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The Ubyssey Mar 20, 1984

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 \JBC Archives
Serial
UBC admin plans to abolish tenure
By ROSS PINK
As many as 400 professors could
soon be on the firing line if the administration accepts formal procedures allowing the termination of
faculty appointments, a member of
the committee of concerned
academics warned Monday.
Social/education studies professor Donald Fisher said the proposed procedures, which must be
ratified by the faculty association
and the board of governors, essentially abolish tenure for professors
and give the administration power
to initiate large scale firings.
Before the procedures can take
effect, administration president
George Pedersen must declare that
the university faces a financial
emergency. But political science
professor Phil Resnick said this
move is only a formality because
UBC currently faces a $10 million
budget shortfall.
"If the agreement is passed April
4, a university fiscal emergency will
be declared April 5. Seventy-five to
100 tenured professors could be on
the firing line by July 1, 1984."
Faculty deans must prepare three
lists of professors to be fired after
the agreement has passed, but the
economics department has already
vowed not to participate. One list
includes those professors to be
reviewed on a merit basis.
The committee of concerned
academics also plans to fight the
procedures. Resnick said one of the
committee's concerns about the
agreement is the administration
may recall or hire sessional lecturers
instead of tenured professors in a
bid to save money.
"The administration will have
enormous discretionary powers. We
could have a large number of sessional as replacements for those
fired under the merit and service
list," he said.
The procedures also allow the administration to single out certain
departments and programs for
financial reasons, he added. "The
agreement legitimizes their power to
terminate permanent appointments,
with the faculty and faculty association reduced to a purely consultative role."
The faculty association has expressed its support for the agreement and plans to recommend at
the next faculty meeting that the
agreement be accepted, Resnick
said. But at this Thursday's faculty
association meeting, the committee
Socreds extend
youth program
The provincial government is extending the maximum length of Youth
Employment Program jobs by one month as a result of student and faculty
protest.
This summer, UBC students will be eligible for up to three months
employment in the program. The government has allotted $903,600 — an
increase of $303,600 from last year, according to Dick Shirran, UBC student counselling director.
Shirran said letters complaining about the program's length were sen: to
the government.
But he said the program might still not be suggicient to help students
cover increased costs such as higher tuition fees. Shirran said the government will create 753 jobs paying up to $600 a month.
The YEP jobs offer students relevant job experience, he added. "This
program has an academic overture which provides an advantage for
students to gain valuable experience in work other than jobs in mundane,
routine work not normally available."
Student attendants at an information booth in SUB have been swamped
with inquiries about another government employment project: the student
capital venture program, said engineering student Neil Smith, one of four
students being paid $5 an hour by the government to answer questions at
the booth.
"The government did not expect as many inquiries and did not print
enough information booklets as only three are left until we receive a new
shipment Friday," said Smith.
Smith said students are secretive about their project ideas, adding many
may involve gardening, daycare and house painting.
Wyman for restraint
By CHRIS WONG
UBC's new chancellor says he
supports the Social Credit party's
idea of restraint when the concept
means the elimination of "waste"
and "redundancy."
Robert Wyman said he hopes
provincial government's underfunding of education is a move to
reduce waste. But in following a
"restraint" policy, the government
must recognize the importance of
universities in sharpening young
people's skills, he said.
"What is the commitment on the
part of the government to learning
institutions? It's significant, but is it
significant enough?"
Wyman denied his support of the
Social Credit party will impede his
ability to act as an advocate for
higher education, adding he cannot
comment on the Social Credit
government's funding levels for
universities because of his limited
knowledge on the subject.
"I have got an awful lot to
learn."
He said governments should
shoulder less responsibility for
university funding. Efforts to raise
private funds should be directed
towards the business community
and university alumni, Wyman
said.
"I'm really surprised there hasn't
been any kind of organized capital
campaign for close to 20 years.
"(Alumni and members of the
business community) can contribute
millions of dollars for the funding
of an art gallery — and I'm all for
that. But what's the matter with using the same effort to provide
education facilities for young people?"
He said his experience in the
business community will help the
university acquire more private sector funding.
Wyman is chair of Pemberton,
Houston, Willoughby Inc., a firm
he calls "the largest investment
dealer in Western Canada." Stan
Persky, who lost in his third bid for
the chancellorship, claimed Wyman
acts as a "legalized gambler" in his
job as chair.
But Wyman denied this accusation. "I helped raise $210 million
for the Squamish Pulp Mill. I don't
know where Persky was when it was
about to shut down, but my job is
to raise the money necessary to
make an economic project
workable."
Wyman said the firm raises
capital mainly for government projects, industry and private clients.
He adds he also has experience
with handling university funds
because of his participation in the
management committee for UBC's
endowment funds — created from
private donations.
and other concerned faculty
members plan to protest the ex-
ecu.ives' acceptance of the agreement.
"They have presented a controversial document without allowing faculty members to voice their
objection to the plan. It was done
with haste to make it impossible to
have debate on the matter," he
said.
The committee believes alternate
methods could be taken to reduce
UBC's shortfall without resorting
to massive firings of professors.
"The committee favors shutting
down the university in the winter
and summer for whatever number
of days it takes to overcome the
shortfall — probably two or three
weeks. "The committee would also
support a cut in academics' salary,
he said.
The committee will bring forward
a formal motion at the April faculty
association meeting recommending
that these and other proposals be
accepted.
-lis. hab.rt photo
YOUNG SOCRED OUTLINES new rollercoaster track design for Surrey ALRT extension. Official went on to
say that new lines would be paid for out of new provincial taxes on all persons over two feet tall. "Just close your
eyes if you don't like what you see," commented official as she departed for dinner with unnamed premier.
Government may support AIDS research
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
A handful of Vancouver medical
experts currently studying the
development of Aquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome among gay
men hope to receive a $40,000
federal government grant to continue their research.
UBC epidemiologist Eric Jeffries
said the research team is cautiously
optimistic it will receive the money.
"We don't want our optimism to
put Ottawa off," he said.
Ten physicians from UBC's
health sciences centre and St. Paul's
hospital are now examining more
than 800 gay men in an attempt to
establish a link between the persistence of large lymph glands in
gay men and the incidence of AIDS.
The gay men's lifestyles, including number of sex partners and
type of sexual activity, will be
studied over a period of two years,
Jeffries said. The research team is
working in conjunction with the
volunteers' general practitioners,
some of whom prompted the study
because of the anxiety surrounding
AIDS in the gay community,he added.
In New York, 17 per cent of gay
men with large lymph glands have
contracted the disease, but only one
per cent have done so in San Francisco, he said, adding the study will
determine the percentage in Vancouver.
Although gay men, Haitians, intravenous    drug    users    and
hemophiliacs are susceptible to
AIDS, the chances of becoming afflicted in Vancouver are slim, Jeffries said. In B.C., five people have
died of Aids, and three people are
currently ill because of it. Physicians have not yet found a cure for
the disease, which they suspect robs
the body of its ability to fight infection.
"It's a brand new disease. People
who have it are looking criticially at
their pasts," Jeffries added.
The B.C. Health Care Foundation and the Vancouver Foundation
have donated $40,000 and $20,000
to the study respectively. The
researchers plan to publish some
preliminary findings in a medical
journal by early summer. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 20,1984
Student strike possible
MONTREAL (CUP) — A very
divided Quebec student movement
is proceeding with plans to stage a
March 21 general student strike.
But support for the action is questionable.
Year long, rival student groups
have complained about the tactics
used by Quebec's largest student
organization to fight government
policies.
Now, even student association
members within ANEQ (Associa-p
tion nationale des etudiantes du
Quebec) express discontent.
Since the February decision of a
narrow majority of ANEQ's
members to stage a general student
strike, two associations have dropped out of the group, and two
ANEQ central councillors have
resigned.
The strike is a strategy which
does nothing to influence the
government say two other student
groups, representing universities
and colleges.
RAEU, Regroupement des
associations etudiants univer-
sitaires, advocates negotiating with
the government for improvement.
FAECQ, Federation des associations etudiants collegiale du
Quebec, agrees with RAEU.
The idea of a general student
strike was the last straw for the
McGill University Students Society,
a former ANEQ member.
Society   external   representative
Patrick Gagnon has consistently
disapproved of McGill's membership in ANEQ and McGill students
confirmed this by voting for RAEU
membership in a recent referendum.
The students society had not paid
its ANEQ membership fees, despite
an early agreement to contribute at
least $5,000.
With McGill, RAEU has five
member university associations,
three from the Universite de Montreal.
Another ANEQ member,
representing the students at Andre
Laurendeau College, renounced its
affiliation with ANEQ last week
over the proposed strike.
After the strike decision was
made, five student associations
voted not to strike, while three
decided in general assemblies to go
out March 21. The remainder of
ANEQ members are expected to
make a decision soon.
Whether or not student associations and students in general are in
favor of ANEQ's tactics, they are
increasingly angry over the government's policies in education, youth
welfare and unemployment.
The recent announcement of
another tuition fee hike for foreign
students and new college regulations are just two items in a long list
of grievances.
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Student Union Building Tuesday, March 20,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Ex-Ubyssey staffer to rule nation
By CHRIS WONG
Who says writing for The
Ubyssey only leads to cushy jobs in
the commercial press?
Former Ubyssey staffer John
Turner announced Friday his candidacy for the Liberal Party leadership.
Turner was Ubyssey sports editor
in 1947, and eventually went on to
become Liberal finance minister.
Ernest Yee, outgoing UBC
Young Liberals president, said
many club members support
Turner, not because of his affiliation with The Ubyssey, but because
of the media hype surrounding the
Toronto lawyer.
"Turner's a very charismatic
man," Yee said.
The club's executive will remain
neutral    on    their   candidate
preference and make individual
decisions he added. "We're
Liberals — we believe in making an
individual choice."
Yee said he expects club membership to double before the leadership
convention, which will be held June
14-17 in Ottawa. "Our membership
is increasing a handful every
week."
The UBC club will pick two con
vention delegates by the end of
April or early May, Yee said, adding most club members want to
go.
Active Young Liberals will soon
be wooed by the leadership candidates in the form of letters and
phone calls from staff, he said.
Youth will make up about 30 per
cent of the convention delegates, he
added.
Yee said the Young Liberals will
make their decision based on the
candidates' position on issues such
as unemployment, post-secondary
funding, social policies and
economic policies.
He said he expects the Liberals to
do well in the next federal election.
"With the excitement of a convention and an election, I think the
Liberals will do a lot better than
people think."
Socreds cut funds
to battered women
Vancouver's Transition House
was forced to turn away hundreds
of women last year because of inadequate funding and the number
may be even higher this year.
Pat Feindel of the Vancouver
Status of Women said the provincial government's plan to privatize
the house by March 30 will result in
a decline of its quality of care.
"The government will probably
give the contract to whoever does it
for the cheapest cost. That will
mean lower wages, less skills being
provided and less women being accomodated," said Feindel.
Feindel criticized human
resources minister Grace McCarthy
for offering women money to stay
in a motel, if no group offers to
take over the house's operation.
"She thinks that is the equivalent of
Transition House," said Feindel.
Provincial information officer
Joan Abrams said the privatization
is   part   of   the   government's
"restraint" measures announced in
the July 7 budget.
"We are looking at proposals
from non-profit societies to take on
the operation of Transition House.
We would negotiate with the society
to provide support on a per diem
basis," said Abrams.
Transition houses in Richmond,
Prince George and other areas of
B.C. are privately funded. The
Vancouver house is the only one
funded directly by the human
resources ministry.
Accoring to Abrams, the ministry
will not be abandoning the Transition House once it is privatized.
"We are continuing to support
transition services but our aim is to
turn welfare programs over to the
private sector."
Transition House was established
in 1973 as a refuge for battered
women and their children. In 1978
the B.C. government began funding
the shelter directly.
-lis. hebert photo
"HEY THERE, wait a minute mister premier..." says student (right) as Bill Bennett marches to piper (left) of a
different tune (see grey boxes for details). Premier was unavailable for further comment as he rushed to meeting
with unknown supporter, but was overheard to say to piper "Can we go play in my nice new stadium now?"
Ontario fees hurt foreign students
Students mock cuts
OTTAWA (CUP) — International Students' Week at Carleton
University brought dancing lions,
cultural displays, exotic food, and
grim warnings that such events face
extinction.
The onslaught of quotas and differential fees, which caused a 25 per
cent drop in first-year foreign student enrolment for Ontario universities last year, threw a pall over the
week's lively festivities.
"The whole future of the university as a place of . . . assimilating
views, philosophy, education from
around the world is in danger by
those people who believe that a
price can be put on everything,"
said multiculturalism minister
David Collenette at the week's
March 5 opening.
Foreign students in Ontario are
paying about three times the
amount Canadians pay for tuition,
because the Conservative government plans to make foreign
students pay close to two-thirds of
their education costs. The plan
came into effect with a 50 per cent
fee increase in 1982, and another 40
per cent in 1983.
The government's reasoning is
that foreign students don't pay the
taxes that support the colleges and
universities.
The fee increase resulted in a 25
per cent drop in first-year foreign
student enrolment in both 1982 and
1983, said Carleton vice-president
academic Tom Ryan.
"The provincial government has
really gone too far in levying the excessive tuition fees and the response
is that we are losing this culturally
enriching factor in our academic
programs," Ryan said.
Foreign student groups have said
they believe they are already paying
more than what their education
costs the government.
"There has never been any figure
published by any government in this
country to indicate how much a
foreign student might cost," said
George Tillman, director of international student affairs at the
Canadian Bureau for International
Education.
Tillman said the tax argument is
based on income tax, which makes
up less than 50 per cent of the tax
money collected by the government.
The majority of what the government gets comes from tax on meals,
clothing, rent, and so on — ta.xes
which foreign students do pay.
The president of the International Students Association at
Carleton, Sulley Gariba, spoke of a
"silent conspiracy" between the
province and the universities. He
said universities have chosen to
comply with the differential fee
policy because they gain financially.
The money brought in from
foreign student fees has become a
"compensatory fund" for cutbacks
to the universities, said Gariba.
Carleton University has set
limitations of 10 to 15 per cent on
foreign student enrolment in computer science and engineering, but
the fee increase has made them unnecessary so far.
International students at
Carleton are hoping a law suit to be
launched against the University of
Toronto will bring the differential
fee structure to public attention.
The committee of concerned visa
students in Toronto is raising
money to sue the U of T for failing
to notify foreign students of the 40
per cent fee increase last fall early
enough for them to make crucial
decisions about their education and
finances.
"The situation at the University
of Toronto is no different from any
other Ontario university," Gariba
said. "So if the lawsuit at U of T
had any results whatsoever, positive
or negative, it would reflect the case
of every university."
Differential fees for visa students
are fast becoming a national trend.
In recent months, all three B.C.
universities bowed to government
pressure and introduced higher fees
for foreigners. Quebec followed
suit in early March, and differential
fees there will also hit out-of-
province students.
Differential fees are already
established in the Atlantic and
Alberta, and have been threatened
at the University of Regina in
Saskatchewan.
Only Manitoba, with an NDP
government, has not considered differential fees.
By LISA HEBERT
Students worried about education cutbacks invited the public to a
mock classroom set up downtown
Friday for a free lesson on the effects of university and college
underfunding.
"Fact — B.C. spends the lowest
on education of any province as a
percentage of personal income.
Fact — B.C. has the second lowest
participation rate in post-secondary
education. Fact — it is costing you
(students) more!" Deb Lattimer,
Langara student society vice president external, told the crowd
gathered in front of the Vancouver
Art Gallery.
More than 120 people, including
students from UBC, Simon Fraser
University, Capilano, Langara and
Kwantlen colleges, attended the
event   which   featured   songs,
Liberal* to woo youth
OTTAWA <CUPj--* A secret Liberal party film shown to party
faithful in Halifax reveals that youth will be key electoral targets in
the next federal election.
According to Southham News, the Liberals plans to make "better
use" of youth newspapers, including those at colleges and universities. 1|he party will buy advertising space and give student jour-
nalisu greateraccess to cabinet ministers for interviews.
The 30 minute Start implies the Liberals will use tax-payers' money
to woo several major electoral groups — youth, women, urban middle class and ethnic voters.
But David Graham, an official with the newly created youth
ministry,* says he knows of no plans to woo the youth vote.
His statements contradict recent Liberal party moves. The federal
throne speech in December introduces a new Youth Ministry, and according to influential Liberal senator Jaques Hebert, the ministry
was a "simple and inexpensive" way to appease young peopl«: and
gain their support.
Gordon Ashworth, a spokesperson for the Prime Minister's office, which produced the film, confirmed the youth ministry will
sponsor ads in student newspapers and inform student journalists of
issues concerning their readers.
A January meeting between employment and immigration minister
John Roberts and 35 student journalists from across the country,
flown to Toronto at tax-payers' expense, was not an example of
Liberal campaigning for the youth vote, Ashworth said.
Roberts, a potential Liberal leadership candidate, said at the time
the meeting was intended to publicize established programs dealing
V with youth unemployment.
speeches and skits.
Two Langara students dressed up
as human resources minister Grace
McCarthy and education minister
Jack Heinrich for the event. Gracie
twirled an orange umbrella in one
hand, and waved her precious rings
in the other as she stared forward in
a daze. Jack stood beside her, smiling uncomfortably.
SFU student society president
Steve Howard listed the increasing
costs of education to students, such
as the growing debt loads now placed on students who formerly received grants. "We're being asked to
tighten our belts so that some people can have bigger waist lines," he
said.
The Canadian Federation of Students, which helped organize the
event, originally planned to set up
three public classrooms, but security personnel at Pacific Centre mall
advised against such a move. "The
mall isn't supposed to be used for
political stuff," one officer warned.
Instead organizers combined the
classrooms into one on the public
property in front of the art gallery.
Another schoolroom set up in Kamloops drew 50 people.
Student society members said
they wanted to increase public
awareness of the real costs and
benefits of education by holding the
information sessions.
Meanwhile down the road, premier Bill Bennett tried to ignore students swarming after him as he left
the Hotel Vancouver after a visit
with the royal couple of Spain.
Bennett claimed he was not responsible for enrolment restrictions
being implemented at UBC and
huge tuition increases taking effect
next year at all of B.C.'s three universities.
But the premier did say thank
you to a student who handed him a
leaflet about the effects of cutbacks
on B.C.'s education system. About
5,000 leaflets outlining the problems facing education were passed
out at the event. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 20, 1984
0, pn-i-don me, -tWou. ]o\eaX\M piece
gentle uuitK -tWi-v
butchers f"
THE UBYSSEY
March 20, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Who writes for this rag anyways?" Chris Wong despondently. "Beats me, Chris," was all that Lorna Olson could reply. "What about that
tall weirdo with the mohawk?" asked Ian Weniger, in obvious shock over Lisa Hebert's snap decision to join the Liberal leadership race.
Monte Stewart laughed hysterically until Ross Pink let him have it with his Dodge Vegematic. Neil Lucente gasped, "Oh, no - not my
Vegematic! That was next week's feature!" Muriel Draaisma chuckled knowingly, thinking how nice it was to know so many people who
could spell her name right. Debbie Lo locked the door behind her and threw away the key on the pathetic bunch of yuckies
Edwin Meese embezzles America
By WAYNE NIKITUK
A scandal of potentially grand
proportions is blossoming in
Washington these days amidst all
this eclectic "new ideas" election
talk. Ronald Reagan's nominee for
attorney general, Edwin Meese, is
presently being grilled alive by the
Senate Judiciary Committee, particularly by Senator Howard
Metzenbaum, for apparently doing
something most bureaucrats consider second nature: cronyism.
Nothing illegal yet, mind you, but
nonetheless immensely repugnant
coming from a man who believes
hunger is not a problem in America.
Ah yes, good ole' Ed. Most people remember White House
counsellor Ed Meese's comment
last Christmas that hunger and
poverty were not grave problems in
the U.S. Meese said he had not
"seen any figures or statistics" that
proved such unpleasant notions.
Democratic Senator Ted Kennedy,
a member of the Senate committee,
asked last week how Meese "felt in
his gut" about the issue. Again,
Meese uttered the same vacuous
nonsense. Kennedy, who spent
many months last year travelling
across America in order to obtain a
personal look into the question of
hunger, was outraged by Meese's
remarks.
Ed Meese has managed, however,
to anger many more people than
just Kennedy. In fact over one
dozen groups have publicly opposed Meese's confirmation as attorney general, among them the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.
The NAACP is angered over the
Reagan administration plan to
grant tax exemptions to segregated
private schools, a plan in which
Meese was the chief architect. The
NAACP also questions Meese's
role in the administration's long
resistance to extending and
strengthening the Voter's Rights
Act.
But Meese's past actions pale in
comparison to recent discoveries
about his financial and personal
dealings. It appears as if Meese
received financial favors from
friends in return for government
jobs. It should be remembered
Meese is not an aberation in the
Reagan administration. Former
deputy undersecretary of defense
Paul Thayer and U.S. Information
(ireestyfe)
Mease
man or Meese?
Agency head Charles Wick are only
two of 12 top administration officials who have either been convicted or fingered on charges ranging from perjury to wiretapping. As
one Washington journalist put it:
"Meese, Reagan, and all their
friends make the Nixon White
House look almost virtuous."
Two years ago Meese was
$450,000 in debt, and desperate to
sell his La Mesa, Calif, home which
had been on the market for one
year. Moreover, during this period
Meese missed 15 mortage
payments. Irv Howard, a member
of the local elite, bought the house
for $307,500, selling it several months later for $275,000. Only one
month before the house was sold,
Thomas Barrack, a local developer,
loaned Howard $250,000. Barrack
told the Senate committee that the
loan was not intended to pay for
Meese's house.
Reagan named Barrack as Assistant of the Interior in 1983. John
McKean, Meese's accountant, then
arranged $60,000 in interest free
loans for Meese. After the loans
were secure McKean was named to
the U.S. postal service board.
The banker who winked at
Meese's missed mortage payments
is now part of the U.S. United Nations delegation. Another bank officer is now head of the Federal
Home Loan Bank Board. Last week
it was disclosed Meese had received
an additional interest free loan of
$15,000 from Edwin Thomas, a well
to do Californian, in 1982. Thomas
currently holds a top federal job.
Even more outrageous is the fact
that Thomas's wife was quickly appointed to an administration job.
Together, the husband and wife
team earn over $100,000 annually.
Lastly, Meese recently requested
and received a change in his army
reserve status from retired to active
major. The transfer means an extra
income of $15,000. Due in part to
media pressure, the U.S. army
publicly declared last week that
Meese should not have been granted
See page 5: MEESE
Public enemy
Robert Wyman is our new chancellor, and if you expect this
editorial to give him a chance to show his mettle, well, tough rocks.
First off, the chancellor is elected by UBC's alumni, graduates
who are for the most part out of touch with the reality of education
in B.C. today. They've finished with school (unless they have kids
who still go) and wish we'd stop whining and just study.
The exclusion of current students from the voting is thoroughly
undemocratic and electoral set-up does not reflect the interests of
students represented.
The chancellor acts as UBC's official link with the provincial
government. This post would be an excellent platform for a solid
critique of the Socreds' attack on education and a demand for full
restoration of funding.
But Wyman is a staunch defender of the "restraint" fraud and
sees no reason to change his mind, as massive faculty layoffs loom
ahead in the face of hopelessly unprofitable projects like Northeast
Coal, for which the government seems to be able to find hundreds
of millions of dollars.
In fact, Wyman profits from this Socred scam through his position in a large investment firm. Less money for UBC means more
money for private capital and makes his business richer at the expense of the interests he claims to represent.
Such a conflict of interest is simply intolerable, especially when
students must fight to retain the rights and services they now take
for granted.
But let's look at that electoral base. UBC's alumni are pretty
complacent about education, to say the least. They are now part of
the establishment that no longer sees accessibility to post-
secondary education as an issue, and they have chosen Wyman
over Stan Persky, a left leaning author dedicated to slamming the
Socreds.
Robert Wyman is the newest member of UBC's hierarchy and he
will change nothing for our benefit. If we're going to get our
money's worth, we must know our enemies and Wyman is one not
to trust.
Letters
Reporter guilty of
Freudian slip
In Shaffin Shariff's article, Was Freud wrong? (Mar. 16), he is willing to
dismiss the newly discovered substantive material concerning Freud's
beliefs about incest, child sexual abuse and female sexuality because of whc
discovered it. The subtitle answers the question posed in the title, saying,
"It may not matter when the detractor is someone like Jeffrey Masson."
That approach — judge a book by its cover, or the contents by its author
(hell, don't even read the contents!) — is unprofessional, subjective, and
cowardly.
Masson's theory suggests that the modern-day psychiatric and
psychoanalytic treatment of sexually abused children and sexually
assaulted women may be based on a false premise: that incidents such as incest and rape don't often actually happen; that women and children have
an inherent tendency to "imagine" such things, to make them up. When
presented with Masson's potentially disturbing theory, based on letters
written by Freud, letters whose authenticity is not in dispute, Shariff ignores it.
Instead he spends a paragraph discussing the clothes Masson wore — the
length of Masson's boots, the dots in his tie, and the color of the stripes in
Masson's jacket.
In what appears to be a metaphor for the feminist belief that claims of
childhood sexual abuse are rooted in fact and not fantasy, Shariff says a
sore nerve has been hit "in the decaying sexual orifice." Not only does this
language display an insensitivity to the delicate issue of incest and child-
adult sex, its crudeness shows a lack of respect for women as persons, and a
lack of insight into the whole issue being dealt with.
In describing Emma Eckstein, Shariff talks of "the women Fliess performed surgery on — to prove the absurd notion that nasal surgery could
correct sexual disorders." Shariff misses the whole point of the Emma
Eckstein story: she did not have sexual disorders! Like Fliess, who operated
on Emma, Shariff presupposes that she did.
Yet he blunders on, calling the seduction theory — that the sexual abuse
of female children happens and is reflected in psychological damage later in
life — "feminist." Why is it feminist? Because it concerns females? This is
an issue that concerns society as a whole, not just the female involved.
Shariff says that Freud qualified the universitality of his theory, and that
this qualification was crucial. I fail to see why. What people have picked up
on for the last 100 years since Freud is not his qualification that sexual
abuse sometimes does happen, but his principle assertion that it does not,
and that "imagine" these things.
Consider this quote from a leading authority on the law of evidence,
Wigmore:
"It is unanimously held (and we say "unanimously" advisedly) by experienced psychiatrists that the complainant woman in a sex offense case
should always be examined by competent experts to ascertain whether she
suffers from some mental or moral delusion or tendency, frequently found
especially in young girls, causing distortion of the imagination in sex
cases."
At the end of a poorly reasoned, subjective article about a topic which he
doesn't understand, Shariff says Masson's book Assault on Truth "is one
rock that deserves to end up on the bottom." I suggest the same could be
said for Shariff s article and Shariff himself. He could start by reading the
book.
Gillian Parson
law 2 Tuesday, March 20, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Meese nomination faces criticism
Punk atoll no nftgUxn cult, punk mam thinking for youmlf. Vou •rtn't IwnfcaM mum you
•plk* yaw hair. Ciwtt ■ Jock Mill llvw Italda your hud , . . NAZIPUNKS NAZIPUMKS
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From page 4
such as transfer under normal procedure.
Like most of the Reaganites,
Meese is a wealthy man in a world
of his own. He believes a progressive income tax, such as the
type here in Canada, is immoral. "I
don't think we should penalize people because someone is successful,"
he said. He also possesses a disdain
for the poor, and freely admits poor
people "go to soup kitchens
because the food is free, and that's
easier than paying for it." I guess
Ed never had to walk into Wendy's
and ask "whre's the beef?"
As attorney general, Meese
would be the judicial watchdog of
the executive branch of the U.S.
government. He also would be
responsible for enforcing some
moral and ethical code applicable to
all branches of government. In
short, he would have to be
reasonably impartial, and
courageous enough to investigate
all wrongdoings, even those that
could possibly implicate some of his
many friends in government, including his best friend, Ronald
Reagan. It is not unreasonable to
ask how Meese can be expected to
do this when he is apparently willing to pull the strings of power as
White House counselor purely for
his own personal gain.
Senate conformation hearings for
top government jobs usually take
one week. Meese is now into his
third week of interrogation, but
despite the uproar it is likely he will
be confirmed as attorney general by
the Republican controlled judiciary
committee. According to White
House reporters, many administration officials are intensely worried
about the political fallout caused by
the Meese case. But Reagan is not
among those officials, preferring instead to smile and ignore reporter's
questions regarding his good friend.
It is possible Reagan's personal
"blind spot" with Meese could
damage him politically.
"WE
RUN THINGS
IN THIS TOWN.''
(Quality Copies that is!)
kinko's copras
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
(604) 222-1688
LovE
t^QuicheS
The New York Times questioned
last week the "taste of a man who
can extend one hand for money to
save his home and swimming pool
while reaching out with the other to
slap the poor." Oh well, maybe the
Times can take solace in knowing
that some things never change.
News item: The U.S. justice dept.
announced Sunday it would begin
conducting its own investigation of
Mr. Meese's financial dealings. The
Senate inquiry is suspended pending
the outcome of the Justice Dept. investigation.
Wayne Nikituk is a Ubyssey staffer who has four years of N. Y.
Times back issues and watches 60
Minutes every Sunday.
Heinrich blows Govt, money
Education Minister Jack
Heinrich spent our money to visit
Germany to try to learn about
education. We all are aware of the
infamous "accomplishments" of
German education made so far this
century. Had he consulted UBC
scholars who have researched German education, however, he could
have saved his travel expenses and
learned a lot about educational
reform in post-war Germany (both
East and West).
For one thing, streaming is being
abolished in favor of comprehensive schools (Gesamtschulen).
Heinrich has chosen to emulate the
old model. University students pay
no tuition, nor do visa students.
Federal funds are granted to
students as a matter of public investment and foreign aid (visa
students).
Germans are preparing to enter
the twenty-first century physically
fit, artistically aware, and culturally
and scientifically educated whereas
in B.C., government policy
prepares the population to, in the
words of my postie," . . . march
into the twenty-first century a
bunch of dodos." Stephen Foster
education faculty
DESIGN
IN BRONZE
EXHIBITION
MARCH 26-30
10 A.M.-4 P.M.
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By Division of Industrial Education
Faculty of Education
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Intramural
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Awards Night
Thursday March 22, '84
5:30 p.m. Student Grad Center
Celebrate
Wine/Dine/Dance
Students $17.50
Non-students $25.00
Everyone Welcome
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3621 W. 4th Ave. • 733-3831 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 20, 1984
Ytsfa.
'Card***
TODAY
ANARCHIST CLUB
A video of Noam Chomsky's Vancouver lecture
on: The U.S. in Latin America, noon, Buch.
A205.-
DEPARTMENT OF
BIO-RESOURCE ENGINEERING
Seminar on agricultural modernization and Chinese economic development, by Dr. Jaw-Kai
Wang, University of Hawaii, 10:30-11:30 a.m.,
CEME 1204.
ISPC-INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Japanese/ Chinese film series, featuring Enemy
Alien and Bamboo, Lions and Dragons, 7:30
p.m.. Gate 4, International House.
WOMEN'S BIG BLOCK AWARDS BANQUET
Women's year end dinner to honor UBC's outstanding athletes, tickets available at Athletic Office, 7 p.m., Cisco's Restaurant.
DANCEWORKS UBC
Tickets will be on sale for the performance of
Menagerie on March X, 12:30-1:30 p.m., SUB
216E.
HILLEL HOUSE
Free salami lunch, noon, Hillel House.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Pin tests finish this week, pin party and general
meeting on Sunday, 2 p.m., SUB partyroom.
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS .
A socialist perspective on the war in Lebanon will
be given by Ahmed Shawki, 7:30 p.m., Britannia
Community Centre.
WEDNESDAY
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Poetry reading by Joseph Rosenblatt, noon, Buchanan penthouse.
DANCEWORKS UBC
Tickets will be on sale for the performance of
Menagerie on March 30, 12:30-1:30 p.m., SUB
216E.
ISRAEL TABLE
Israel info,  11:30 a.m.-2 p.m., SUB main concourse.
HILLEL HOUSE
Supper and annual general meeting, 5:30 p.m.
sharp, Hillel House.
REGENT COLLEGE
Free lecture, noon, Regent College, Room 1.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Singing bible study discussion, noon, SUB 213.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Talk on: Council Communism and Anarchism, j
noon, Buch. D352.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly Testimony Meeting, all are welcome,
1:30 p.m., SUB 215.
UBC FLYING CLUB
General meeting and seminar, noon, Hennings
302.
UBC CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Do you believe what the bible says? Come and
listen to Mr. Soo Inn Tan speaking on: The Iner-
THRILLER
Beat it! Beat itl Beat
itl No one wants to be
defeated. Showing how
funky and strong is your
fight. It doesn't matter
who is wrong or right.
Eat itl Eat itl Eat itl No
one wants to eat itl
Showing how kooky and
strong smelling is your
blight.
Write itl Write itl
Write itl No one wants
to read itl Showing how
left and biased is your
doesn't matter
misquoted   or
rancy of the Bible, noon, Scarfe 206.
UBC FEE-HIKE STRIKE COMMITTEE
Open activists meeting, noon, Buch. D238.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General elections, noon, Buch. B214.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
Films: Juggernaut (atomic energy comes to India, courtesy of Canada) and The Todas (mountain tribe in southern India) — free for the viewing, noon, Asian Centre auditorium.
THURSDAY
REGENT COLLEGE
Free lecture, noon. Regent College, Room 1.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
General meeting, noon, 'SUB 239.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Seminar on rock music, 7:30 p.m., Scarfe 100.
EDUCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
AND SCIENCE FOR PEACE
NFB War series: Anyone's Son Will Do, noon,
Scarfe 1006.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, 1:30 p.m.. International House
(upper lounge).
FRIDAY
DANCEWORKS - UBC
Tickets will be on sale for the performance of
Menagerie on March 30, 8:30 p.m.. Centennial
Theatre, noon, SUB 216E.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Last chance voting for general elections,
noon-1:15 p.m.. Woodward and Sedgewick
lounge.
REGENT COLLEGE
Free lecture, noon. Regent College Room 1.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Bear garden, 4-7 p.m., SUB 215.
CAMPAIGN AGAINST MILITARY
RESEARCH ON CAMPUS
Strategy meeting for campaigns, all welcome,
noon, SUB 212A.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Small group meetings, 7:30 p.m., Call 228-8554
or 224-4553 for info.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon, International House upper lounge.
IN SUB BASEMENT
For the very best sandwiches, snacks, pastries,
juices. Have now introduced
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Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A6
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
80 - TUTORING
DUKE'S IS OPEN!
The   SUB's   very   own
Gourmet    Cookie   and
Cappuccino Bar.
Mon. thru Sat.:
8 a.m.-10 p.m.
Sunday:
10 a.m.-6 p.m.
MATH TUTOR: Math 100, 101, 111, 140,
141, 200. $8.00'hr. Pis. call before 8 a.m. or
after 10 p.m. on weekdays. Scott, 224-3122
or 224-4442.
ENGLISH TUTORING - Assistance in all
areas. Oral, written; grammar, composition, spelling, punctuation. 682-1043
20 - HOUSING
STUDENTS - Pass on a deal! Wtd. 2 bdrm
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May.$500 max. 872-0757 evegs till 11:00.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS
NEED A TUTOR
TO PASS THAT
FINAL?
Tutor referral for nearly all
faculties available at
SPEAKEASY
Drop by SUB concourse or phone
228-3777
Open 9:30 a.m.-7:30 a.m.
Monday - Friday
85 - TYPING
DUKE'S   GOURMET   COOKIES   in   SUB
thanks all applicants for counter sales people. The positions have now been filled.   —
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30 students required for Van.
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TYPWRITING
Essays,    Resumes,    Tapes
transcribed
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED
U.B.C. Village location
224-6618 DAY or NIGHT
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING service
offers reasonable rates for students for term
papers, essays, & masters thesis. 273-6008
evenings.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
EXCELLENT TYPIST,   IBM,   AVAILABLE
ANYTIME. Reasonable rates. 263-0351.
SALES CAREER — Major life insurance
company has several positions open,
3-Year training program. Excellent income
during training. Sales background helpful,
but not required. Income to $500.00 a
week, if qualified. Call Mr. Petrie 273-1370.
35 - LOST
1 PAIR Men's Glasses. Silver U.F.O./Frame.
Tinted lenses. Rwd. 224-4465.
NEW   SONY   SERIES   35  w/p   SYSTEM
installed. Have your essay, resumes &
manuscripts done on the best. We have
special rates for students. Four years in
business at 266-6814.
W/P & typing: term papers, theses, mscpt.,
essays, incl. reports, letters, resumes, Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
QUALITY TYPING on short notice. Reports,
essays, resumes, etc. Reasonable rates.
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typing. Reasonable rates. 734-8451.
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EXPERT research help for hire. 224-5802 or
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notice. Close to UBC. 732-1745. Tuesday, March 20,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Footballers start season!
By MONTE STEWART
Football anyone?
While most UBC teams are winding down their 1983-84 season, the
football 'Birds are already preparing for fall. The team began two
weeks of alternate day spring training at Thunderbird stadium.
Last season the 'Birds compiled a
5-3 conference mark and a 6-4 overall tally. They finished second in
Canada West play and bowed out
to eventual Canadian champions
Calgary Dinosaurs in the Western
final.
The 1983 campaign was disastrous in terms of injuries. Their second place finish was commendable,
since most starters missed at least
one game due to injury. Despite
these debilitations, UBC was still
competitive.
They might have won their second straight Canadian title if not
for the play of Calgary super sniper
Greg Vavra. The Dinos signal caller
has completed his collegiate eligibility — prompting a sigh of relief
from 'Birds coach Frank Smith.
The Thunderbirds are secure for
next year at quarterback. Smith has
lured former Richmond Raider
pivot Dave Romaniuk to UBC. Jordan Leith and Frank Cusati will
both return for their second seasons. Unfortunately, Jay Gard —
the quarterback who led the 'Birds
to their national crown in '82 — will
not return for his fourth year with
the club.
Smith has also coaxed running
back Terry Cochrane to return to
UBC. Cochrane — a member of the
1981 team — went to play junior
football in Saskatchewan, here he
set several records.
Smith has recruited from a U.S.
college (recruiting in Canada outside B.C. is against CIAU rules).
Carey Lapa, who missed all of last
season with torn knee ligaments
which he suffered at Hamilton
Tiger Cats' training camp, will return for his final year.
Meanwhile, Laurent DesLauriers
has not signed with the B.C. Lions.
The Lions made DesLauriers their
1984 territorial protection, but are
currently more concerned with signing their American hopefuls.
Greg Kitchen and Jim Rybachuk,
drafted by B.C. and Winnipeg respectively, have yet to sign CFL
contracts.
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A LIFE CHANGING MESSAGE
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• Founder and director of Maranatha Ministries International, a university
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England, Australia, Europe, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil and Venezuela.
• Speaker at JESUS '78/Orlando and JESUS '79/Pennsylvania.
DATE: Monday, March 26, 1984, 7:30 p.m. Scarfe 100
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INQUIRIES: PHONE 228-8554 or 224-4553
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Wed. Mar. 21
FREE  SALAMI   LUNCH   -  sponsored  by
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SUPPER AND ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING
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March 19-31
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DO YOU.
A) NEED CAREER EXPERIENCE?
IB) WANT TO MAKE NEW FRIENDS?
C) HAVE AN INTEREST IN PERSONNEL,
COUNSELLING, PUBLIC RELATIONS OR
ADMINITRATION?
IF You answered 'YES' to any of
these questions, then Volunteer
Connections would like to hear
from you. We are looking for On-
Campus Volunteer Interviewers
for the 1984-85 school term.
(Training provided)
IF You are People-Oriented, have
good communication skills and
can volunteer 4-5 hours per week,
and would like to find out more
about Volunteer Connections,
contact us in the Student
Counselling & Resources Centre,
Brock Hall 200, or call 228-3811. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 20, 1984
Thunderbirds win Yankee ski title
By MONTE STEWART
Let's hear it for the red, white,
and blue!
The UBC men's ski team won its
first ever national championship
last week. The ski 'Birds became the
second team to win a national
championship   in   the    1983-84
season. The women's field hockey
team — which has virtually
established itself as a perennial
champion — also won a national title this season.
So, what do the U.S. national
colors have to do with the skiers'
triumph?
Well, uh, you see folks, the ski
'Birds actually won the American
national championship. The 'Birds
reigned supreme at the National
U.S. Collegiate Ski Association
Championships in the thriving
metropolis of Steamboat Springs,
Colorado.
UBC men finished first in the
men's Alpine and third in the nor-
dic event. The Alpine involved competition in both the slalom and
giant slalom events while the nordic
was a combination of both the 3x5
km relay and the 15 km cross country races. The UBC women also
THE SHORTEST DISTANCE between two points is straight line, UBC
Physics 110 class demonstrates as part of normally boring and mundane
Friday afternoon lab. Psychology 100 students were on other side to ask
the obvious question — why not walk around? Cyclist, lower left, formed
part of engineering experiment to see if ramp would catapult him over
latest barrier to education. A student radical came to Ubyssey office to
claim wall was part of Socred policy to wall up university. "Just like
Berlin, I saw it in a movie." Students were taking part in annual "Storm
the wall" competition.
Rugby crew scores triple UVictory
By LORNA OLSON
The Thunderbird rugby team had
reason to celebrate last weekend
after taking a much sought after title: The University of Victoria International Universities TournaH
ment. The 'Birds have won the!
tournament for the third consecutive year, once again beating
UVic in the final game.
Saturday's final was rugby at its
best as UBC won an exciting 21-18
victory over the embarrassed Vikings who have yet to win their own
tournament.
The 'Birds took an early 4-0 lead
on a try by centre Gary Vine, but
the Vikes came back with two converted tries to go ahead 12-4 after
the first 20 minutes. A try by UBC's
winger, Pat Palmer and a penalty
goal by stand off, Stephen Rowell
cut the lead. Yet the Viking's Bruce
Grey added another kick leaving the
Birds behind 11-15 at half time.
The second half seemed to be a
whole new ball game that the 'Birds
obviously controlled starting with a
early try by scrum half Ian McKay,
that was converted by Rowell.
The Vikings fought hard but the
'Birds were too fast and Pat
Palmer's second try was enough to
clinch the win.
Thunderbirds coach Donn
Spence said he was delighted with
the win. "I know how hard the final
game was for the boys. I'm proud of the way that they made
necessary adjustments to control
the second half of the game," he
said.
The scores of the other UBC victories in the eight team tournament
were 27-0 over the University of
California   at   Berkeley   Golden
Bears, 25-3 over the University of
Calgary Strikers, 42-0 over the
University of California at Santa
Barbara, and 24-0 over the Simon
Fraser University Clansmen.
UBC's top scorers of the tournament were Pat Palmer with eight
tries, Stephen Ridenour with five
tries, Jim Carson with four tries and
Stephen Rowell with 34 points in
kicks.
Earlier in the week at Thunderbird Stadium, the 'Birds took the
Intercollegate Rugby World Cup by
beating the Berkeley Golden Bears
31-6.
competed and finished in eighth
place overall.
Point totals were calculated by
finding the aggregate of the three
fastest times and then dividing by
four (the number of competitors in
each event). Therefore, the team
with the fewest points won. The
men finished with a total of 135
points, just eight in front of the
University of Minnesota at Minneapolis. Brigham Young University was third with 199 points while
College of Idaho and Colorado
State University finished fourth and
fifth with 290 and 405 points
respectively.
College of Idaho captured the
women's title with 128 points while
Washington State University (from
Pulman), University of Minnesota-
Minneapolis, and BYU rounded out
the top four.
John Hilland captured the giant
slalom with an aggregate total of
114.9 for two runs. Stuart Gairns,
in his first year of competition, was
third. Bob Leitch came in tenth and
Tom Stewart came thirty-first.
Gairns also finished third in the
slalom while Hilland recorded a
seventh place finish. Leitch was
thirtieth while Dale Stephens, who
is also the team's coach, did not
finish.
UBC was the only Canadian
university to qualify for the championships. Simon Fraser University
is the only other Canadian School
which competes in the NCSA,
however, the Clansmen were not
eligible to compete at the "nationals" because this is their first
season in the NCSA.
The 'Birds recorded a perfect
record this season, winning meets at
Blackcomb and Whistler mountains
as well as a meet at Bend, Oregon.
They also won the regional championships held in Idaho.
Stephens praised his team's
season performance, singling out
Hilland. He also commended cross
country competitors Ole Anker-
Rasch who was first overall and
Paul van Donklaar who finished
third.
While the 'Birds were aware that
they had finished third in the Nordic, they were uncertain of their
placing in the Alpine.
"We were at the awards banquet
and we weren't sure about what
place we had come in the Alpine."
Some of us stood up as they were
announcing the third place team
and some more stood up before
they announced the second place
team. We were very surprised to
find out that we won the Alpine,"
said Stephens.
Gairns, Hilland, and Van
Donklaar were selected to the All-
America team.
Editor declares
A former Ubyssey sports editor
declared his candidacy for the leadership of the Liberal Party of Canada Friday.
John Turner, better known as
"Chick" or "Lance" during his
UBC days, was Ubyssey sports editor, before moving on to UBC student council.
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