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The Ubyssey Jan 16, 2012

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 Ready your Gaslamp Funworks SINCE 1918
January 16,20121 vol. XXVIII iss. XXXI
Just one
more...
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Festival gives birth to great
performance art
THE
PIO
UBYSSEY
IS SICK
D<feens of student
journalists were lai
at a national conference in
HQctoria last week. Among them, us.
Debate #3
President
VP Finance
VP Admin
We walk you through the 12 days, 4 referenda and 36 candidates
campaigning for your votes in the...
AMS elections
P3 21 Page 2101.i6.2012
What's on
This week, may we suggest..
ACADEMICS»
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^SHI 1 ' ■
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s, ' —;    ^
Last day to add/drop classes
This is the last day to drop courses without receiving a W on your
transcript.
TUE
film:
Film Screening: Cultures of
Resistance: 7-9pm @ Michael M
Ames Theatre
Directed by Lara Lee. this film explores how art and creativity can
be used as ammunition in the
battle for peace and justice.
THU
DEBATE»
17"S"
WED
UT»
Africa Awareness Week: 4:30-
6pm @ Marine Drive Ballroom
Keynote speaker NoViolet Bula-
wayo-world-renowned author
and the 2011 winner of the Caine
Prize for African Writing-will speak
on the importance of African literature in western higher education.
Debate #1: 11am-2pm@the
SUB
Cheer on the AMS candidates
for president. VP Finance and VP
Admin in the first of four debates
for the upcoming election.
DEBATE»
Debate #2:11am-2pm @ the
SUB
If you're sick of the whole student
politics thing already, too bad. It's
another week of students trying
to get your vote for local democracy, you apathetic person you.
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
*M
A-.Q
■lU
ill
THEUBYSSEY
January 16,2012, Volume XCIII, Issue XXX
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
coordinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
orinteditor@ubysseyca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
webeditor@ubysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor   4
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writers
Will Johnson   1
wjohnson@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
5p0rts@ubyssey.ca   *
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
featu res@u bysseyca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubysseyca
Senior Web Writer
Andrew Bates
abates@ubysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
joel@ubysseyca
Webmaster
Jeff Blake
webmaster@u bysseyca
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
ousiness@u bysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
advertising@u bysseyca
Accounts
Sifat Hasan
a ceo u nts@u bysseyca
LEGAL
CONTACT
Business Office: Room 23
Editorial Office: Room 24
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.llbyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
Print Advertising:
604.822.1654
Business Office:
604.822.6681
advertising
@ubyssey.ca
STAFF
Andrew Hood, Bryce Warnes,
Catherine Guan, David Elop
Jon Chiangjosh Curran, Wil
McDonald, Tara Martellaro
Virginie Menard,Scott
MacDonald, Anna Zoria,
Peter Wojnar, Tanner Bokor
Dominic Lai, Mark-Andre
Gessaroli, Natalya Kautz, Ka
un, RJ Reid
The Ubyssey Is the official student newspaper ofthe University of
British Columbia. It Is published every Monday and Thursday by The
Jbyssey Publications Society. We
are an autonomous democratically
"un student organization, and all stu-
Ire encouraged to participate,
toilals are chosen and written
Jbyssey staff. They are the
sed opinion of the staff, and
necessarily reflect the views
Jbyssey Publications Society
University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing
n The Ubyssey Is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories opinions, photographs and
artwork contained herein cannot be
reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is afounding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUPs guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 wc :   :,,t:-:t - Judeyour
jnstude
ler"- are
itc
lytheL
s<p >se
io :n<
>fl Ut
>r ti ■  Ui
phone number, student number anc
signature (notfor publication) as wel
asyouryear and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked wher
submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey. otherwise verification will be done by
phone. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit submissions for length
and clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before
Intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published In the following Issue unless
there Is an urgent time restriction
or other matter deemed relevant
bythe Ubyssey staff.
It Is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertislnc
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the I IPS will not be greater
than the pr _e paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
>1
JOSH CURRAN^HE UBYSSEY
The current VP Academic, Matt Parson, is hoping his proven leadership skills will help secure his bid for the AMS presidency.
Presidential Candidate: Matt Parson
Micki Cowan
News Editor
"Channeling the inner Tebow,"
said AMS presidential candidate
Matt Parson.
Parson was referring to his
position as quarterback on his
fraternity's flag football team, but
the idea could easily be applied to
his newfound verve for student
politics.
He's hoping that given the transient nature of student politics,
stepping from his current post
as VP Academic and University
Affairs to the presidency will not
mean that progress is lost.
"It's kind of frustrating to see a
lot of good work being done and so
many projects started and needing
them to have their torch carried
on and this issue of continuity."
But though he's willing to carry
the team on his back, that's not a
position he thought he would be
in at the beginning of his time at
UBC.
"The AMS was something quite
foreign to me in my first two years
or so at UBC. [I had] a more typical type of student profile, I would
say. Last year, getting involved to
be the VP Academic, was a little
bit out of left field."
Parson said that a diverse life
experience has prepared him for a
leadership role. At age 12, he found
out that his father was diagnosed
with Huntington's disease, a disease that affects coordination and
leads to cognitive decline.
"I really had to change my approach to more of a level-headed,
leadership sort of role in my family," he said, noting that he took
on the role of "sauce boss" in the
kitchen back home in Smithers,
BC. "I have a particular ability to
make really good sauces."
He attributed this ability to
his mother's excellent skill in the
kitchen, both at home and as a
home economics teacher.
When he came to UBC, he
found a home away from home
in the fraternities, and served as
InterFraternity Council President
before becoming an AMS vice
president.
"I definitely think it's a close-
knit community of very involved
people that spawns people who
look for leadership opportunities.
You have the perfect storm to have
people gain the types of experiences that you need to acquire to
be successful," he said of his experiences in the frats.
"I found that whole process to
be a complete blast."
More than anything, Parson
thinks it's his everyday student
experiences that have most
prepared him to represent the
student body.
"It's a matter of going through
those types of experiences that
every student has: the late night
study sessions that you have as
you're preparing for an exam, the
beer gardens. It's Long Boat and
Storm the Wall.
"Ifyou are to properly represent
the students of UBC, you have to
know what it means to be a student of UBC." 13
Over the next three issues, Our
Campus will profile the threepresi-
dential candidates for the AMS.
Congratulations!
»1
On Saturday,
The Ubyssey was up
for six JHM Awards for
outstanding campus
journalism, more than
any other paper in
Canada.
We came away with
two awards: Congratulations to to Kalyeena
Makortoff for diversity
reporting and Jonny
Wakefield for design.
And congratulations to
fellow nominees Arshy
Mann, Alison Mah, lan
Turner, Brian Piatt and
Geoff Lister.
Club event?
Early exam?
Studying late?
Stay on campus!
Commuter
Student
Hostel
AT GAGE
RESIDENCE
I   a        WWW* EM:H
1 housing i|
I BOOK ONLINE
STUDENT HOUSING AND HOSPITALITY SERVICES News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
01.16.2012 | 3
Let the AMS elections race begin
36 students announce candidacy
•••
Kalyeena Makortoff
News Editor
The nominations are in, and 36 students are vying for 18 spots in this
year's student government elections.
Three candidates—Alyssa "AJ"
Koehn, Ben Cappellacci and Matt
Parson—are running for AMS
president.
"I think that in my experience with the Student Leadership
Conference and UBC Rec and
Rezlife, I've really become a strong
leader figure," said Koehn, who in the
last 12 months has helped organize
the Student Leadership Conference,
AMS Firstweek, and the "yes" campaign in the March AMS referendum.
"I've given the idea of runningfor
the presidency [thought since] probably about seven months ago, once I
got a good taste ofthe AMS and saw
what they were capable of achieving,"
said Parson, the VP Academic and
University Affairs.
However, itwas the entry of
Cappellacci into the race that surprised many. Though he served as
VP Academic and University Affairs
the year before Parson, he had only
recently returned to campus after an
exchange to France.
"The AMS is far too important to
overlook and ignore and has the potential to have impact on our lives today and for the students of tomorrow.
I recently returned from exchange in
Paris and with my fresh perspective I
decided to do something bold and run
in the new year," he said.
Debate calendar
Thursday, January 19,11am-2pm
(SUB): President. VP Fin. VP Admin
Friday, January 20,11am-2pm
(SUB): VP Ex. VP Academic. Senate
Meanwhile, two positions are
uncontested, with Tristan Miller
running for VP Finance and Kyle
Warwick for VP External.
Caroline Wong and Elaine Kuo
will be running against each other in
the VP Administration race and six
candidates will compete for the VP
Academic seat: Bahador Moosavi,
Carven Li, Iqbal Kassam, Kiran
Mahal, Armin Rezaiean-Asel and
joke candidate "Party Rock," nominated by Ian Campbell.
Seven students are running for the
two student positions on the Board
of Governors: Matt Parson, Erik
MacKinnon, Justin Yang, Mike Silley,
Tagg Jefferson, Sean Cregten and
incumbent Sumedha Sharma.
Eight are runningfor five positions
on the UBC Senate: Katherine Tyson,
Montana Hunter, Kiran Mahal,
Devin Syrovatka, Barnabas Caro,
Dawei Ji, Malileh Noghrekar and
incumbent Justin Yang.
The Student Legal Fund Society
is the only race which allows slates.
This year two groups are fielding
candidates for the six positions:
Students for Responsible Leadership
(SRL) and Student Progressive
Action Network (SPAN).
Six candidates make up the
SPAN slate: Jannel Robertson,
Arran Walshe, Nai N. Louza,
AlissaWestergard-Thorpe,Arielle
Friedman and Gregory Williams.
SRL is running five candidates:
Aaron Sihota, Sandy Buchanan,
Maria Cirstea, Jordan Stewart and
James Pettit. 13
►>1
Monday, January 23,6-9pm
(Vanier): VP Fin. VP Admin. President
Wednesday, January 25,6-9pm
(Totem): VP Ex. BoG. VP Academic
Presidential candidates
FIFTH YEAR ARTS
Political science major
SLC CO-CHAIR
Helped organize the Student Leadership
Conference for 2012, four months after
being the chair of AMS Firstweek.
t
FIFTH YEAR COMMERCE
Marketing and international business major
FORMER VP ACADEMIC
Served as VP Academic and University
Affairs in 2010-2011 before doing a Go
Global exchange in France
I Ben Cappellacci i
Matt Parson
t
t
FIFTH YEAR SCIENCE
Biology major
CURRENT VP ACADEMIC
Part of this year's AMS executive; was
previously president of the Intra-Fraterni-
ty Council at UBC
AMS to pose four referendum questions on ballot
Council looks to sell Whistler Lodge and part of art collection
Four referendum questions will join
the elections ballot this year. The
first question asks to decrease the
Student Spaces Fund fee by $3.88
while adding a $1 fee to fund the
UBC Ombuds offices—leading to an
overall decrease of $2.88 in AMS
fees.
The second question asks to
entrench the rules ofthe AMS
Endowment Fund as a bylaw,
which will mean that any withdrawals by Council from the fund
will require permission through
referendum.
Currently, the fund is not a bylaw; it is part of AMS Code, which
only requires a Council vote for
withdrawals.
A third question asks to sell
the AMS Whistler Lodge and the
V
land plot.
The money
raised through
the sale will
go straight
to the AMS
Endowment
Fund.
The final
question looks
to sell a maximum of three pieces of art from the
AMS art collection. The referendum doesn't say which ofthe pieces
will be sold, and the final selection
will be up to an AMS Council vote.
The revenue will be used to establish an AMS Arts Endowment
Fund to purchase additional art
and support other on-campus arts
programming and initiatives. 13
>.
*
<ELLANHIGGINSGRAPHIC
$3.88 REDUCED
Student Spaces Fund fee would be
reduced by less than $4 per student.
AMS ENDOWMENT FUND
Revenue from the sale of the Whistler Lodge would be put
into the AMS Endowment Fund.
Lost the AMS $500,000 in repairs in
the past 5 years.
NEW ARTS
ENDOWMENT
NEW ARTS FUND
money made from the art sale would
help establish an Arts Endowment Fund
+
SELL 3 PIECES
Art from the permanent AMS
collection could be sold next
year.
$1 INCREASE
UBC Ombuds Office fee will increase AMS fees by $1 and help the
AMS meet their funding obligations to the campus service. 41 News I oi.i6.2oi2
COURSES»
<AI JAC0BS0N/THE UBYSSEY
CIRS is UBC's—and North America's-most sustainable building
WALYA KAUTZflHE UBYSSEY
New solar technology on parking meters means less waste
If there's monoculture thinking on
sustainability, you can be certain that it's
wrong.
Kurt Grimm
Associate professor, EOSC department
A green light for
Sustainability 101
Class teaches "greatest hits" of sustainability
Evan Brow
Contributor
UBC is now offering a multidisciplinary course intended to give
students from all faculties a chance
to focus on sustainability.
Sustainability 101 is offered bythe
faculties of Arts, Applied Science,
Forestry, Land and Food Systems
and Science.
Kurt Grimm is an associate
professor in the earth and ocean
sciences department and one of
seven UBC Sustainability Teaching
& Learning Fellows team-teaching
Sustainability 101. He believes
the course creates a multi-faceted
"greatest hits" approach to sustainability education.
"If there's monoculture thinking
on sustainability, you can be certain
that it's wrong," said Grimm.
Only 35 students are admitted
into the course, and while there are
no prerequisites, undergrads had
the choice to fill out an application that asks what attracts them to
Sustainability 101, what they might
contribute, and what they would
like to take away from the course.
"One of my big interests is sustainability education, and this
course is on the leading edge of
that," said fourth-year student
Angela Willock.
Willock is a student rep for the
AMS Sustainability Projects Fund.
She said she looks forward to learning from the instructor panel to
help expand her understanding of
sustainability.
"I am really excited about the
'campus as a living lab' and 'students as agents of change' vision.
I think there is huge potential for
universities like UBC to harness the
innovative potential and motivated
capacity of students to tackle sustainability challenges."
Grimm said that the difference
between this course and others offered at UBC is that sustainability is
the single unifying theme, not just an
important part of a study area.
Grimm himself will be giving
multiple lectures, with topics exploring a wide range of what he said
are not-so-obvious environmental
fumbles.
"How crazy it is that we poop in
our water? I think that's something
that's one ofthe truly crazy things
we do, not just here in Vancouver
and Canada but we export that all
around the world. Water is the most
precious substance for life and we
crap in it and it's insane. So, I'll stick
with that. The insanity of pooping
in our own water."
His other lecture topics include
"Learn to expect surprises" and
"Sustainability equals authentic
abundance."
The framework for Sustainability
101 was created from the
Sustainability Academic Strategy,
a document published October 17,
2009 recommending that UBC offer
any student sustainability studies
alongside their degree program.
This goal was the Sustainability
Academic Strategy's first recommendation and part of what
led to the creation ofthe UBC
Sustainability Initiative in 2010.
"It became increasingly clear that
this first-year shared experience—as
kind of a launch pad into various
sustainability pathways—was really
key," said Jean Marcus, associate
director ofthe UBC Sustainability
Initiative Teaching & Learning
Office.
One aspect emphasized by
both Marcus and Grimm was that
Sustainability 101 is an experiment.
"It's a carefully constructed
experiment that activates the experience of a very committed team,"
said Grimm. "It's not just something
brainy that we're doing. It's our
hearts that are invested in the topic
and each one ofthe people in there,
you just know they're invested in
the students."
Students wishing to join the
course will have to wait until
the winter term of 2013, the next
time the course will be offered,
as it won't be available come next
September.
"It's a pilot course," said Marcus,
explaining that continuing the
course requires going through UBC
Senate for further approval.
As for the next step, Marcus is
planningto develop a fourth-year
course on the framework of sustainability leadership experience that
similarly brings together all faculties into one classroom.
"They've had this shared experience here and we hope to bring
them back to have a shared experience in fourth year too." tH
.UBC   . .. .
housing action plan
foriim - January 18,2012
The Community Planning Task Group of the UBC Board of Governors, chaired by
Dr. Nassif Ghoussoub, is developing a Housing Action Plan for the Vancouver
campus, with a key objective of improving housing choice and affordability
for faculty, staff and students.
dnesday, January 18, 2012
nderosa Centre, Arbutus R
nch will be provided.
12:0<
oom, 2071 Wi
0 (noon) - 2:00pm
'est Mall
The forum will focus on faculty/staff housing, provide an "early look" at the options being
explored and give an opportunity for participants to ask questions and provide feedback about
key issues related to the options. Discussion questions for the forum can be found online at
ubcvhousingactionplan.sites.olt.ubc.ca
Please RSVP to stefani.Iu@ubc.ca
For more information on the Housing Action Plan, visit ubcvhousingactionplan.sites.olt.ubc.ca
a place of mind
campus+community planning
Volunteer. Write.
Thrive. Survive.
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE FOR WORD SUSTENANCE.
THE   UNIVERSITYOF   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
WHO ARE THE
DIRECTORS OF
UNDERWORLD
AWAKEHING?
SEND ANSWERS
TOFPEREIRA
©INTERCHANGE
.UBC.CA FOR A
CHANCE TO WIN
KATE BECKINSALE
UNDERWORLD
A     \./     A      V      V     M      I      M      n
AWAKENING
IN3D
0120.12 oi.i6.2oi21 News 15
MISCONDUCT »
New non-academic misconduct policy at UBC
Natalie Corbo
Contributor
UBC is taking steps to ensure that
its students are conducting themselves properly outside of their
studies.
As of this month, UBC
Vancouver will be a implementing a new, detailed non-academic
misconduct policy, which reexamines punishable activity that has
nothing to do with grades, classes
or schoolwork. The policy is based
on what the university has deemed
a successful model from UBC-
Okanagan (UBC-O).
"The goal always was to make
sure that...if it was working well
we would make the appropriate
adjustments to take it to scale at the
Vancouver campus," said Hubert
Lai, university counsel at UBC.
The policy will involve a completely new process to deal with
student discipline, which, accordingto UBC legal counsel Kimberly
Beck, is "99 per cent the same as
the Okanagan policy." The process
is intended to be more student-
centric than the old one, and will
provide students with the option to
accept responsibility for their actions and avoid a formal hearing.
The new policy is constructed in
three main parts.
A detailed student code of conduct, accordingto Lai, is meant to
inform students what's expected of
them by their own community.
If a student engages in a punishable activity, they will deal directly
with a representative from the VP
Students Office, which Lai estimates
will be over 90 per cent of cases. At
this stage the student may accept
responsibility and help decide what
they should do to make amends.
GEOFF LISTER^HE UBYSSEY
Internal coordinator at the
UBC-O student union, Sarah
Martinuik, said the new method of
dealing with misconduct seems to
have gone well. "[Campus Security]
assess in everyway, and if they see
that the student shows remorse and
they feel bad then they're pretty
good at not making a huge deal out
of it," she said.
AMS President Jeremy McElroy
said the new policy helps to clarify
and streamline the whole misconduct process. "Previously, the
non-academic misconduct [policy]
was a big grey area and a very
encumbering sort of formal process
that actually required the presence ofthe president in order to
oversee anything from being written up in residence to vandalizing a
building."
For more severe cases that can't
be appropriately resolved by the
student and the VP Students Office
representative, UBC will create a President's Non-Academic
Misconduct Committee, comprised
of students and a committee chair.
Instead of a "prosecutor and defender" format, the committee of
peers will undertake an investigative process. Lai said this process
has garnered positive feedback
from UBC-O students.
The goal always was to
make sure that...if it was
working well we would
make the appropiate
adjustments to take it to
scale at the Vancouver
campus.
Hubert Lai
University counsel
"Unless it's a really severe incident of misconduct, it will just
be dealt directly with the student
and security..and usually what's
required of students is just to write
an apology," said Martinuik.
While fourth-year UBC student
(and Ubyssey contributor) Henry
Lebard was in favour ofthe policy
overall, he expressed concern that
the punishment would be lessened
if the person showed remorse.
"He or she who displays relative
remorse are not to be shown more
leniency. Who knows if they will be
stimulated again to do exactly what
they did again?" said Lebard.
The new policy is set to be
fully and formally integrated by
September 2012. tJ
Current smoker?
Recently quit?
Picture Me Smokefree is a digital photography and social
media project for young adults that asks you to show how
you "picture yourself quitting."
Eligibility:
•   Men and women 19 to 24 years old
.   Currently smoke or have recently quit tobacco
■   Able to take digital photos and upload them online
Participants will receive up to $175 for the research. We are also
giving away over $2000 in photo contest prizes!
To participate or for more information:
picture.me.smokefree@gmail.com
facebook.com/PictureMeSmokefreeProject
604-822-0545 voice
1-855-822-0545 toll-free long distance
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Picture Me Smokefree is a UBC study based at the School of Nursing (Vancouver) and the
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Suuif* j» *
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fS
T-Bird Standings
►>1
Bird Droppings
►>3 Cnltnre»
Editor: Ginny Monaco
01.16.2012 | 7
COURTESY OFTHE BELKIN GALLERY
Michael Morris's Letters series features several large-scale tryptichs. Morris was heavily involved in the concrete poetry movement of the 1960s
VISUAL ART »
Belkin hosts concrete poetry exhibition
Rhys Edwards
Contributor
UBC students are agents within an
international network of education, communication and subsistence—perhaps now more than
ever. Underlying this network is
the Internet, which allows us to
create global relationships and facilitate common understanding.
Less obvious, however, is that
a development in the world of
art and poetry, decades before
the emergence ofthe Internet,
performed an analogous function. Letters: Michael Morris and
Concrete Poetry, a new exhibition
at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art
Gallery, is a survey of this global
phenomenon.
Generally speaking, the term
"concrete poetry" conjures the
idea of letters and words arranged
compositionally to form an image
(for example, the words "leaves"
and "branches" in the shape of a
tree). The concrete poetry movement itself is much broader. "As a
movement...Its greatest achievement is this incredibly open and
generous conversation amongst its
participants," said Michael Turner,
a Vancouver-based author and
co-curator ofthe exhibition. "The
generosity amongst its practitioners, I think, is the hallmark of
concrete poetry."
Various examples of concrete
poetry have existed in written language the world over for centuries,
but it was in the early 1960s when
artists and poets across the world
began to simultaneously innovate
with the form. Every region, from
Brazil to Germany, had a distinct
style; yet it was only after the
emergence ofthe movement that
the artists recognized the international coherency of their work, and
began to use it as a new mode of
communication.
"I would say perhaps the
[Marshall] McLuhan world, that
world of communication that
McLuhan theorized, may have had
bearing on that similarity between
independent invention," said
Turner. "It was united by communication systems and shared
experiences which were becoming
more and more common."
Despite the international reach
ofthe movement, Turner feels concrete poetry is under-appreciated
in art historical discourse. "As an
example ofthe far-reaching effects
of modernism, it hasn't really been
given its due," he said.
"There's a curious notion
that abstract expressionism, or
Anthony Caro's opening ofthe
sculptural object, somehow united
the world." Letters is an effort to
emphasize an alternate art historical viewpoint.
The centrepiece ofthe show is
comprised of the titular Letters
themselves, a series of monumental colour-gradated triptychs, each
one named after a major centre of
art in the 60s. The paintings are
the work of Michael Morris, who
contributed significantly both to
the development of concrete poetry and to the Vancouver contemporary art scene.
Morris, who won the Governor
General's Award in Visual and Media
Arts last year, said the paintings
coincided with a sustained effort to
promote global interconnection. "I
was hopingto address the world...
because in those days, it was much
more parochial in Vancouver than it
is now.
"We were impatient. We wanted to ignore the geography ofthe
country and get on with the world of
ideas."
The exhibition is not merely a
historical survey, however. Letters is
relevant to today's world of instant
messages and gratification, as a meditation on the nature of language and
communication. "You can see it from
its time, the materials and stuff like
that, but in another sense it points
in other directions. It doesn't end in
the 60s," affirmed Morris. "[It's] still
valid for thought and interaction."
The opening reception for Letters:
Michael Morris and Concrete Poetry
is on January 19 at 8pm in the Morris
and Helen Belkin Art Gallery. The exhibition runs until April 8.13
Arts briefs
Vancouver Art Gallery aquires
1S6 new pieces
The Vancouver Art Gallery(VAG)
added 156 new pieces to its permanent collection in 2011, including
work by Robert Davidson, Gathie
Falk, Rodney Graham, Angela
Grossman, Lawren Harris, Brian
Jungen, Ken Lum, Liz Magor,
Takao Tanabe, John Vanderpant,
Frederick Varley and Ian Wallace.
Michael Audain and the Audain
Foundation donated several First
Nations works, including .Fire
Rangers Lookout by Frederick
Varley, Etienne Zack's Inner Works
and an argillite model totem pole.
The Audain Emerging Artist
Fund also enabled the acquisition of works by Vancouver artists
Jeremy Hof, Isabelle Pauwels and
Jeremy Shaw.
Last year's acquisitions now
bring the VAG's permanent collection to 10,262 works of art.
Triplett's arts grant review
doesn't achieve identical
reactions
The impending restoration of some
of the cut gaming grants to BC
arts organizations has garnered
a mixed reaction from advocacy
groups.
After the completion of former
Kwantlen Polytechnic University
president Skip Triplett's review
into BC's community gaming grant
system, the provincial government
announced that it would increase
funding for arts group by $15 million and restore the grants for
adult arts groups.
Some groups felt the restoration,
which makes permanent a onetime increase first made last year,
did not go far enough.
"We have consistently said
from the very day ofthe cuts that
we should be returned to the full
amount, at the very minimum,
and immediately. And after two
years they still haven't done that,"
said Susan Marsden, president of
the BC Association for Charitable
Gaming, accordingto the Georgia
Straight.
Rob Gloor, executive director of
the Alliance for Arts and Culture,
expressed relief.
"While the total funding amount
does not reach the levels allocated
in 2008, before the cuts occurred,
it represents a significant increase
to the arts and culture sector
compared to where we stood last
week," he said in a press release. 13
UBC Bookstore
Tech Tuesdays 12:15-12:45
Join the Apple experts in Tech Central for these lunchtime sessions:
Jan 24 Can an iPad replace a laptop?
Feb 7 MacBook Air training
Feb 14 Apple TV for classroom for leisure
Feb 28 The iPhone for study & leisure
bookstore.ubc.ca/technology
I
DO YOU WANT THE CHANCE TO
this Summer?
2008 All Star Team
www. P ro perty Sta rsJobs.cc
www.ubyssey.ca 81 Culture 101.16.2012
THEATRES
PuSh Festival pulls in the audiences
Alanna Mackenzie
Contributor
Since its inaugural season in 2003,
PuSh, a three-week long performing arts festival, has become a
fixture of Vancouver's arts and
culture community.
The festival's mission is to
showcase local and international
artistic talent through original and
thought-provoking performances.
One ofthe main themes of this
year's festival, accordingto associate curator Dani Fecko, is "storytelling, and the way that we express
stories and tell each other stories."
The text is contemporary and the language
is very current, even
though the play is set in
another period.
James Tait
Director of The Idiot
Opening the festival is Mexico
City's Amarillo, a production that
explores the physical and internal
journey of one man who crosses
the US-Mexico border and is
forced to question his own cultural
identity. Fecko called the play "a
fantastically poetic piece about the
journey of an immigrant crossing
borders, and what it is to make the
Amarillo explores the cultural identity of a man who crosses the US-Mexico border
COURTESY OF ROBERTO BLENDA
choice to leave your life behind for
what you think is going to be a better life."
Another main show, flamenco
dance by the renowned Noche
Flamenca Company, incorporates
dance, song and theatre into a
dynamic performance. Martin
Santangelo, the company's artistic
director, described the company's
style as "very theatrical, authentic flamenco." Principal dancer
Soledad Barrio has garnered international attention for her ability
to fuse intense, expressive drama
with the nuanced dance technique
of authentic flamenco, a dance
form which originated in 16th
century Spain against the tragic
historical backdrop ofthe Spanish
Inquisition.
Accordingto Santangelo, flamenco emerged from "an extraordinary oppression and repression,
economic, spiritual and physical."
The expression of grief of those
persecuted bythe Inquisition—
their "scream"—eventually transformed into the modern dance
form of flamenco. Through their
original and multidisciplinary
performance, the company aims to
tell a part of this story. Santangelo
described the effect ofthe show
on audiences as a "catharsis...It
helps people to get along with their
lives."
Theatre at UBC, in partnership with the festival, will present an adaptation of Russian writer
Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel The
idiot. It describes the adventures
ofthe innocent Prince Myshkin in
the morally corrupt society of 19th
century St Petersburg. The play's
director, James Tait, has adapted
the novel into a contemporary
piece, using modern language and
humour to communicate themes of
modernity and identity.
"The text is contemporary and
the language is very current, even
though the play is set in another
period," said Tait.
This year, PuSh has placed a special focus on Aboriginal performing arts, and includes Aboriginal
performers such as Beat Nation, a
hybrid collection that focuses on
indigenous hip-hop, and Ghost-
keeper, a Calgary-based band influenced by Northern Alberta folk
music. tH
PuSh
INTERNATIONAL
PERFORMING   ARTS
FESTIVAL
THE
- PRESENT -
A NEWORLD THEATRE PRODUCTION IN PARTNERSHIP
WITH VANCOUVER MOVING THEATRE
Fyodor Dostoyevsky's
fiJM
JAN 20 — 29, 2012 AT 7:30PM
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE, UBC
$28-36, THEATRE AT UBC BOX OFFICE
604.822.2678 I THEATRE.UBC.CA
2PM MATINEE SAT & SUN
pushfestival.ca
UBC     a place of mind oi.i6.2oi21 Games 19
T>ue to overwhelming demand, we
present an entire page of sudoku). Tfe
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student whoyines to spendtfieirfree
time unlocking the intertwining
mysteries of math andfogic. It has
ahsouiteiy nothing to do with the fact
that we have been away for jive days
at a conference, and came down with
a horrihie virus.
Intermediate
SincereCy, T^he V-hyssey
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HOURS:
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www.food.ubc.ca
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Building #4   2205 Lower Mall
(Marine Drive Residence)
GRADUATE
STUDENT SOCIETY
UBC• VANCOUVER
CALL FOR NOMINATIONS
GSS ELECTIONS
2012
Eligibility:
ALL UBC GRADUATE STUDENTS
Nomination period:
Opens Jan. 16,2012 (noon)
Closes Jan. 30,2012 (noon)
For more information, please refer to
http://gss.ubc.ca
or email elections@gss.ubc.ca
Answers
/
»
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STAFF
MEETING
AGENDA
NASH Debrief
2. Staff restructure
3.???
4. Profit!
5. Discussion of
other lame memes
6. AMS Elections
coverage
7. Board of
Governors u
8. Endorsement
discussion
COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS Opinion »
B Editor- Rrian Piatt
01.16.2012 | IQ
awiVBRSlTY
COKFERewce
VIRGINIE MENARD/THE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
This weekend, The Ubyssey went to a conference, won
some awards, and mostly survived the outbreak of a
virus. We hope you'll accept the story of that in lieu of
our regular parting shots and snap judgments.
"There was vomit on the roof."
So said celebrated Esquire and
ESPN The Magazine writer Chris
Jones to a room of 300 young
journalists Saturday night at the
Harbour Towers in Victoria, BC.
It was the endingto one of his
many hilarious and insightful
anecdotes, and an end to four days
of great seminars and speeches
at the national conference for the
Canadian University Press (CUP),
the organization that links together most campus newspapers in
this country.
Bythe end ofthe night, vomit
hadn't quite reached any roofs, but
pretty much every other part of
the hotel had seen some gastrointestinal mutilation. Close to 80
people over the course of 18 hours
came down with what officials
believe is a norovirus (previously
known as a Norwalk-like virus).
During the middle ofthe night, ten
went to the hospital while the hotel refused to give any information.
Meanwhile, CUP staff attempted
to prevent a city-wide outbreak,
let non-vomiting journalists know
how to stay safe, while simultaneously dealing with the fact that an
Annual General Meeting integral
to the running ofthe organization
was definitely not goingto go as
planned the next day.
It was quite a time. And we were
there, two dozen of us, experiencing firsthand an event that
will live for 24 hours on the news
cycle and in infamy for campus
journalists.
What exactly is Norwalk, you
ask? In layman's terms, the virus
is a fast-acting, highly contagious
infection that can take hold in
close-knit communities (like a
cruise ship or conference). Once
you get it, the general form it takes
is intense vomiting, fever, nasuea,
and other unfortunate toilet-related adventures.
"You feel like you wanna die, it's
highly unpleasant," said Suzanne
Germain, a Vancouver Island
Health Authority spokesperson, a
claim that only sounds hyperbolic
to those that haven't seen someone
with the virus up close.
The conference is a highlight
of the year for us, building up to a
great climax on the final day. This
year was no exception. At 7pm,
we were awarded two John H.
McDonald awards (one to news
editor Kalyeena Makortoff and one
to print managing editor Jonny
Wakefield), the highest honour a
university publication can achieve.
At 8pm, we listened to Jones talk
about his acclaimed profile of
Roger Ebert. At 9pm, we were
upstairs, having celebratory drinks
and singing "Simply the Best," all
while getting ready for the semi-
formal dance gala on the other side
of town at UVic.
Then suddenly, our feel-good
movie turned into a horror flick.
There were mysterious reports of
people throwing up around the
hotel. Then it spread to the buses.
Something was wrong—a fast-
acting flu? Food poisoning?—but
everyone was far too excited about
the end of an amazing week to notice the telltale signs of a coming
zombie apocalypse/virus.
When the first few reports of
vomiting showed up, itwas seen
as an act of weakness rather than
a warning of what was to come.
Journalists don't throw up. We
had spent the week internalizing
this weird mythos, the hard-living
reporter hammering out stories
in defence of truth. We spent four
days immersed in journalism and
four nights partying hard, celebrating the profession we want
to join, celebrating the idea that
we would endure low pay and numerous humiliations because we
believe in what we do.
Bythe time health authorities
issued a formal warning asking everyone to return to the hotel, people had been out drinking for hours
since the outbreak began, throwing
caution to the wind because the last
night of a university conference demands dancing and drinking.
This may have contributed to
the escalation ofthe outbreak.
It also didn't help that people
found this exciting and terrifying
information out when they were
drunk and split into groups. But,
we got through it. People got back
to the hotel, separated themselves
accordingly and listened to instructions. Throughout the next
day, on the advice ofthe health
authority, people departed the hotel if they were healthy and stayed
if they were still ill. West Jet was
applauded for offering refunds on
missed flights. Air Canada was
derided for doing exactly what you
would expect Air Canada to do (i.e.
nothing).
But what will we take away from
the event? We'll remember the abject fear we faced at the possibility
that we had a 25 per cent chance of
getting affected by this at any moment. We'll remember the amazing
work ofthe conference organizers
to manage a crisis about as well as
a group of 20-somethings can.
More than anything else,
though, we'll remember the
Twitter stream. Ifyou ever wanted
to see the full power of social media to inform, engage and entertain in real time, ifyou ever wanted to see how Twitter could work
in an apocalyptic crisis, ifyou ever
wondered what the Macho Man
Randy Savage would say about
Norwalk, check out the #nash74
hashtag. You won't be bored and
you may even gain a new appreciation for the medium. Which, even
if it took a massive illness, will
please many of our colleagues. 13
Elections bring plenty
of interesting races
Editors
Notebook
Brian Piatt
We're off to the races again. It's AMS
elections time. Last year's was filled
with shenanigans, from the president
campaigning against his own VP
External, to anonymous websites
trashing candidates. What fun can
we expect this time?
Two ofthe races are uncontested,
which is always disappointing. But
both Kyle Warwick (VP External)
and Tristan Miller (VP Finance)
have plenty of experience in their
respective areas, and ifyou're going
to have candidates elected by acclamation you could do a lot worse
than this. The other races, fortunately, are goingto be fascinating to
watch.
The biggest surprise was a
third entrant for president, Ben
Cappellacci. We knew already that
Matt Parson (current VP Academic)
and Alyssa Koehn (all things "student leadership") were goingto run.
Both of them are generally non-confrontational and middle-of-the-road.
Parson would have likely been the favourite, given his AMS campaigning
experience and former presidency of
the Inter-Fraternity Council.
But the entrance of Cappellacci
blows this race wide open; he
was Parson's predecessor as VP
Academic and rivals Parson's roots
in the Greek system. Now Parson,
Koehn and Cappellacci are goingto
have to scratch and claw for every
vote available, which is good news
for voters.
What makes the presidential race
especially interesting is that this may
be the first time the relatively new
Condorcet voting system makes a
difference. Under the old system, you
simply had to get more votes than the
other candidates, whereas Condorcet
requires voters to rank candidates
based on preference, and the candidates who out-ranks all of their competitors bythe highest margin wins.
In other words, the danger of
vote-splittingbetween Parson and
Cappellacci is much reduced. This is
anybody's race.
The VP Academic race is crowded
with five candidates (plus a joke one)
vying for the unglamorous position
of negotiating land use policies and
goingto University Neighbourhoods
Association meetings. Most ofthe
candidates are well-qualified and serious, so they will have to work hard
to start separatingthemselves from
the pack.
The race for Board of Governors
has a very impressive field of candidates, and thus all of them are in
for a tough battle for the two seats.
The most entertaining and possibly controversial candidate is
Erik Mackinnon. Visit his blog at
baldtruth.ca and imagine that person
onthegoverningboard of UBC.
There is more, of course, including
an attempt by the resource groups
to gain hold ofthe Student Legal
Fund Society—but that will have to
wait for another column. Bythe time
you read this, the election will be
underway. Let's hope it lives up to its
promise. 13
Will AMS candidates
show real courage?
Perspectives
»Gordon Katie
In my four years of observing
AMS politics, I have seen some
very entertaining political theatre.
Constitutional and budgetary crises, incendiary personal squabbles,
national scandals—the record is too
lengthy to document. To say that the
AMS is an institution prone to scandal is a gross understatement.
Despite the fireworks, there is a far
more pernicious problem few speak
of. Year after year, voter turnout remains dismally low. Since 1986 there
have only been three occasions where
it eclipsed 15 per cent. We ought to
start callingthe AMS the Almost
Matters Society, because it has made
itself virtually irrelevant and invisible
to average students.
And the crisis continues: in this
year's election, two ofthe five executive positions are running uncontested. Why the disinterest? Why do
so few run, and so few vote? It is easy
to reflexively condemn students for
their apathy, but outcry over AMS
presidential scandals (see: all three of
our last presidents) are latent expressions ofthe passion and conviction of
this vibrant student community. Even
on less sensational matters, such as
land use and governance, there has
been popular outcry.
In truth, the AMS receives little
attention during election time because students lost confidence in the
institution long ago. Most see their
student society as an uninspiring
and incestuous clique of self-serving
politicos, afraid of what real advocacy
might entail. The narrow bounds of
respectable opinion, the insipidness
of campaign rhetoric, the myopia
of conventional wisdom, the self-
absorbed focus on petty political
squabbles, and the impotence of un-
threatening orthodoxy: these are the
reasons students don't vote.
It doesn't have to be this way. If we
have moral and political courage, we
can inspire students in our society
once again. So here's a little advice
for the candidates in this year's
election.
Be bold and break convention;
don't succumb to the culture of pretend politicians. We're not inspired by
neckties, pantsuits and pleasantries;
we're inspired by intrepid advocacy.
Be honest about the society's challenges, and specific about your prescriptions. In so doing, spare us from
platitudes and euphemisms: tuition
has doubled in recent memory, university governance is undemocratic,
professors are unaccountable, and
crippling budgetary problems endure
for the AMS.
Above all, a candidate should aim
to inspire by radically re-imagining
this society's potential. The AMS has
become a small place for small people
who persist in thinking small; it must
begin to think big, or it will persist in
irrelevance. Be courageous enough
to tell students what you think we're
capable of achieving, and they just
might be inspired by your vision. 13 Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
01.16.2012 | 11
LIFE»
Learning how to embrace apatheism
Losing religion was one of the hardest processes of my life. Why force it on others?
Melodramatic
Musings
Will
Johnson
I used to believe in God.
Every day, as I went through the motions of
high school, I would send up quick prayers to
Jesus. I pictured the Almighty as this warm,
mystical wind that was carrying me through
life. My relationship with God gave me a
sense of purpose, challenged me to be a better
person and informed my opinion on basically
everything. If I was worried, stressed or confused, all I had to do was send up a quick plea
to the Almighty, and everything was better.
I was a part of a vibrant community of
believers at my local church. Our youth group
did work with the homeless people ofthe
Downtown Eastside of Vancouver. We travelled to Mexico and Brazil on mission trips.
We had worship services, bible studies and
games nights. I've never felt so strongly like
I belonged somewhere, or like I was doing
something important with my life.
Then I grew up.
One by one, I watched my friends "fall
away" from youth group. It was always the
same story. Someone would start dating a
non-Christian or would be tempted into
the party lifestyle. It seemed like as soon as
anyone went away to university, they would
come back after their first semester and announce they had become an atheist. I saw
post-secondary education as a poisonous,
faith-stealing endeavour that was robbing my
friends of their relationship with God.
But then, at about the age of 19,1 started
asking questions too. I'd held these exclusivist,
puritanical views without really questioning
them.
Why should I? I was happy and I was surrounded by people who had carefully constructed explanations for their beliefs. I was
young enough to know everything then, and
like the rest ofthe people in my church, I had
a parable or a bible verse for every scenario.
I'd read my CS. Lewis, my Donald Miller, my
Philip Yancey. I had an arsenal of one-liners.
What more could I need?
In the summer of 2004,1 left my faith
behind.
For the next few years, I desperately
searched for the answers. I took college
courses in Eastern religions. I wandered
through Buddhist temples and signed up for
introductory classes to the Baha'i faith. I ate
a "love feast" at a Hindu temple in Vancouver
and even took a personality test at the Church
of Scientology. I was intent on making sense of
my world.
For a while, I was interested in atheism.
I read Richard Dawkins and Christopher
Hitchens. I watched videos of Sam Harris's
speeches on YouTube. Atheism is a seductive
religion of its own, mostly because it is just as
evangelical and intent on converting the world
as any major faith. I loved the audacity and
pomposity of these men, and their devotion to
science and common sense. I collected atheist
parables like I once memorized bible verses.
But ultimately, atheism came up short too.
I realized I didn't want to be a
bitter has-been, intent on robbing other people of their faith.
One day, I was driving with my deeply religious sister, and I told her one ofthe parables
I'd learned. It compared faith in God to the
delusion of having a giant diamond buried in
your backyard, and made the argument that
most people don't even bother to dig. They're
just content in the knowledge that the diamond is there. It gives them hope.
She turned to me and said, "Will, that's really mean."
It had never occurred to me that a belief,
that an argument, could be "mean." In my
mind, I was just bouncing around ideas. I realized that I didn't want to be a bitter has-been
intent on robbing other people of their faith.
Ditching religion was one ofthe most terrifying, depressing and traumatizing things I'd
ever done. For years I had been miserable and
lost. Why would I wish that on my sister? She
was happy, and I want her to stay happy.
These days, my quest for understanding
has lost its urgency. I'm pretty comfortable
with the phrase "I don't know." I feel like it's
the most honest thing we can say when we're
faced with the infinite mystery and overwhelming chaos ofthe universe. I settled on
the label agnostic for a longtime, but now I've
found something even better: apatheism.
The fact ofthe matter is, the question of
whether or not there is a God seems profoundly unimportant to me. I know it's crucial for
some people, but right now nothing interests
me less.
Being a better person—a better brother, son,
friend, neighbour—that's what's important.
And if some people need religion to get them
stoked about waking up in the morning, I can't
fault them for that.
But if people spent less time thinking about
religion, and spent more time thinking about
the world we live in, maybe we'd be better off.
If more people embraced apathy about the Big
Picture and took time to notice the Here and
Now, maybe we could make this world a little
more worthwhile to live in.
And if there is a God, I'm sure He'll understand. 13
This article originally appeared in The
Martlet at the University of Victoria in
January of 2010. Referendum 2012
AMSVOTES.CA
Lower Student Fees
► Increased funding for student services.
Establish a Student Endowment Fund
► A long-term growth strategy.
Benefit from our Whistler Property
► A more responsible use of student money.
Promote Student Art
► An Arts Endowment Fund through the
sale of three paintings.
ams
4Q
REFERENDUM QUESTIONS 2012 ► vote on jan.23 -27
To start a Yes or No campaign contact
elections®ams.ubc.ca to apply for funding.
4. Do you authorize the AMS Student Council to sell a maximum of
three (3) paintings owned by the AMS at any time prior to February 28,
2013, such paintings to be selected at the discretion ofthe AMS
Student Council?
Note: Proceeds from the sale will go towards an AMS Arts Endowment Fund, which fund
will be used to purchase additional art and support other on-campus arts programming
and initiatives.
3. Do you authorize the AMS
Student Council to sell the land
located at 2124 Nordic Drive in
Whistler, BC
(legally described as PID: 006-959-831,
Lot 56 Except Part in Plan LMP22342,
District Lot 7179, Plan 19839) together
with all buildings thereon, such land and
buildings collectively being the'AMS
Whistler Lodge'?
Note: Proceeds from the sale of the AMS
Whistler Lodge will go to the AMS Endowment Fund.
1. Do you support and approve the following changes to the
AMS student membership fees?
(a) The reduction ofthe current Student Spaces Fund fee by $3.88,
effective September 2012.
•The Student Spaces Fund is administered bythe AMS Student Council
and is used to maintain and improve UBC student spaces including the
Student Union Building, the Whistler Lodge, athletic facilities in the vicinity
ofthe Student Union Building and childcare spaces.
• If the reduction is approved, the Student Spaces Fund fee will be $12.25
effective September 2012.
• If the reduction is rejected, the Student Spaces Fund fee will be $16.13
effective September 2012.
(b) The introduction of an annual Ombudsperson fee in the amount of
$1 to provide funding for ombuds services to UBC students, effective
September 2012.
•This fee will be indexed to the British Columbia Consumer Price Index.
• This fee will be eligible for subsidy.
• Members will not have the option to opt-out from paying this fee.
• This fee will not be pro-rated based on the number of classes taken.
Note: The net effect of these fee changes will be to lower annual AMS student
membership fees by $2.88.
2. Do you support and approve the following change to
AMS Bylaw 11(2)(a):
2.Funds
(a) The Vice-President Finance shall:
vii) ensure the establishment and maintenance of an endowment fund known as the
"AMS Endowment Fund", the maximum limit of which shall remain open. The
principal ofthe AMS Endowment Fund shall be retained as an endowment which
cannot be spent. The interest and other income derived from investment ofthe
principal shall be used, applied, devoted and accumulated for the benefit of:
(1) increasing the principal amount ofthe AMS Endowment Fund from time to time; and
(2) advancing the mission ofthe Society, including but not limited to funding
initiatives in the areas of strategic planning, governance, sustainability, marketing,
services, and other programs developed to advance the mission ofthe Society.
If the Society generates an unforeseen surplus, that surplus shall be deposited in
the AMS Endowment Fund. Other allocations of Society revenues to the AMS
Endowment Fund and the terms of reference regarding disbursements and
continued financing ofthe fund from part ofthe income ofthe fund shall be
determined in the Code.
viii) ensure the establishment and maintenance of such other funds as determined
in the Code, the limits and terms of reference of which shall also be determined in
the Code.

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