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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1965

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Array First
the Bayshore
THE UBYSSEY
now
the world
Vol. XLVIII, No.  18
VANCOUVER,   B.C., THURSDAY,   OCTOBER   28,   1965
CA   4-3916
UBC MARCHED AGAIN
TO PUBLICIZE PLIGHT
WE WERE CONCERNED
Rebel sit-in
answered
by walkout
By TOM WAYMAN
Ubyssey Editor-in-Chief
Three students stalked out of
an AUCC-marchers confrontation at the Bayshore Inn Wednesday over the seating of an
unauthorized delegation.
Randall Enomoto and Gary
Taylor, representing the ad hoc
March of Concern Committee,
left the meeting when two students representing what they
termed a "conservative" viewpoint insisted on being seated.
Ed Lavalle, western regional
president of the Canadian
Union of Students, also left
the meeting.
The meeting between student representatives and members of the board of directors
of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada
was announced after 3,500
marchers reached the parking
lot of the Bayshore Inn where
the AUCC is holding its annual
meeting.
The marchers were met at
the Bayshore by a small group
of students carrying signs advocating an increase in tuition
fees.
Two members of this group
showered pennies on the first
ranks of marchers as they
arrived.
The rebel group was then invited by the Alma Mater Society president Byron Hender
to send a representative to the
meeting with AUCC  officials.
Hender made the invitation
when he announced the meeting.
As the student delegation
began to squabble about the
seating of the two unauthorized students, UBC president
John Macdonald asked that all
viewpoints be heard.
The two students—Rod MacKenzie and Norman Mackie,
both Law TJI — insisted their
viewpoint wasn't being expressed by the official delegations.
When they refused to leave,
Enomoto, Taylor, and (Lavalle
walked out.
At the round-table discussion
of the fee situation which followed the walkout, the student
viewpoint was presented by
AMS first vice-presidents Bob
Cruise and Peter Braund, commerce undergraduate society
president Rick McGraw,
Ubyssey editor-in-chief Tom
Wayman, Simon Fraser Academy representative Alan Garr
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE: MEETING
ra*";!^'--* '.;.
—norm   betts   photo
TROMP, TROMP
SOGGY FEE FIGHTERS tromp watery way down Georgia
Street Wednesday. Block-long column represents less than
half of 3,500 marchers, broken into two groups to avoid
blocking traffic on way to Bayshore.
Vancouver trek
half NSD total
UBC students hit the pavement Wednesday for the
second time in three years to publicize the financial plight of
higher   education.
four abreast and packed into six city blocks, 3,500
marched two miles through rain and downtown Vancouver
traffic to confront Canada's top university administrators
meeting at the Bayshore Inn.
In March of 1963, 5,000 students hit Vancouver streets
to "Back Mac"— asking for consideration of UBC president
John Macdonald's report on the needs of higher education
in B.C.
Wednesday they trekked for the cause of universal accessibility to higher  education.
Trekkers met by Mac
One of every two students
participating in the Oct. 27 National Student Day demonstra-
ions across Canada were on the
wet Vancouver streets.
Only 1,000 students from
eight Nova Scotia universities
marched through Atlantic rain
to the legislature buildings in
Halifax.
Eight hundred marched from
four Ottawa Canadian Union of
Students institutions, 600 turned out from Toronto's three
universities; 700 Victoria College students made the downtown trek in B.C.'s capital.
UBC's march of concern
started Wednesday with only
1,000 students attending a lively noon rally at the armory.
But at 2:30 p.m., when the
march was scheduled to start,
more  students   poured   out  of
classes and into waiting cars
and buses for the ride to Sunset beach.
Led by police, a pipe band
and Alma Mater Society councillors, they left Sunset Beach
at 3 p.m., trekked up Burrard,
along Georgia, and into the
parking lot at the Bayshore
Inn.
As AMS president Byron
Hender and the first ranks of
marchers entered the lot, UBC
president John Macdonald and
Association of Universities and
College of Canada president
Dr. J. A. Corry emerged from
the AUCC convention inside.
Fifteen minutes later, the
last marchers arrived.
Macdonald said: "I am just
as concerned as you.
"Student concern has done
much for UBC."
Pro-fee faction, too
Corry, competing with the
boos and catcalls that followed
his mention of Hender, said
students had shown an unmis-
takeable interest in the fee
issue.
"I accept this dramatic expression of your concern," he
said.
"We are all concerned, and
we shall certainly do all we
can to strive for a common
goal."
However, Corry said, a public gathering was not the place
to discuss differences about the
fee question.
"But you have certainly
chosen a good time to demonstrate," he said.
The only disturbance was
caused by a small group of
students near the speakers
carrying signs reading: "Responsible students pay fees"
and "Too lazy to work?"
Their signs were removed
by surrounding marchers.
The same group had tried
to drive in front of the marchers with pro-fee signs displayed on cars, but police di
rected them away from the
march route.
Banners amid the marchers
included two sponsored by an
ad hoc group.
They read: "Abolition of fees
contrary to the official AMS
view designed to stress "We
are concerned" banners.
At one point, Vancouver
City police superintendant
Alan Rossiter accepted a "we're
concerned" march button and
pinned   it  to his   uniform.
The marchers included a
surprise representation from
Simon Fraser Academy, 100
strong, and six trekkers from
Victoria College.
One SFA student said his
group was defying an SFA
Student council decision to not
support the march.
INSIDE:
MORE MARCH
See Pages 2, 5, 7, 10 Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
Thursday,   October   28,   1965
SWINGING SIGN INTO Bayshore Inn parking lot, AMS vice-president Bob Cruise (centre) and   friend lead 3,500 damp students to confrontation with
university presidents attending national convention. Pipe band in front of "universal accessibility" banner kept marchers marching over two-mile route.
DISSENTER DISAGREE with 3,500 marchers arriving at Bayshore Wednesday.  Pay-your-
way fans waited at hotel after police curtailed their car cut-ups along parade route.
"DAGNAB RAIN" say Jill Coed, after two-mile trek through
rain Wednesday. Dampened coiffure, didn't hurt
her enthusiasms for cause of publicizing student's financial
plight.
FORMER EXERNAL AFFAIRS minister Howard Green addresses dry marchers in armory
Wednesday   before they   proceeded   to  Sunset Beach  for two-mile trek to  Bayshore.
powell hargrave photos Thursday, October 28,   1965
THE
U B Y S S E Y
Page 3
BROCK CLASH
Ad hoc chairman
given bum's rush
The academic Activities office in Brock extension turned
into a battlefield Thursday when Alma Mater Society coordinator Graeme Vance tried to have ad hoc committee
chairman, Randy Enomoto thrown out.
AAC chairman, Ray Larsen,
MANITOBA premier Duff
Roblin speaks on "Which
way Canada?" noon today
in Brock.
Campaign
labeled
negative
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
National defence minister
Paul Hellyer Tuesday called
the current federal campaign
the most negative of eight
elections in which he has taken
part.
"There is a great deal of
apathy in the country," said
Hellyer, following a speech
to 300 students.
"I think there are quite a
few people who would like to
see four years without an election."
Hellyer branded "reprehensible" the tactics used by Creditiste leader Real Caouette,
in claiming that the Liberals
would introduce conscription
in Canada to help fight the
Viet Nam war.
"I think we should try to
inform and not mislead," he
said.
In his speech, Hellyer said
Canada is the perfect laboratory for the experiment of integration of the armed forces.
"People are watching. Already there are signs that
other countries will follow our
example," he said.
Hellyer said that Canadian
military planning was being
based on the assumption that
there would be no major nuclear war in the next 10 years.
"The most likely kinds of
conflict are insurrections and
riots because such trouble can
be an exension of the foreign
policy of powers, where the
powers feel the result is worthwhile."
Canada's major military roles
would be in peace-keeping operations and in contributing
to   the   nuclear   deterrent   of
"TO, he said.
sent a letter Friday to Vance
asking him to issue a directive
banning non-members of AAC
from the office.
The letter said the office had
become a headquarters for
March of Concern Committee
members.
In it, Larsen said the office
was to be locked at all times
and "The only person it is to be
opened for is me (Ray Larsen)."
At 3 p.m. Tuesday, assistant
co-ordinator, Jim Lightfoot,
saw Enomoto and some MCC
members in the office and asked them to leave.
Enomoto, who is also program co-ordinator for AAC, refused.
Lightfoot told Vance, that
Enomoto was in the office and
Vance called the university
patrol asking them for help.
A patrolman turned up at
the office and, after asking
Enomoto to leave, resorted to
dragging him out.
Vance said later he did not
know Enomioto was a member
of AAC.
"We don't have a list of AAC
people," he said.
"Larsen refused point blank
to give us a list of people who
are allowed in the office," 'he
said.
Larsen said Wednesday
Vance had misinterpreted the
meaning of his letter.
MEETING
(Continued from Page 1)
and Canadian Union of Students' vice-president Richard
Good.
They spoke with university
heads Corry, Mgr. L.-A. Vachon
of (Laval, R. P. C. Cormier of
Moncton, Dr. L. H. Cragg of
Mount Allison, Dr. W. H. Johns
of Alberta, Macdonald, Dr. H.
G. Thode of McMaster, and
Prof. W. J. Waines, Manitoba.
AUCC board members said
while they agreed fees ultimately should perhaps be reduced, the whole problem was
a matter of priority.
Corry said university administrators have to worry about
maintaining and improving the
quality of instruction given at
their institutions, as well as the
state of access to their institutions.
He said at present the former
is the first priority.
Cruise asked the board members for some sort of sign that
they were in general agreement with the ultimate idea
of lower fees.
"Is it possible for students
to get some sort of formal,
rather than unclear, committment?" he asked.
Macdonald said he, for one,
couldn't make such a statement.
"If you ask me to give you
a guarantee that fees will not
go up, in effect you are asking
me to assign a higher priority
to keeping fees steady than to
improving the quality of education."
STUDENT PRESIDENT Byron  Hender (right) talks up a storm as president John Macdonald
takes shelter under umbrella at Bayshore Wednesday.
McGill has year
to make decision
MONTREAL  (CUP) — Representatives  of the Union
Generale des Etudiants  du  Quebec  have  agreed  to allow
McGill to join UGEQ while  retaining membership  in the
Canadian Union of Students for one year.
At a meeting with   Sharon
Sholzberg, president of the McGill student council Oct. 25,
the UGEQ spokesman decided
to change their organization's
rule that members may not
belong to another union of students, to allow McGill one
year to choose between CUS
and UGEQ.
After one year McGill will
have to leave CUS in order
to remain in UGEQ.
McGill will seek membership in UGEQ at the union's
next congress which opens in
Quebec City Oct. 28.
Jacques Desjardin, president
of UGEQ, has indicated that
the agreement with McGill will
apply to all CUS member universities who wish to join the
Quebec union.
Sir George Williams, Loyola
and Marianopolis student coun
cils have all passed resolutions mandating their executives to seek UGEQ membership at the congress.
Miss Sholzberg said the
UGEQ representatives had
agreed that English speaking
members would be allowed to
use their own language at the
union's meetings.
Campaign
heats up
Two UBC students have
heated up the federal election
campaign by organizing a
Conservative hot line system.
Phil Lind and Bob O'Call-
aghan, both arts IV, thought
up the system which uses
tape recordings and national
phone hook-ups to give instant pick up of Conservative party speeches as they
happen.
The recordings are distributed to 28 B.C. radio stations.
Lind and O'Callaghan obtain their material by phoning speakers shortly before
or after the speech and asking for short excerpts. What
the speaker says is recorded
over the phone.
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VISIT YOUR NEAREST FIRST LADY COIFFURE
FEATURING UP-TO-DATE STYLING mmsstr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily these of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28,   1965
"The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction." -Wm. Blake.
Good show
It was great.
Thirty-five hundred marching out there in the rain
behind the bagpipes and drums, getting soaking wet and
having a fantastic time.
It was simply great.
Thirty-five hundred showing that the phrases about
concern for higher education batted around by student
politicos in the past couple of months had a real meaning.
Or at least just about enough meaning to get somebody in line behind those banners.
Everything about the march was great. The crowds
were friendly, the police were good. And you could tell
the spirit of the thing clicked as stray UBC students
watching from the downtown sidewalks along the route
were urged into the line by their marching friends.
And at the Bayshore, as student delegations sat
down with university administrators to talk about their
concern, those students sat down with a feeling of
strength for their position.
That strength came from 3,500 friends.
It was great.
Cashniks
Only one blot marred the Day.
In a sense it is inevitable that in any society or group
there will always be a few who will childishly try to
turn some positive action of their fellows into a chance
to exhibit themselves.
So there were a few who did not march, but greeted
the marchers at the Bayshore with inane grins, signs
about the Great Pumpkin advocating higher fees, and
showers   of   pennies.
Discount the fact that these people in their fancy
cars are the true cashniks — with more cash than
brains — who have absolutely no reason to care about
fees one way or another.
What still made this the most infantile stunt of all
was the insistance of these troublemakers at attending
the meeting with the Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada board of directors.
Every other student there represented a group which
had put long hours of work into considering the fee situation from every angle.
That these cashniks, there for an obvious lark,
were invited into the Bayshore at all was an incomprehensible mistake. That once inside, they maintained their
right to carry on the '^oke" despite the opposition of
every student delegate present, is nothing short of tragic.
Tragic, because it presented the AUCC board with
a squabble, a hot-headed walkout, and then a disgusting
display of boorishly-expressed ignorance.
A squabble — after 3,500 students had demonstrated
that the majority of those who care about anything
are concerned with higher education.
A walkout — precipitated by these cashniks desire to show themselves off to the assembled university
heads as representing something.
Finally, boorish ignorance — such statements as:
"If fees are lowered and more people attend university
instead of most jobs requiring a BA, soon those jobs
will require an MA, so why lower the fees?"
Plus frequent loud interruptions of the proceedings
with  their comments.
It was obvious these people did not represent a
viewpoint.
They represented bad taste, thoughtlessness, and a
slur on their fellow students.
Dear President Macdonald: While gaining my LLD. at Simon
Fraser Academy I had no trouble paying my fees . . .
LETTERS
WE'RE SORRY I
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
On Oct. 22, a front page
story appeared in The Ubyssey
which blamed the Science Undergraduate Society for irresponsible' conduct of one or
two individuals.
The "story", entitled "Chariot brawlers bloodied", was
roun d a n d firm and fully
packed with statements which
were either wholly or partially false.
I was not too perturbed
when you quadrupled the
weight of smoke bombs, and
printed an injury report
which made it appear that
sciencemen had sustained but
a single injury while the poor,
defenseless, (pardon while I
shed a tear) engineers were
made to resemble the Viet
Cong on an off day.
But when a statement such
as the one supposedly made
by Art Stevenson claiming
that the unfortunate aspects of
the chariot race were the re-
results of the "irresponsibility
of the SUS", then I get perturbed.
An investigation is being
held into the acid throwing
which took place during the
chariot race.
Preliminary results point to
an individual or individuals
taking things into their own
hands and procuring unauthorized material, namely
acid, which they used in the
race.
The policy of both the SUS
and the EUS is that the "combatants" are issued their ammunition by the undergraduate society only, and they are
to obtain them from no other
source.
Apparently some individuals chose to ignore this and
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
Newe   Ron  Rlter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City       Richard   Blair
Photo _     Bert   MacKinnon
Sport*  .    Ed  Clark
A«»'t News   Dan  Mullen
Robbi West, Janet Matheson
AMt City    Al   Donald
Page Friday  John  Keliey
Managing     Norm   Betts
Feature*  Mike Bolton
CUP     Don   Hull
regardless of their faculty,
they are the irresponsible
parties and they alone must
bear the consequences.
The article which appeared
in The Ubyssey has given SUS
a bad name on campus because of the actions of a few
students.
I hope that in future The
Ubyssey will keep its coverage of such events to known
facts such as the fact that
$1,500 was contributed to a
worthy cause because of the
teacup game and chariot race.
Save the wild stories until
all the pertinent and necessary details have been
gathered.
I might add, Mr. Wayman,
that if such a story appears
again it is conceivable that a
certain, much criticized campus figure may find himself
with a dyed beard, or maybe
even no beard but a dyed
(black and blue) chin.
DAVE WILLIAMS
President, SUS
P.S. I might add that a joint
committee of sciencemen and
engineers will be meeting to
discuss rule changes as well
as review films of the event
in an attempt to discover the
parties guilty of throwing
acid.
DIRTY
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
Why must every minority
pressure group choose to deface Totem Park as part of its
program ?
When these groups adopt
responsible, intelligent
methods of presenting their
views, then I will be inclined
to consider them responsible
and intelligent.
Until then, I will not.
Totem Park resident
Lots of working types Wednesday including Fearson Whitney,
Anne Slipper, Vivian Gigun, Peggy Stein, Kim Richards, Don
Hume, Pat Hrushowy, Brent
Cromie, Anne Balf, Doug Halver-
son, Joan Fogarty, Stuart Gray,
Rosemary H y m a n and half a
dozen others whose names aren't
known at this hour of the morning.
By IAN CAMERON
Whenever I get a chance to
read a paper from the USA
I always read the classified
ads first.
To Canadian eyes,
these ads contain things
that have no
place iff a
sane newspaper. Advertisers offer por-
nography,
crime to cameron
order, and personal service
from trained masseusses.
But in this issue, the ad
that caught my eye was a
squib reading 'Happy
Grounds Funeral Home . . .
conveniently located right
outside  the  hospital gates.'
This led to an interesting
speculation .... it's about
time the funeral people
caught up with everyone else
in the fields of merchandising.
For this purpose I propose
a mass-reduction set-up to be
called "Cameron's Corpsery",
It will have a crematorium
in conjunction and will feature the motto "Cameron is
hot for your body."
• •      •
The salesman will wander
around looking suitably doleful, wearing  signs  saying
"Trust  Cameron the  last
man to let you down."
These salesmen will offer
a full range of burial service, including five models
of caskets, ranging from the
'Impervious; at $500, to the
'Millenium',   at   $3,200.
As far as the funeral goes,
the customer has a choice
of a Cadillac hearse, and a
sedate procession, for $250,
a Rolls Royce, with hundreds
of mourners and black crepe
hung along the route, for
$1,695 or a Ferrari with Phil
Gaglardi driving, for $6,000.
(For ten cents extra, Phil
throws in a sermon).
The plots range from a
view lot, with mausoleum, at
$8,000, to a fast trip on the
inner harbour, with lead, for
$85.
Now, one of the big problems with funerals these
days is that they're made for
macabre people. How about
uncle Joe, who's a happy-
go-lucky lush? What does he
get out of staring at an embalmed brother whom he
never liked much in the first
place?
• •     •
It would be more to the
point if he was provided with
a bottle and dancing girls,
while the necrophiliacs of the
family drooled over the dear
departed.
And—you guessed it. We're
going to be ready. At the far
end of the building, as far removed from the chamber of
horrors as possible, we're setting up the 'Casket a go-go',
with the Ghouls as featured
entertainers, for the more joy/
ous relatives.
It should be worth a rr
even though it will be a/
work. In fact,  one  n>-"
most  call  it  a  grav &
taking ... ' Thursday, October 28,   1965
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOREGROUND
Politicos review
election promises
CONSERVATIVES
By BOB LANCE
"The Pearson government
has labored only to bring
forward a mouse, they have
deceived the people"—this is
the opening note of the Conservative .party's education
platform.
And the usual election-time
platitudes follow: "Higher
education must not become an
institution reserved for the
privileged. The object of a
Conservative   government   is
The writer is a fourth-year
arts student majoring in political science. He has been associated with both the Liberal
and the Conservative party on
campus.
to ensure that higher education will be made available to
the widest possible number of
these capable of taking it."
All parties are promising
greatly increased expenditures
for education.
The specific suggestions include:
• An increase in the per
capital grant from two to five
dollars;
• An adjustment of the
enrollment formula for distribution of grants to better reflect varying proportions of
enrollment from province to
province;
• Increased grants for research in all fields;
• Implementation of the
Hall Commission recommendations on education and
health;
• Pay 75 per cent towards
capital construction costs in
universities and colleges;
• Set up a Department of
Youth Affairs.
The platform obviously
plays it safe when it comes to
the controversial question of
tuition fees, calling for "consideration to be given to meeting the problem of tuition
fees."
The Conservatives are not
supporting federally-sponsored
scholarships while the Liberals are calling for the expenditure of ten million dollars over four years for this
purpose.
The party claims it is constitutionally impossible for
such a scheme to succeed because of Quebec's insistance
on non-inferference in areas
of provincial jurisdiction.
Dave Fulton has labelled
this Liberal promise a "cynical piece of maneuvering."
The Conservative stand
sounds pretty weak here when
compared with the view of
Geoffrey Andrews of the Association of Universities and
Colleges, who supported the
Liberal stand last week.
If this constitutional problem is to prohibit the grant
ing of scholarships why does-)
n't it stop other federal incursions  in the  education field, |
such as the loan fund?
One might also question the I
use of fixed per capita grants)
on the  grounds that  it  has]
proved inadequate in the past,
and even though the Conser-i
vatives call for a three dollar
hike, it is unlikely to do more
than hold the line on fees in
the immediate future and will
surely prove to be inadequate
in a very short time.
The fees are already too
high.
Some way must be found to
spread the skyrocketing costs
of higher education more
evenly.
The fact that the writer was
forced to go to the official
party platform to find a policy
on education, because several
prominent campus Conservatives were at a loss to explain
just where the party stood on
education, makes one question
the importance of this basically well thought-out platform
to the Conservative party.
Is it merely a reflection of
the Santa Claus complex in
Canadian electioneering?
In the campaign to date the
Conservatives have placed
little emphasis on the positive
parts of their policy.
Diefenbaker has not even
bothered to comment on the
recently published Bladen Report.
DIEFENBAKER
If he is as concerned over
education as he professes to be
why hasn't he established
some stand on this important
report?
Rather the Conservattives
have chosen to come down
hard, time and again, on the
supposed incompetence of the
Liberals in this and other
areas.
If the Conservatives want
to be taken, seriously in this
important area of public
policy they should campaign
on their virtues rather than
on someone else's vices.
EDUCATION
ON THE
HUSTINGS
OUR DAY
Part 1
SOCREDS
By ERIC DOLL
Secretary-Treasurer,  UBC
Socreds
What is the Social Credit
view on the Bladen Report on
Financing Higher Education?
The report has been greeted
with enthusiasm by everyone
except the federal government.
This is hardly surprising since
the report urges Ottawa to increase four-fold its contribution
to higher education.
• •      •
While the federal government has been spending millions, with more concern for
the welfare of the party in
power than for that of the nation, the provinces have felt
the squeeze of too little revenue
for their growing responsibilities.
The government of B.C.
nlong with other provincial
governments has long advocated a return of federal monies
to the provinces.
Instead of contributing to
higher education from its revenues, the central government
should extend the policy it has
initiated in Quebec, that of sur-
rending some of its taxing
power to the provinces.
• •      •
This would leave complete
responsibility for education
with the provincial governments and would render unnecessary the proposed federal
ministry of higher education.
The report places too much
emphasis on government as a
source of revenue for higher
education. Canada's industries
should realize the value in supporting universities through research fellowships and capital
grants.
• •      •
Another source of income
which the report failed to mention is endowment property.
The universities of B.C. will receive considerable funds from
the downtown Vancouver and
Point Grey endowment lands
when their development is
complete.
The report is a frank appraisal of the financial situation in higher education.
Let us hope that both levels
of government as well as the
students accept their responsibilities without trying to pass
the buck.'
Marches faded
across Canada
One out of every two students who marched in Canadi
on National Student Day Wednesday were from UBC.
In  Nova   Scotia,
only 1,000
students from the province's
eight universities marched in
the rain to legislature buildings.
They were met by representatives of four political
parties.
In Fredericton, N.B., Conservative leader John Diefenbaker told a student rally: "Nation Student Day was a good
thing."
At Montreal, Sir George Williams university held a five
hour teach-in on universal accessibility.
The parliament buildings in
Ottawa were surrounded by
800 students from the four Canadian Union of Students'
schools in the city.
They were addressed by student leaders and representatives of the political parties.
Rex Murphy, student council
president at the Memorial University in Newfoundland told
the group: "I hope the example
of Premier Smallwood in in
troducing free education wil"i
shine forth over the rest of
Canada."
Paul Kenniff, CUS president
said: "National Student Day is
only the beginning of the CUF
effort to press the issue of uni
versal accessibility."
In Toronto, only 600 students from the universities of
York, Toronto, and Ryerson
marched to the provincial legislature where they were met
by political representatives.
The organizers said they
were disappointed with the
turn out.
At Victoria College, 700 students marched to a theatre in
downtown Victoria where they
were addressed by political representatives.
The only jarring note to the
day was in Winnipeg, at the
University of Manitoba, where
a referendum was held on the
abolition of fees.
The students voted 2,408
against the abolition of tuition
fees, and 1,178 for abolition.
PETER BRAUND
... at rally
Noon rally
marchers
fired up
By STUART GRAY
A lively rally held in the
Auditorium at noon Wednesday left almost a thousand
students brimming with enthusiasm for the fee protest
march.
The rally saw seven speakers receive a mixed response
from the crowd that hissed or
npplauded at each point, depending on who made it.
Association of Universities
tive director, G. S. Andrew,
and Colleges of Canada execu-
said during a burst of booing:
"I don't mind the boos and
hisses, as long as you also
think."
The speakers also included
Socred Burrard candidate Ed
Chisholm, Vancouver South
Communist candidate Bill
Stewart, Quadra Conservative
candidate and former External
Affairs Minister Howard
Green, Liberal Burnaby-Co-
quitlam candidate Dick Hayes,
NDP Burrard candidate Dr.
Ray Parkinson, and Canadian
Union of Students vice-president Richard Good.
Parkinson and Good received the loudest applause for
their speeches demanding the
elimination of fees on every
educational level.
Did you know the joy of
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Notice to Graduating Students in
SCIENCE
A meeting will be held in Room 100,
Mathematics Building,
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 29 at  12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,   October   28,   1965
UBC's baby  peace corps'
is growing up rapidly
A baby "peace corps", four-
year-old brainchild of two
UBC students, is growing up.
Canadian University Service Overseas attracted 148
volunteers from across Canada
last year, 18 from UBC.
• •      •
This year CUSO is making
an active pitch for UBC volunteers to serve for two years
in one of 24 countries in
Africa, Asia, South America
and the Caribbean.
• •      •
This year the nature of
CUSO operations will be described to faculties, clubs and
residences, with returning volunteers giving talks.
Second and third-year students will probably be given
Smith gives
talk on Sarte
Professor Colin Smith, of
University College, London,
will lecture noon today in
Bu. 102 on "Sarte—Thinker
or Humbug?"
He will give a second lecture, "The Phenomemology
of Merleau-Ponty", 8 p.m.
Friday in Buchanan penthouse.
Smith's visit is sponsored
by Dr. L. L. Bongie, romance
studies, and Dr. Peter Remnant, philosophy.
a chance to take part in sample training programs; some
are now coaching foreign students in English.
Only university graduates
serve in the overseas program.
Volunteers for overseas
spend five weeks at a Canadian university before leaving.
•      •      •
They study the history, geography, language and culture
of their assigned country.
The federal government
then transports them to their
country.
Volunteers are paid by the
local government or agency
at the same wages as local
workers. They have no special
privileges.
•      •      •
CUSO is otherwise financed
by Canadian universities and
member organizations, the
provincial government and
private donations.
Volunteers serve in almost
any skilled capacity. Teachers
are most in demand; doctors,
nurses, agriculturalists, geologists and artists also go out.
For further information, go
to the AMS office in Brock or
International House.
VOTE
as you please, but please vote
on November 8, 1965
Vote now
CONSERVATIVE    prices
with    LIBERAL trade-in allowance
for
or
N.D.P.
(that's no down payment, Charlie)
and  use        SOCIAL   CREDIT      security
with the purchase of a new Volvo or a good used car
at bank interest rates from
VANCOUVER VOLVO SALES
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GRADUATE   INTERVIEWS
ONTARIO HYDRO
will interview on
November 3-5
Electrical, Mechanical, Civil, Metallurgical
and Chemical Engineers, Engineering Physics
-  Mathematics  and Commerce  Graduates.
Training Program geared to individual interests and based on rotational work
experience.
Variety of Engineering Work — planning, design, research, construction, operations, maintenance, marketing or computer applications.
• A Career in an organiation which encourages diversity of training and experience.
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station expansion.
-An Intergrated Data Processing System — Analysis and programming of complex engineering and scientific problems as well as extensive commercial
applications.
Further information in your Placement Office. If you wish to make
additional enquiries please write:
Employment Officer,
Professional and Management Staff,
ONTARIO HYDRO,
620 University Avenue,
Toronto, Ontario.
Quebec university papers
form new association
QUEBEC (CUP) — A press association of Quebec
university newspapers called Presse Universitaire Quebe-
coise has been formed here.
Student newspapers of the Universities of Montreal,
Sherbrooke and Laval have pulled out of Presse Etudiante
Nationale, a French Language student press association
with university and classical college members.
The McGill Daily, represented at the founding meeting, by its editor Patrick MacFadden, will be a member
of PUQ.
MacFadden said his paper will retain its membership in Canadian University Press.
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NOVEMBER 1 and 2, 1965
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Honors Geology
Honors Math
Honors Physics
Geological Engineering
Engineering-Physics
Pan American, a member of the Standard Oil Company
(Indiana) organization, has several challenging career
openings   in  the  Canadian   Division   Office   in   Calgary.
We are a rapidly growing major oil company offering
attractive salaries and benefits in addition to opportunity
for advancement.
Appointments for interviews are being made at the Student Placement Office. Company and Job information
booklets are available there. Thursday, October 28,   1965
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 7
AUCC HEAD  SAYS:
BEAR A SHARE'
SO WHY MARCH ? Some had another way of burning off
restlessness from pressure of nasty mid-terms and rough,
hard university life.
CSR NEWS
Executive Resolutions Concerning
"March"
At the Executive Meeting of the GSA held on Monday  October   25,   1965   the   following   resolutions   were
(1) "Regardless of the results of the special AMS
referendum regarding the mass student march, the
GSA Executive reaffirms its original stand concerning the Education Action Program." The stand taken
earlier and referred to above may be paraphrased
as, the GSA Executive support the concept of a University Education for all students of ability without
the incurrment of undue financial stress, ie. the
executive does not support the concept of abolition
of fees per se. nor a mass student march on October
27 to protest University Fees.
(2) "Moved that the Executive express extreme
dissatisfaction with the ambiguous and misleading
wording of the referendum regarding the mass student march on October 27, referred to as an, 'Orderly
academic procession.' "
(3) "Further, that no Executive member of the
GSA plans to lead any official contingent other than
the originally agreed to in Minute No. 24 of the
AMS meeting of October 12, as follows: 'A delegation to the Annual Meeting of the AUCC . . .' consisting of the Students Council, Five members from
each Undergrad Society Executive, the GSA; and
representatives from Victoria University, Simon
Fraser University, the B.C. Institute of Technology;
the Presidents of Senior High Schools in the Lower
Mainland; five representatives of. the CUS; and a
maximum of ten faculty representatives."
The above motions were subsequently read at the
AMS meeting of Monday October 25, by Mr. George
Wooton, GSA President.
'Fees must continue7
By RICHARD BLAIR
Ubyssey City Editor
University students must continue to pay fees says the president of the Association of
Universities and Colleges of
Canada.
Speaking at the AUCC convention in Vancouver Wednesday, Dr. J. A. Corry said: "If
our resources were limitless
and governments boundlessly
generous, the considerations
for free tuitions would be different.
"But we have no evidence
that either of these conditions
can be met in the near future,"
said Corry, principal of Queen's
University, Kingston.
"If we are to have enough
government support to keep
the university a worthwhile
place to go, those who can bear
a share of the cost of their education must continue to do so,"
he said.
Corry said: "Student aid
needs careful attention and
more money, but the current
campaign for free tuition and
'universal accessibility' tends
to obscure the fundamental
issues.
"It will not do for the governments to provide free tuition until the universities have
what they need to become and
remain first class institutions."
Corry also warned that increased support from governments might result in increased
intervention in university affairs.
"We are in a period of social
change which will alter the relationship between the university and the community in
many ways," he said.
He said the public has been
perplexed, suspicious and some
times mistrustful of universities.
"This tension between community and university becomes
a matter of some importance
when universities depend on
public support.
"What the governments will
do in the long run depends on
what the general public will
support.
"If the taxpayer is willing
to concede big expenditure on
universities, he may well say
the government should stop
some of the nonsense he thinks
goes on there," said Corry.
With this increased dependence on government grants, the
university will be subjected to
governmental influence and
social pressure never before
experienced he said.
"It is hard, however, to find
a basis for objecting to all outside influence and pressure."
"The way to have a vital role
in a society is to be immersed
in it, subject to its pressures,
and sensitive to its deeply felt
needs."
The president's speech was
followed by a report from the
executive director of the
AUCC, Geoffrey Andrew, a
former UBC presidential assistant.
His report covered the business done by the various AUCC
committees and the reports received by the AUCC during the
year.
He said: "The study of university government in Canada
was completed this summer,
and is expected to be published
early in 1966."
Andrew said plans are underway for the institution of a
campus   planning   service   as
part of the AUCC secretariat.
Plans are also underway for
a survey "of the development
needs of university libraries to
1980."
A report on a survey of university summer schools teaching spoken French and spoken
English will be submitted soon,
Andrew said.
The survey was conducted
by Prof. John Harney of the
University of Quelph, and Prof.
Charles Parent of Laval University.
"The survey's object was to
discover what support schools
would need to make their maximum contribution to bilingualism in Canada," Andrew said.
"A joint committee on corporate aid to higher education
with representation from the
universities and businesses also
has been established."
On financing, he said: "During the past year $27.2 million
in federal grants was distributed to 86 Canadian institutions.
WHY
GET WET?
Let   the   Boys    at
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
serve  you  with
anywhere  on   the
CAMPUS
Phone    224-3202
Whatever became of:
G. Fawkes,
CLASS OF '08?
Voted the student likely to rise highest in
his class, Guy. will be remembered for his
major thesis "The Raising and Lowering
of Buildings by a Revolutionary Method".
Cognizance was taken of this project by
Parliament. Always keenly interested in
problems of rapid movement of mass,
Mr. Fawkes became attached to an early
space programme which failed due to
non-ignition of the propcllant. Results of
some of his earlier experimental space
work are clouded due to excessive blastoff. However—who knows?—due to good
old Guy, this college might well have
been the first to put a man on the moon.
Conclusive evidence must await more
sophisticated lunar exploration.
Whether you are aiming for the moon
or some less ambitious objective, your
chances of success will be enhanced by
a Savings Account at "MY BANK".
Bank of Montreal
THE BANK THAT VALUES STUDENTS' ACCOUNTS
Your Campus Branch:
Th* Administration Building:       G. F. PEIRSON. Manager
,   '.   (.   Cf,   <■'.   I.  I,   l,.lrt,J.   '. (,   '     I.J.   L.I X' Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,   October   28,  1965
New Brunswick students
demand premier apologize
FREDERICTON (CUP) —
The Students' Representative
Council of the University of
New Brunswick has demanded that Premier Louis Robichaud apologize publicly for
intervening in a recent demonstration against Prime
Minister Lester Pearson.
The council claims that a
phone   call   from  Robichaud
to UNB president Colin Mac-
Kay led to the cancellation
of a bus the demonstrators
had chartered to take them to
the airport to meet Pearson
Oct. 16.
A resolution passed Oct. 23
protested "Premier Robi-
chaud's unwarrented use of
his position to prevent the
student body   from   enjoying
Simon Fraser students
against concern march
Simon Fraser Academy students are against a march
of concern, SPA student president Tony Buzan said
Wednesday.
Buzan told The Ubyssey an open forum and general
meeting of SFA students Tuesday decided not to support
any march.
"We feel the public will misinterpret the demonstration," he said. "UBC is demonstrating to the wrong people."
He said SFA council's official policy was to freeze fees
immediately and also "to request immediate increases in
scholarships, loans and bursaries and then discuss the
matter of abolishment."
U.B.C THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
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SUNDAYS
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
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7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
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*   Special student admission:  15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov. 19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
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Evenings — Students .50f Adults .750
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their full rights as Canadian
citizens."
The statement went on to
"request a formal apology
from the premier for his intervention."
The premier's executive assistant in a phone interview
Oct. 25 admitted that Robichaud made the call to Mac-
Kay.
But he denied that the
premier had anything to do
with the cancellation of the
bus.
He said the bus was cancelled by the leader of the
campus Progressive Conservative club after he had been
called into MacKay's office to
discuss the matter.
About 50 students showed
up at the airport despite the
cancellation of the bus to
heckle the prime minister on
his arrival.
They complained that they
had been disfranchised in the
federal election.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
ELECTIONS COMMITTEE
Applications are now being received for membership
on the Elections Committee. Applications should be
addressed in writing to the Secretary, A.M.S. (Box 54)
and should include name, address, and telephone
number. Deadline Monday, November 1st, 4:00 p.m.
DOZENS OF
ENTHUSIASTIC ENGINEERS
are on our payroll now
AND WE NEED MORE!
See Your Student Placement Officer
for information about
e
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE
COMPANY, LIMITED
Vancouver,  British Columbia
Hoars: • A.M. to 6 P.M. daily incl. Sat.; Men. to • P.M.
INVESTIGATE
A CAREER
IN MARKETING
General   Foods,   Limited,  Canada's  leading  food   marketer,  is
seeking young men who are interested in exciting and rewarding
careers in the field of Marketing.
WHAT ARE WE LOOKING FOR?
We are looking for aggressive, imaginative young men who can be
trained to become Product Managers in our Advertising    Department.
WHAT DOES A PRODUCT MANAGER DO?
His is a highly responsible and rewarding position wherein he has complete
charge of the full range of marketing activities for one General Foods'
many consumer products (for example: Maxwell House Coffee, Jell-O
desserts. Post cereals). The work involves dealing not only with Advertising Agencies in the development of consumer advertising, but also in
the design of in-store promotions, product/package development, sales
planning,  production forecasting, profitability,  etc.
WHAT ARE THE OPPORTUNITIES
FOR ADVANCEMENT?
They are excellent. Promotion is entirely on the basis of merit and men
are given additional responsibility as soon as they have proven they are
ready for it.
WHAT SHOULD YOU DO NOW?
You should contact the University Placement Office to arrange an interview time. We will be at the University of British Columbia on Wednesday,
November 3rd to interview students in their graduating year.
GENERAL FOODS
GENERAL FOODS, LIMITED Thursday, October 28,  1965
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
RUTHIE SHAVER (who is also Miss Music) comes on her
shimmering, smiling best for happy Ubyssey photographer
who drew fashion show assignment Tuesday noon at
Brock.
Belefontes protege
entertains at pep rally
Singer Carmen Christina, a protege of Harry Bela-
fonte, will head the festivities at the pep rally today at noon
in Memorial Gym.
Miss Christina, who specializes in Mexican folk songs,
is currently making a tour of northwestern universities.
Also on the program is the presentation of the 17
Homecoming queen candidates.
The cheerleaders will arouse the crowd after which
the Thunderbird football team will be presented.
Flowers for Homecoming!
Show your A.M.S. card
for   10%  Student   Discount
The Secret to a
Successful Evening
HER CORSAGE from
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3691 West Broadway
English schools
reject Canada
By Canadian University Press
A split between Quebec students and those in the rest
of   Canada   could   replace   the  traditional   French-English
division in Canadian student life.
The new split is threatened
by four English universities in
Quebec who are applying for
membership in the Union Gen-
erale des Etudiants du Quebec.
The French-speaking union
which opens its congress in
Quebec City today, will hear
the applications at this meeting.
An agreement reached Oct.
25 by UGEQ officials and executives of the McGill student
union, will enable the English
universities to enjoy a year of
dual membership in UGEQ and
the Canadian Union of Students.
•     •      •
Next year these universities
will have to leave CUS to remain in UGEQ.
The agreement must be ratified by the congress, but Sharon Sholzberg, McGill council
president, says she expects no
difficulties.
If McGill and Sir George
Williams universities and
Loyola and Marianopolis colleges are admitted to UGEQ
the process of dividing Canadian students on geographic
lines, begun last fall, will have
been carried to a point near
completion.
A year ago the Universities
of Montreal, Sherbrooke and
Laval left the Canadian Union
of Students to prepare for the
founding of UGEQ.
X      •      •
The 55,000 member union
brings together Quebec university students, and post-secondary students in the classical
colleges, along with those of
the technical schools and
teachers' colleges.
UGEQ has emphasized from
the start it is a' union of "Que-
becois" and not of "Canadiens
Franca is".
It rejected the entrance of
the bilingual University of Ottawa to a special status in
UGEQ on the grounds that the
university is not in Quebec.
This year UGEQ is courting
English Quebec and even allowing it another year in CUS
while it grows accustomed to
its new home.
New fire drill
set for library
The library will have a
new alarm procedure in a
few days.
Library personnel, the UBC
fire marshal, and an official
of the building and grounds
department held a meeting
Wednesday to discuss new
procedures.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Two films on Poland noon
Friday, in Bu. 202.
INTERNATIONAL
Panel discussion, 8 p.m.
Thursday, Societies in transition, India.
WATCH
FOR
OPENING
OF
SHAKEY'S
Pizzo  Parlour
Important Notice
To All Students
Absolutely No Refunds
Will Be Given
on Books or
Miscellaneous Items
after
Friday, Oct. 29, 1965
Exceptions will be made only on goods which
are returned within a few days of the date of
purchase.
UBC BOOKSTORE
736-6565
ENGINEERING
GRADUATES
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Invites you to discuss
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES in our
FOREST PRODUCTS INDUSTRY
interviews will be held on campus on
NOVEMBER 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
For information  applications and   appointments  please see  your
STUDENT PLACEMENT OFFICE
>."..'».    "   ;,«,».»' Page 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday,   October   28,   1965
3,500 MARCHED
LABORERS SWORE
The day the rains came down
By PAT HRUSHOWY
"I hope it rains on the
marchers—all three of them,"
said an anti - march Alma
Mater Society official last
week.
It rained on all 3,500 of
them Wednesday.
The march left Sunset beach
at 3 p.m., 30 minutes behind
schedule, and included 100
SFA students who defied their
council and a few concerned
Vancouver City College students.
The march was complete
with an eight-piece pipe band
and shopping cart.
Public reaction was generally good but there were a
, few against it.
The march annoyed motorists all along the route. Said
one police officer, "You didn't
make any friends with motorists."
A lady in a cab said, "It's
great, but why do you have to
march now? I'm in a hurry.''
TV newsman Brad Keen
came to an on-route window
and was loudly invited to join
the march.
A radioman thought the
marchers were trying to elect
him president.
CBC people covering the
march were annoyed. Said
one, "Why don't you say something? Why aren't you better
organized? Where are your
protest songs?"
"I haven't seen my daughter
yet so no comment," said a
bystander.
A CHAN newsman said,
"It's a good march, but how
successful are marches?"
"I admire your spirit but
the idea is wrong. Any student who really wants an education can get it in spite of
fees," said a successful university graduate.
A pair of laborers, obvious
ly tied up in traffic, swore.
A working girl was also
against the march: "My taxes
are high enough already."
"Maybe they should get
fees abolished; then they
could afford to get haircuts
and shaves," a businessman
said.
The march was met at the
Bayshore by a group of fraternity kids bearing signs: "Make
UBC a private college for rich
kids,"   and   "Raise   the   fees,
down with proletariat."
When asked who paid their
expenses, one said "Daddy."
After hearing officials at
the Bayshore, buses left for
UBC—without 150 marchers.
AMS treasurer Mike Sommers
ordered more buses and free
coffee for waiting students.
"Next week I'm going to
protest marching in the rain,"
said a soggy but still concerned trekker.
BRITISH SCIENTISTS
Senior scientists from Imperial Chemical Industries
Limited,  England,  will  be visiting  the  Campus on
Monday, 1st November
They wish to meet graduates in any scientific discipline from Britain or the British Commonwealth who
would like to discuss careers with I.C.I, in the United
Kingdom. Recent arrivals, as well as those who are
considering the possibility of returning to Britain,
are   invited   to   get   in   touch   with   them   through:
MR.   A.   F.  SHIRRAN:    -    Office   of   Student   Services.
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List 149.95
104
88
Silent electrically
powered operation by remote control runs slides through
forward or reverse; and fine focusses up to 10' away. Other
features include 500-watt CZA lamp, f/3.5 lens, single slide
editor, turbo-blower cooling, all metal self-contained
case. Uses long-play Spacesaver trays.
Features
automatic timer that changes slides at preselected intervals. Remote control changes slides forward or reverse
and fine focusses-has built-in pointer light, 500-watt
lamp, 4 inch f/3.5 lens, turbo-blower cooling,self-contained design. Uses long-play Spacesaver trays.
Trades Welcome . . . Easy Terms
KERRISDALE CAMERAS
2170 W. 41st AVENUE
AM 6-2622
HAN NAYS CAMERAS
2289 W. BROADWAY
Buy NOW For Christmas
RE 8-5717
BAY
HELD OVERI
LA DOLCE VITA
Marcello Mastroianni
Anita Ekberg
(Restricted)
STUDENT RATE - 75c
DELTA
_'Across Frottr St. Bride*, RIcmmm
OCT 29  and   30
STAGE TO THUNDER ROCK
Scott  Brady   —  Marilyn   Maxwell
CRACK IN THE WORLD
Dana Andrews — Janette Scott
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
 Publications  Office:  Brock   Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Loit & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall. Local 26,
234-3242.
LOST: U.B.C. JACKET FRI. NITE
at Lower Me.ll Dance, owner in
urgent need of glasses which were
in the pocket. Please phone Totem Park Haide 384.
LOST — UMBRELLA LEFT IN
Blue Volkswagen Wed. afternoon,
October   20th.   Will   finder   please
phone  Les,  736-4619.
LOST — ZOOLOGY LAB KIT ON
Chancellor, Monday. Phone 731-
3898.
GIRL'S GLASSES, Brown & White
Frames, found in AUD. CAE. Oct.
25 —Pick up at Publications Office
Brock. " I
FOUND CAR KEY IN CASE No.
183-361, field next to Memorial
Gym, Monday. Call at Ubyssey
Advertising Office.	
FOUND — ONE WRISTWATCH.
Probably lost while hitchhiking
one to three weeks ago. Phone
Devin, AM 1-1549.
FOUND IN WEST VANCOUVER—
Duffle Coat, with Campus A-Go-Go
tickets in pocket. Phone WA 2-
6815.
FOUND NEAR NURSES' BENCH
during Chariot Race, one black
pen, silver cap. E. J. Cakeyne,
Dept. of Math.	
FOUND — 2 CLUTCH PURSES,
1 gold watch, 1 silver lighter, 1
pair women's brown glasses. AMS
Office, Brock Hall.	
FOUND — HISTORY TEXT BOOK,
at Wesbrook Bus Stop, 8.30 p.m.
Tuesday. Call at Lost & Found
Dept.,  behind Bookstore.	
EYE GLASSES—HAVE YOU LOST
Yours? AMS Publications Office
has Five Pairs of Glasses looking
for owners.
LOST — LADD3S DARK BROWN
Sueda Jacket in Biological Science
Building, Tuesday, Oct. 26. Please
phone WA 9-2724.
Special Notices
13
CAVE  IS  NEXT.
VOTE SHARIE MALISAUSKAS for
HOMECOMJNG QUEEN.	
SWING WITH THE CHESSMEN
at another great Totem Park
Mixer Friday, October 29th, from
9:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. AMS Cards
required at door.
DISPLAYS FROM EUROPE, ASIA,
Africa — See these and much
more at Fall Fair '65, Nov. 5, 6,
Armouries. Tickets 50c - $1.50.
AMS Office or Int'l House.	
THE FABULOUS MR. BARRY —
Hypnotist. One more hilarious
show Fri.,   Nov.   15,  Totem  Park.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED FOR TWO 8:30
Mon. to Fri. Vic. 41st & Cambie.
Staying out some evenings preferably. Marilyn 327-3862 or Mary
321-9239.
NORTH VANCOUVER — RIDERS
wanted, one or both ways. Leave
7.30 a.m., return 3.30 p.m. Phone
988-4860 evenings.
TWO DRIVERS NEEDED FOR
West Van carpool, Taylor Way to
24th.  Phone  Christine,   922-3067.
RIDE WANTED FROM 18th AND
Renfrew for 8.30 classes. 433-2596
after six.	
Wanted
15
WANTED —  SHARIE  MALISAUSKAS for HOMECOMING  QUEEN.
AUTOMOTIVE   & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1959 NA"SH METROPOLITAN —
Tremendous condition. New paint
job.   RE   3-2686.
1958 PLYMOUTH 6 CYL. STAND-
ard 2 doors. Very good running
condition $350' or best offer. RE 6-
4620  after 5:30  p.m
1965' VW DELUXE — PERFECT
condition, white, seat belts, 7,000
miles, Contact Rowell, 224-9845,
Rm.  9, after 6:00.
FOR SALE 1958 M..G.A. CONVER-
tible with wire wheels, radio.
$600 or nearest offer. Can be seen
at  Thomas Motors, 715 Kingsway.
MUST SELL 1961 NSU PRINZ. Excel, cond. $450. Also 1964 Honda
Sport 50 $165. John FA 7-1216.
>3 FORD TUDOR STAND TRANS.
Clean and in good running condition. Rebuilt engine. $300 or best
offer. WA 2-0913.
'53 RED & WHITE HARD TOP
Ford Sedan, excellent running
condition, $175.00. Good whitewall
tires, signals. Phone 988-2997 after
7 p.m.
'62 M.G. MIDGET, SHARP, FAST,
economical, 1 owner, good condition. Phone WA 6-1729.
Motorcycles
27
1965 MONZA DUCATI 250cc, $580,
or payments. ,2455 W. Broadway.
Phone 738-4992. __
'65 HONDA S90 ONLY 2400 MILES
Al condition phone 224-9793, Room
143 after 6 p.m. Leave  message.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters tt Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, IS*
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
SO percent savings. Polaon Typewriter*, 2140 W. 4tta. Phone HE
1-8J22.
Typin»
43
THESES, ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
views, Notes. ARDALE GRIFFITHS LIMITED, 70th and Granville.   Phone   263-4530.       	
ESSAYS TYPED ON I.B.M. ELEC-
tric by Registered Public Stenographers. 30c per page includes
paper. L. J. Brown, 5-6 p.m. RE. 8-
1971 fori detail.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
IT
PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE
as taxi drivers. Black Top Cabs
Ltd.,  701 Beach.
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and West Van.
PS:   New  outlet   coming  close  to
U.B.C.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
IT'S HERE "COMOPLETE GUIDE"
to Chem. 101 Labs. Your Experiments will be easy with your new
Chem. 101 Guide, e This book is
written as your experiments should
be written up. e Shows how to
work calculations step-by-step,
e Complete with theory, procedure, data, calculations and discussion.
• If you would like the rewarding thrill that Chem. Labs can
bring drop into The College Shop,
Brock Extension, for your complete guide to Chem. 101. Labs.—
$2.50.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BALL AND CHAINS! 15-45 LBS.
From $7.95. AM 6-2869 after 6 p.m.
6 STRING ELECTRIC BASS GUI-
tar must sell, group disbanding
offers YU 7-5737.	
BIRD CALLS—-the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part ot
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 76 cents.	
Ben's Carpet Centre
UBC   STUDENTS   SPECIALS   9x12
rugs   $29.50   up.   Desks   and   bookcases, $9.95-$23.95. Open Fri. 'til 9.
Cor.   4th & Burrard.   RE  1-8913.
Rooms
81
SLEEPING ROOM NEAR U.B.C.
Hotplate. $40 month. Board can be
arranged.   Phone   263-4328.	
ROOM AND COOKING FACILITIES
available near Eighth and Arbutus. (Cost $30 per month.) Phone
Russ Affleck  AM  3-3580. Thursday, October 28,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
DEMONSTRATING form that ranks her in the top five
gymnasts in Canada is UBC's Leslie Bird. Miss Bird, a
graduate of North Vancouver High School, is a member of
the UBC Gymnastic Club which competes in WCIAA competition.
Simon Fraser
outlines its
athletic policy
The following is a press release from Simon Fraser
Academy's Director of Athletics, Lome Davies, outlining
SFA's athletic program.
During the early planning of Simon Fraser Academy
public pronouncements were made regarding the place of
athletics in the university.
Excellence in the athletic program was to be established,
commensurate with excellence in teaching and research
going on at the university.
To prevent the drain of good students from British
Columbia, plans were set in motion to establish first-rate
coaching in athletics and steps were taken to secure financial
assistance for those students eligible for the university who
had, as well, good athletic abilities.
Such an approach simply acknowledges a responsibility
of a modern university.
If a student is admitted to the university with good
abilities in athletics, is clearly the responsibility of the
university to provide for the expansion and enhancement of
those abilities.
• • •
A wide range of evidence now suggests that the university must acknowledge the fact that well co-ordinated minds
can be found within co-ordinated bodies.
To ignore athletics or to provide second rate coaching
is clearly to abdicate responsibilities to students in British
Columbia.
It is our belief that a well organized athletic team
provides more than just a place to discuss and test self-
discipline and achievement theories; it furnishes a laboratory for actual practice.
This educational laboratory demands actual responses
to situations just as much as life does in general.
Athletics provide students with a unique learning experience which is both physically and psychologically challenging.
To this end the following individuals have been granted
athletic scholarships:
• • •
FOOTBALL
Christopher Beaton, Robert Boyer, Ronald Faulkner,
Patrick Fears, Leonard Harding, Hans Jaanusson, Simo
Korpisto, Herb Lang, QpjjLumb, Robert McGeein, Rojjert
Mi»in, Joseph Marcuzzi7wHffiSrt)'Doherty, Kim Rawley,
Ron Reichelt, Richard Sanders and Bolko Skapsi.
BASKETBALL
Emery Baker, Douglas Dougan, Gary Field, Gunner
Kuehn, James Mills, David Murphy and Robert Wright.
SWIMMING
Peter Marshall.
SPECIAL AWARDS FOR ATHLETIC ABILITIES
The Fred H. Dietrich Athletic Scholarship — James
W. Jardine; the Victor Spenser Athletic Scholarship —
Russell W. Jenkins; the Fred Bolton Athletic Scholarship —
R. J. MicLaren; B.C. Lions Football Club Athletic Scholarship — Edward B. Warkentin; Carling Breweries <B.C.) Ltd.
Athletic award for swimming — Mary Stewart.
All of our endeavours are marshalled to provide a
well rounded athetic program. The recipients of these awards
are outstanding people of the highest calibre.
It is to be noted, however, that this is our initial announcement of Athletic Awards and further announcements
of awards will be made in the very near future.
Women
flying
in gym
UBC's women's gymnastic
team is on the beam again.
Returning from last year's
team, which placed third in
the Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association competition, is coach
Monique Lindeman.
Miss Lindeman, a native
of Germany, ranked among
the top 10 gymnasts before
coming to Canada 12 years
ago.
She now serves as chairman of the Women's Technical Committee of Gymnastics
in B.C. and Secretary of the
B.C. Gymnastic Association.
Ruth Johnson, who received her Big Block last
season, is back in good form.
Practices are held in the
Memorial Gym apparatus
room, Tuesdays and Thursdays from noon to 2:30 p.m.
New members are welcome, no experience necessary.
SPORTS
Editor: Ed Clark
10% OFF CORSAGES
To All UBC Students
ORDER   EARLY
VOGUE   FLOWER  SHOP
2197 W Broadway   736-7344
MARXIST
speaks on
The VERTICAL
MOSIAC
ANALYSIS OF GLASS
STRUCTURE OF CANADA
Noon Thursday
(Today)
Henry Angus 110
SOCIALIST CLUB
Look-Ski SETS!
'Beginning of the season' SPECIALS
NOVICE SET
INCLUDES                                                                                     ,      . ...
"AMERICANA" SKI — has a 'poly-tex' base steel edges, Plast'c
top, lip and heel protectors. Color—White with black S«y.50
trim.   Sizes   ISOcm.   to  205   cm —       *•'
"MILLCO" POLE — Tapered metal pole has formed grip, SC-95
leather wrist  strap,   moulded   basket        ~    **
SAFETY   HARNESS — Toe  piece   has  a  full  double  action
for fast  release—front  levor has  famous  "pistol action"
cable release	
TOTAL
SAVE
Ml95
*4540
y.90
50
COMPLETE SET ONLY
'37
FOR THOSE  TRADING UP
Famous   "ANDERSON   AND   THOMPSON"   ZERMATT   SKI   — 21-
piece laminated,   'polymica' plastic base,   inlaid  plastic
top edges, interlocking steel edges, metal tip and heel
protectors.   Color—blue     	
SAFETY   HARNESS — World  famous
piece.   "GRESVIG"   front   lever   	
•MARKER"   too
"MILLCO" POLE"—Tapered metal pole has formed grip,
leather   wrist   strap,   moulded   basket   	
TOTAL
SAVE   ...
♦37.50
»1889
*5-95
*62M
Q.34
50
COMPLETE SET ONLY
'52
FALL SELECTION OF BETTER QUALITY LADIES' and MEN'S
SKI JACKETS — Such names as "HRLU3U", "WHITE STAG"
and   "TYROIj".  Good  color assortment. *«JfV00  to  ?AC-00
Triced from   MAS 13
NEW ARRIVALS IN SWEATERS, Patterned and plain. Ideal for
fall campers,  curling or skiing.
Complete Ski Repair Service — Now is the time to check
over your skiis and  get those needed  repairs !
Free Parking D.P.C. Lot, Pender &  Hornby  — Open Friday 'lil 9 p.m.
ARLBERG
SPORY hAUS
816 WEST PENDER ST., MU 2-4288
Watch for the opening of Arlberg's Shop
at Whistler Mtn.
1
Listen to "Outdoors with "Arlberg"—Thursdays at 6:15 p.m. — CHQM
Join the Football Team
For a Weekend
In San Francisco
CHARTER FLIGHT TO SAN FRANCISCO BEING PLANNED FOR THE NOV. 5th-7th
WEEKEND, LEAVING VANCOUVER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5th AT 5:30 P.M.,
RETURNING SUNDAY, NOVEMBER  7th,   AT 9:30 P.M.
Return   Fare    -    Vancouver - San Franscisco
$60 00
(Regular Fare - $118.00)
Those interest should apply at Athletic Office in The Memorial Gym
not later than Wednesday, November 3rd.
$60.00  payable   at time of application.
Flight Limited to 50 Passengers    —    Sign Up Immediately
Less than 25 seats left — Don't miss this opportunity to travel
with the Thunderbirds and see San Francisco.
*.-*.*.«„*% -x. n-\»,n. *.«. * aw*. *.-«, «
».-*.* *.H  At*,"*. D,»k 1
ik -*.-*.-* -*-ifc.-*. *. a. *.«. *.-*. *. ft. a. t
l~*» «. ■». %."*w*-iv~*r». Page 12
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday,   October   28,   1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Roblin gives Tory view
Premier Duff Roblin of Manitoba, on a one-day election
visit to Vancouver, will address
students at noon today in
Brock.
Following the rally, Sir Ouvry Roberts will host a luncheon
at the Faculty Club for Roblin and Conservative candidate
for Vancouver Quadra, Howard
Green.
Roblin has  been  mentioned
as a possible successor to John
Diefenbaker    for    the    Tory's
national leadership.
GAMMA DELTA
Talk in Bu. 2201 by Dr. Walton on "Reformation in Modern
Perspective." Friday, noon.
AFRICAN STUDENTS
Film and get together at International House, 7:30, Thurs.
PHYS. SOC.
Grad  Studies  talk  on  Geophysics     and     Oceanography,
Thursday,     1:30,     room     204,
Phys. Bldg.
SUS
Grad   students   meeting   in
room 100 Math Bldg., Friday,
noon,    lecture   on   "Graduate
Employment."
COMMITTEE TO END
VIET WAR
Film produced by NLF (Viet-
cong) Friday, noon, Bu. 102.
SAILING CLUB
Emergency general meeting,
Bu. 202, noon Thursday.
VOC
Hon. Arthur Laing speaks on
"Canada's National Parks and
Garibaldi." Noon Thursday, in
Hebb Theatre.
RAMBLERS
General   meeting,   Bu.   214,
Thursday noon.
BIG BLOCK
Big Block dance for members
and campus athletes, Vancouver Rowing Club, Nov. 13 at
9 p.m., featuring The Accents.
Tickets $3. Bar will be open.
SKATE SOC
Meeting Thursday, Thunderbird Arena, 3:00 to 4:20. Everyone welcome.
MUSSOC
Mussoc's Fall banquet Saturday night at International
House from 6:30 to 1:00 a.m.
v*AtA«w«
Pre-fall symposium evening
YOUNG MEN
THE WHEELERS
SALES AND   SERVICE
4395 W. 10th Ave.   224-4914
HONDA SPECIALISTS
SPECIALS:
RAIN SUITS  ... $ 2.99
HELMETS $10.95
AUTO HEADRESTS 5.95
10% Down and
24 Months to Pay
session.  Dr. Laindauer, Thursday, 8:30 p.m.
SOCREDS
B.C.   cacus  chairman,   Herb
Bruch,    speaks    on    "Federal-
Provincial     relations,     Brock
Hall, Friday noon.
SOCREDS
Social Credit Candidates
Donald Gosse and Norman
Howard, Brock Hall, Monday
noon.
RELIGIOUS   AND   ASIAN
STUDIES
Lecture by Dr. Edwar Conze
on   "Buddhism   and   History"
Friday at 8:15 p.m. in Fine arts
107.
QUAKER GROUP
Worship    meeting    Sunday,
11:00 a.m. Bu. Penthouse.
NDP
War Propaganda film, Thursday noon, Bu. 100. Admission
25 cents.
THEATRE  CLUB
Harold Pinter's "The Collection" Thursday and Friday at
noon, Frederic Wood Theatre.
Admission 25 cents.
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES
Poetry Reading by Susanne
Mowat, Leslie Cartr, and Frank
Harris, Thursday noon, Bu. 204.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Film "Martin Luther," Angus
104, 12:30 Thursday. Free.
SOCIALIST CLUB
Marxist speaks on "The Vertical  Mosaic"   noon,  Thursday,
Angus 110.
FINE ARTS
Thursday, 12:30, tour of Jean
Paul  Riopelle  exhibit at   Art
Gallery. Rides from southwest
corner of the iLasserre Bldg.
U.C. THEOLOGICAL
Dr.   Ken   McMillan   speaks
12:30    in   Theolog.    Common
Room.
PANHELLENIC ASSOC.
Open   House,   Friday   6:30
p.m.
VCF
General  meeting,   Thursday
noon, Angus 110.
SEE	
THE
COLLECTION
A Play by Harold Pinter
THURSDAY - FRIDAY
12:30 - NOON
OCTOBER 28 - 29
25c AT THE DOOR
AT THE FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
CLASSICAL GUITAR
Tuition   up   to  Advanced
Level   -   Segovia Technique
W. PARKER
Reeltallst. S82-10M
Corsage Needed
For Homecoming Dance?
Call:
STRATHCONA FLORAL CO.
5585  West   Blvd.
AM  1-7271
>*■
Prime  Minister
PEARSON
Will Address the Student Body
Friday, October 29
MEMORIAL GYM - 12:30 NOON
V-Neck Pullover Sleeveless
Pace Setter For
1966
A Must in Every Student's Wardrobe
LAMBS WOOL $9.95
As Usual
Better Sweaters
Richards & Parish Ltd.
786 Granville St.
Phone 684-4819
SPECIAL     EVENTS
The Erick Hawkins
Contemporary Dance Company
Auditorium - 8:30 p.m.
T
U
E
S
D
A
N
O
V
E
M
B
E
R
Erick Hawkins has created a work for the theatre that
explores with daring, lyric humility all we have ever
thought about movement and sound.
Tickets on Sale at A. M. S. and
Vancouver Ticket Centre
Students $1.50 - $1.75—Others $2.50 - $2.75
Coming Friday, Nov. 5
CHARLIE MINGUS
Auditorium — Noon—50c

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