, 1983. In the meantime the search for his successor is on.
UBC's board of governors voted to set up an advisory committee
to assist the board in choosing a candidate. This committee will consist of four students, three faculty members, three deans, three
members of senate, four board members, three alumni association
members, one member of the non-academic administration and one
chair. (Don't all apply at once for his job.)
The new president, it is hoped, will be Canadian. The board has
the official responsibility of appointing a suitable candidate, but the
committee will advise and assist in this decision.
Kenny said he plans i:o teach again and to research in psychology.
He has spent 39 years in the university as student, teacher and administrator. Page 28
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1981
vista
This is the last Vista of the year,
so for the one or two people on this
campus who actually read this column, savor it.
The Vancouver Museum is
holding its largest exhibition ever,
in space and number of artifacts
displayed. Many of the items have
never been seen by the public before
and include stuffed animals, vases,
engines, etc. Sounds like a nice way
to spend a rainy Vancouver afternoon when you run out of drugs.
That little known but amazingly
popular night club where you have
to pay outrageous prices for beer
but can listen to good music, The
Savoy, featuring the B-Sides until
Saturday. The B-Sides are the
crazies who sing Bedtime for Bonzo, so bring your Ronnie masks and
ride on down.
The Savoy is also featuring Sweet
Dick the following week and Uncle
Wiggly's Hot Shoes Blues Band will
be playing Dec. 17 to 19. The Savoy
is located in Gastown at Number 6
Powell street.
And the music of old Vienna, for
those   with   more   discriminating
•K 2T
^**v:
tastes, is featured in a Fantasy in
the Orpheum on Monday, Dec. 28
at 8:30 p.m. and the following day
at 7:30 p.m. and on Wednesday
again at 8:30 p.m. The Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra will play Johann Strauss's most popular tunes
and soprano Nancy Hermston (and
the Hermits) will sing Laughing
Song and Audition Aria.
The performance is sponsored by
Imperial Oil who want to look like
good guys as they smile and take
your money at the pumps. What is
the relationship between politics
and art?; to be continued in next
term's Vista.
Doug and the Slugs, another
music group, will be playing on
Thursday, Dec. 17 in the Commodore ballroom at 870 Granville
Street. Show starts at 8:15 p.m. and
the guest artists will be the B-Sides,
who we all know, are famous for
their song about American president Ronnie Raygun.
On Saturday International
House, located near the Asian Centre is holding a Latvian and Esto
nian Folk dance. It starts at 7 p.m.
and will continue until 11:30 p.m.
"Gee Mom I want to go, back to
Estonia, gee Mom I want to go
home."
The Native Indian Students'
Union will also be holding a
Christmas social at 6 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 11 at International
House. And there will be an El
Salvador benefit dance on New
Year's beginning at 7:30 p.m.
]\o nianbut a
BlocHJiead ever
wi&tebut for
money!     CJ
— Samuel Johnson
. . . And there's $600 in prize money for UBC student writers
in the UBC Alumni Chronicle Creative Writing Competition.
Details at Speakeasy, SUB or call the Alumni Office, Cecil
Green Park, 228-3313. Final date for entries, January 30,
1982.
APPLICATIONS
for
Student Administrative
Commission 0 MEMBER)
Forms available in SUB 238
Must be turned in to SUB 238 by
4:00 p.m. Monday, December 7th
!   WRITERS!
AThe Arts Undergrad Society.
f wants your stories, plays and f
k poems for a fiction magazine to a
▼ be published in late January. Iff
A you study, teach or work at UBC, A
" and want to see your fiction *
|published, submit typed, double-!
.spaced manuscripts to the A.U.S., .
|Buch. 107, before January 8, |
1982. There will be a $100 prize a
for the best work submitted, so f
submit! A
PHOTOGRAPHIC
SPECIALIST
RESUME
•   PASSPORT
872-3821 "
• (Main & 20th Ave.)
£     3555 MAIN ST.,
1
VISA
;.<
VANCOUVER
PHOTO STUDIOS
J
A CHRISTMAS STOCKING
FUND
AT
THE PIT
NOV. 30-DEC. 16
ALL CONTRIBUTIONS OF TINNED FOOD AND MONEY
WILL   BE   DONATED   TO   THE   SALVATION   ARMY
Thank You For Your Support. Merry Christmas!
FOR THEATRE INFO CALL 687-1515
WARNING: Completely concerned with sex.
— B.C. Director
BENEATH THE VALLEY
OF THE ULTRA
VIXENSand UP
SHOWTIMES: 2:16 3:40 6:16 8:40
8:20 9:60
RUSS MEYER'S
VOGUE
918  GRANVILLE
685-5434
OOEON
881  GRANVILLE
682-7468
{mature)warn,NG: Many ■c"n••
mey frighten young children.-B.C. Director
duNb/i
SHOWTIMES: Odeon 2
9:46: Dunbar 7:30 9:40
DUNBAR at 30th
224-7252
TIME
?— BANDITS
...they didn't make history,
„   they stole it!
SEAN CONNERY
| /VaaTIImN WARNING:    Religious   ridicule;
[ \£»£^Z5/ some   nudity   and   coarse   language.—B.C. Director
851   GRANVILLE
685-6828
SHOWTIMES:
2:00 3:60 6:40 7:40 9:40
WARNING: Violent, gory
and frightening scenes
throughout.
— B.C. Director
SHOWTIMES:
STATES    2:00   6:00
851   GRANVILLt        10:00. SCAN4:008:00
685-6828
CORONET
/1UEREDSMTES
Cmatwh)
AMBIE at 18th
WARNING:   Occasional
very   coarse   language.
— B.C. Director
SHOWTIMES:
7:30 9:30
TICKET TO
HEAVEN
t^S)"*.Rz0!.^™-"-T Continental
occasional    suggestive    V   ^-* J.J.*lJ-iA*«   X.J.  *.l_i
Divide
DROAdwAV
scenes. —B.C. Director
SHOWTIMES:
7:15 9:30
70 7   W. BROADWAY
8741927
JOHN BELUSHI. BLAIR BROWN
(general)
I SHOWTIMES: 7:00 9:15
WARNING: Occasional swearing.—B.C. Director
707 ^""^"CHRISTOPHER REEVE MARGOT KIDDER
FOR APPOINTMENT
228-1471
5736 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(Next to Lucky Dollar Store)
FOR
WOMEN and MEN
TRY ONE OF OUR HAIRCUTTERS
ken hippert
hair company ltd.
Student discount with presentation of ad by Terry, Karin and Debbie
Expires Dec. 10, 1981. Friday, December 4, 1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 29
Basketball not for the UBC 'Birds
By SCOTT McDONALD
Ouch!
UBC men's basketball team has
played the University of Victoria
Vikings three times this season. The
first time was in a tournament at
Simon Fraser when the Vikings beat
UBC 77-42. The other times were in
Canada West league play in Victoria where UVic won 69-49 last Friday and 94-59 on Saturday.
In both weekend games UBC was
totally outclassed. Friday night
both teams shot badly but Victoria
killed UBC on the boards. The
'Birds only pulled down 15 defensive and 7 offensive rebounds while
UVic grabbed 31 and 24 respectively.
UBC shot 36 per cent from the
floor with Pat West as top scorer
netting 16. Jamie Boyle with 10
points was the only other UBC
player to hit double figures.
Victoria shot 37 per cent which is
well below its league leading 47 per
cent average. The top Viking scorer
was Eli Pasquale with 18 points.
Victoria was 11 for 14 from the
foul line while UBC managed a
dismal 3 for 7.
Again, on Saturday 5 of UBC's 7
shots were made. Victoria, on the
other hand, scored 24 points off 36
shots from the line.
UBC drowns UVic
By BRUCE CAMPBELL
The UBC Thunderbirds swimming and diving team travelled to
Victoria Saturday and came away
with a strong first place finish. The
University of Victoria was little
competition, as the 'Birds completely dominated the meet,
outscoring UVic 191-42.
The UBC women proved to be
very strong with eight swimmers
making the Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union times.
This enables them to compete in the
nationals, which are being held at
UBC in March. Ronda Thomasson
was the top woman for the 'Birds,
winning four events, and making
C.I.A.U. qualifying times in the
50m freestyle and 200m individual
medley. Kim Austin won three
events, and was a full five seconds
under the C.I.A.U. qualifying time
in her 100m breaststroke win.
Coach Jack Kelso said Austin
should be the favorite to win the
100m breaststroke at the nationals
this spring. Nancy Brown, with
three firsts, qualified for the nationals in the 100m and 200m
freestyle. Team captain Karen Van
Sacker was second in three events,
but also made CIAU qualifying
times.
In the men's division the 'Birds
had three men make CIAU
qualifying times. Ian Robertson
won two races, with his qualifying
time coming in the 1500m freestyle.
Neal Carley had two first with his
qualifying time coming in his leg of
the medley relay. Kevin Stapleton
also qualified in the 200m and 400m
freestyle. Team captain Mike Blon-
dal also had a strong meet with
three first place finishes.
Kelso was very pleased and impressed with his team's performance, "our women are coming on
very strong. We have eight women
with CIAU qualifying times and I
expect another two or three of our
women to qualify in their events."
The strength of the women's team
can be seen by the fact that UBC
will be sending from 8 to 10 swimmers to the nationals whereas most
universities only send five or six
women.
In the diving competition, both
the men's and women's divisions
were won by UBC divers. Alan Hay
was first in the one and three metre
events and Nancy Bonham won the
same events in the women's division.
This was the only dual meet of
the fall for the 'Birds. Kelso said
UVic didn't provide much competition, having only one good male
swimmer and one good female
swimmer. In the diving division
there was only one diver that gave
UBC any competition.
Next action for the 'Birds will be
during Christmas when they head
south to compete in Arizona.
The other difference between the
weekend games was Victoria's
shooting. Only two Vikings were
under 50 per cent as the team as a
whole shot an outstanding 60 per
cent. From the floor Gerald
Kazanowski lead UVic with 19
points and Bruce Hamilton scored
18. The only thing that saved the
game from a complete wipe-out was
that UBC's Bob Forsyth came alive
and hit for 28 points.
Victoria is now 4-0 in league play
while UBC has fallen to 1-3. The
Vikings are the defending Canadian
champions, and with four national
team members are favored to repeat
in that role.
The UBC men were more successful than the UBC women. The
women were also up against a
defending national champion, the
Vikettes.
UVic won 90-46 and 88-33.
UBC's top scorers were Karen
Stewart with 15 points on Friday
night and Linda King with 8 on
Saturday.
The junior  varsity teams  were
also in Victoria. The junior men    jfc
lost 62-51 and 84-77. The only UBC     f|
team to win on the Island was the
junior women who took both games
with scores of 54-45 and 46-44.
— arnold hedstrom photo
OKAY SO THE PHOTO is a week old. Number 13 is Lloyd from Richmond, the guy in the lower left by the ref is
Bob from somewhere. The player in the lower right, who is going bald, is Karl from Calgary. Karl thinks cars and
basketball mix. Your agent does not know who the other people are.
Volleyballers fall in fourney
By SCOTT McDONALD
When you host your own tournament you should know better than
to invite the best team in the province.
The UBC women's volleyball
team was beaten by Chimos 'C' in
the final of the UBC Fall invitational Saturday at War Memorial
gym, 15-1, 17-7. The Chimos team
is composed of players who
represented Canada at the 1976
Olympics and UBC coa<;h Sandy
Silver said it is good for her team to
face stiff competition like Chimos.
Rugby slips again in Cup
"This is the best team we will
face and it gives us experience in
preparing for the Canada West,"
Silver said.
In earlier rounds UBC defeated
Lightning and SFU. In the SFU
game UBC's Karen Blair collided
with a team mate and was taken to
the hospital with a concussion and
neck injury. But Silver said Blair
should be back in January.
UBC is currently third in league
standings after two tournaments
and Silver said that by the end of
the fifth and final tournament UBC
should be in top spot.
The UBC men are also third but
face a slightly more difficult road to
the top and only playoff spot.
Calgary with a large lead after the
first two tournaments, can only be
caught by UBC if it is upset by some
of the lower teams in the league.
The league is still deciding
whether to revert back to a playoff
between the top two teams at the
end of the fifth tournament.
UBC coach Dale Ohman said if
this does not happen then the team
which represents the league in the
nationals at the end of the season
might not be the best team, but
rather the one that won the most
games at the beginning of the
season.
By SCOTT McDONALD
In the past five years the UBC
rugby team has won the McKechnie
Cup three times and shared it once.
Injuries and a lack of scoring have
reduced UBC's chances of continuing this streak.
On Wednesday night at Thunderbird stadium UBC dropped a close
game to the Vancouver Rugby Union reps 9-0. It was the third loss for
UBC in Cup action and the 'Birds
can now only finish 3-3 at best.
UBC's chances of repeating as
champions now rely on the results
of the games between the other
three teams in the Cup play. Fraser
Valley must defeat both Victoria
and Vancouver and they must tie.
Vancouver's scoring came off
three penalty kicks, two of which
were in the first 10 minutes. These
penalties came from broken plays.
UBC coach Donn Spence said the
score was not indicative of the play.
He added UBC played very well defensively and dominated the second
half but could not convert any of its
chances.
UBC currently has four starters
out through injury. Spence said the
replacements are playing well, but it
takes time for the play to run
smoothly again.
UBC has gone through two
scrum-halfs, a prop, and a back
row man. Spence is hoping these
players will be back after Christ-
On Saturday UBC had a regular
Vancouver Rugby Union match and
came away with a more favorable
result as it downed Kats 15-13. And
like the Wednesday game the score
is not indicative of the play as UBC
was leading 15-3 with one minute
left when a letdown enabled the
Kats to score 10 quick points.
Keith Spencer scored UBC's only
try off a five yard scrum. Spence
said UBC completely dominated the
game and should have scored more
points.
As in the McKechnie Cup, the
damp made it difficult to handle the
ball. The UBC Braves downed the
Kats second team 4-0 and the UBC
Totems turned back the third Kats
team 26-8.
»11«
Birdwatch
Hockey
The men's team dropped a pair
of close games against the University of Saskatchewan on the
weekend. The 'Birds lost 3-1 on Friday night and 6-4 on Saturday
night. UBC is now 1-7 on the season
and Saskatchewan is 5-3. The final
goal on Saturday was into a open
net as UBC had pulled the goalie
for an extra attacker.
Cross-country
Pat McDonagh of the men's
cross-country team placed ninth out
of a field of 2,000 runners in the
Seattle   marathon   on   Saturday.
McDonagh was the second Canadian to finish the race.
Water Polo
The men's team was in Edmonton on the weekend and placed
fourth in the Western Canada
University Challenge Cup. The top
scorers for UBC were Gill Van
Bunen with 10 goals and Lanny
Ellenwood with five. Both Van
Bunen and Ellenwood were named
to the tournament all-star team.
Field Hockey
The men's team was knocked out
of the Vancouver playoffs with a
1-0 loss to the Hawks. The junior
women beat North Van. 4-0. Page 30
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1981
CHARIOTS OF FIRM
RICH
and
FAMOUS
/J%?^?*,
m^1
^
«?
i \
th'
^
«.
FOR CHRISTMAS
GIUETHE G1FTOF
MOVIES!
v'a^'^'^vU^UM^'-'.
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
FAMOUS PLAYERS THEATRES
GIFT CERTIFICATES
Available in Attractive
$5, $10 or $20 Booklets
Accepted at face value at all Famous Players
and affiliated theatres across Canada.
NOW ON SALE:
CAPITOL 6, VANCOUVER CENTRE, STANLEY,
PARK ROYAL, RICHMOND SQUARE, COLUMBIA,
LOUGHEED MALL, GUILDFORD, PARAMOUNT
AND WILLOWBROOK 6.
?4 ■itfA-ifraifr-A'tA'Aim.-im.-im.-lAU
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
tt
i
tiKmpou
PRIVATE
BENJAMIN
BtNITIKYNOlMk
m ■'•wiiiSm
T
of the
iheTmnch
pi itpnnnt\
r^oman Friday, December 4,1981
THE!    UBYSSEY
Page 31
Religion for money
It is sad that Jason Barton, the
one Christian on campus to respond
to my letter of Oct. 29, should have
so misunderstood the main point of
my arguments against evangelical
Christians and the tactics they use
to win converts to their beliefs. In
that letter I stated that the use of
threats, hard-sell techniques and
guilt trips do not belong in a
religion which stresses the power of
love. And that these Christians do
more damage to their religion than
good with their zealous, simplistic
approach to life.
Barton wonders why I have my
defenses up, and why I don't like it
when people try to overcome those
defenses by sheer persistence. The
implication being that if I would
just relax and be a bit more naive,
the pure, blinding light of the Truth
(his, I assume) would shine in and I
would be in a contented state of
bliss for the rest of my life. Or
rather for eternity, I suppose. Well,
the fact of the matter is that there
are all sorts of crazies running
around out there who believe that
they, and they alone, possess the
secret of life. If I did not have my
defenses up, I would run the risk of
being a Moonie on Tuesday, a Hare
Krishna devotee on Wednesday,
and perhaps a Solar Druid by Friday. Every sane person has
defenses, and they are there to protect him from the likes of the fates
just mentioned.
Barton makes much of the importance of having a "searching
mind receptive to concepts that
should . . . have a sound intellectual basis." He speaks of facing up
to doubts, and unbiased attitudes.
Coming from a self-avowed Christian, a Seventh Day Adventist,
those statements are so hypocritical
they would make even a politician
blush. What is the definition of a
Christian? One who publicly states,
and believes in his heart, that Christ
was the Son of God, that he died on
the cross for our sins and then rose
from the dead. All of this is fervently believed in by our hapless convert
even though there is not a shred of
evidence to support it.
The entire structure of Christianity is based on faith. Testament after
testament in the Bible exhort the
reader to trust in God, have faith
and be saved. Barton writes that
"truths of any sort . . . are seldom
comprehended until people come to
confront them with an unbiased attitude." That he should have the
audacity to speak of an open mind
and unbiased attitudes is a moving
testimonial to the strength of his
convictions, if not the wisdom.
One wonders how "receptive"
Barton would be to Buddhism, or
Hinduism? Perhaps at this point I
should note that I was in a Christian
Fellowship group at UBC for a
year, "actively sought answers,"
and found Christianity sorely lacking. I met many people, mostly
seekers of instant karma, who had
no idea of the hardships awaiting
those who choose to really live their
lives in accordance with certain
spiritual principles. Christians
discussing poverty in luxurious
apartments, new cars downstairs.
It would have been laughable if
they had not been so much in
earnest.
Barton has difficulty understanding the distinction I drew between
evangelical Christians and their
more reflective colleagues. I mentioned the spiritual blackmail, etc.,
that the evangelists indulge in to
woo their prospective victims. The
Bible-thumpers preach instant
salvation and eternal bliss. It is
almost as if they have a quota to
fill, and are not concerned with the
people so much as their tally sheets.
"Four saved, two damned. Not bad
for today." And by doing this they
turn thinking people off of Christianity altogether.
"Pure" Christianity, by contrast,
would be a form of religion in
which one is more tolerant, loving
and merciful towards one's fellow
man. It is doubtful whether this
brand of Christianity exists today.
When I spoke of Christianity as a
pre-packaged philosophy of life
with all questions answers and no
loose ends sticking out, I was referring to the evangelical Christians,
not Christians as a whole.
I spoke of street-corner preachers
and their over-loud music and
amplified arguments as an invasion
of my privacy. Barton seems to
think this is unjustified because ax-
throwing contests and other noisy
events take place outside of SUB
quite often. The difference, and it is
a big difference, is that they never
try to convince me to become an ax-
thrower. If they did, then I would
consider them guilty of invading my
privacy as well.
Barton thinks hard-sell techniques are justified if the objectives
are noble. Translation: The ends
justify the means. Well, an interesting theory, and one that got
Nixon into a great deal of hot
water. Apathy is the problem, he
says, and we must do what we can
to break through to those poor ignorant students. Commendable,
but very condescending. Let people
make up their own minds. If
somebody is looking for answers,
flogging him over the head with
your version will not, or should not,
convince him that yours is
necessarily the right one. And if it
does work, then you have won
yourself a rather weak convert, and
a shallow victory.
It is interesting that Barton felt
the need to use such terms as
"disgruntled hack," "ridiculous
opinions" and "the foot in mouth
parts of his letter." Strange terms
indeed to be coming from
somebody who is unbiased and not
defensive.
Chris Bocking
psychology 4
The great male burden
I should like to offer an honest
gut reaction to Julie Wheelwright's
article on pornography. First, I
should like to laud her use of
English — the style is readable and
avoids any of the unnecessary lexical and syntactical "muscle
flexing." Three cheers for the
demise of turgidity in writing of any
kind and especially in journalism
which is read and trusted by
millions. Second, it would be difficult indeed to condone the
sometimes all too blatant exploitation of women such as one so often
finds in the hard-core porno
magazines. I am unconditionally in
favor of the liberation of all human
beings wherever they are shackled
by the tyranny of social oppression.
Bravao, Julie! May more women
(many more) have the courage to
take an active stance in voicing their
views and become more involved in
matters of social relevance.
Regrettably, as is the case with
too many men vis-a-vis women, you
seem to lack understanding of the
male sexuality. Men need sexual
release on a regular basis. The lack
of it may lead to emotional and certain physiological disorders.
May I suggest reading Portnoy's
Complaint and then doing a sampling of your male friends and/or
relatives asking them to read it (in
whole or in part) and to comment
on the extent to which this book
reflects the way they truly feel and
whether it really is just a ludicrous
exaggeration of the nature of male
sexuality?
Or better still, do a random and
(to ensure honesty and avoid false
claims to machodom) anonymous
poll of (say) 100 men at UBC, asking them simply to indicate if they
would like more or less sex than
they're already getting. Then conduct the same poll on women, and
you'll find a significant difference.
This difference is what more men
and women need to become aware
of if we are going to help one
another to share a healthier and
more fulfilled life together in these
times of social alienation.
What vie need, Julie, is not
another polemic condemning pornography and offering no realistic
and workable alternatives, but articles which bring men and women
closer together, which encourage
each of the sexes to understand the
wants and needs of the other and to
become truly aware of the meaning
of "different but equal."
Allen Learn
former UBC student
THE ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
is sponsoring
A STUDENT-FACULTY
CHRISTMAS
SOCIAL
with
Rum, Handel's Messiah,
Eggnogg
4:30-6:30 p.m. THURSDAY,
DECEMBER 110
at Buchanan Lounge
The next in the continuing sags of Ubyssey production; how many
screws up can occur in 36 pages of ads and copy? Just believe us that
the number is too high for sane people who only have to worry about
courses, to possibly contemplate. Yes everyone, this is a plea to join
the paper, help out the harassed and frenzied few who pull together
the paper three times a week. It's free and freaky, 241K SUB.
The black sheep of Canadian liquors.
lUkon
Jack
Soft-spoken and smooth,
its northern flavour
simmers just below the
surface, waiting to be
discovered. Straight, on the
rocks, or mixed, Yukon Jack
is a breed apart; unlike any
liqueur you've ever tasted.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky. mm
Page 32
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4,1981
C.I.T.R.
and
THE PIT
presents
THE
QUARTER FINALS
"HOT
AIR
SHOW
FEATURING LIVE
STICKERS
TEMPEST
FRENCH LETTERS
INTERPOL
Cheapest Free Entertainment in Town
MON., NOV. 30th
9:00 P.M.
NO COVER
ii
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE hist delivery!
228-9513
4610 West 10th Ave.
icM\rfc
Jack's
Cabaret
WITH
HOT ROCK
Appearing Dec. 4 & 5
BRIAN LIARS
Dec. 7-12
DESTINY
932 Granville Mall       687-6418
Great Sandwiches,
Fabulous Desserts,
Cappuccinos,
Espressos
Licensed Premises
k When the 5
t
—Vic   V
When the
studying's done —
look here _
for fun! v
4^^^/^*^>yff^#/v«)4^^ft^-*^
MON. Wet "10" T-shirt
Contest
TUES. Whip Cream
Wrestling
WED. Wet Jock
Night
THURS. Ladies Night
yrss
TOP LIVE BANDS NIGHTLY
FRI. £r SAT.
THIS WEEK:
Two Bands
KARROLL BROS.
&
DRAGON FLY
NEXT WEEK:
TWO BANDS:
VACATIONERS &
BOX TOPS
FREE PASS WITH THIS AD (Mort-Thurs)
315 E. Broadway 879-4651 Free Parking
OVe/s
eson->
Cftacc
HOTCL
Now Appearing:    _
DECADE
1006 Granville
681-6341
TRADITION
2272 W. 4th Ave.
While still keeping to our
traditional cozy Greek
atmosphere, we have now
expanded in order to accomodate
your Wedding, Birthday, Party,
lunch or dinner. You'll be taken-
with the Full Array of our
delicacies served to your banquet.
We even take care of the Cake!
• COMBINATION PLATTERS
• SKEWER CHOICES
(SOUVLAKIA)
• POPULAR SPECIALTIES
• ORETIKA •  HORIATIKI
tTJtie QUiEHtiire (Stieese 3nn
A Sraaitional English ftcutaurant
4686 Dunbar at 30th 224-2S21
3 COURSE LUNCH SPECIAL     3.96
DINNER SPECIALS from 4.JB
Plus complete Menu Selection
\ of Salad. Sandwich and
\ House Specialties
tJOpen: 11:30 - Midnight
Monday thru Saturday
ENJOY ENGLISH PUB STYLE
FOOD IN AN AUTHENTIC SETTING
Fully Licensed Premises
Make "The Cheese "Your Local
LUV-A-FAIR
Vancouver's #1
New Wave Club
175 Seymour St.
11  a.m.-l  a.m.   Monday to  Saturday 4-11   p.m.   Sunday 736-2118
,^m 0^m Afm Aft* /tym* t^iF'^m/M^»0^nA^0^
ROOTS ROCKERS REOOAE
•2 RANDS'
SUNDANCE
DIDO
""ne HANDPEOPLE
SATURDAY DEC. 12,8:30 PM
•*■*•_ SUB BALLROOM / UBC_
TICKETS: CBO 501 WEST GEORGIA, ALL LOWER
MAINLAND WOODWARDS STORES, AMS TICKET
OFFICE/UBC, ERNIE'S HOT WAX & BLACK SWAN
FOR INFO: 687-2801
A Highlile Dance — Children & Outrageous People Welcome
RED LEAF    .
RESTAURANT ^
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK-UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISE
Mon.-Fri. 11:30*00 p.m.
CL08ED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
4 00 p m -9:00 p.m
r»*C Wsstam Partcway
*ff*      J f L Vancouvar. 8 C
Opposite Chpvror Statio
VBG GaiKpaft
Pizza
Steak & Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
r-,    Mon    Thurs    11 30 a 1-1   2 00  p ui
O m mi   3 00 p iv     Sm:   4 00 p mi   3 On   ,
■1 00 p in    1 00 .1 in
2136 Western Parkway
AGADIR RESTAURANT
fcy)\AMBR4*0
v
K-:
<o
^
The Only MOROCCAN Cuisine
10% Student Discount
15% for Parties over 10 People
1156 Robson St. 682-1110
Xmas p-p
p-partiesa
Unfortunately the bozo
who wrote the headline
had a terrible stutter. But
never-the-less, his info was
correct. For a great and
inexpensive Xmas bash head
to 1' F F FJ- Burger & Sons.
15 classic burgers. And other
great stufffff. 2966 W. 4th Ave.
bv Bavswater. Open dailv
from 11:30a.m. Call 734-8616.
Free gold
Boy, wouldn't that be something. And believe us,
pal, our staff would be the first
in line to pick up that gratis
glittery stuff.
But they'll just have to be
content with serving our 15
gigantic, creative burgers,
super salads and other tasties.
Open 7 days a week,
11:30 a.m. till like late.
2966 West 4th Avenue. And
remember all burgers less than
$500 an ounce.
*
GEORGIA
HOTEL
Proudly Presents
GEORGIA EXECUTIVE
HAIRSTYLISTS
Under New Management
For Appointment Call
801 W. Georgia 681-5615
Lower Level
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
(Self Serve
Restaurant)
& 5732 *>
•**■ UNIVERSITY BLVD/V
r^T Eat In and Take Out i£
>f£ OPEN EVERY DAY ^,
«     4:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.      *^
** Phone: 224-1313 A
ROTIMAN DELI
CARIBBEAN FOODS
Rod—Curry Chicken—Beef—
£tow— Poulourri Rice TV' Peas
Take Out—Catering—Delivery
Tel: 876-5066
Open Tuesday through
Sunday 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.
922 Kingsway - Opp. ICBC
NOW, A NEW
BURGER THAT'S
MORE BURGER
THAN
BUN
Introducing the new hamburger from the DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER store. In a new "six to a pound" size that really
gives you some meat for your money. Instead of a banquet of
bun.
You see, while other burger chains
get as many as ten hamburgers from a
pound of beef, we get only six. And
that gives you "more burger than
bun." A burger that's tender,
deliciously-cooked. Every time. The
new burger from DAIRY QUEEN
BRAZIER.
Dairy
Queen
brazier
2601 W. Broadway Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 33
Tween Classes
TODAY
CITR
Dateline International: international affairs in
focus, 3 p.m., cable 100 fm.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE
Literature table: Marxist literature and discus-
sion, SUB lobby.
BSU
Bible study, doctrine of person, noon, Angus
215.
MUSLIM STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Muslim Juma (Friday prayer), all Muslims requested to attend, noon. International House
lower lounge.
NDP CLUB
Information table, all week, SUB. Get Socialist
and Socred Scandal Calendars cheep.
McGEER FOR PRESIDENT CLUB
Discussion followed by praise and worship,
noon. Old Admin 107. (This is not a cult group.)
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES
Laurence Vigrass speaks on geothermal energy
from sedimentary basins, 3:30 p.m.. Geological
Sciences 330a.
GAYS/LESBIANS OF UBC
Christmas dinner-dance, 6 p.m., UBC faculty
club. Tickets $15 at SUB 237b. Tickets *W at
door, 9 p.m., for dance only.
FROSH COMMITTEE
Christmas dance, $2.50 per person, 8 p.m. to
midnight, SUB party room.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Position open for internal secretary. Contact
CSA office.
ASTRONOMY CLUB
Film: Seeing the Universe, ail welcome, 5:30
p.m.. Geophysics 140.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
First bzzr garden for members and those interested in becoming members, 5 p.m., SUB
212.
GEOLOGY DEPARTMENT
Dance with band Pacheena, 7:30 p.m., SUB
ballroom. Meet Santa, suffer door prizes, take
advantage of liquor licence. Tickets $5 from
AMS box office or Geology building. No tickets
at door.
SATURDAY
CITR
Behind Four Walls: A look at housing as it affects the UBC student, cable 100 fm.
THUNDERBIRD WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS
UBC vs. Seattle University 1 p.m., Osborne centre, gym B. All spectators welcome. Warm-up at
12 noon.
SUNDAY
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Game with Simon  Fraser University, 5 p.m.,
Aquatic centre.
SAILING CLUB
Interclub racing, 1 p.m., Jericho Sailing Club.
CITR
Laughing Matters: A documentary series looking
at the history of recorded comedy, 2:30 p.m.,
cable 100 fm.
CHRISTMAS CANDLELIGHT SERVICE
Annual Christmas candlelight service, 8 p.m.,
St. Andrew's Hall chapel.
MONDAY
NORTH AMERICAN JEWISH
STUDENTS' NETWORK
Information table on Soviet student, Misha Taratuta,  who  has been forbidden to leave the
USSR, noon, SUB foyer.
CITR
The Melting Pot: Geography graduate student
Tony Charles is interviewed by Harry Hertscheg
on his research into B.C. fisheries, 3 p.m., cable
100 fm.
Making Waves: Issues of concern to the university community, 4:30 p.m.
Offbeet: A comic roundup of the week's offbeat
news, 7 p.m.
TUESDAY
STUDENTS FOR AN ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 207.
AVENTIST (sic) CHRISTIAN STUDENTS' CLUB
Discussion on I Corinthians, basic Christian principles applied to daily living, noon, SUB 213.
Everyone is welcome.
CITR
Gay Issues: Produced by the gay people of UBC,
3 p.m., cable 100 fm.
Thunderbird Sports Report: A look at intercollegiate and intramural sports at UBC, 5 p.m.
Airstage: Radio drama produced by Joe Marsh
and the CITR players, 9 p.m., written by students in the UBC creative writing department.
STUDENTS FOR AN ACCESSIBLE EDUCATION
Petition distribution and planning meeting,
noon, SUB 207.
WEDNESDAY
COMMITTEE AGAINST RACIST
AND FASCIST VIOLENCE
Literature table, noon, SUB foyer.
UBC BRIDGE CLUB
Informal bridge night, 7 p.m., Le:he in SUB.
THURSDAY
AMNESTY UHC
Human rights day rally for the disappeared, 4
p.m., 400 Granville mall.
Film: Musi: Freedom Fail?, noon, SUB 111. NFB
film in honor of international human rights day.
EIG
Slide show and discussion of tho Skagit Valley
flooding controversy with Tom Perry of the
ROSS committee, noon, Geog. tOO.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Prayer meeting, noon, SUB 113.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Christmas special, noon, SUB 111. Readers
should note this is the same time and place as
the Amnesty film, so one of these groups is
wrong.
UPCOMING
THEATRE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Friday, Dec. 11, general meeting, noon, Frederic
Wood theatre building green room.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Sunday, Dec. 13, Children's Christmas party,
meet Same, goodies for children nine years and
under, magician, singing an entertainment, refreshments for all, 2:30-5 p.m , International
House upper lounge. Advance tickets only —
phone 22U-5021 before Dec. 11. Glen Sanford
will show up in a trench coat.
ONGOING
CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM
Accepting applications for co-op ed programs in
engineering and forestry until Dec. 15. All interested students in science 1, applied science 1
and forestry 1 are eligible.
Hot Flashes
Geology rocks
with Clous
'Twas some weeks before
Christmas.
But all over campus
Few clubs were Inactive
There were parties and dances.
This hot flash has been suddenly
struck by a creative energy shortage, and as an emergency measure
the president of hot flashes has put
an end to all rhymes. This flash will
now continue in clear concise prose.
Today there will be a whole shit-
load of holiday happenings. The
Campus Crusade for Christ is the
first off the mark with a noon hour
Christmas special in SUB 111.
The gays/lesbians of UBC start
their dinner-dance at 6 p.m. in the
UBC faculty club. Tickets cost $15
each and can be obtained in SUB
237b. For students who show up at
the door at 9 p.m. for dancing,
tickets are $4.
At 7:30 p.m., the geology department gets into some real rock 'n roll
with the band Pacheena. This
event, which features Santa Claus,
a liquor licence and door prizes,
takes place in the SUB ballroom.
Tickets are $5 and are available at
the AMS box office and the geology building. No tickets at the
door.
At 8 p.m. in the next room, the
SUB party room, Frosh will be dancing until midnight for $2.50 per
person.
Then, way off on Sunday, Dec.
13, International House is putting
PREPARE FOR
MCAT-LSAT-GMAT —
SAT-DAT-GRE
NATL MEDICAL BDS
VQE • ECFMG • FLEX
NDB'NPBI-NLE
on a children's Christmas party. It'll
feature Santa, magicians, 'singing
and entertainment, refreshments
for all and goodies for children nine
years and under. The event kicks
off at 2:30 p.m. in the upper
lounge, and winds up at 5 p.m. See
you there.
A Merry Christmas to all, and to
all a good night.
Amazing offer
Tired of the same old summer job
washing cars or dishes or your best
' friend's back? Try this amazing new
offer from the people who hire you
when you graduate. Now available
for free to all first year science, applied science and forestry students.
Just fill out the form below.
Yesl I want to subscribe to the
Engineering and Forestry Co-op
program. I will get my application to
your office at Brock 213 by Dec. 15
and in return the program will try to
place me in an exciting, high paid
summer job in engineering or forestry. My name is	
Amnesty vigil
In honor of International Human
Rights day — a film. A film about
the meaning of human rights in
everyday life. That's my life and
your life too. The film is at noon,
Thursday in SUB 111.
And if human rights really mean
something to you then one way to
show it is to partake in the vigil
sponsored by Amnesty International in front of the Philippines embassy the same day. For more information visit the Amnesty UBC
office in SUB.
SAC meefs
"Look out Lois, here comes a flying cutback," said Clark Kent, as he
dodged the fiscal banana peel aimed by the provincial and federal
governments.
"Look you muscle bound jerk,"
snapped Lois, "I've got eyes and I
know a cutback when I see one."
Lois has tired of Superman's protective attitudes and is currently trying to teach him about the oppression of women.
Tune in next week when Superman learns that he too will have to
wash dishes, scrub toilets and feed
drooling babies.
Anyway, back to the current
situation at UBC. The Students for
an Accessible Education is interested in getting both Loises and
Supermen to come and support
them by attending an upcoming
meeting in SUB 207/209 noon on
Tuesday, Dec. 8.
Goodbye, folks
That's it folks. Bye bye. No more
entertaining hot flashes this year.
Sorry. We'd love to go on writing
them, but this rag closes down until
Christmas. See you in January.
£
THE test
preparation
specialists
EDUCATIONAL      |  SirlM 1 938
CENTER
Call Days, Eveninfs t Wcnkends
440- 1107 N.E. 45 Street,
Seattle, Wash. 98105
(206) 632-0634
In this epoatde of Masterpiece Grey Boxes, we continue with the great Canadian saga by
W.O. Burton, How I drove the Last Spike on My Summer Vacation. In episode nine, Marno
the young and enthusiastic Chinese philosophy doctoral candidate has Juat found the tie ptate
and given it to Sutherland his immediate superior. As the episode ended Sutherland had sent
Marno to look for a spike. The spike that would make history. In this episode we discover
Mamo wandering around. The search for the spike is cleverly developing as a symbol for a nation in search of. . .
The only
store
with a
FAIR PRICING
POLICY"
on Loudspeakers
SPECIALIZING IN:
□ SPEAKERS
□ SPEAKER KITS
D SPEAKER REPAIR
AND ACCESSORIES
WE HANDLE SPEAKERS BY:
□ Electro-Voice     D Motorola
□ Peerless □ Philips
□ Pioneer □ KEF
□ Eminence □ Audax
C Pyramid
734-5142
2077 W. 4th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. V6J1N3
(At Arbutus)
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campua - 1 Nnaa, 1 day MLM: additional Unas, He.
Commaretal - I HnM. 1 day *M.S); additional Hnaa
Me. Additional days MJ0 and Me.
Oassfflad ads arm not acoaptad ty tahphona and an payab/a in
advanea. DaadKnak 10:30 a.m. tha day baton puMcathn.
Publications Offica, Room241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
ATTENTION — Sailors, Windsurfers, Skiers
(and in that orderl) Ski Bunny — Beach
Bum Interclub classic BROOMBALL
GAME. Sailing/Windsurfing vs Ski Club
Monday, Dec. 7th, 8:45 p.m. Thunderbird
Sports Centre, Main rink. Support your
team, Labatts representation. Special bar
prices afterward.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
PROGRAMMABLE CALCULATOR Texas
Instrument SR-52. 224 steps, 20 memories,
magnetic cards, program libraries, $125.
876-9048.
11 — For Sale — Private
FOR SALE — Pop machine ana hot dog
machine and lots of supplies e.g. napkins,
plates, cups and straws. Call 986-6389 eves.
MUST SELL 4 tickets to Hawaii, Air Canada,
Dec. 13 till Dec. 27 charter. Call 683-1633
FOR SALE Williams upright piano and
bench. Newly tuned, cleaned, regulated.
$1200. 224-0805.
BACK DOOR POTTERY
ANNUAL
CHRISTMAS SALE
Sunday, Dec. 6th - 11-5
4430 W. 10th Ave.
COME EARLY FOR THE BARGAINS
BRUNING DRAFTING MACHINE Model
2699, 1 set 12" blades, 1 18" blade, $150
O.B.O. 682-1527.
JVC TURNTABLE AND AMP. Like new
Hart speakers sound excellent. Travelling,
must sell. $800 firm. Phone 734-7383.
15 — Found
FOUND Ladies gold watch by Brock Hall
Dec. 1st, 12:00 noon. Reply to Flm. 241J.
30 - Jobs
CAREER IN
MARKETING
Major organization has asked us to
find three people seeking a career in
marketing. The opportunity will appeal to individuals that are
'diamonds in the rough'. The company will provide a training and
career development path. The compensation and benefit package is excellent. If interested, please call us
today.
THE CARLTON
MANAGEMENT GROUP
1374)121
STUDENT for filing, light hswk. few hrs. per
wk. $6 plus per hr. and /or will counsel and
correct assignments for some students, ph.
Maggie before 1 p.m. 228-4606, after 4 p.m.
228-9637.
SECURITY PERSONNEL required by AMS
to supervise non-student functions held in
SUB. Mainly evening and weekend work.
Call Linda, 228-6540.
CLEAN UP CREW REQUIRED for some,
heavy work in SUB. December 29-31. Call
Linda, 228-6540.
36 - Lost
BLACK BINDER containing notes in B-lot
Marine Drive area. Call Gord, 263-7340.
Reward offered.
GOLD ladies Seiko watch between watch
between B-lot and Scarfe Monday morning. Please call Anne, 261-5087.
LOST: One black-stone gold signet ring.
If found please phone 224-3501. Reward.
40 — Messages
PRACTICAL acupuncture, moxibustion,
home study course. P.O. Box 25676, Vancouver, B.C. V6M 4G9.
WOOLY COAT for sale. Good as new -
used no more than thirty-four times. Contact D. K. Epsilon. Congrats guysl
60 — Rides
65 — Scandals
PETE OLSON — Clinic phoned. Tests positive — start penicillin diet tomorrow.
70 — Services
MODE COLLEGE of barbering and hairstyl-
ing. Student hairstyle, $8. Body wave, $15
to $25. 601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
COOL CAT TUNES recorded music for your
Christmas party. The latest in rock, pop,
ska, r&b and disco. Call Ken evenings,
985-5448.
80 — Tutoring
ENGLISH COMPOSITION TEST. Almost
50% will fail it. Intensive preparation.
Phone Robert, 736-3157.
85 - Typing
EXPERT TYPING: essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses. IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
TYPING: $1 per page. Legible copy. Fast,
accurate, experienced typist with IBM
Selectric. Gordon, 873-8032(after 10a.m.).
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING. Close to
campus. 266-5053.
ESSAYS, Theses, Manuscripts, Resumes.
Fast, professional typing. Phone Lisa,
873-2823 and request our student rate.
ESSAYS, THESES, MANUSCRIPTS, including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
TYPING — Special Student Rates. Filtness
6 Cameron Public Stenographers, 5670
Yew Street, Phone 266-6814.
WORD PROCESSING Specialists for
theses, term papers, resumes, during
regular office hours or evenings/weekends
if arranged in advance. 736-1208.
THESIS TYPING: Micom word processing.
IBM Selectric, $1.25 page. Equation typing
capability. Pick up and delivery. Call Jeeva
at 826-5169 (Mission). Monday-Thursday
after 6:00 p.m.
SPECIALIZING in academic typing. Fast,
dependable, top refs. North Vancouver.
Iona Brown, 985-4929.
90 - Wanted
LOST umbrella. Brown collapsible umbrella
left in 220 Buchanan on Mon., Nov. 23.
Please call Johanna, 733-0962.
LOOKING FOR A JOB next term? Why not
be a UBC Intramural refereel Sports include
women's floor hockey, softball, men's
rugby, and men's and women's volleyball
basketball and ice hockey. We need you.
See Larry - War Mem. Gym, 203A for further info. Page 34
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, December 4, 1981
'WHY WAIT FOR THE SO-GALLED BOXING DAY SALES?
GRAND OPENING BLITZ
V
NOW OPEN IN WEST END, 1711 DAVIE STREET.
®
Makes Life's Good Things... Better
^   The
Sportsmates
1 Mini-Cassette with
Headphones
for—joggers
—hikers
—skiers
—music lovers
M4430
from
$14995!
Soundtripper III
Stereo Portable
With Headphones
$109
96
Soundtripper V
Stereo Cassette
With AM-FM
Stereo
and Headphones
169
.96
HEADPHONES   \1\KUM
STUDIO QUALITY
T10
$7Q95
—compact
—lightweight
T30
• top performance model     £
T20
• Brilliant & sharp
accurate reproduction
• Comfortable
$00.95
• ultra comfy
• top accuracy
149
THE UNIQUE NEW
GracIo
^ CARTRIDGES
SAME AS U.S. PRICES
GTE + 1 $35.OO
GTE +    $30.00
GF3E +  $55.00
GF + 1 $80.00
LIKE SURPRISES w^^SSEi.
HITACHI   SR2£go
—stim line AM-FM receiver
—sector tuning
—50 watts total power
from England
IDgarrard
—belt drive
—low resonance base
—straight Brie
GL 235 Speakers
—2 way air suspension   -~~ -"»*^^^*-~      ""*i"*""*j
-deep bass, well *      ..    ~rragL£
defined highs "■ -    - *^W
HAVE A LISTEN,
WE KNOW YOU'LL BE IMPRESSED!
>    i  i  J
'0      >
# Hitachi Cassette Deck]
Bulliten
Cheep & Mean!"!
■-•-••srr*rrai
'«• »
1*1 ~>1*
Have you experienced the I
challenging task of search-1
ing for a realty good towl
cost cassette deck to add!
to your system? Look no|
further!
DE10
—metal capacity
—Dolby NR for noise free recordings
—DC servo motor	
rjF OR —soft touch control
uc *° -LED meters
Full convenience cassette deck.
QE 55 —computer controlled feather
touch transport.
Hitachi DE 65   simply the finest low price
3 head deck
95
$219-95
$319.95
on the market!
)
—3 head R & P combination head
—LED Peak hold meters
—Microcomputer transport system
—20hz — 20,000 hz Freq. response
—0.04% wow & flutter able,  the  DE 65 is
dB signal to noise your deck!
If you Hke innovative technology, want tots of I
handy features and insist on high quality I
music reproduction and ^aaa &_[
a price that is unbeat-      5 Villi Jjl
'399
0 Hitachi     Cassette Decks
(ZTSAIC3. CAR STEREO!
A Ridiculous Buy!
T681A AM-FM Cassette1
• 12 watts per channel
• separata bass + treble
• loudness • pre out jacks
• R3 road rated FM
^Lm^J^Ltr   Complete ■
• power play
• extended range,
clarity +• definition
Regular selling
$350.00
he Stunning CARVER
Revolutionary Sonic Holography Adaptor
JSSi        T*W      flffjT
$479-95
GOOD-BYE STEREO... ENTER SONIC HOLOGRAPHY
Turn your audio system into a totally 3
Dimensional sound system,
if you hear it, you'll buy it!
Hundreds of In-Store Gift Items
At Very Special Prices
ACCESSORIES TO IMPROVE ANY SYSTEM!
AUDIOTECHNICA
• Sonic broom record care eyatem $14.95 ea.
• At 607 atylua cleaner $3.95 ea.
POD record clamping device $14.95 ea.
TRI PAD/racord mat     $29.95 ea.
FULTON headahell laada $18.00 ea.
FULTON brown, apaakar cable $3.00 ft.
HEAD DEMAGNETIZERS $19.95 ea.
HITACHI AD 091 electronic demagnetizer $39.95 ea.
RECORD CLEANING FLUID ON TAP! FREEI
Bring your own old 1 oz. bottle
biQbir-d/ound
Leading The Way In Innovative Technology
NORTH VANCOUVER   at Mountain Hwy.
1246 Lynn Valley Rd. 986-4266
WEST END
1711 Davie St.
at BkJwell
689-7441
KITSILANO
3060 W. Broadway
at Balaclava
734-2304
WHITEHORSE
302 Strickland
Whitehorse, Yukon
(Prices may be slightly
higher in Whitehorse) Friday, December 4,1981
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 35 y
rH
Intramural Office
Room 203
War Memorial Gym
INTRAMURAL STAR
STAR CHARTS
Point standings as of Dec. 1, 1981.
Does not include sports still in playoffs.
MEN
Pts.
WOMEN
Pts.
1 Engineers
1570
1 Forestry
1090
2 Dekes
1147
2 Kappa Kappa Gam ma 560
3 Betas
968
3 Phys Ed
464
4 Fijis
794
4 Commerce
404
5 Forestry
740
5 Phrateres
336
6 Phi Delts
737
6 Delta Gamma
329
7 Science
684
7 Nursing
317
8 Rowing
416
8 Rowing
283
9 Pharmacy
321
9 Home Economics
252
10 Commerce
260
10 Arts
224
11 Kappa Sigma
138
11 Rehab Med
215
12 Gage
137
12 Alpha Phi
201
13 ZBT
136
13 Science
200
YULETIDE BASKETBALL TOURNEY
Kappa Sigma breezes into the finals after wins against the Engineers and
Phys Ed. On the other side of the draw. Law and the Fijis meet to decide who
will advance to the finals.
Law appears to be the favorite to win it all. However, Kappa Sig's point
guard Neil has been getting extra shooting practice in and could make the difference in the crunch.
Division II quarter finals were played Tuesday. Semi-finals with the top
four teams tip off today at noon.
In Division III, the Norseman team, after trouncing Kappa Sig's and! Fiji's,
will see action in the finals as they challenge C.V.C. After a close game against
the Minorz, C.V.C. doubled Pharmacy to grab their spot in the finals.
All championship games for the three divisions will be played Friday,
December 11 at 12:30.
NEW YEARS RESOLUTIONS
JANUARY -
Snowshoeing Trip
Bowling fr Pizza Night
SPECIAL EVENT - Grouse Mountain
Slalom Ski Challenge
FEBRUARY -
Cross Country Skiing
Curling Bonspiel (CoRec)
Tennis Mixed Doubles
MARCH -
SPECIAL EVENT - Storm the Wall
Tower Beach Suicide Run
Intramural Color Night (Banquet and Dance)
INSTRUCTIONAL SPORTS
The Recreational Program
offers non-credit courses in a
wide variety of individual and
team sports for all skill levels.
Registration for second term
is Monday, January 4th thru
Friday, January 15th. Classes
are limited in size, so register
early to avoid disappointment.
FITNESS
Yoga
Jogging
Strength Training
Circuit Training
Rhythm Fit
DANCE
Modern (Beg. & Inter.)
Jazz (Beg. & Inter.)
OUTDOOR PURSUITS
Flat Water Kayaking
Power Skating
Mountain Climbing
COMBAT SPORTS
Fencing
Karate
Kung Fu
- Women's Self Defence
TEAM SPORTS
Power Volleyball
Basketball
RACQUET SPORTS
Tennis
Badminton
Racquetball
Squash
THE INTRAMURAL STAR is a
publication written and totally funded for by Intramurals.
The Intramural Staff wishes
all students, faculty and staff
a Happy Holiday Season. We
look forward to the best year
of participation and fun ever.
SEE YOU THERE!
MEN'S SOCCER DIVISION 1 WINNERS - BETAS, after defeating Forestry 2-1.
In other soccer action. Chemical Engineers took the Divison 3 title downing
VST 2-0. In the Super League Championship yesterday. Commerce triumphed
over Law by a score of 2-1.
1982 STARTING LINE-UP
WOMEN
Bowling (Jan. 8)
Basketball
Hockey
Volleyball
Softball
(Jan.15
(Jan. 13)
(Jan. 15)
(Jan. 15)
Floor Hockey   (Jan. 29)
MEN
Volleyball
Basketball
Hockey
Curling
Rugby
Wrestling
(Jan. 8)
(Jan. 8)
(Jan. 8)
(Jan. 15)
(Jan. 15)
(Jan. 20)
Dates shown are registration deadlines. Register
now before the leagues fill up.
CHRISTMAS
SOCIAL
O
H
FRI. DEC 4
3'.30-7:00 p.m.
everyone
^ei
corner Friday, December 4,1981
•      I
S100CP
The performance of this cassette
is certified in writing. Features include a Dolby noise reduction
system, metal capability, flow
meters, solenoid controls, LED
record indicator and full auto-
stop.
$249
95
M95ED
$4995
Deluxe high trackability cartridge with built-in
snap-down stylus guard and biradial elliptical
stylus. For % to 1% grams tracking.
The V15 IV has trackability at ultra-light tracking forces
and its frequency response stays flat instead of rising. For
performance, reliability and price the V15 IV comes out the
top choice.
maxell
UD-C90
90-minute premium-quality blank
cassette tape allows clear, wide-
range recording with low distortion.
T610 & VI02
AM/FM cassette deck gives you great mobile sound and features like locking fast forward/rewind and local/distant switching. Solidly designed speakers deliver a full range of sound. Attractive padded, perforated grilles that can be mounted in almost any location.
T500 & 9427B
AM/FM cassette deck is designed especially for most import cars. Features locking fast forward, local/distant control and power-off eject. Practical, solidly designed twin flush mount
speakers have hemispherical dome radiator for wider frequency response.
PRICES VALID ONLY WITH THE PRESENTATION OF THIS AD.
WE TAKE
TRADES
PHONE ORDERS
ACCEPTED
556 SEYMOUR STREET, 687-5837-2696 E. HASTINGS STREET, 254-1601

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128288/manifest

Comment

Related Items