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The Ubyssey Oct 29, 1968

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Array — powell hargrave photo
5000 STUDENTS gathered Friday afternoon in front of Buchanan as a result of the  Faculty Club  takeover Thursday.    It  was one  of the  University's  largest
turnouts of students ever. A result of the meeting is the teach-in Wednesday to air student gripes to individual profs. See story below.
Students
should not
•»^i-*.f;v
* -      r
s*r**$.
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29,  1968
let their
hare down
rr
Hare alive and well;
"glad to be back'
UBC president Dr. Kenneth Hare is back. ||
Hare, who had been undergoing medical treatment in |
London for flu and exhaustion which made him take a leave §;
of absence last month, said Monday he returned to put ||
an end to the speculation about his position at the univer- |
sity.
Hare said his illness will need further treatment some- I
■ r    time during the winter and he will return to the special- ||
ists in London who were recommended by his own doctors. ||
"I am very glad to be back," he said. "I am happy to |§
learn that the student occupation of the faculty club last |§
week was  resolved without violence.
"I am extremely  grateful  to members  of the faculty ||
and particularly faculty club  president David  Huberman |§
for having coped so effectively with a most difficult situ- |
ation." ||
Hare   then   suggested   all  persons   on   campus   strive 1
harder to solve the problems that create  dangerous fru- |§
stration in students. I
He said there are no crises between him and the board l|
of governors about policies. He suggested that any accusa- ||
'    tion to this effect are "completely ludicrous."
Continued Page 2
See: HARE
Philosophers teach-in
on reforming classes
Students and facult of the philosophy department will meet
in SUB today to raise issues to be discussed at Wednesday's
teach-in.
■* A department spokesman said Monday the pre-teach-in was
conceived after Friday's noon meeting in order to avoid neglecting important issues at the teach-in.
"We want to discuss meaningful issues," he said. "The issue
is not whether it was wrong to bring a pig into the faculty club
or whether or not Jerry Rubin is a good guy.
"The   real   question   centres   around   the   basic   need   for
academic reform."
A        It will not be limited to members of the philosophy department, but will not be openly advertised, he said.
"We want to get something done," the spokesman said. "We
won't if there are too  many people there  who would rather
turn the meeting into something like the faculty club confusion.
""■       "Something is bothering the students. We want to see what
can be made of it."
Hare, Zirnhelt endorse
student-prof teach-in
By JOHN GIBBS
Wednesday's proposed teach-in has been
endorsed by both Dave Zirnhelt and Kenneth
Hare.
In his first day back on campus since his
illness, Hare, president of the university, met
with Alma Mater Society president Zirnhelt,
and drafted a letter of approval for the teach-
in.
The idea was proposed as a motion and
voted in at a mass meeting Friday noon attended by some 5,000 students.
The letter said in part: "We propose that
this (teach-in) take the form of inquiry during
which we -would maintain the existing structure of classes. The purpose is to contribute
to the University's understanding of itself, its
nature and its relationship to to society."
The letter went on to call for co-operation
of all members of the university community
in the venture.
Support for the motion was virtually
unanimous at Friday's meeting but there was
considerable concern about its legality —
whether or not it would get the support from
faculty and administration many felt it needed
to succeed.
Asked about this, Hare replied, "I don't
know if it's legal, it's sensible.
Zirnhelt said students were welcome to
switch classes if they wished. "A meeting of
certain faculty and students is planned for tonight," he said, "where we will decide on what
some of the issues are. We also hope to get a
group who will go around to the classes and
lead discussions."
Dr. William Webber, president of the faculty association, said there was not any official association policy concerning the proposal
due to a lack of time.
"It's very much a matter for individual professors," he said. "It's not something you can
force anyone to do."
Webber said it would be discussed at an
open forum sponsored by the association at
noon today. The meeting, to take place in the
old auditorium, is open to all students and
faculty.
Reaction among various student councillors
Monday night indicated solid support of the
idea.
Ruth Dworkin, internal affairs officer, said
she supported the idea but that one day was
not enough. "I'd also like to see it used to discuss the idea of giving students a say in the
form of the Christmas exams which was asked
for in our report." (The council brief "Fair
weather or foul", presented during the summer
asked that this be acted on by Christmas.)
Stan Persky also voiced a need for more
time. "This is a good first step in understanding
why we are here," he said.
The AMS's new secretary, Isobel Semple,
said it was an excellent idea. "This is a great
gift to the students ... I hope they will support it."
Asked about whether she thought Friday's
sit-in was responsible for it, she said, "I don't
care what prompted it ... it would have come
anyway,  but  more  slowly."
Jerry Olund, education president, was concerned about the students not knowing what to
do. "It will be up to the faculty to take the initiative," he said.
The meeting that proposed the idea on Friday was the biggest of its kind in UBC history. The 5,000 attending listened to many
speakers, most of them condemning the sit-in.
Support for this viewpoint was by far the most
predominate.
Nearly all speakers, "left wing or right",
however, supported the teach-in.
The meeting marked the formal end of the
sit-in as the last protesters left the faculty club
to attend the rally.
Before the noon meeting however, there
were threats of violence as engineers attempted
to confront the protesters.
At 10:30 a.m. Friday a large number of engineers began to gather in front of the faculty
club, threatening to erect a barricade and prevent any more "students and hippies" from
entering the club.
In  a   meeting  with   engineering  president
Fraser Hodge, faculty club president D. S. Huberman said: "If you erect this barricade there
Continued Page 2
See: SIT-IN Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29, 1968
— John frizell photo
ENERGY IN CANS. Knocking it back in preparation  for Thursday's Teacup  game,  two young
"guts" dump their suds.
Charities hope teacup leaves
a fortune in their coffers
Canvassers will hit the classrooms Wednesday for preliminary donations to Cool-Aid and
the Children's hospital.
The main donations come
Thursday from the Teacup
game and the world-renowned
half-time chariot race.
Lecture in Hebb given
by  British  economist
"What Can We Know About the Future?" will be the title of
a lecture by well-known economist-author Kenneth Boulding
Wednesday, Oct.  30,  8-9:30 p.m., Buchanan  106.
Boulding is president of the American Economic Association,
professor at the Institute of Behavioral Science and department
of economics,  University of Colorado.
He is also former research director, Center for Research in
Conflict Resolution, University of Michigan, and author of numerous works including The Image and The Meaning of the Twentieth
Century.
He will address UBC students on "Freedom For or From
What" Friday noon, and will lead a lecture-discussion on the
same topic Friday, 8:30-10 p.m., in Hebb Theatre, as well as a
symposium on the evening address Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to
noon, in Buchanan 106.
Panelists at the Saturday symposium will be William Nicholls,
head of religious studies; A. D. Scott, head of economics; and W.
Basil McDermott, department of behavioral science foundation,
SFU.
SIT-IN  REACTIONS
From Page 1
will probably be  a  confrontation and then violence. If there
is violence I will have to call
the police."
UBC acting president Walter
Gage then arrived and urged
the engineers to leave the
scene. Former arts president
Stan Persky, acting as spokesman for the protesters also arrived and anxiously inquired
if the engineers were going to
start something that might
lead to voilence. Persky then
said the demonstrators were
considering leaving the club
for the AMS general meeting
outside Buchanan.
Hodge replied that he did
not want a confrontation and
then instructed his followers
to to back off from the entrance to the faculty club.
But all were not as serious-
minded.  One unidentified  girl
was almost beside herself with
glee early Thursday afternoon
right after leaving the club.
"Wow, isn't this great. This is
the wildest. It's really fantastic."
Inside, however, all weren't
quite so happy. Radio personality Jack Wasserman was engaged in a heated debate with
one student. "There are left-
wing bigots and right-wing
bigots," said Wasserman, "and
you can't establish communication between bigots." (Which
left and right wing bigots he
was referring to was not determined.)
What was perhaps one of
the most lucid comments was
made by a math prof who said,
"They've blown it. A number
of departments were about to
hold votes on putting students
on the departmental committees. Now you don't have a
chance."
Free transportation to Thunderbird stadium will be provided Thursday by Pacific National Exhibition passenger
trains. The trains will be tested Wednesday, weather permitting, giving drivers a free
ride to D lot.
In a Monday Teacup boat
race, four nurses downed the
suds and their home ec opponents, announcing that "beer
power" would win Thursday's
game.
The home ec department had
no comment except a polite
burp.
Grape gripers
win U. of C.
concessions
BERKELEY (CUP - CPS) —
Mexican-American students at
the University of California
have won important concessions from administration president Charles J. Hitch in the
week-long dispute over university recognition of the California table grape boycott.
They call the concessions a
"major   victory".
Hitch has agreed to allow
individual UC campuses to do
away with grapes although
they may not officially support
the boycott.
The United Farm Workers
Union has called a nation-wide
boycott of California table
grapes to back up their strike
against grape-growers in that
state.
Hitch also dropped university
disciplinary action against 11
students who were arrested
after occupying his office Oct.
14. Hitch will ask California
courts to deal leniently with
the arrested students who occupied to demand support for
the boycott.
The students won two other
demands: construction of a
centre for Mexican - American
studies and increased minority
group admission to the university.
Sit-in supported
by SFU's SDU
Students for a Democratic Society at Simon Fraser University have voiced unqualified support for Thursday's occupation of the UBC faculty   club.
In a statement released Monday, SDU members said:
"The SFU SDU supports the spontaneous action of over
1,000 UBC students to demonstrate their opposition to the
meaningless education that prevents students' self-determination
and a university structure that undermines the possibility of
community and dialogue among equals, symbolized by the
exclusiveness of the private faculty club.''
The statement said the SFU SDU recognized the widespread
nature of student alienation and political rejection of an
oppressive system demonstrated by students.
The statement voices support for the demands made by
UBC-SDS leader John Mate that all buildings on campus be
made open and that faculty and the board of governors press
for the dropping of charges against Georgia Straight.
"We hope that UBC students will continue their fight
against an oppressive and undemocratic university structure,
challenging the arbitrary power of the faculty, in the classroom
which corresponds to the arbitrary and exclusive privileges
they maintain in the private faculty club.
CEGEP MOVEMENT
DYING SLOWLY
MONTREAL (CUP) — The last holdouts in the Quebec
Colleges d'Enseignement Generale et Professionel occupation are
slowly drifting back to classes though students of two institutions remain defiant.
CEGEP Maisonneuve was to resume normal classes Monday
after a meeting of students and administration officials Thursday.
At CEGEP Edouard Monetit, students are considering an
ultimatum demanding their return to classes. The administration
has said students will not permitted study sessions or class cutting
for the rest of the term in order to make up for lost time.
Meanwhile, L'Ecole des Beaux Arts here is still occupied
and probably will remain so for a while. Students there have
been administering the school for over two weeks and are
running classes by themselves. They say they have created their
own type of school and curriculum which they have no intention of giving up.
Som 400 social science students at L'Universite de Montreal
continue to occupy their faculty despite administration threat
to cancel the year. "The situation can only lead to an impasse,"
said  an  administration  statement.
Students have been asked to give up the "pressure tactic"
so "channels of communication could be opened". Administration
officials have promised to set up investigation commissions to
study  university  problems  when  the  occupation  ends.
Commission would be jointly sponsored by the board of
governors and the student association. There has been no student
response to the proposal.
Student power knocked
by Lethbridge faculty
-c
LETHBRIDGE (CUP)—
Members of the faculty of the
University of Lethbridge aren't
taking any of the students' sass.
The executive of the faculty
association released a statement
last week that attacked "student power" and said it is the
faculty that is "charged with
the responsibility of deciding
in what way the university
should serve society ... it is
expected that faeulty will call
upon students to contribute as
appropriate".
The document has been called a reaction to student requests for increased departmental representation as well
as an expression of faculty fear
of student moves to abolish
tenure at the university.
The  document   will   go   for
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Blorgs marked two by two, and
even three by three, into no
man's land here Thursday, and
the death toll from the action
was surprisingly low.
Officials say a pig with
wounded pride was seen running with cutlery in her jowls.
consideration to a general meeting of the faculty some time
within  the next  month.
HARE
From Page 1
"As for the board of governors," he said, "it is true that K
have been advocating to them
a very liberal line of policy
and so far they have accepted
all my suggestions.
"At   my   last   meeting   with
the board, all my budget proposals for 19t*9-70 were accepted   without   a   single   change"*
being made."
Hare said he must limit his
commitments to a bare minimum until at least Christmas,
and thus must cancel a number
of speaking engagements he
had made earlier this year.
"I will make one exception v
to  the  limitation  imposed  on
me by my doctors," he said.  "I
will   not   refuse   any   student
group that wants to speak to. *•*■*.
me." Tuesday, October 29,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
^MHHSP-Sr»--B_S__L
IS NOTHING SACRED? The old Ubyssey office (in Brock) has been taken over fey students as
a meeting place.
Revisions on rep by pop,
undergrad fees shot down
At a special meeting held Sunday afternoon,
student council threw seven months of hard
labor down the drain.
This is how Alma Mater Society vice-president Carey Linde views the way council treated
his brief on proposed constitutional revisions.
"For the last seven months I've put my
main energies into trying to reform the AMS
and the way it runs its business, and now
they've rejected all my efforts," he said.
The proposed revisions, contained in 11
comprehensive pages, are concerned with three
main issues. These are:
• to   enable   undergrad   societies   to   levy
their own fees;
• to implement the commission structure;
• to replace the present weighted vote system by representation by population.
Four weeks ago, at the Sept. 30 council
meeting, Linde brought forth these revisions
and received the general support of council.
On Sunday, the last day possible to approve
these revisions in time for the general meeting,
"council members, who at times were not in
sufficient numbers to produce a quorum, were
successful in defeating the main part of the
proposals Linde put forth.
It was the first proposal that caused all the
trouble.
Frank Gregory, forestry representative,
typified the opposition by saying the larger
faculties are afraid if they manage to pass a
referendum allowing them to levy their own
fees, the smaller faculties would be taking advantage of them.
"Actually, this is happening now with the
arts faculty," Linde said.
"Arts students pay AMS fees like everyone
else, but get a very small percentage of it
back."
Rod Ramage, the new AMS co-ordinator,
said he was against the proposed constitutional
-revision because he didn't want to decentralize
the AMS.
"Ramage's attitude typifies the most back
ward ideas in the AMS," said Linde.
"He still wants the AMS to have power over
value judgments, and that's exactly what we
want to get away from."
But not all of the councillors were against
the proposed revisions.
Commerce representative Russ Grierson saw
the revision as "the most exciting thing that
has happened in council".
"In putting such emphasis on undergrad
societies, the students will certainly question
the value of the AMS," he said.
Linde affirmed the revisions were not abrogating anything from council.
"The ultimate power is still left to the
treasurer," he said. "All financial contracts
will still have to go through his office, but as
long as the undergrad society has enough money
in their budget, he has no right to refuse the
desired money."
After having the first of his proposed constitutional revisions defeated, Linde left the
council meeting in disgust.
The other councillors tried to carry on the
discussion concerning the revisions, but there
was no quorum.
As this was the last day possible to discuss
the issues before the general meeting, the date
for the meeting was changed from Nov. 7 to
Nov. 28.
"I've given up with council," said Linde.
"I'm now going to try putting the revisions to
referendum.
"The two main aspects of the problem were
the constitution and the antiquated authoritarian nature of the business staff that used to
live in Brock and has now reared its ugly face
in SUB in the person of one Ron Pearson, general manager.
"If these two problems aren't solved, we
can't get anywhere on any other problem," he
said.
Council will discuss further constitutional
revisions in a special meeting Sunday.
Forum to discuss
arts appointment
Should arts students have a say in choosing their dean?
An open forum to discuss the question will be held Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in Hebb Theatre.
It will be led by panel members J. S. Tyhurst, head of
psychiatry; William Fredeman, English department; Malcolm
McGregor, head of classics; and Ralph Stanton, arts undergraduate society president.
A spokesman for the student assembly on the university,
an Alma Mater Society ad hoc group which organized the forum,
said student power and academic appointments in general will
also be discussed.
A faculty committee has been meeting weekly to choose a
new arts dean from a list of 140 names submitted.
The only student appointed to the committee, Don Munton,
resigned in September, saying that students should elect their
own representative to the committee.
A similar forum in September on the topic of curriculum
changes attracted about 75 faculty and 150 students.
STUDENT WALKOUT
BACKS  DEMANDS
OTTAWA (CUP)—The University of Ottawa social science
faculty is preparing for trouble this week.
Some 400 students walked out of classes for two days last
week to come up with proposals for change in their education
and have given the faculty one week to respond to their demands.
Student leaders say they will call a general strike if the
proposals aren't adopted.
The demands fall into six specific categories.
• bilingualism: French students demand they be permitted to write papers and exams in French, express themselves
in French and that employees by bilingual. More than 80 per
cent of the students are French-Canadian.
• university and society: endorsement of universal accessibility and free education. The mony for free education would
be derived from government employment of students during the
summer months in return for payment of tuition in the fall.
e university government: equal, tripartite representation
on all decision-making bodies of the university.
• course and accreditation structure: detailed proposals
for a revamping of the promotion system, course and degree
requirements.
e teaching technique: restructuring of seminars, new definitions of the roles of faculty and students, course exaluation, set
qualifications for staff, more funds for teaching assistants.
• library and documentation centre: proposals for a documentation centre and an expanded library with periodical sections
and study rooms.
The students compiled a 30-page report and presented it
to the faculty Oct. 18.
During the boycott, the Canadian Union of Students sent
a telegram of support to the students that read: "CUS expresses
solidarity with the students of the faculty of social science who
seek to determine their own educational environment.
"We congratulate them for having taken this initiative and
having successfully resisted administration pressure to undermine their fight for self-determination."
Treasure Van is here
If you're looking for swords, incense, jewellry or pipes,
come to Treasure Van.
This project of World University Service of Canada has
items for sale from more than 40 countries in the SUB party
room. Proceeds go to WUSC.
The sale is on from 11 a.m. to 5 pjn. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.
until Friday, Nov. 1.
Sponsors say so far the response has been excellent. There
are more goodies coming in continually. Page 4
THE     UBYSSEY
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; advertising
228-3977. Telex 04-5843.
OCTOBER 29,  1968
Tuesday, October 29, 1968
IDEAS  AT LARGE
BY JOHN  TWIGG
Aftermath
Thursday's outburst was a spontaneous action by students arising from the inability of their leaders — radicals,
student councillors, or faculty — to provide meaningful paths
by which to solve the dilemmas confronting them in university life.
Since the occupation, no groups or individuals have publicly put forward directions that students should follow to
give them more control over any or all aspects of the
university community.
Wednesday's teach-in is proposed to discuss, in classrooms, the wide range of university reform. But, as already
indicated, no method of action has been proposed following
this by any of the university's so-called leaders.
Due to last week's events, students presently find themselves, on an individual, undirected base, in a position where
they are in an unprecedented position of power to make their
decisions felt on the whole university structure.
The faculty occupation effectively toppled the faculty
and administration from their position of exercising control
and direction on the student body.
They held this control only because the student body
allowed this minority to govern and direct them in: the channels it laid out.
But Thursday a significant and representative number of
students threw off the symbolic bonds placed on them by
taking part in a mass action of defiance.
The faculty and administration at that point were powerless to exert influence on the students (other than outside
police repression) because students were physically and consciously taking part in an act which refused to submit to the
existing authority.
The faculty was conscious of this ursurption of their
authority and either came down to the student level and met
them as equals as the club, or quietly withdrew from the
scene.
The administration also accepted that its authority had
been defied ,and refused to act, as well as later bringing
president Hare back from retirement to go and talk to the
students, again at their level.
What is facing students now is the choice of letting the
administration and faculty regain its power by default or by
presspressing their demands and taking power out of the
current vacuum.
By simply having a discussion session Wednesday without specific demands backed up by the threat of using their
mass power again, the university will simply return to normal
and authority will rest in the same places it did before the
mini-revolution.
But the power to. press the demands rests now as it did
Thursday, with the individual student and the mass, devoid
of any leadership which understands the current situation
and has articulated proposals for the students to support.
So the individual students, in their individual classes,
must realize that they alone have the power, and effective
power, to see some basic changes made—and now, if they
wish. And it also may be the last chance for some time.
In the discussion sessions Wednesday students must determine for themselves what changes have to be made —
whether they want parity on faculty curriculum and promotion committees, on administration budget committee, parity
on senate and board of governors, a limit on class size, or
whatever—they must articulate what they want, and convince
their fellow students to press on to the end, by whatever
means necessary, to see that these changes are implemented.
Unfortunately, I don't see that the student body has the
political awareness or desire to take these steps, and what
will result will be a frustrating day of fruitless discussion,
leaving conditions unchanged and setting the stage for future
outbursts of a similar nature to last Thursday.
But students will have to realize eventually that they
cannot leave formulation of demands to their so-called leaders,
and that they themselves must formulate what changes they
wish to see at the university and must be willing to take the
measures necessary for attaining them into their own hands.
EDITOR: Al Birnie anxiously. Blurb, blurb, bulletin, that's
all we  ever do, screamed Brynjolfsson
News  _  John Twigg through   the   rigging.   By   Garr,   com-
Assf News   John Gibbs mented social Norm Gidney. Whafs the
City    Peter Ladner specific gravity of Karle Bureau, boom-
Managing   Bruce Cortis ed Jim Maddin  with breast bared   an*
Wire  -   Norm  Gidney ticipating Friday's diving contest, Muriel
Associate    Mike  Finlay Moscovitch said she'd ruddy be a facul-
Photo    Powell   Hargrave ty   club   than   a   student   strike,   but
Sports  _  Jim Maddin wasn't   sure.   Dick   Button   and   John
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat Frizzell    snapped    at   the    world,    con
Yi-Yi-Yippiehippiewhatsit!   We've   lost gusto. Owen Hertzman stayed and work-
another city editor, we groaned out of ed.  Irving  Fetish  come   back,  we   love
unison.    A   mainstay   gone,   said   John you and we  need  an unobnoxious city
Gibbs before the boat race. Sue Gordon editory. Second-hand silverware on sail
anunast    her    strength    and    gurgled while  it lasts.  Good bargains.
What obscenity means
First Al Gatheringfroth and
now Forlorne Parton of the
downtown bourgeois press have
taken time to castigate The
Ubyssey.
Apart from the obvious criticism that the downtown columnists can find nothing else to
write (?) about, there are other
faults that can be found in
their genius as well.
For example, Gatheringfroth
featured an article concerning
The Ubyssey and a dissatisfied
advertiser who had cancelled
his ads in The Ubyssey.
We have a copy of the advertiser's letter, and it reads,
"we will reconsider advertising
in your paper pending a general clean-up of the filth now
being printed."
There was no mention in the
letter of "Filth and pornography" as appeared in the Sun.
Saturday, Oct. 25's Province
carried as usual a More'n
Pharton column on the front
page of the third section. It too
featured an unkind cut at The
Ubyssey.
In the Parton Thought por-
"Just five thou . . . and it oinks on the half-hour
and yippees on the hour.
tion of the column appeared
"the (sic) Ubyssey, the wicked,
wicked journal from the uni- "
versity that printed that four
letter word recently, ran a
picure, full page width, of the *
fellow who took a nude dip in.
the faculty club pond.
"But what's this? The Ubyssey, that grand defender of
radical freedoms, carefully
painted in a black rectangle in
the strategic place.
"Could it be the (sic) Ubyssey
thinks the male nude is obscene?"
For starters, College Printers,
our print shop, and not The
Ubyssey editorial board, censored the photo.
College Printers attends trial
today with The Georgia
Straight because the city has
charged the Straight with obscenity for publishing a carica-
ure of Acidman's balls, un-1**.
covered.
Another obscenity charge involving College Printers would
have been embarrassing for
them to be involved with.
But The Ubyssey is no prude.
We find Canada's laws archaic,
as opposed for example to
Denmark's, and by breaking
Canada's laws, we hope to in
some -way start an improvement
in Canada's laws.
But more about Forlorne's
column. Alluding to words like
fuck and shit by calling them
"that" reflects a juvenile attitude reminiscent of the Victorian Age.
There's more obscenity in
alluding fo swear words than
there is in saying them. As is
generally known, the imagina- _
tion creates more of an issue
than the issue itself.
Therefore, The Ubyssey is
not obscene, and definitely not
prudish.
Parting Fart: Has anyone
noticed the asterisks the Sun's
page five editor uses in place"
of four letter words. Might I
add that "news, that, soap, love
and salt" are four letter words
that aren't "dirty".
SDS occupation statement
A. After a noon speech by Jerry Rubin
Thursday, somebody suggested that the students should occupy the faculty club, and one
thousand students marched from the student
union building to the Club.
B. Why the faculty club?
1. The basic fact about this university
is this: it is an authoritarian institution. The
faculty club sybolizes this authoritarianism.
This building is like a hacienda on a plantation. Only managers and owners are welcome
— to the majority of people it is forbidden
ground. By occupying the building the students  have  shattered this   taboo.
2. We came here to reject this hierarchy which is the basis of our authoritarian
society.
3. We came here to express to the
faculty our dissatisfaction that they occupy
this position in that hierarchy, for example, by
constituting 75 per cent of the senate.
4. The faculty club is only one of the
many seats of authoritarianism at UBC. Others
are the graduate student centre, the administration building and the meeting room of the
board of governors.
C. As a result of this action we ask all
students and faculty to support the following
demands:
1. Since UBC is a public institution,
no area of the university should be the exclusive domain of any privileged group. Every uni
versity facility should be accessible to every '•»
individual in our society.
2. That the board of governors issue
a statement clarifying whether or not president Hare will return to his office.
3. That the faculty, administration and
board of governors exert pressure on the B.C.
government and the city government so that
all charges against the "Georgia Straight" are -
dropped. This demand is included because we
reject this type of authoritarian censorship and
because the business community which is trying to crush the "Georgia Straight" also controls this university.
D. No matter what the immediate results
of this event, students must not lose sight of
the following conclusions:
1. The occupation showed the tremendous potential power  of cooperative  student'
action.
2. By its expressed position, the AMS
council revealed its impotence and its opposition to any cooperative student action that
threatens the status quo.
3. Two years ago his action would
have been impossible at UBC. But there is a
process of education of students going on <.
throughout the world, and Thursday's action
showed that UBC is very much a part of this
process. Much more action is forthcoming unless the nature of this authoritarian institution^
is changed. Tuesday, October 29,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
University reform—suggestions
By KARL BURAU
First my great respect for
Simon Fraser Univesity Student Council—they acted with
great competence and maturity.
By being genuinely tolerant
and democratic they succeeded
in involving the majority of
' their fellow students and thus
became a real student power.
Now they must come to see
that their fight against the onesided class structure of their
board of governors must be extended into a fight for more
genuine academic freedom all
round. And the greater and
more profound problem is the
threat to academic freedom
from the personal vanities and
greediness of most estabished
persons, i.e., also most professors. This is also the basic problem at UBC and most other
universities.
Our universities have become too much places of intellectual stagnation and brainwashing with the private bias
and prejudices of the academic
establishment teaching outdated cliches and refusing any
basic discussion, and forming
cliques of intellectual incest
and hallucination, preventing
everybody from speaking who
does not belong to their in-
group, who is competent and
no lackey.
PREVENT GROWTH
Instead of being places of intellectual growth and social adjustment, our universities are
to a large extent preventing
such adjustment and growth —
not on account of a conscious
• class conspiracy — at least not
necessarily — but as a result
of the unchallengeable position
of the academics with all their
petty vanities and limitations.
There is, of course, an essential difference between the
situation of the arts and humanities, and education on one
side and the natural science,
etc. on the other. The natural
sciences have much more objective contents and are therefore less dominated by the bias
of the established professor.
And while the standards for
the professional training of
physicians, engineers, etc. must
remain more or less the sole
responsibility of the professions
and the academic authorities,
the basic discussion of general
goals, the truth and relevance
of philosophical thought, educational theory, history and
political science, etc.—especially also law and social reform—
must be thrown wide open.
FIVE SUGGESTIONS
Here are five suggestions for
the direction in which university reform ought to proceed:
- 1) Introduction of challenge
lectures. Whenever a student
thinks that the professor
teaches nonsense, he may object; and if the professor insists
and refuses any discussion, the
student is entitled to challenge
him to a public debate. Some
- authority must be established
where the student can go to
force the professor to a debate.
2) Every student if failed is
entitled to being given the reasons which he may challenge.
Ev-ery examination dealing
with general problems may be
turned into a debate under a
* neutral chairman. Also professors must be capable of showing that they can prove or
argue their point.
~', UNDERSTANDING
3) The  various  departments
and professors must be prevented from developing a phraseology of their own and from
mistaking this phraseology
with the whole reality, and
from refusing to discuss in
plain English. (This, of course,
again refers only to the arts as
pointed out above.) In the arts
and humanities some interdepartmental basic lectures
and discussions ought to be developed in order to regain some
fruitful unity and understanding each other. Especially also
the faculty of law ought to admit some basic discussion of
the legal system instead as at
present to restrict itself to producing brainwashed lawyers
for the system.
There must be a weeding out
of course contents. It often depends more on what the professor happens to have learned
in his student days than on
what is meaningful. An example for this from Germany:
students of Germanistic — that
is chiefly future teachers of
German—used to have to waste
much of their time on Gothic
and Althochdeutsch. But they
never come across these subjects teaching school. There is
no Gothic literature of any
value, but in order to be a good
teacher of German at school—
and to be a really educated person — one has, of course, to be
familiar with the best writers
of any country. The time
wasted on Gothic ought to have
been spent on world literature.
Or the students of Anglistic
had to spend much time studying every word of Beowolf but
remained ignorant about parties, economy, law, etc. in the
English-speaking countries. The
main reason for this absurdity
is the mental inertia of the
established professors. Their
ignorance of a changing world
and their preference for what
they had learned and what remains the same made them insist on the worthless. Here in
Canada the same problem exists and will be overcome only
by student participation in
planning of the curricula. On
the other hand, students often
tend to go too far in cutting
down requirements. For I think
that an academic education in
the arts and humanities must
include the mastery of at least
one foreign language to the degree of being capable of understanding and expressing ideas.
Otherwise the logical faculties
remain underdeveloped and
mere words are mistaken for
ideas, phraseology for reality.
The choice of the language
should be free as long as the
language has a considerable
treasure of literature and philosophy and is different enough
from the native tongue of the
student to be enough of challenge.
DEMOCRATIZE
4) It is necessary to democratize the whole academic administration by having more
open discussions, more student
participation, and more change
in the top positions. It is not
good if somebody studies at the
same university, then teaches
the subject for twenty years
and then heads the department
for another twenty years. This
too easily transforms the department into a court round a
monarch by divine right, leads
to intellectual incest, and to
selection of professors on the
basis of incompetence in the
interest    of    the    department
head. It also is suspicious that
nearly all top positions at our
universities are occupied by
Britishers.
5) Most important is the development of an "Experimental
College" or "Free University"
to complement the courses offered by the establishment and
also as the best means of breaking the monopoly of the establishment of admitting to an
academic career only him who
lackeys to the bias and vanities
of the department head.
STUDIUM GENERALE
We cannot give credit e.g. in
engineering for work in student government. We ought to
have a 'studium generale' for
engineers, etc. It means also
students of the non-art faculties ought to have to take some
courses for citizenship, some
basic philosphy and political
science and history, and say 10
to 20 per cent of their professional credits as stadium generale. Student government
work and experimental college
can then be credited as studium
generale.
At present the danger is that
only students of wealthy parents can afford to get involved
in student government, therefore money and credit must be
made available.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29,  1968
OCCUPATION LETTER
Suggestions
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
UBC in the last few years
has undergone phenomenal
growth. In 1962, we had 12,000
on the campus— in 1968 we
have 20,000, and in 1975 it is
estimated that we will reach
our maximum rate of growth
of 13 per cent, and have a campus with a student enrolment
of thirty to thirty-five thousand.
Last -week's demonstration
is, if not directly, then indirectly a symptom of this
growth, unparalleled in UBC's
history. Last week, the students of our university, sparked by Jerry Rubin, unleashed
their many frustrations with
the administration of this campus, and irrationally struck out
at the faculty club, a club privately owned and privately
run. Nevertheless, it indicated
that all is not right with our
campus, and some changes will
have to occur before this type
of action breaks out again. It
seems to me, after a lengthy
sojourn on this campus (to use
an administration word), that
several actions could be implemented, that never before
have been paid serious attention.
EIGHT SUGGESTIONS
The first of these, is that
AMS, which criticizes, the students for not attending AMS
meetings, should realize that
the average student is not interested in listening to petty
bureaucracy in the top of the
SUB building, but rather,
would soon become a captive
audience, if AMS brought all
issues to the students where
they should be brought: on the
front of the library steps,
where 100 per cent of our
apathetic friends congregate.
With a good P.A. system (something the AMS forgot to set up
earlier this year, when they
held an informal gathering),
the AMS could effectively ad
dress the students as to what
issues they are attempting to
solve. This could be done regularly — i.e. once a week.
Secondly, it seems to me,
there is too much discontinuity
from one AMS administration
to another, resulting in rather
a piecemeal effort on the part
of student government. Also,
in this regard, AMS should
have some kind of long-term
plan (3-5 years) in which they
attempt to deal with the priorities facing an ever growing,
ever changing, monolithic,
multi-university.
LET'S  HEAR  HARE
Thirdly, as long as I've been
on this campus (six years), I've
never yet seen our university
president come out of his ivory
tower (his office) and come to
the library steps to address the
student body. Why didn't our
presidents (Macdonald, acting
president Gage last year, and
Hare) realize that the centre
of our campus is not in old
Brock, or the armories, or
many of the other obscure
places they choose to speak,
but right on the front steps of
our library? Let's hear from
Hare or Gage from the library
steps before this term is over,
maybe we will have less of
what we saw last week!
Fourthly, with respect to the
life of the average student, administration's red tape is overwhelming! Why $30 late fee
fines, that the students cannot
afford? Why poor service extended to students in the administration offices, that grows
to epidemic proportions every
fall and spring semester, when
we are forced to wait in long
lines to get blue slips, pink
slips, white slips, and pink
polka-dot slips so we can
change classes? Add-course
forms, drop-course forms, faculty advisor appoval, department advisor approval, etc.!
Fifthly, let's abolish prerequisites for those upper year
courses that do not follow upon the learning in second year
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courses   (and  there   are  many
many of these on campus).
Sixthly, the parking rules
and regulations on this campus
are one big pain — let's face
it — the university makes big
money off of the rat-patrol enforcing the rules and regulations that state that the car
with a C-lot sticker can't park
in the president's spot; I advocate that there should be an
end to the highly regulated
campus parking, that during
the daytime, parking is wide
open in most lots, and that at
night, parking is wide open in
all those campus lots where it
is possibly feasible.
GET OFF BUTTS
Seventh, let those long established institutions on our campus that have become smug
and complacent over the years,
get off their butts, and get interested in understanding the
other half of the campus —
there is no room for complacency on campus.
Lastly, I'm down at Cecil
Green Park every Friday
night; why is it not possible
for more professors to be down
there to engage in informal
dialogue — maybe then we can
have a positive exchange of
ideas between student and professor. Let's all put an end to
last week's type of activity on
our campus — let's get with it.
JEREMY S. CRQLL
arts 4
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Photos by Powell Hargrave
and John Frizell Page  8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29,  1968
CRUG: A $150,000 ACADEMIC DAYDREAM
By  ALLEN GARR.
Canadian University Press
Ross Thatcher, premier of
Saskatchewan, has threatened
to close down any university
in his province when students
get rambunctious.
Students marched on the British Columbia legislature two
years ago to see then-minister
of education Leslie Peterson
and complain about inequities
in allotment of loans and bursaries. Peterson refused to
speak to them except to say:
"You should all be back in
your classrooms or libraries,
where  you  belong."
The government in Quebec
has, so far, sidestepped its promise to build a second French
university in Montreal and the
minister of education, Jean-
Guy Cardinal, said he would
back any action CEGEP administrators would like to use,
short of bringing in the cops, to
drive the 45,000 protesting students back to class.
The list of incidents of government control, threatened
control and interference in the
educational system in Canada
is endless. The buck passes
continually between the federal government and the provinces.
Student and faculty demands
received in Ottawa are bounced out to the provinces and
back to Ottawa. Governmental
heavy-handedness and irresponsibility at the federal level is
perhaps best realized in Trudeau's classic statement: "Education is a provincial responsibility, you know."
But government intervention
in academic affairs has been
frequent in Canada since the
second world war when government subsidy of post-secondary institutions became their
major source of income. And
the government is determined
not to pay for a pie it can't
keep its fingers in.
The most popular form of
government control lies in its
appointment of governors or
regents to university boards.
What the government would
like   to  believe is  a  marriage
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between themselves and higher
education, academe calls rape.
CRUG (the Commission on
the Relations between Universities and Governments) was
conceived to clarify the relationship between the two
bodies.
It is a co-operative venture
of the Canadian Union of Students (CUS), 1'Union General
des Edudiants de Quebec
(UGEQ), the Association of
Universities and Colleges of
Canada (AUCC) and the Canadian Association of University
Teachers (CAUT).
Representatives of each of
these groups — one each from
the student organizations and
two from the professional
organizations — make up the
steering committee that acquired $150,000 from the Ford
Foundation in November, 1967,
to finance the study.
The commission is to:
e consider the distinctive
role of universities in the
changing Canadian society particularly with respect to their
responsibilities for the development of this role at the various
levels of society; community,
provincial, regional, national
and international.
• determine the need, nature, and extent of university
autonomy and government and
public control of universities
and,
e recommend the appropriate instruments by which relations between universities and
government can be established
that do justice to their responsibilities.
In discussing the mandate,
co-commissioner Donald Rowat
says:   "Almost anything to do
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with higher education falls into
our terms of reference, so we
have to set up priorities."
While Rowat is "impressed
with the similarities of problems in education from province to province" it is doubtful
simple description of them will
do more than scratch the surface. CEGEP de Hull in Quebec is not Simon Fraser University in British Columbia.
He admits he doesn't think
he can study all problems in
depth and seems to be more
an academic chart-maker than
a social reformer.
The overwhelming mandate,
however, is not the only thing
which may render CRUG totally ineffective. CRUG co-commissioners have only until
June 1969 to report and have
had few briefs presented to
them since they were appointed in May.
Letters requesting briefs
went out this summer and set
a deadline of Dec. 1, 1968.
This was to allow the commission time to review the
briefs before their planned
three month tour of open hearings from January to March of
next year. The deadline has
now been extended to the end
of December, in the face of
summer slowdowns and general
lack of information about
CRUG.
Like a royal commission,
CRUG hearings will be open
to the public; unlike a royal
commission, however, the
CRUG report was not called for
by any government agency
and may, after being published,
disappear.
While CRUG has a fair
chunk of cash from Ford to
operate   on,   Rowat   said   that
most of this will go to pay the
two commisisoners and their
staff of four, and the open
hearing expenses. Rowat point- .
ed out that the grant is relatively small when compared to
the $7 million dollars already
budgeted for the B & B commission and the $600,000 dollars so far spent by the royal
commisison on the status of
women.
We seldom measure successful   projects    in   dollars   and    *'
cents;   it   is   only   when   they
seemed doomed to failure that
we wonder why.
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Bertolt Brecht's farce-parable about the
transformation of a porter into a human
war machine
with
PETER JAENICKE-ALAN SCARFE-GREGORY REID
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Directed by DONALD SOULE
Designed by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Music by JOHN CHAPPELL
NOVEMBER 8-16
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00 (Available for all performances)
- SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES -
Monday, November 11 — 7:30 p.m.
Thursday, November 14 — 12:30 NOON
Tickets: The Frederic Wood Theatre Room 207
^
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
■—FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
d Tuesday, October 29, 1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
CUS dealt knockout,
Lethbridge opts out
LETHBRIDGE (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Students
took it on the chin again when students at the University of
Lethbridge voted 422-135 not to join the movement.
The referendum, representing a 55 per cent turnout, is
another in the growing list of losses from the national organization.
Earlier this month, both Windsor and Waterloo Lutheran
universities voted to let CUS go its separate way. The Union
won at Laurentian University last week.
On the same referendum was a section dealing with membership in World University Services of Canada which passed
364-187.
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A MAZE? Actually it's the heart of the belltower with the staircase circling down.
Reagan tries power play
to ban political speakers
BERKELEY (CUPI)—Ronald
Reagan, flint-eyed governor of
California, tried and failed last
week in a preliminary step to
ban political speakers from the
University of California.
The governor presented the
motion to the university regents at a meeting in Santa
Cruz directed against Eldridge
Cleaver, scheduled to lecture
at Berkeley throughout the
coming term.
Reagan wanted to come in
the back door by taking all
powers away from the board
of educational development, a
group created after the Free
Speech Movement controversy
at Berkeley in 1964. This board
in 'the last three years has
initiated over 100 experimental courses, including Cleaver's.
Reagan told the regents "our
backs are against the wall. The
regents must assume their
rightful responsibility for the
operation of this university. It's
now or never!"
Before the Free Speech
Movement, even mainstream
political leaders of the United
States were not permitted
speaking rights. Richard Nixon,
Adlai Stevenson and Henry
Wallace all at one time or another were refused permission
to speak.
Now, anyone can speak about
anything on the campus.  The
steps of the administration
centre, Sproul Hall, are usually
clogged with people addressing
students through a university-
owned speaker system provided
for that purpose.
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PANEL: Prof. M. MacGregor-Classics
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November 7
to interview 1970 Graduates and Bachelors and
Advanced Degree candidates in four year major
or honors Geology, Geophysics, physics and Mathematics.
Hudson's Bay Oil and Gas
320 Seventh Avenue S.W., Calgary 2, Alberta
4 Page   10
THE       UBYSSTEY
Tuesday, October 29,  1968
THE FRIAR
4423 W. 10th
Fish Burger - 45c
Spaghetti - $1.00
Friday, Nov. 1 Only
PIZZA
EAT IN'TAKEOUT-DELIVERY'
Don't be a
fun
dropout
-*SV^
"Who,me?
97
Yes, yon. On problem days
can you honestly say you've
never asked for a gym excuse?
Or given a feeble answer when
the gang decided to go horseback riding or swimmingon the
spur of the moment?
If your answer is definitely
no, never —vou probably already use Tampax tampons —
the world's most widely used
internal sanitary protection. II
you have to admit that yes,
sometimes you've dropped out
of the fun—here's your answer.
Tampax tampons were developed by a doctor over 30
years ago for the benefit ol all
women, married or single.
There age no pins, pads or belts
with Tampax tampons. When
properly in place, vou can't
even feel them. No odor or
chafing, either. And both the
Tampax tampon and its container-applicator are easily disposable. Thev just Hush away.
In short, nothing can lorce
you to drop out of the fun unless you reallv want to. Unless
you just may have another date!
Tampax tampons are available in three absorbency-
sizes: Regular, Super and
junior — wherever such products are sold.
TAMPAX
SANITARY PROTECTION WORN INTERNALLY
MADE ONLY BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD., BARRIC. ONT.
— dick button photo
MICKEY McDOWELL MISSES on this shot as rookie Wayne Schaub waits for rebound.
Rugby coach
likes winning
Lets put it this way," said
head rugby coach Don Spence,
about the Birds game against
the Georgians, "my ulcer didn't
bother me."
Don Crompton probably did
most to keep the coach happy,
as he accounted for all of the
Birds' points.
Three penalty kicks and a
try Saturday leave Crompton
the Birds highest scorer on the
season.
Spence said that the Georgians have one of the best teams
in the league on paper, so he
was pleased that the Birds
were able to pull it out of the
bag.
Except for a few lapses,
when the Georgians scored
their points, the Birds played
the way they should have, their
own wide open brand of running game.
Next weekend's game will be
against the Rowing Club and
will be one of the most important on the UBC schedule
because a loss here will put
them out of contention.
Other weekend rugby results
were: Braves 17-6 over Georgians; Georgians 22-12 over Totems, and the Frosh 39-0 over
Royal Roads.
Hockey Birds win season opener
The   Thunderbird   hockey    ing the Vancouver Carlings 4-3 This year sees the return of
team showed a lot of potential,     at the Winter Sports Center on     Glen   Richards   to   the   Birds,
but a lack of polish in defeat-     Friday night. after  missing   a   year   due   to
ACADEMIC ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE
CZECHOSLOVAKIA
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30-Manuel  Neira
Talks on Political & Social Reforms instead of Tuesday,
Oct. 29 as originally planned.
BUCHANAN  106   -   12:30
CmfiUiftMHt DnteHtietoA
Our representative will be visiting the campus
NOVEMBER 12, 13, and 14
to interview students of the following disciplines:
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING - Bachelor, Master and Ph.D.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING - Bachelor, Master and  Ph.D.
CHEMISTRY - Bachelor and Ph.D.
PHYSICS - Ph.D.
MATHEMATICS - STATISTICS - Master or Ph.D.
Your Placement Office will be pleased to supply you with information
on job openings for 1969 graduates and if you are interested they
will arrange an interview appointment.
DU PONT OF CANADA
Employee Relations Department
P.O. Box 660
Montreal 101, Quebec
knee surgery-
Coach Bob Hindmarch also
feels that the excellent group
of newcomers to the team will
serve to strengthen them
greatly.
In adidtion, the Birds have
acquired Cam Kerr from Brig-
ham Young University, and
utility man Brian Jones from
the University of Toronto.
Hindmarch feels that the
team played well for the first
game of the season.
Next weekend's games
against University of Victoria
should see the Birds hit their
stride in preparation for the
opening of their league play
November 22.
They're Going Fast
Buy Your Copy
Today
BIRD CALLS 75c
SUB LOBBY
Missing
someone
far away?
She's lonely like you
- phone her tonight!
B.C.TEL^ Tuesday, October 29,  1968
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
*-        J ■ toff      **• W-N fi". *?-i.S -
*#  'TjIi'-uT_u><i.    fH'^RsSr ■"■TV1'
l.V   '.■     ■   -»-«■*.'•-■■■-    .»
— dick button photo
BIRD QUARTERBACK ROGER GREGORY seen here with the ball is about to be tackled by the
Pacific Lutheran Knights' end, Jack Irion. Gregory and his Birds were again held scoreless as
they went down to a 40-0 defeat.
Birds bombed at homecoming
After Saturday's game at Thunderbird
Stadium, football at UBC has nowhere to go
but up. For the record, the Birds lost to Pacific
Lutheran University Knights 40-0 in the Homecoming Game before about 2,700 fans in their
poorest showing of the year.
In the first half the Knights amassed much
of their 400 yards in total offence and most of
their 19 first downs.
The Birds failed to complete a pass, had
three intercepted and generally looked inept.
Before the first half ended, the Knights
added two touchdowns by quarterback Bob
Lovell and another by end Mike Murphy to go
Cross country
The UBC cross country team showed over
the weekend that it has good legs.
They proved this point well by putting four
runners on the team that is going back to St.
Lambert, Quebec to represent British Columbia in the National cross country championships.
UBC dominated the placing in the Open
Men's race as Tom Howard, Jack Burnett, and
Bob Tapping placed third, fourth and fifth respectively. Tapping and Howard will run on
the B.C. team.
In the Junior Men's race, UBC frosh Ken
Hirst won a place on the provincial team by
his first place finish.
Pat Mills won the women's division to
earn the right to go back east also.
ahead 26-0. On all these plays the Birds' defense was badly beaten.
The left side of the defence was badly
beaten many times as was the secondary on
three of the touchdowns.
The offence was inconsistent throughout
the half; the only Bird threat died when Kent
Yaniw dropped a pass from Roger Gregory on
the Knights' five yard line.
The Birds' specialty squads again let them
down. Twice they set up PLU touchdowns with
bad snaps to punter Tom Ellisop; also, the kick-
off return team couldn't provide good blocking for the return men.
Their fifth TD came on a forty yard touchdown pass to second string end Vic Eaton.
By the end of the third quarter the Knights'
hard hitting began to show and the Birds
slowed visibly.
The final Knight TD came on an interception of a pass thrown by Murphy Costello, the
Jayvee quarterback injected late in the game.
Costello provided some of the Birds' most
exciting plays, as did halfbacks Paul Danylieu
and Ron Ritchie who ran well.
The Birds lost for three reasons — first,
they weren't up for the game physically or
mentally, and were not running, blocking or
tackling up to their potential.
Second, they showed glaring deficiencies
both on offence and defense, especially at
quarterback, at corner linbacker and in the
defensive secondary.
Third, they came up against a team that
could and did capitalize on the breaks.
It was a poor showing — but we can always
hope for better days ahead.
UBC JACKETS!
ORDER    NOW    THROUGH
THE THUNDERBIRD SHOP
OPENING SOON IN THE BASEMENT OF S.U.B.
Two traditional styles to choose from — both in  navy blue melton cloth with
leather sleeves . . .
(A) "U.B.C." embroidered on the front - $20.95
(B) "UNIVERSITY OF B.C." crested on the back - $26.45
Payment and delivery upon the opening of
J- *j ! _ T PI3. ^! P _E -R_B J -R-P- AH_ 9 f - during^November
NAME STYLE A     Q or B     Q
PHONE Sizes 38 - 46	
STUDENT NUMBER REGULAR  Q    TALL □
Take this Order Form to the  Information  Desk on  the main  floor  of the  S.U.B.
Birds fail  in  field-
lucky tie,  poor  loss
The field hockey Thunderbirds played one of their weaker
games on Saturday, and were lucky to come away with a scoreless tie with India "A".
Bird goalie Sandy Hall saved his shutout, when he stopped
a direct penalty shot midway through the second half.
The only other player who showed well for the Birds was
Kelvin Wood. The rest of the team didn't get untracked.
Mark Skorah scored a hat-trick and got all the goals in the
Tomahawks 3-2 victory over the Pitt Meadows "B" team.
The Braves also played poorly, as they fell 3-2 to Grasshoppers "B".
The Birds will play Jokers I, the Tomahawks take on Jokers
Also, and the frosh play the Jokers Again team. The Braves will
be playing away.
AQUA SOC
IS SPONSORING AN AQUARIUM
TOUR OPEN TO ALL MEMBERS
Thursday, October 31, 1:00 p.m.
Meet around aquarium doors at 12:45 p.m.
Information on club board.   Cost 25c.
G.A.S.A.   SKI   SWAP
SHOW MART BUILDING  P.N.E.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 2nd 4 - 8 p.m.
Take  ski  equipment to  be sold  to the
North Door of the Show Mart Building on
FRI.  NOV.  1 7-9 P.M.
SAT. NOV. 2       11 A.M.-1 P.M.
You sell  at your  own  price:  10%   retained  for  C.A.S.A.
Registration  charge:   15t  per  item
Jumping and cross country skis accepted.
Pick up money and unsold equipment on
SAT. NOV. 2 9-10 P.M.
SUN. NOV. 3 1-4 P.M.
For More Information Please Call:
DAYS-688-2737
l~. —	
EVENINGS-985-6364
Metro Goldwyn Mayer presents
Ptfijci&HeolL
in Frank D. Gilroy's Pulitzer Prize winning
The story of three strangers
A mother...
A father...
and
Jack Albertson • Martin Sheen
produced by
Edgar Lansbury
^ Metrocolor rf&
screenplay by
Frank D.Gilroy
directed by
Ulu Grosbard
► MGM
Starts Friday
Downtown
685-6725
965   Granville Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 29, 1968
,-v*
'TWEEN CLASSES ..
Prof padplundered',
what now my love?
Open forum in Aud. noon today for student-faculty discussion of events following
Faculty Club sit-in.
OPEN FORUM
Discussion on selection of
Dean of Arts Wednesday 7:30
p.m. in Hebb.
SPEAKERS
Mark Rudd, leader of Columbia rebellion, noon today,
SUB ballroom, 25c.
SAILING CLUB
Those wishing to sail; see
board and/or pick up membership cards Tues. to Thurs.
noon, outdoors clubroom.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting Wed., Oct. 30, 7:30
p.m., SUB O.
GAMMA PHLEGMA
Urgent meeting for all, and
prospective members noon,
today, SUB E.
GEOPHYSICISTS
SEG meeting today noon,
Geophys. annex, 202.
SCIENCE   FICTION
Fan club. Meeting today
noon Bu. 222. Elections.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
General meeting on student
power. Wed. noon, Bu. 221.
BIAFRA DISCUSSION
Films etc. Fri. Nov,. 1, 8 p.m.
Alpha Delta Phi., 2270 Wesbrook Cres.
FLYING CLUB
CPA tour tonight.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Meeting today noon, SUB K.
Talk on Yugoslavia, Thurs.,
Oct. 31, Bu. 104.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Dance at Autumn Leaf Nov.
1, 9-1 SUB ballroom.
Licensed. Tickets in AMS.
CHOR  SOC
Practice Wed., 6 p.m. Bu.
104. Males needed.
NISEI VARSITY
Meeting Thurs. noon, Bu.
204. Elections.
CIRCLE K
New members installed Wed.
7 p.m.  at  Harry's.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
No meeting on Thurs., Oct.
31.
WOMEN'S  ATHLETIC
ASSOC.
Tennis practice Thurs. Oct.
31, 6-7:30 p.m.
PRE-DENT SOC/HYGIENE
Meeting Thurs. Oct. 31, noon
SUB 119 E.
ONTOLOGY SOC
Meeting tonight 8 p.m. SUB
C.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
CUS comm. meeting noon
Wed. SUB 210.
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting noon today SUB
215. German castle discussion.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Ladies comm. meeting noon
today Bu 1221.
BIRD CYCLE CLUB
Meeting Wed. noon, SUB
215.
ACADEMIC  ACTIVITIES
Speaker on Czeck reforms
Wed. Oct. 30, noon, Bu. 106.
PRE-MED  SOC
Dr. Kennedy to speak on
prov. health dept. Wed. noon,
Wesbrook 201.
MUSSOC
Fall banquet Sat. Nov. 2,
7 p.m., SUB ballroom. Free
for members who sign in
clubroom.
PSYCH.  CLUB
Dr. Lee Poulos will discuss
training and group therapy
Wednesday noon SUB 211.
AQUA SOC
Aquarium tour Thurs. Oct.
31. Meet at Van. Public
Aquarium doors 12:45 p.m.
Open to all members.
LEGAL ADVISORY COMM.
All students needing legal
advice come to AMS Vice-
pres. office Mon., Wed., and
Friday noon every week.
HISTORY  DEPT.
Berkeley prof, speaks on
"Landlords. Peasants, Revolution: The Lesson of India"
Wed. 1:30 in SUB 209.
ARTS LECTURE SERIES
Geography prof. J. D. Chapman speaks Wed. noon SUB
Aud.
JUDO CLUB
Judo competition at Centennial Community Centre, New
Westminster this Saturday
7:30 p.m.
CAR RALLY
Gimmick rally Thursday
noon.
IL  CAFFE
Meeting, Wed. noon, International House 402: Italian
conversation.
CIASP
Meeting, Wed. noon, SUB
105B.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Film: Boy with a Knife, Friday, noon, Bu. 204, 10c.
SKI TRIP
Meeting, Wed., noon, Place
Vanier Common Lounge, for
all interested; or else, phone
Cherry, 224-9878.
CROSSROADS AFRICA
Summer '69 exchange program info' Thurs., noon, Upper Loung-3, International
House.
WUS
General meeting, noon today,
SUB 205.
FILMSOC
Triumph Of The Will Thurs.,
old Aud., 12:30, 3:30, 6:00,
8:30. Friday: 6:00, 8:30 p.m.
DEBATING  UNION
Debate: SUB 105A noon today.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
YOUTH RESOURCES
Meeting   noon   today,
101 J.
SUB
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
VANCOUVER'S TOP BANDS ARE
managed exclusively by MCM &
Associates.   731-4741.
FOR RENT: GIANT STROBE POR
Dances of 200 to 1,000. For information  phone  922 1451.
ANDY  WORHOL'S
VELVET   UNDERGROUND
At  The Retinal  Circus
Halloween   Costume   Bash,   Oct.   31
12.50
DANCE TO WIGGY SYMPHONY
Nov. 1, 9-1 in SUB Ballroom.
Tickets in Brock AMS.  (Licenced!)
DANCE TO THE MOCK DUCK.
Totem Park, Fri. Nov. 1, 9-1. Girls
75c,   guys   $1.00,   couples   $1.50.	
BLACK CAT BALL — SUB BALL-
room — Sat., Nov. 2 — 9-1 —
Tickets on sale now —■ A.M.S. or
Room 1119, Math Annex.
Greetings
12
SALLY    MUNN:    LETTER    FROM
Paul.   Phone  Gail  277 7936.
Lost & Found
13
REWARD FOR VALUABLE INFOR-
mation regarding theft of Mag.
wheel from brown 1950 Chev. in
"T?" lot on Friday. Phone AL 5-5096.
LOST—PICKETT YELLOW METAL
slide rule in black case in Hebb
theatre. 'Phone Jim 266-6076. Re-
ward.	
FOUND WOMAN'S WATCH. LOWER
Mall near Engineering bldg. Call
r.22-1361  after 6 p.m
LOST TWO MEN'S RINGS TN
Henry Angus. Reward. Phone 434-
S073.
FOUND PAIR OF LADYS GLASSES.
Black  rim.  Phone  224-7374.	
LOST:      BLACK     WALLET,     WED.,
Oct.   23/68.   Phnne   9S7-3259.   Reward.
Xl'-U AT THP" PSI V HOUSF
Sat. night. Blue woman's leather
cont. To claim call Don at 224-9665
at   6:15  any   night.
LOST FRIDAY AFTERNOON NEAR
Armouries French 304 text Modern
French Literature. Finder phone
Maureen   253-6700.
LOST!?) ONE BROWN LEATHER
Jacket Saturday night at the A.D.
House. Finder please phone 224-
6961.   Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE DESIRED TO SEE THUNDER-
bird's second touchdown at Caldwell, Idaho Nov. 2. Phone Dan 224-
9706.	
NEED PASSENGERS TO TORONTO.
Shorter hops O.K. Leaving Thurs
day, Oct. 31 or weekend. Manuel
228-8035  evenings.
Special Notices
IS
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS,
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. You'll find it across from
the Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway.
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to know.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott,
299-9422.
"ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN
serving on the committee for the
'Brock Hall Art Collection' (now in
the SUB) please contact Professor
George Rosenberg, Fine Arts Department, Lasserre 401A, 22S 2757
by  Wednesday   30th   October."	
KNIGHT    ERRANT,    SOLAR    CROSS
please   contact   224-9031   Room   10.
■68 — INVITATION -— '69
A student-oriented booklet of 33
different entertainment passes
valued at over $50.00. Available
at the Bookstore, He & She Clothing (The Village) Canteens in the
Residences and the Information
desk at  S.U.B.  $2.50.
ALL CARIBBEAN STUDENTS —
General Meeting, International
House.   Noon,  October   31st.
TREAT YOLTRSELF AT THE AU-
tumn Leaf, Nov. 1. 9-1, SUB Ballroom.   Tickets  in   A.M.S.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'62 GALAXIE 4-DR. V-8 AUTO. P.B.
& P.S., new brakes & trans. $900.
Phone  after  6.   732-8346.
1967 FIAT 850 SPYDER UNDER 6,000
miles.   Phone   266-6176.
1953   STUDEBAKER,   GOOD   CONDI-
tion.   Best   offer.   AM   6-9544.
'64 V.W. VAN. EXCELLENT CON-
dition. Overhauled engine. 4 new
tires. 44,000 miles. Double doors on
both sides. Best offer.  733-9047. Bill.
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
'62 AUSTIN HEALY 3000 MVII
Special Knock off Disc wheels.
$1,200.00. Phone 733-0993 and ask
for  Ron.
1957 CONSUL LICENSED. CITY
tested. W.W. needs clutch work.
263-6159.
1964 TRIUMPH 2000 SEDAN, Excellent condition, overdrive. Phone
Grant 731-9974.
'64 M.G. MIDGET EX. COND. MECH.
Perfect. See on campus. $850. Call
M.W.  at   224 9769.
Automobile—Parts
23
AUSTIN COOPER EQUIPMENT: 2
Dunlop GT Mags; 2 Cooper "S"
rims;' 2 (new) Firestone 2 (used)
Goodyear racing tires. John Humphreys. 224-9029. If not available
leave  number.
Automobile—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
26
1967   SUZUKI   100   CC's.   EXC.   COND.
Offers  263-4462.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating  &  Copying
32
ELECTION HANDBILLS AND ALL
other printing: Photo - Offset or
Mimeo. Ian 228 8427, Floyd. 224-5513,
Kirk  224-4936.
Miscellaneous
33
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
at the UBC Barber Shop & Beauty
Salon. "It pays to look your best."
5736 University Blvd. 228-8942.
BUSES FOR CHARTER
Available   in  Vancouver
For  Rates   That  Please
SQUAMISH COACH LINES
580  Howe 684-0522
Home Entertainment
35
Guaranteed Expert & Efficient Repairs
Color TV — Black and White TV
Record  Players —  Radios
Stereo Equipment — Tape Recorders
ALEXANDER   AND AXELSON  LTD.
4512 W. 10th —  228-9088
Complete   Record   Department
Rentals—Miscelleous
36
DUNBAR COSTUME RENTALS
Costumes  for  all   occasions.   New  address.   3567   West   41st.   Ph.   263-9011
37
Scandals
BOOZE YOUR BLUES AT THE
Autumn Leaf! Nov. 1 in SUB Ballroom.
CONGRATS BURNS ON YOUR 2nd 2
is a grand and proud number, but
remember that 3 is just that much
belter. Go get 'em Burns!
HEROIN
is one of the freakiest songs ever and
you  can  experience  it at The Retinal
Circus  when  the  Velvet  Underground
do up for the Halloween Bash Oct. 31.
Sewing & Alterations 38
Typing
40
EXP.       TYPING      ESSAYS AND
theses,    reas.    rates;    legible work;
phone   738-6829   after   10   a.m. Mon.-
Thurs., and Sundays.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—Male
52
APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING
taken for the Pizza Patio Pizza
tossing program. Training course
will be held at the Milano Pizza
Training Institute — Italy. For further information contact:
Personnel Director — Pizza Patio
The Home of Perfect Pizza, 688-2381
Male or Female
53
BE   RICH!
Earn   maximum    rates   for    minimum
time.
Campus Rep. for respected International company. See file P-393. Personnel Office.
Work Wanted
54
RESPONSIBLE MARRIED COUPLE
would like babysitting or odd jobs
for weekends. Reasonable rates.
Phone  733-1375.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY LES-
sons given by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
Other languages offered. Phone 736-
692S.
TUTORING IN ENGLISH HISTORY
and French First and Second Year.
Reasonable rates. 733-4394 Evenings.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BUST "B" BOOKS — USED UNI-
versity texts bought and sold. 14*
W. Hastings, opposite Woodwards.
681-4931.
BUNK BEDS, SET, $29.50. 2'x4" TOP,
unpainted double pedestal desks,
each $29.50. New 252 coil single
Hollywood beds, complete, from
$49.50. Unpainted book cases, from
$8.95.
KLASSEN'S
3207  West   Broadway RE  6-0712
(Beer bottle drive-in at rear of store)
YES, WE STILL HAVE COCONUT
oil best for your hair and skin. Plus
appointment service. Upper Tenth
Barber, 4574 West 10th Avenue, 224-
«622.
PAIR FISHLER ALU SKIS WITH
Marker   bindings.   $1.00.   266-9804.
BLUE COMFY OLD 3 PCE. LIVING
rm. ste. $30 or offer. Call 224-1640
after   5   p.m.
WATCH: RODANIA CHRONOGRAPH
wrist watch. Precision time piece
plus two dials for stop-start purpose cost $100. Used 2 weeks. Ph.
228-9448.
HEAD 210 GS. MARKER HEEL AND
toe $90 or offer. Phone 261-4113 ask
for  Peter.
The  Hand
■est Book on
Campus
BIRD
UBC's STUDENT
CALLS
TELEPHONE
Only 75c at
DIRECTORY
Bookstore  8t
Publication
Office,  SUB
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
MALE STUD. SEN. BED & BREAK -
fast. S50 packed lunch optional.
Large, bright room, desk & closet.
Mrs! E. Stone, 4545 W. 6th Ave.,
224-i'460.	
BED SITTING ROOM WITH PRIV-
ate entrance, shower, fridge. Phone
CA  4-3465.
BEDROOM, WASHROOM, HOT-
plate in exchange for $25 per month
care    of    3   schoolage    children.    263-
BED-SITTING ROOM, HOT PLATE,
share bath. Mrs. Craig, 2316 W.
6th  Ave.  738-5724.	
Room & Board
82
ROOM   AND   BOARD.    EXCELLENT
meal!*..  Breakfast,  lunch and  dinner.
736-5030.
ONE TO THREE GIRLS. THREE
meals, laundry, priv. telephone extra,   study,   studio   space.   $90.   224-
0074.
COMPLETE PRIVACY FOR GIRL.
Bedroom sittingroom and toilet. All
meals.   $80.00   month.   731-9743.
SINGLE WORKING GIRL OR STU-
dent to babysit Sundays and some
evenings, do dishes, make school
lunches for large family in pleasant
surroundings in return for room &
board —■ live in bed-sitting room —
fireplace—private bath. Year round.
UBC campus area,  after 4, 224-3565.
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DELTA
Upsilon Fraternity House, good
food, short walk to classes, quiet
hours enforced for study. Phone 228
9389   or   224-9841.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
FURN. APT. AVAIL. OCT. 31 - Nov,
21. 10 min. to main library. Single
couple stud., $45. Others $60. 228*
9472 even.
•Sri
BOYS — SINGLE (DOUBLES)
Board optional not basement; all
facilities available. Chinese students
welcome. 2620 W. 10th Ave. 733-3678
phone  after  3 p.m.
GIRL TO SHARE PLEASANT FTTR-
nished apartment, Kitsilano. Low
rent in exchange for light babysitting.
733-3348
SENIOR OR GRAD. TO SHARE
large legal suite near gates. Call
224-1935. Avail. Nov.  1,  1968.   	
HOUSEKEEPING SUITE GATES.
Available 1st November. Male student   to   share.   224-3517.
SUITE TO SHARE. MALE ONLY $45
month. Light house keeping, cooking facilities. Private bath. Quiet,
clean, furnished. Close to UBC. Call
224-0417   at   4597   Belmont.
FURNISHED BASEMENT SUITE,
Kerrisdale. Suitable for one or two
men   preferred.   261-4319.
GRAD./SENIOR STUDENT WANTED
to share comfortable furnished
apartment. Near campus. $50 per
month.   738-2850.
BUY — SELL — RENT
USE
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED
UBYSSEY ADVERTISING
OFFICE
Now Located In
ROOM 241 — S.U.B.

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