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The Ubyssey Feb 3, 1966

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Array THS UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 44
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1966
48
CA 4-4916
Braund beats  em out
Wins presidency
over Mate, Wise
SftJS'      — ■<'_!_■
s.-r*
— norm   betts photo
WRITING ON THE WALL tells first-year law student Peter Braund he's taken 1966-67 AMS
presidency with 3,322 votes to runner-up Gabor Mate's 2,637. Candidate Don Wise was
eliminated on first ballot with 855 votes.
Peter Braund won Wednesday's election by 685 votes
to become UBC's AMS president for 1966-67.
Braund   polled   3,322   votes
'Curb drinking minors'
inquest tells frat council
Br   RICHARD   BLAIR
Ubyssey Ass't News Editor
UBC's Inter-Fraternity Council will meet today to consider
adopting regulations to stop
minors drinking in fraternity
houses.
The action followed a coroner's inquest into the deaths
of two UBC students in a car
accident after a four-hour afternoon drinking party at the
Kappa Sigma fraternity house.
High speed and liquor were
blamed by the jury for the accident Jan. 20 which killed
Charles Turner, arts I, and Susan Bates, ed. I, both 18 years
old.
The jury recommended that
IFC should supervise all fraternity functions more closely,
especially those serving alcohol.
"This supervision would be
in collaboration with the university administration and
police officials," the jury said.
IFC president Michael
Hughes said proposed changes
to the IFC's constitution would
be put to the council in a meeting today.
"The changes include the
banning of all afternoon parties in the 15 fraternity houses
unless sanctioned, by the IFC,"
Hughes said.
"In future, there will be no
open parties in the evening.
Attendance will be limited to
fraternity members and their
dates.
"Fraternities wanting to hole
a party will have to first ap
proach the IFC for approval to
get a permit to dispense liquor.
"If approved, the fraternity
will get a letter from the council to apply for a permit," said
Hughes.
"No liquor licence will be
issued by police without the
IFC letter."
"If a fraternity breaks regulations, it will be brought before the IFC's judicial committee. This can result in a year's
suspension, or a total ban from
the campus."
Hughes said the IFC is now
investigating   Kappa    Sigma's
activities and the results would
be sent to the RCMP.
An RCMP spokesman said
no charges have been laid
against the fraternity, but added the "matter is under full
investigation."
At the inquest, Ronald Smith,
arts I, testified he attended the
Kappa Sigma party from 3
p.m. until 6:45 p.m.
He said about 100 to 150
students were there and toeer
and liquor were served.
"A good number of the stu-
(Conlinued on  Page  2)
SEE:   INQUEST
against Gabor Mate's 2,637 in
the final ballot.
Don Wise was eliminated on
the first ballot with 855.
Under the preferential voting system, Wise's ballots were
counted for Braund or Mate according to the second choice on
each ballot.
The 5,959 voter turnout represents 36.5 per cent of the
total electorate, three per cent
greater than last year.
The other two candidates of
the first-slate election, Ian Mac-
Dougall and Gail Gaskell, were
acclaimed second vice-president and secretary when nominations closed Jan. 27.
Braund said the issues in the
campaign had been given serious consideration by the voters.
"But since I did not get a
clear mandate from students I
will seek out students on an
individual level to find their
views on SUB."
Braund, who is in law 1, said
he will take a light arts program next year. "So I can
carry the president's administrative load and still have time
for political issues.
"I plan to meet with the ombudsman from Simon Fraser to
see how we can establish the
post at UBC," he said.
"Also, I want to see the facts
about the Student Union Building disclosed to the students.
"We must go very carefully
to get through the reforms I
advocated on SUB."
Both Mate and Wise based
their platforms on scrapping
SUB.
Mate said later the election
proved a majority of students
were backing SUB.
"If Braund carries out his
policies, then he will make a
MATE  PAYS
ON  BIG  DAY
Prexy hopeful in hoosegow
Alma Mater Society presidential candidate Gabor Mate
almost spent election day in
jail Wednesday.
Mate said he was summonsed to the Vancouver Traffis
Court to pay a parking ticket,
and pleaded guilty.
His fine was set at $15 with
the alternative of three days
in jail.
"Since I didn't have too
many dollars, I took the three
days," said Mate.
But he found out the jail
period was to start as soon as
he got out of court, thus jail-
GABOR MATE
. . changed mind
ing him on election day, he
said.
"So I changed my mind.
"If it wasn't election day, I
wouldn't have minded serving
the three days."
Mate was joined by Ubyssey
reporter Stuart Gray in his
cell while he was waiting to
reappear in court.
Gray also had a traffic fine.
"We compared notes on
bureacratic idiocy with two
drunk cellmates," said Gray.
Mate was given a week to
pay his fine.
good president," he said.
"I suppose you could consider Braund's victory a reaffirmation of SUB."
Wise said the campaign was
well fought and clean.
"I had a lot of fun," he said.
RETURNING OFFICER
JIM TAYLOR
. . . charges neglect
See Page 3
Grits go up
5 per cent
in play vote
Campus Liberals won the
right to form a minority government in UBC's play parliament elections Wednesday.
'Liberals took 43 per cent of
the vote — five per cent more
than last year — to win 34 of
the 80 seats.
The New Democratic Party
won 28 per cent of the vote
and 23 seats, Conservatives 14
per cent and 11 seats, Social
Credit 11 per cent and nine
seats, and Communists four per
cent and three seats.
Last year the play parliament standings were: Liberals,
30 seats; NDP, 22; Tories, 13;
Socreds, 12, and Communists,
three.
The Liberals, under play
Prime Minister Alan Gould,
will form the government and
deliver the throne speech during the session Feb. 24 and 25
in Brock hall.
Then each party will submit
one bill for passage.
If two governments are defeated the parliament will be
dissolved. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1966
QUINN HALFORD, JAN RAE, GERRY COOKE
... take them along next week
RADSOC TAKEN
FOR 5  HOURS
Mussoc stages a coup
UBC musical society has
been using force to advertise
its upcoming musical Take me
I Along.
Several members of Mussoc
| crashed into the Radio Society
INQUEST FINDS
(Continued from Page 1)
dents were under 21, but nobody asked me about my age,"
said Smith,  18.
"By 6:45 p.m. the beer was
sold out and I helped Rick to
leave the house because he
couldn't walk by himself," he
said.
Smith said they walked the
half mile to the main library,
by which time Turner was
able to stagger." He left the
couple there.
Ann Gooding, arts III, said
she was taking tickets at the
auditorium door for the film
St. Joan.
"Shortly after 8 p.m. I saw
Sue, Rick and another boy,
who was helping Sue to suport
Rick, enter.
About 8:35 p.m. Sue helped
Rick out of the auditorium
alone and they sat in the lobby.
"He wasn't able to sit up,
and flopped over into Sue's
lap before rolling onto the
floor."
"He objected to being moved so we left him there. They
left just before 9:30 p.m. she
said.
"While they were in the
lobby I asked Sue how they
were going to get home,"
"Sue said they were going
to drive. I asked if they wanted a ride, but she refused,"
said Miss Gooding.
The couple were killed instantly when their car ran off
University Boulevard, crashed
into a tree and split into three
pieces about 11:15 p.m.
City analyst Edward Fennell
said Turner's body had a blood
alcohol reading of .19 per cent
and Miss Bates' had a .06 per
cent reading.
He said this would indicate
Turner had about a .25 per cent
reading when he left the party.
"At .19 per cent most people
are definitely impaired."
RCMP constable Jim Hey-
land said: "I would say the car
was going faster than the posted speed limit of 35 miles an
hour, but I would not like to
say how much more."
William Bayne, Kappa Sigma
social convener, who secured
the liquor permit for the party,
said the permit allowed for 600
bottles of 'beer and nine bottles
of hard liquor.
He said: "The bartenders
had instructions to ask persons
for identification if the person
appeared to be under 21."
Studios, Monday before Radsoc personal arrived, and locked the doors.
But the Radsoc types got in
through the back door and
ejected the agressors before
they could begin Broadcasting at 8:30 a.m.
They capitulated later Monday and granted Mussoc two
hours  air  time.
Mussoc members took advantage of being inside the
studio by throwing the rad-
soccers out and broadcasting
five straight hours of numbers
from Take Me Along.
Radsoc personnel refused
technical assistance to the intruders.
Greg Martin, program director, refused comment on
the take-over, but said he did
not think Mussoc would make
another attempt.
The musical opens Monday
in the auditorium.
VALENTINES
Remember Her With Flowers
(only   11   days   away)
STRATHCONA FLORAL CO.
AM 1-7272
5555 West Boulevard
Arts exec waffles
on censure motion
By CAROL WILSON
The arts undergraduate
executive decided Tuesday to
censure arts president Chuck
Campbell for firing the two
editors of the arts magazine
Consensus.
Then they decided to reconsider the move because Campbell was  not  at  the meeting.
As a result, Campbell has
not resigned as he threatened
to do if there was a motion of
censure  against him.
Campbell was not at the
meeting which overruled him.
"It is also unfortunate I was
sick and unable to attend," he
said.
It is also unfortunate I was
not informed of the meeting."
Arts executive member Terrell Popoff said the executive
had tried to locate Campbell
before the meeting, "but
we couldn't find him."
Campbell fired editors Peter
Cameron and Nancy Corbett
Monday after a letter from
AMS lawyer Ben Trevino said
an   article    in   the   magazine
about Einar Gunderson was
libelous.
Campbell said he was willing to put his position as president on the line and that an
executive decision against his
move would result in his resignation.
At the AUS executive meeting Tuesday, Popoff moved
the censure motion which was
carried on a 3-2 vote with one
member abstaining.
The executive then decided
to reconsider the motion and
hold another meeting with
Campbell present.
Executive member Darey
Burianyk said, "This doesn't
imply that the executive has
changed its mind. We merely
want Campbell to be at the
meeting"
EVBISONG & COHORT
Chapel of the Epiphany
Anglican   Theological   College
Sunday, Feb. 6 at 4:30 p.m.
Sung by
Christ  Church  Cathedral  Chamber
Choir
THE
BEST
FILM
OF
1965
BOSLEY CROWTHtt N.Y. TIMES
<N!
"BEST ACTOR AWARD."
—Berlin Fita FttUvat
"THE
PAWNBROKER
STARTS TODAY
WEEK DAYS
Feature at 12:00, 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20.
Sunday 1:45, 3:43, 7:03, 9:23
OAm*"
GMimuc
6S2-7468
JOIN
KITSILANO
CREDIT UNION
Low Cost Loans
to Members - Insured
Phone or Call:
2821 W. Bdwy.    RE 1-4531
THE UBC MUSICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS
TAKE ME ALONG!
The Smash Broadway Musical
Starring:  Jerry Cook
Jan Rae
Dave Overton
Directed by: JAMES JOHNSTON
Music Conducted by: BEV. FYFE
Choreography: GRACE MacDONALD
UBC AUDITORIUM — February 7-12
TICKETS:
Auditorium  Box Office -
AMS Box Office -    -    -
228-3176
224-3242
Special Student Prices
Mon., Tues., Thurs. Noon 75c or 2/$1.25
Wednesday Night -    -    -    $1.00 rush Thursday, February 3, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Malcolm denies housing
allocated 'by standings'
—dennts gans photo
LONE STUDENT embarks on long night of study and research   through   bright   portals   of   library   reflected   in
undergraduate societies' favorite bathing spot.
POLLS MISSING
By BILL GRAF
UBC's housing director
denied Wednesday that admission to campus residences is
determined by academic standing.
UBC consultant psychiatrist
Dr. Conrad Schwarz said in an
interview in Tuesday's Ubyssey, "Admission to residence
depends on academic standing.
"Students with good records
are put in Totem Park, while
a person with a poor record is
put into Acadia Camp."
"The statement is completely
false and I doubt if Dr. Schwarz made it," said director of
residences Malcolm McGregor.
He said when a student applies for residence accommodation only two academic questions are asked: "Did he pass
his last year?" and "Is he planning to take a full academic
program this year?"
"If the answers are affirmative, he is assigned if possible
to the area of his choice, otherwise to the area of his second
choice," McGregor said.
"No allocation whatever is
made on the basis of an academic record," he said.
Schwarz confirmed that he
made the statement.
"The article was accurate if
comewhat out of context," he
said. "At the time I was under
the impression that this was
the practice in housing."
Schwartz said his allegation
was based on interviews with
various students.
Several residents told The
Ubyssey they believed students
were in many cases assigned to
areas on the basis of academic
record.
'Gross neglect'
loses 300 votes
Up to 300 votes were lost in the election Wednesday
because of two undergraduate societies' neglect.
Chief returning officer Jim
Taylor said Wednesday there
was no poll all day in the
auditorium cafeteria and no
polls until noon in the education building because the archi
tecture and education under-
grads did not pick up their
polling boxes on time.
He said the failure to pick
up the material by 10 a.m. was
"a gross neglect of the students' responsibilities as members of the undergrad societies."
Taylor himself had to set up
a poll in the education building
at noon.
The Architecture undergraduate society was responsible
for the poll in the cafeteria.
Polling boxes should have
been picked up from Brock
and have been in place when
polling started at 10 a.m.
Architecture president Ken
Hutchinson said he didn't know
the boxes were to be picked
up.
"I didn't hear about it," he
said. "I missed council meeting last night because my back
was out of joint. I guess my
secretary missed the mail this
morning."
Healy solves
trash problem
by legislation
Arts dean Dennis Healy has
a solution to the problem of
"the propensity of some to litter corridors, classrooms and
the campus with rejected victuals, skins, rinds, waste paper
and nameless trash."
Healy's solution is contained
in a memorandum requested
from all deans in December by
the university Senate, after a
discussion of the decay of manners, evils of tobacco, and
aforesaid littering propensity.
He proposed a resolution to
legislate the nuisance out of
existence, thus:
"Whereas the university of
British Columiba is no mean
city;
"Whereas tidiness is a valued but admittedly small virtue;
"Be it resolved that, henceforth, dustbins, ash trays, trash
cans, and wastepaper baskets
be used by all.
"And 'be it universally recognized that it is manly or
ladylike as the case may ibe, to
eat one's apple cores."
Fouks  donates
$5,000 to SUB
A UBC board of governors
member has offered to contribute $5,000 to the proposed Student Union building.
Arthur Fouks told AMS
council in a letter Monday
night he would be pleased to
contribute towards a planned
record library for the SUB.
He said he was sure he
could find other donors after
the building was completed.
Assistant director of residences Leslie Rohringer confirmed McGregor's stand.
"We are not concerned with
an applicant's standing," he
said.
"If a student fails he is asked
to leave residence," he said.
"If he wishes to re-apply,
and if there is room, he is assigned a room wherever there
happens to be a vacancy.
"As Acadia and Fort Camp
Camp have the highest vacancy
rate, he is most often assigned
to a room in either of these
residence areas," he said.
"Other students see these
students moved to Fort and
Acadia and assume the move is
a punitive one," Rohringer
said.
FIGHT SUCCESSFUL
Vic student head
says no fee hike
Victoria College student president Paul Williamson said
Wednesday he does not expect a tuition fee increase next
year.
He
was speaking to about
20 students in Brock Hall about
the island college's recent fee
protest.
Williamson led about 700 students in withholding this year's
$56 fee increase.
The students finally gave in
posed Jan. 26, one day before
the self-imposed deadline.
But Williamson said he feels
the fight was successful. "Public opinion has turned in our
favor" he quoted several favorable editorials from newspapers that had formerly not
supported the students.
"We feel that the members
of the legislative assembly have
been impressed with the necessity of increasing operating
grants to universities," said
Williamson.
He said this indicated there
would be no fee hike next
year.
He outlined the plans the
Victoria AMS has for making
presentations to caucuses of the
three parties in the provincial
parliament.
"We also plan to send mainland students around to see
their MLA's."
Williamson appeals to the
students of UBC to help pay
the $10 late fee fine that each
of  the  700  students  incurred.
He said Simon Fraser students have set up a committee
to collect 25 cents from each
student.
PAUL WILLIAMSON
. . . success anyway
Ed Lavalle, chairman of the
meeting, said he was ashamed
of the inactivity at UBC during the fight at Victoria.
Lavalle, who is western regional Canadian Union of Students chairman, said CUS will
request UBC's AMS to help
pay the fines.
Williamson said if there is
a fee increase next year he will
suggest a B.C.-wide general
student strike before registration.
"In other words, students
would not sign the registration
form which requires them to
follow university regulations,"
he said.
MENNONITE BRETHREN Bible College Choir of Winnipeg sang in Brock Hall Tuesday.
Choir, one of top four in Canada, was sponsored by UBC Varsity Christian Fellowship
Club. rmwfsw
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and mdays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University ot B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
toe. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Pounding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mall by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1966
"It is not the contexture ot words, but tho
effects pf .Action, that gives glory to tho times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
B-rahl-nd
The Ubyssey congratulates Peter Braund, AMS
president 1966-67.
On the basis of his past record, we sincerely hope
and trust that the upcoming ye.q. will see student
participation in the affairs of the university extend, to
a new dimension.
His experience in the ins and outs of the Brock
organization should stand him in good stead. And in
view of the campaigns of his opponents, we feel sure he
will not try — as certain of his predecessors have done
—- td forget about the campus at large while he deals
weekly with his new council.
Mr. Braund's stated willingness to take cognizance
of the total campus seems a good sign to us, especially
on those points of policy where we might differ slightly
with him.
He has already said he will accept graciously the
results of any union building referendum, despite his
announced platform of support for the project as it
exists now.
And he has suggested action on residence problems,
on the basis of the soon-to-be released residence conditions survey.
It looks like a good year for doing things, next year.
We've always had the brains, and now got the
Braund.
f
Speak out!
Our hats are also off to Wesbrook psychiatrist Dr.
C. J. Schwarz.
'Cause we like a man to speak out.
Dr. Schwarz, you may remembet, made front page
news Tuesday with a blast at UBC's mental health
services.
And as a result of his statement with regard to the
placing of students with poor academic records into
Acadia Camp, a housing official has protested.
It's not true, the official says, that a person with a
poor academic record is placed in Acadia Camp.
What happens is, he says, that when a person with
a poor academic record is kicked out of another residence
because of his poor academic record, he must re-apply
to housing if he wishes to return to residences the next
year.
By the time his application is processed, he says,
usually the other residence areas have been filled up.
So it's not that a person is placed in Acadia because
he has a poor academic record, it's just that a person is
placed in Acadia because he has a poor academic record.
(Dr. Schwarz's point, by the way, was that this
policy means the people with difficulties get put in the
worst conditions.
(Funny how nobody took issue with that point.)
Hats off to Dr. Schwarz. And here's hoping the
protesters take a look at what he is saying, and not what
they interpret as a minor mistake in his statement.
"Look at it this way, Ambrose: Living here is camp!"
IN THE EAR
BY IAN CAMERON
Creative voting 202
I see in the paper that there
is going to be a Department
of Creative Arts.
Oy.
A thought comes to mind.
This means that there will be
a Creative Arts Undergraduate Society.
So it is now
the first meeting of this
august body.
Some aspirant for office
has organized
the students
into a com-
cameron mittee to start
the machinery that will lead
to becoming a bona-fide society, with officers and graft
and all that.
So this yo-yo calls the
meeting to order, and says
'The first thing we must do is
select a committee so we can
have an election."
"Nonsense" says a voice
from the back. "The first
thing we have to do is decide
whether or not we need an
undergraduate society."
"Right," comes another cry.
"Is an undergraduate society
conductive to creativity?"
"Well, what do you suggest?" asks the would-be
bureaucrat.
"I think that we should
have a short story contest, so
that everyone can express his
ideas on the subject."
"And the winner would be
the one who made the best
case?"
"Not in the least. The one
who wrote the best story."
Finally, the meeting ends
up in disruption, because they
can't decide who should be
allowed to judge the contest.
There is talk of a competition to select the judge, but
they can't determine who is
to judge that competition
either.
Finally, of course, they do
have a person who has no
interest in politics whatsoever.
He is picked because this is
an example of irony, and we
know how important that is,
don't we?
The first question to be debated at the council meeting
is: How can the society get a
cut rate on  grass?
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
  . Ron Riter
Associate      George Reamsbottom
City . Al Donald
Photo   Norm Bolts
Sports —  Ed Clork
Ass't News      Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City       Danny Stoffman
Page Friday      John Kelsey
Managing    _— Ian Cameron
Features   .       Mike Bolton
CUP    -      ■   -    Don Hull
Slack Al skipped his slaves, but
the news desk comes through with
the hero list: Joan Fogarty, Cafol-
Anne Baker, Derek Blackte, Bill
Graf, Carole Wilson, Stu Gray,
Gordie Taylor, Pat Hrushowy, Dai
Borgia, Bert Hill, Doug Halver-
soo, Val Zuker, McBush, Sue
Gransby, a new rimslave named
Carol;  and Elaine  Briere.
the ■f^itkdl cJveirkia*& ojf
MAN 0F>
STAINLESS STEEL
TRIUMPH % TRAGEDY ARE THE STUFF OF ELECTIONS, WE ARE HAPPVTO ftEPOPX J* -^
 — -   -   —    "-"     *■ —~ '' ^WHjT HAPPENEPJrj
iaaa-r«->-._-»/.I-y  -__T      r   '   A     -JHE; 00T ONLV ojffi V«r
:DISCOUNT*©.IT HAD Ac
It is finally decided that
this should be looked into, but
when the question is brought
up at the AMS meeting the
president is informed that B.
and G. takes care of the lawns,
so he should contact them.
The president resigns, at
this point, and. devotes his
time to writing a five thousand line epic ballad on his
experiences   in  office.
After the next president is
elected, it is discovered that
he is a she, something entirely
unsuspected up to that time,
due to her propensity for
wearing black leather jackets
and   motorcycle   boots.
In the hue and cry, she resigns, and starts to compose'
an opera on her experiences.
The next president thinks
that they should have a newspaper.
Unfortunately, this guy is
very creative, but he's also
very impractical and knows
nothing about newspapers. As
a result, the paper goes broke
after the first issue.
By this time, the head of
the department, (a UBC man,
naturally) is getting more than
somewhat perturbed about the
whole thing, as the students
are spending more time worrying about elections than
about classes. He says that
there will no longer be an
undergraduate society.
After this happens, the students hold a meeting to discuss the situation. They decide to have an essay contest.
FOR
LETTERS
LAND 0" GOSHEN! C0UL0THIS MEAN THE _5/VPOF.10RALriAN?STOP HOPING+SEE TOflORROW!
see page 9 Thursday, February 3, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOCUS
EDITOR: GEORGE REAMSBOTTOM
Academicians
go try-ways
Focus interviews Simon Fraser's lively student president Tony Buzan. Buzan makes an appearance at least
once weekly on his school's soapbox and has had the job
of carving SFU's charter student government constitution.
He had this to say about Burnaby's new institution:
"We are the potential leader in setting new dimensions in education through our architectural concept of a
centralized university, experimental teaching and the tutorial system, academics and athletics.
"Students find it harder to adapt to Simon Fraser
than UBC in some cases but that's because students here
are oriented towards thinking.
"High schools in B.C. do not prepare students but
UBC seems to cater to this non-thinking approach. It is
easier to adjust here because less pre-requisites are required so a student can take a program he is interested
in rather than what he is told to, as at UBC.
"The organization of our student council and newspaper came about surprisingly quickly and both are proving effective in their roles. Much of the credit, for this
goes  to president   Patrick   McTaggart-Cowan.
"His policy is that students should be as autonomous
as possible and administration and faculty have given us a
free hand in organizing.
"Communications have been a problem which we have
largely overcome by creating an ombudsman, town crier,
student guides, council bulletin and soapboxing.
"We've done remarkably well in our first year. A
play, fine student newspaper, smooth function of student
government, and athletic participation and support all
demonstrate   the   enthusiasm   of  students   here.
"One example was the blood drive when we set a
record for donating blood in a single day.
"Our standards are easily as high as UBC's in the
curriculum offered and better because we encourage students to participate in learning and to think.
"Simon Fraser is already having an effect on UBC
in athletics, and in student government which will now
consider creating the position of ombudsman.
"In the area of student action, most important is
educating the public to the expanding costs of sending
their children to university and to point out that lower
income families have few children in university.
"We did not support UBC's march protesting high
fees because of the complete indecisiveness shown by
UBC. student council and the lack of planning. Subsequent
negative reaction following the march has proven our
decision  right.
"Victoria's methods of protest, including lobbying
the .provincial legislature all this week, have proved much
more sensible and effective.
"Both present presidential situations at UBC are
unfortunate. President John Macdonald's remarks recently
on student irresponsibility and lawlessness were uncalled
for, and the UBC student council has waffled along into
a complete state of inactivity.
"The heavy study atmosphere at UBC is conducive
to studying one's navel. Here at SFU the more exuberant
atmosphere is perhaps not so conducive to studying but it's
a hell of a  lot more conducive to getting things done." Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1966
McT tells how SFA does it
—despite the skeptics
Focus interviews Simon
Fraser president Dr. Patrick
McTaggart-Cowan.
Asked about SFA development, the experimental
academic program, student
government and newspaper,
financing education and the
role of a university Dr. McTaggart-Cowan had these
answers:
"The original plans when
Simon Fraser was on the
drawing boards look as
sound now as the way it was
outlined in UBC president
Dr. John Macdonald's 1963
report on higher education
in B.C.
"It was imperative that
Simon Fraser be completed
by the fall of 1966 to take
the pressure of accelerated
undergraduate enrol ment
off of UBC.
"Many people kept saying
we would never finish our
university in time but that
just made everyone here try
all the harder, from laborers
working on construction to
the administration.
"It is impossible to say
what costs would be for
Simon Fraser up till last fall
because of continuation of
building going on and even
more impossible to give
final cost because of increasing building costs.
"But I can tell you by the
time we complete construction under way the cost per
student place will be $5,500.
In keeping with the Bladen
report this compares favorably with other Canadian
universities. For example at
the University of Toronto
the cost per student place
is $9,000 to $10,000.
"We knew we would have
to take at least 1,500 undergraduate students to take
the pressure off of UBC but
this was an underestimate
and we ended up with 2,500.
"But more and more
young people are surprisingly mature, they read a lot,
look around them and are
realizing the importance of
education. Those with ability are seeking opportunity.
"With 2,500 students here
it was a tremendous job in
itself for the students to organize activities, a student
council and newspaper. But
our students have done an
excellent job on all counts
and needed very little help
from the administration and
faculty although our assistance was  always  available.
"There were the usual
problems of course, such as
registering 2,500 students
and introducing them to a
new program and environment. We also lost our registrar at a critical time because of ill health.
"Our curriculum is experimental and new in that
most courses are made up
of a combination of large
lectures and small tutorial
sessions which emphasize
participation by the students.
"There was a certain
amount of adjustment called
for but most adjusted and
our failure rate at the end
of the   first   semester   was
ANOTHER DIMENSION?
. boards walk into mountains
under ten per cent. It's not
fair yet to draw comparisons but we can do even better.
On McTaggart-Cowan's
concept of a university he
said: "A university is the
students and faculty, the
president and buildings are
part  of the  environment.
"Faculty and students are
here for the same reason
— to build a good university. There should be a
close inter-relationship between them on issues concerning the whole university.
"We already have a graduate program and we intend
to develop a first class graduate school. But it will take
time.
"Simon Fraser must level
off at 18,000 because we
want to stress quality rather
than quantity. We're not
taking the broad public
view — no public university
can examine this goal in
isolation. Other universities
should develop where the
concentration of population
develops.
"Post secondary education
covers the vocational school
systems, the institutes of
technology, regional colleges and universities. If
we leave one of these groups
out a certain group of students will be left out. There
will also be some students
that transfer from regional
colleges to universites but
some will terminate their
education at regional colleges.
"There'll be transfer pat
ters developing between
vocational, technical and
regional colleges so that
when one talks about free
education all four systems
must be looked at.
I'm completely in favor of
freezing fees but let's look
at the whole problem. How
fast can we go and where
are the priorities ? In the
meantime let's make sure
there's adequate bursary
monies so those needing a
helping hand get it.
"The Bladen report gave
many of the facts but only
about universities. What
about these other institutions? University administrations, faculties and students all have to continually
discuss this subject.
"Another significant part
of our university is athletics. Sports reporters assure
me that we'll fill Empire
Stadium the first time we
play UBC's Thunderbirds
in football. This and the
possibility of rowing meets
between our schools is
developing a healthy rivalry
which is part of the university environment.
"Another assurance to
continued liveliness at
Simon Frasfer is the tremendous breadth in the
backgrounds of our faculty.
Their goal is good teaching
and good scholarship because that's what we stand
for and what attracted
them. They have a wide variety of ideas and are all
ready to put them forward."
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Daily truck load
fills SFA library
'Size wont
make US
impersonal'
Although Simon Fraser
Academy's population will
soar to over 15,000, academic
planner Ron Baker doesn't
think the multiversity on
Burnaby Mountain will become impersonal.
"The size of an institution
is meaningless," he said in
an interview. "It's the size of
the individual departments
that counts."
• •     •
Baker, who doubles as
head of the academy's English department, said his
school — University of Lon-
lon — had 45,000 students.
"But I never felt lost," he
said. "In fact I was the only
full-time student in my department.
• •     •
SFA has instruction in
three faculties. The arts
can award the degrees of
BA., M.A. and Ph.D. Science
offers programs leading to
B.Sc, M.Sc, and Ph.D. degrees.
In the faculty of education degrees offered are
B.Ed., M.A. (Ed.), and M.Sc.
(Ed.).
Students must choose one
15-unit major, said Baker —
the same system coming into
effect next year of UBC.
• •     •
There is no language or
science requirement as at
UBC, but SFA students must
pick two non-credit general
education courses to be taken
during the first four semesters.
The   only   other   requirement is that students, in their
, first   two   semesters,   must
take one social science course
and one of English, history
In the faculty of Science
credit is given for labs as
separate courses.
Each course is completed
ARCHITECTURAL STIMULANT
rises up through student lounge
in one semester and a final
exam is written in the last
few days of the semester.
A year at the academy is
divided into three semesters.
UBC's summer session
lasts seven weeks and consists of a reduced numiber of
courses many of which are
given by visiting lecturers.
At SFA the summer semester last from May to August
and offers the full program
given by the regular staff.
By SUE GRANSBY
SFA's librarian, Donald
A. Baird, stressed UBC's
co-operation with the growing library at SFA in an
interview Jan. 25.
"We have not made excessive borrowings as some people expected we would have
to. This is because the number of volumes here has
proven adequate for the
needs of our students, many
of whom are in first year.
"Our faculty and graduate students are provided
with "B cards" enabling
them to withdraw books on
a 14-day loan from the UBC
library.
"One member of my staff
works at UBC conducting a
new inter-library loan service. This is a daily service
for the benefit of faculty and
graduate students. A truck
arrives at UBC every afternoon at 3:30 to return books
and borrow others as needed."
Baird said that the main
difference between the two
university libraries is that
the SFA library operates on
the open stack principle.
This means that all patrons
have access to all the book
collections. At UBC only a
limited amount of material
is available to undergraduate
students.
"We have good study facilities," Baird said. "There
is individual seating with
carrels enclosed on three
sides. There are also a few
study tables. On each of the
three levels there is a smoking lounge area for the students."
He said the library is open
longer hours than the UBC
library. One weekdays the
hours are 8:00 a.m. to 2:00
a.m., on Saturdays from 9:00
a.m. to 10:00 p.m., and on
Sundays from 9:00 a.m. to
5:00 p.m. This is an advantage to our students," said
Baird.
The Peak: one newspaper
formed from two mistakes
Baker said the SFA system
means a student can complete a B.A. in two and two-
thirds years — eight semesters.
Gal's pads
out hep UBC
By ANNE BALF
The design of Simon Fraser Academy's one women's
residence is radically dif-
erent from that of UBC's
standardized   institutions.
There are no long, bleak
corridors, where every door
is the same.
At Madge Hogarth House
the single rooms are
arranged in suites of four
to eight rooms each, which
are connected in groups of
three.
Since Simon Fraser is a
very small, young university
there isn't much cultural or
social life.
And since the "nunnery"
—as it's commonly called—
is the only residence at
SFA, 65 girls are living in
isolation at the top of Burnaby Mountain.
The late-night regulations
at the residence have given
it the name "nunnery".
Girls can stay out until
11:30 on weeknights and
2:30 on Fridays and Saturdays.
The girls pay $80 a month
for their room and board.
This is $5 a month less than
the main residences at UBC.
By  PAT   HRUSHOWY
At Simon Fraser Academy
there is a rag. It is a newspaper (sic). It's called the
Peak.
The Peak was hatched out
of a punch pulling fight that
saw   three   different   news
papers try to make a go of it.
Lome Mallen, ex-Ubyssey
staffer, brought out the Tartan (must have something to
do with the ethnic organ of
the name of the institution)
from a broom closet in the
STUDENT PRESIDENT BUZAN
. . first UBC, then the world I
library.
It strangely resembled the
garbage put out in high
school.
SFA students seemed to be
dissatisfied with the Tartan
so the S.F. View came into
being. <Must have something
to do with how far you can
see when you are on top of
a hill).
It wasn't much better than
the Tartan. It too was a carbon copy of a high school
paper.
The student population
didn't like the idea of having
two bad papers so they decided to scratch them and
try to put out one good paper.
Out of the combined staffs
of the Tartan and the S.F.
View came the Peak with
editor-in-chief Sam Steenhus
at the controls.
The Simon Fraser papers
progressed from mimeographed foolscap to its present tabloid form similar to
The Ubyssey. They were fortunate to have The Ubyssey
on hand to help and guide
them to their present form.
The Peak isn't very grateful for the help given them.
"The Ubyssey is approaching the end of an era", said
Lome Maleln, Peak CUP editor.
"A new light will shine in
university journalism — The
Peak."
Allen Bell, Peak Campus
editor said, "The Ubyssey is
a fairly decent paper but the
staff bugs us.
"The Ubyssey has been
digging so long that it has
dug itself right into the
ground."
"The Ubyssey is an old institution and can do what it
wants", said Sam Steenhus,
Peak  editor-in-chief.
"We have to put out a
very good paper because we
can't get away with anything
but the best." Page 8
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1966
MacKinnon's teachers
aren't education softies
HILL DWELLER DWELLS
SFU's own town crier in action
Focus interviews Simon
Fraser's Dean of Education
Dr. A. R. MacKinnon.
Talking about the relationship of his faculty with the
SFU Arts and Science faculties Dr. MacKinnon had this
to say:
"My department offers no
courses of its own. All education students take their
courses in Arts and Science.
The goals are the same as
UBC education students but
they take a different path to
reach them.
"Our first task at Simon
Fraser is to build a first class
undergraduate program. But
we have an important responsibility to develop graduate studies.
"Our campus throws
people together. Students
here refer to SFU as their
university not just a university.
"There are no professional
schools or applied sciences
offered at Simon Fraser but
we are unique in some areas.
For example we have solid
state physics research going
on here and UBC doesn't.
"It is only natural of
course that students will interchange to take advantage
of facilities and personal at
either school.
DEAN MacKINNON
. . SFU and UBC need one another
THEIR OMBUDS MAN HILL
Everyone agrees the ombudsman is a good thing and
he's been talked about in
Ottawa, Victoria and lately
right here at UBC.
But at five - month - old
Simon Fraser the ombudsman is not just talked about
— he exists.
His name is John Mynott,
but the name on the door of
his own personal office in
the academic quadrangle is
just plain OMBUDSMAN.
Mynott's job is to defend
Joe Student from unfair
abuse — real or imagined —
at the hands of SFA's administration.
Mynott, Arts II, says he
hasn't had quite as mud-
work as he had expected.
"But there's always enough
complaints to keep me busy,"
he said in an interview.
His latest job has been to
organize a petition to protest
the administration's decision
to impose fees for uncovered
parking.
He's also been fighting
SFA's burgeoning list ot
traffic regulations with some
success.
Mynott also petitioned faculty counicl to award more
credits for language courses.
"We     handle  curriculum
problems too," says ombudsman.
Mynott, gaining courage
with experience, has lately
taken on the biggest bureaucracy of them all — B.C.
Hydro.
"We want later buses, and
we're working with the
nurses at Vancouver General
and the students at the Institute of Technology to get
a general fare reduction for
students.
'I'm going to approach
Shrum about it," Mynott assures his Burnaby Mountain
clients.
"Our curriculum program
emphasizes the tutorial system combined with lectures.
Tutorials give a student a
chance to ask further questions about lectures and clarify particular points.
• •      •
"In the main our programs
fit1 in closely with professional schools so that no student should have a difficult
time adjusting after leaving
here.
"We are experimenting in
some areas but these procedures are not fixed for all
time.
"Another unusual feature
here is having political science, sociology and anthropology all under the same
department.
• •      •
"We have some tough problems coming up in hiring
people, to service our swiftly
expanding enrolment. Last
year in Canada there were
only 500 people in Canada
to take 1,500 faculty positions which were open across
the nation.
"There are, of course, always many problems getting
ready to open a university.
Many lecture seats didn't
arrive on time because of a
strike and a train wreck de
layed   delivery   of   cafeteria
tables.
"We are entertaining entrance standards identical to
UBC except for two particular . arrangements: mature
students who clearly see
what they want from a university are allowed to enter
without university entrance
requirements completed. And
high school students with excellent academic records are
allowed to enter SFU before
completing the university
program.
• • •
"Under the trimester system students can shift to a
different program after one
four month semester. They
haven't lost a whole year.
"Our relationship with secondary schools present a
combination of responsibilities. The university and high
schools must cooperate
closely.
"It is our responsibility to
give individuals the opportunity to be educated, to tap
their potentials. But Canada
has not emphasized the need
of higher education enough.
• •     •
"But in educating many
students at once there is always a danger of processing
people. Rather than adjusting individual to society.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
FOREGROUND
BATTUN' SIN
Acadia  University
seizes "girlie   photos
Seven hundred copies of a
1966 calendar produced by
the Athenaeum, student newspaper of Acadia University at
Wolfville, Nova Scotia, were
impounded by administration
officials last month.
The administration took issue with one of the six photos
of cheerleaders the calendar
contained.
Said the Athenaeum delicately, in a news story (with
regard to the particular photo
which sparked the seizure):
"The controversial photo, of
an Acadia cheerleader, shows
what appears to be a nipple
under a transparent nightgown.
"However, the cheerleader
said in a statement to the
Athanaeum that she was wearing clothing under the nightgown.
"An enlarged reproduction
of the picture shows the 'nipple' to actually be a fold in
the cloth."
The Athenaeum also commented editorially:
The next thing that will
happen around this place is
that the Catcher in the Rye
will be burned in a ceremonial
fire as English 350 students
are beaten to obtain withheld
copies.
It's really quite funny, you
see.
The Athenaeum calendars,
a joint publication venture toy
this newspaper and the student public relations office,
have been whisked away by
grim-lipped university police.
Were were told they are
"tasteless".
A direct slap in the face to
every one of the six pretty
coeds who posed for the photographs.
We were told they resembled tearouts from a girlie
magazine.
Well, where are the bulging
breasts, taut nipples, slightly
spread thighs and creamy
round buttocks?
We were told that the university's "image" had to be
protected.
Can you imagine anyone
trying to protect the image
this university presently has
in the outside world?
We were told that the girls
involved had to be considered.
Certainly.   And   theylve
agreed that should one photo
ibe slightly doctored, the calendars can be sold.
 The offending photo shows,.
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LOOK, LOOK, says Acadia's Athenaeum, whose Miss November (shown here) sparked a seizure.
see, under a nightie, see, what
looks like a nipple but which
is  actually a  fold of cloth.
Nipples, of course, are un-
speakables which don't exist.
And babies come from storks.
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
Ambitious plans have failed'
SHAKEY'S
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HOOTENANNY
SUNDAY EVENINGS
Coming the Irish
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Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I was very disappointed to
read of John Wheaton's "eliminate me" speech. He received
my vote because he alone
seemed to have a definite program for uniting the frosh.
Mr. Wheaton attempts to
blame us for lack of participation. Yet he and the "50 to
100" have become such a
clique that those excluded
would find it impossible (if
they so wished) to break . in.
If the defeatist Wheaton
can't hack the responsibility
involved, he should not have
run. FROSH(ETTE)
'APOLOGIZE'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to offer an
apology to the members of
the Mennonite Brethren Bible
College Choir for the boorish
conduct of some of my fellow
students during the choir's
recent recital.
The choir had the dubious
pleasure of trying to communicate over, among other
things, loud guffaws, heated
arguments, and rattling of
lunch bags. The offenders,
mostly those standing in the
upper gallery of Brock, continued their performance for
close to forty-five minutes.
Evidently higher education
has negligible effect on some
people's manners.
BOB DUMONT
Eng.  II
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THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1966
CHOP, CHOP,  CHOP
Friedhof,  Evolution
'Allegorical atrocity   axed ? Performed <* fest'val
fc"' * ....«:       Todav and  tomorrow at  the iHirsph.   anrl  .Tnnas   Mekas
A Brock proctor Tuesday chopped a $500
painting into little bits and heaved it out
of Brock lounge to the parking lot behind.
The painting, Allegorical Atrocity by
Robert Wickstrom, B.A., was done in the
auditorium Friday noon, part of a special
events "happening."
Wickstrom, a New York artist, said, "It's
just terrible. The man who destroyed my
painting has no aesthetic values at all."
Special events spokesman David Lui said,
"I'm so mad I'm stomping up and down.
"We had permission from Alvin Balkin,
gallery curator and Brock art committee
official, to place the painting in the lounge.
"Alvin valued it at $500, and we spent
about that much getting Wickstrom here
to do it."
The proctor said he chopped up the
.painting, done on masonite, because it was
too large to get out through the door.
Said Lui: "Nobody can destroy a $500
work of art like that, even if it is eight
by 16 feet big.
"What would happen to me if I destroyed a huge statue just because it was
too big to get through a door?
"We're outraged, you can bet," he said.
Criticism of new SUB
refuted by chairman
The student union building
could net over $3 million before its 55 year lease from
the university runs out, SUB
chairman Roger McAfee said
Monday.
McAfee said space rented to
the bank of Montreal will
bring the AMS $202,000 in the
form of prepaid rental for the
first 25 years and over $1.4
million for the rest of the term
of the lease.
• •      •
In adition machines vending
hot food should gross $1.6 million said McAfee.
After the 55 year lease expires, the building will revert
to the administration who will
collect the rent and the profits.
McAfee said any buildings
on the campus are normally
the property of the university.
This lease will mean students
will have greater responsibility in programing functions
that are normally held off campus," he said.
McAfee said food services in
SUB would be bigger and better than any on the campus
now.
"The 1,200 seat cafeteria will
hold almost three times as
many people as the auditorium
caf holds now," he said.
• •      •
"The atmosphere will also
be better.
He said the architect was
planning wood finishes and
good interior design to make
the cafeteria "comparable to
the graduate centre."
"There will be four service
lines so someone who wants a
cup of coffee won't have to
wait behind someone who
wants a meal," he said.
Food services director Ruth
Blair is planning to have two
main courses available each
day, he said.
"Miss Blair has been most
cooperative in this issue," he
said.
The food services area to be
provided by the administration
will occupy 32,712 square feet.
McAfee denied there was a
lack of club space in the building.
Most of the clubs will be
housed in a 1,700 square foot
meeting room.
•      •      •
When the survey of clubs
was conducted two years ago,
very few people asked for club
rooms he said.
"What clubs need is a place
for a program. SUB is a shell
for a program."
McAfee said many students
had been complaining about
the building without knowing
the facts.
"Anyone who wishes to discuss it is welcome to come to
the office and talk about it,"
he said.
BAY
Starts Tomorrow
A STITCH IN TIME
N. Wisdom, E. Chapman
plus
CAPTAIN  NEWMAN, M.D.
Gregory Peck, Tony Curtis
Angle Dickinson
STUDENTS 75c
DELTA
Starts Tomorrow
BULLET FOR A BADMAN
Audie Murphy - R. Lee
Darin McGain
plus
LADY IN A CAGE
Adult
O. DeHavilland, A. Sothern
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Canadian Union of Students
SCHOLARS — TIRED OF U.B.C?
Applications for I.S.E.P. scholarships now available
from Registrar.
Student Co-ordinator
Student co-ordinator needed to organize study group
to prepare for the seminar "Identity and Anxiety:
crisis of a student generation" in Waterloo, Ontario,
Sept. '66. Apply C.U.S. Office, B.E. 258.
The SUB planning office is
on the top floor of Brock near
the student council chambers.
Today and tomorrow at the
sixth festival of the contemporary arts:
TODAY
12:30 noon, Freddy Wood
Theatre, Friedhof, by David
Watmough, directed by Michael Irwin.
12:30 noon, Auditorium,
Evolution of the Blues by Jon
Hendricks with the Flip Nunez Quartet, Jimmy Wither-
spoon, Big Miller and Hannah
Dean.
3:30 p.m., Auditorium, films
by  Ed  Emshwiller,  Storm  de
Hirsch, and Jonas Mekas.
8:30 p.m., Auditorium, "Evolution of the Blues".
FRIDAY
noon,   Freddy
Wood
David
12:30
Theatre,    Friedhof   by
Watmough.
12:30 noon, Auditorium, The
Byron Pope Quintet.
12:30 noon, Fine Arts Gallery, tours of Bagged Place
and The Edge of Pop.
3:30 p.m., Education 100,
Adams Way, a modern mystery
play by Robert Duncan.
Spring Formal Specials
Complete Outfit
Tuxedos
Colored
Tails
$6.50
Jackets
$7.50
$8.50
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 Howe (Downstairs)      MU 3-2457
Add versatility to your wardrobe
with a well-bred flannel blazer.
For handsome good looks and comfort, outfit yourself with
this traditional 100% wool flannel blazer. Indisputably right
for career and campus, it's tailored in the suave manner;
natural shoulder, high three-button, hook vent, raised seams.
Navy, olive, black. 36-42 S.R.T. 44 Reg. Each 42.50
A natural for you at the Bay Career and Campus, second
floor.
the
OKMtOIA at GRANVILLE Thursday, February 3, 1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
^■^____s
—norm  betts photo
HOMECOMING QUEEN Ruthie Shaver arrives at Vancouver International Airport Tuesday from Waterloo Winter-
Carnival where she placed second in national Snow Queen
contest.
LACK BENEFITS'
Upper-year meds
ask out of fees
By CAROL-ANNE BAKER
UBC's third and fourth year  medical  students  want
exemption from paying AMS fees.
Student council Monday
night approved a brief submitted by the medical undergraduate society on the benefits
medical students derived in relation to the AMS fees they
pay.
The brief said senior medical
students benefit from only 25
per cent of the AMS fee they
pay because they are never on
campus.
UBC medical students' third
and fourth year training is an
off-campus hospital.
The brief also said UBC
graduate students pay AMS
fees only for their first year
of graduate studies but remain
full members of the AMS in
subsequent years although they
do not pay fees.
"Third and fourth year medical students should be considered equal to the post-first
year graduate students with
respect to AMS fees and membership," the brief said.
Some councillors objected if
the brief were approved other
faculties, including law, would
want to follow suit.
Michas told The Uybssey
later he would like to have a
campus-wide referendum on
the issue like the one held in
1961 for the graduate students.
"At that time the students
voted 71 per cent in favor of
exempting grad students from
paying AMS fees," Michas said.
Mac opens door
to meet profs
UBC president John Macdonald has instituted an open
door policy to faculty members.
Macdonald instituted the
new policy after the board
of governors meeting Jan. 6
Faculty members may now
see the president without an
apointment between 2 p.m.
and 5 p.m. Wednesdays.
Ex-MP Green
hits Canadian
parochialism
Canadians are parochial,
says former external affairs
minister Howard  Green.
"There is great apathy about
world affairs in Canada,"
Green told the Lutheran student movement Wednesday.
He said Canadians should
try to be better informed.
"There is more interest in
foreign affairs in all parts of
the United States than there
is in Canada," he said.
Despit the lack of interest,
Green said Canada is more
idealistic than many other
countries.
"Twenty-eight UBC students
went overseas last year for the
Canadian Union of Students,"
he  said.
Green said Canada's main
role in the world should be
keeping the peace.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE — 1966
Effective September 24th, 1965, to April 15th, 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
(Beginners & Preschool Children^
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
*    Special student admission: 15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — No. 19 & 20.
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION: Afternoons    —    Students 25c    Adults 60c
Evenings   —    Students 50c    Adults 75c
Skate Rental 35c per pair — Skate Sharpening 35c pair
For further information: Call 224-3205 or 228-3197
YOSTS'
.
CONFESSIONS
of a
SUB CHAIRMAN
or
How I (GASP) Sold Out
A Full Discussion — Questions and Answers on SUB
VILLANS ON HAND: Hender, Vance, McAfee
The  Deed Will  Be  Done:
BROCK LOUNGE NOON TODAY Page
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 3, 1966
1WEEN CLASSES
Hendricks blows blues
SPECIAL EVENTS AND
FESTIVAL
Evolution of the Blues —
continent's most exciting jazz
event starring John Hendricks,
Big Miller, Jimmy Withspoon
and Hannah Dean — Two
shows: 12:30 — 75 cents; 8:30
— $1.00 and $1.50. Aud.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
General   meeting   in   Chem.
250 at noon. Players' 200 film.
EAST ASIA SOC
Films today noon in Bu. 104.
Everybody welcome.
UBC CONSERVATIVES
Election of convention delegates and general meeting in
Bu. 214 noon.
INDOOR
FOREIGN   STOCK CAR
AUTO RACES
Saturday, Feb. 5
A cross bewteen a demolition derby and a stock
car race —
AGAIN ±he crowds demand that we present this
spectacular show.It's fantastic.
AGR0D0ME
Time trials 7:30 Racei 8:30
Adult $2.00 Student $1.25
Child under 12 FREE with Adult
Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
KE*EP
YOUR
EYES
on
VANCOUVER
•
Every year the
Vancouver School
Board
HIRES
many teachers
directly from
university
•
When the time comes
APPLY
to the
Vancouver
School Board
1595 West 10th Avenue
For an interview
call RE 1-1131
VCF
Inform in Mildred Brock tonight at 5 p.m. Everyone welcome.
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting in Bu. 205
at noon.
ARCHAEALOGY CLUB
Lab open today from 1:00 to
3:00.  All welcome.
LOWER MALL CULTURAL
COMMITTEE
Art exhibition and sale. Feb.
2-6,   4:00-6:00   p.m.   and   7:00-
day 10:30 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.
10:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
Student wanted to assist
with SAIL BOAT RACING
PROGRAM in Vancouver.
May 1st to September 30th.
Apply in writing only to:
J. H. Long,
301 West 5th Avenue,
Vancouver 13, B.C.
CLASSIFIED
Rales: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
DOST THREE LIBRARY BOOKS
Jan. 27, '66. Education Building.
Phone Wayne Rm.  33, 224-9833,
L.OST. THREE RUGBY BALLS AT
Mardi Gras Friday night. Please
return to Mardi Gras, South Brock.
LOST. AT MARDI GRAS FRIDAY
night, one long white wool scarf
with stripes on ends. Phone 224-
9879.   Ask  for   Kit   Pearson.
FOUND IN BUCH. STUDY ROOM
on Tuesday morning, one key
case.   Phone  Bob,  277-0624.
LOST. BLACK CLUTCH PURSE
Monday. Contains valuable papers.
Contact Helen,  224-5714.
I'XIUND.     ESSAY     "GREECE     AND
The Age of Pericles", at Mardi
Gras Pep Meet., Thurs., Jan. 27.
Claim at Ubyssey Publications
Office,   Brock Hall.
LOST: BROWN PURSE IN HEJEtB
Theatre after 11:30 class last Sat.
A.M.S. card and drivers licence
urgently needed. Phone Anne,
Room 443 at 224-9786 (after 6:00)
or send to Box 472, Totem Park
Residence.   Reward.
FOUND. CAMERA AT PONDEROSA
corner on sidewalk, Sunday a.m.
Contact Dietitian at Common Dining Room,  Lower Mall
FOUND. IN MARDI GRAS CHANG-
ing Room. One pair dark brown
suede shoes. Trade for mine,
lighter brown, smaller. Phone 731-
8947,   Andy.
FOUND AT    SHOWMART   MARDI
Gras. Black    ladies     purse    with
watch. Contact    Proctor,     Brock
Hall
FOUND. SLIDE RULE IN HEBB
12, Noon Tuesday. (Physics 101
Tutorial). Owner may claim in
Dept.  Office,  Hebb 11.	
LOST. VICINITY WESBROOK. ONE
pair suede gloves. Phone Mary at
224-9884.
Greetings
12
BE ORIGINAL — SAVE MAILING
a card. Send Valentine and Birthday Greetings to your friends with
a   Classified   ad.
HAPPY    19th,    ROSE    FROM    ED-
gar's. Horticultural Society!
Special Notices
13
WHY FAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.  Phone Ted  Elliott,  224-6707
EDUCATION FORMAL FEB. 5 AT
the Commodore Cabaret. $3.50 t>er
couple with card, $4.50 regular.
8-13 (dancing until 1)—Tickets
on sale A.M.S.  or Ed. Lounge..
VALENTINE A - GO - GO. DANCE
to the Escorts. Jewish Community
Centre. 41st and Oak St. Saturday, Feb. 12, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.
Tickets A.M.S. — $3.00 couple.
Nisei   Varsity   Club.
DON'T BRING A DATE — INTE-
grate! Totem Park's Mixer Friday
night from 9 to 1. The great sound
of "Peter and the Penetrations".
AMC cards required.
LITTLE JIMMIY CHRISTPOHER:
You forgot your lunch today. Pick
it up at A.M.S. Office, Dear Mommy,
HEY THERE! WATCH FOR THE
Sonics and the Shantelles in the
Armouries, Feb. 11th, Friday.
Lovely,  eh?!
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM 8th AVE.
at Crown. 8:30 and 5:30, M.W.F.,
10:30,   T.T.S.   Call  Gleen,   224-7474.
RIDE    WANTED    FROM    29TH    &
Balaclava to 9:30's in Buch. RE 3
5892.
DRIVER WANTED FOR CARPOOL
Lonsdale area. Phone Jenny YU
8-9995.
Wanted
15
MISCROSCOPE WANTED. Prefer
Japanese model. Phone George at
LA   2-0209.
WANTED! RIDE TO TRAIL DUR-
ing mid-term. Break will share
driving and expenses. Phone Sh|ila
224-7821.
AUTOMOTIVE 8c MARINE
Motorcycles
27
HONDA   50.   BRAND   NEW.   BEST
offer.  Call J.  O'Connor 224-9054.
Scandals
39-A
HEY   GROUP   WE'RE   ENGAGED.
Village   Idiot.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters 8c Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, fZO
up. Also Typewriter repair* at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,   263-4530.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and West  Van.
PS:   New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C.
MEN OR WOMEN. WONDERFUL
extra income part time. Flexible
hours. Training provided. Car
necessary. Pleasant dignified work.
Phone 255-8748 between 9 to 10
a.m. and 5 to 6 p.m. for Interview.
INSTRUCTION
Music
•3
GUITAR—SPECIALIZED INSTRyC-
tion by experts in every type of
Guitar and Banjo playing at "The
Mediterranean Shop", Vancouver's
Guitar Centre. 4347 West 10th Ave.
Phone CA 8-8412.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
KLASSEN'S
USED   FURNITURE   MART
Where You Shop at Auction Prices
1207 West  Broadway RE 6-0712
(Beer Bottle Depot at Rear of Store)
TYPEWRITER FOR SALE, OLIV-
etti Lettera 32. Guarantee slip.
Phone after 7:30 p.m. RE 6-9496.
ROoms
81
STUDENT (Ml ALE) SINGLE,
furnished room, kitchen privileges;
one sharing frig., washroom, entrance — 1 block to shops, buses,
non-smoker.  RE  3-8778.
ROOM WITH PRIVATE BATH-
room. Hot plate, coking privileges,
private entrance. Phone 224-3526.
Near gates.
Room 8. Board
B2
IT TAKES HAIRS! ROOM AND
Board — Zeth Psi Fraternity. Near
to campus. Good food. Phone CA
4-9885. U
ON  CAMPUS   ROOM   AND  BOARD
for  male   student   phone   224-9790.
F'urn. Houses 8c Apts.
83
FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR
rent. Suitable for two $65 per
month. 3556 W. 1st. Phone RE
8-5495.
(jetting framed?
Phone or call in for our new "Take
Home" invitation album. For a personal estimate of costs in just 15
minutes, call —
the CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
The House of Seagram
Interviews will be conducted February 7
for students graduating in
CHEMICAL   ENGINEERING
MECHANICAL   ENGINEERING
BACTERIOLOGY
BIOCHEMISTRY
CHEMISTRY
FOOD TECHNOLOGY
See The University Placement Service for Information
and Interview Appointment
EVOLUTION of the BLUES
Canadian Premiere of the Show that Stormed the
Montery Jazz Festival in 1960.
JON HfENDRICKS: worlds best jazz vocalist
JIMMY WITHERSPOON: them dirty blues
HANNAH DEAN: gospel mamma
BIG MILUER: singing preacher
with Bob Maize, Noel Jukes, Clarence Peckton and
Larry Dubovitch
Today! 12:30 and 8:30 p.m. UBC Aud.
Tickets at AMS 75c $1.00 and $1.50
A Festival of the Contemporary Arts Special Event

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