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The Ubyssey Oct 13, 1966

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Array THE UBYSSEY
3
Vol. XLVIII, No. 11
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   THURSDAY,   OCTOBER   13,   1966 T^L
UP* i
224-3916
Revision splits
University
is a Camp
^sanctuary
Visiting national Conservative president Dalton Camp
Tuesday thanked campus sponsors of his speech for "providing
sanctuary for a public heretic.
"I consider the university to
be the ultimate refuge of idealism and healthy scepticism,"
Camp told 700 persons in
Brock lounge.
He has recently been in the
news for stating that the Progressive Conservative party
should be overhauled because
party leader John Deifenibaker
is too old to be an effective
leader.
PREOCCUPATION
"The Conservative party has
an overweening preoccupation
with what will lead us to victory," Camp said.
"We are in need of a new
realism. Without leadership,
unity is impossible; without
unity, a party is impossible;
without parties, government is
impossible and the country will
flounder without government."
History, Camp said, does not
always tell the truth.
"As a young boy in the Mari-
times, I was told that R. B.
Bennett started the world depression.
"Neither is it a natural law
of some kind that the Liberals
should be given long periods of
rule.
"I was among the first to
raise the issue that leadership
ought to be periodically reviewed in a democratic manner," Camp said.
NOT BY NAME
He did not mention Diefenbaker by name.
"I see that at the Liberal
caucus in Ottawa a motion has
been made to vote on party
leadership by secret ballot.
"It seems that my views have
had more effect on the Liberal
party than on my own."
Camp said the Conservative
old guard has tried to corrupt
the young members to cynicism and-instill a proper respect
for power.
"The party system despises
change. Those who desire a new
era do not despise the past, but
do not wish to relive it all
their lives.
FREE SYSTEM
"They need a party system
which is free and open as society is becoming. Politics is in
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: CAMP
FOCUS  ON
WARD, QUEBEC
See pages 7 to 11
Plan illogical,
say rebel profs
DALTON  CAMP .
—dereck   webb
'sanctuary  for   heretic'
photo
By JOHN APPLEBY
Massive   arts   curriculum  revisions   outlined
Dennis Healy has split the faculty in two.
Chief    spokesman    for   the
opposition is classics head Malcolm McGregor.
"I am not in sympathy with
the plan. I do not think that
this is education," he said.
Neither Healy, Young or McGregor would make any estimate of the number of people
involved in the split.
But Young termed the opposition "not serious."
Young said plans for the new
curriculum, announced two
weeks ago, were drawn up by
a committee which included a
majority of the faculty.
SWEEPING CHANGES
The new program calls for
sweeping changes in the first
year and will eliminate much
formal classroom instruction.
Also gone will be compulsory
requirements in English and
foreign languages.
"The first year student will
not know enough to participate
on an intelligent basis in discussion," objected McGregor.
"The frst year student will
get no benefit from discussion
in what are comically called
seminars. He will be talking on
a basis of solid ignorance," he
said.
McGregor feels that with the
system calling for six members
of the faculty to be assigned to
a group of 120 students, a faculty memlber might haye to
lecture in a field outside his
specialty.
McGregor wants students
who want to specialize in a
field to start specializng as soon
as they arrve at UBC and says
the new plan has "no system
and. no logic."
Said philosophy head Barnett
Savery,   "I  would  agree  with
by   dean
the proposals if UBC were
smaller. Dean Healy is trying
lo develop a breadth of choice
before the third year. I would
like to see this choice developed
in high school."
Defending the plan, Young
said: The student will be introduced to more general topics
which will be designed to "take
and immerse him in the university atmosphere."
"With this type of program
he will be better prepared to
choose his field of study when
he reaches his second year," he
said.
"We must shock them out of
the high school mentality as
soon as they come," added history prof Miss Jean . Elder, a
member of the dean's advisory
committee on the proposed revisions.
Chief objection of the plan's
opponents   is   doubt   whether
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: CAN'T
Arts students
to plot reform
The arts undergraduate
society asks all students interested in sitting on a committee to study the proposed
arts curriculum reform to
attend a meeting noon Friday in the student council
chambers, Brock Hall.
A chairman and members
of this committee will be
picked from those attending.
The committee will study
arts faculty reports and
search out student opinion on
the proposed changes.
MALCOLM-THE-DISTORTER
Council squats on crisis denial
By KRIS EMMOTT
Ubyssey Council Reporter
UBC housing czar Malcolm
McGregor was accused Tuesday of gross distortion of
UBC's housing crisis by students' council.
Council unanimously approved a statement saying:
"It is the opinion of this
council that McGregor's
statement grossly distorts the
reality of the housing crisis
and is particularly regret-
able emanating as it does
from the head of UBC's housing administration."
In a recent statement to
downtown   newspapers   Mc
Gregor said the housing
shortage at the university
has been exaggerated.
There is no crisis, he said.
"It is ridiculous to deny
that there is a housing shortage in Vancouver," said AMS
first vice-president Charlie
Boylan.
"The Vancouver city planner says it is city-wide, especially among lower-income
groups."
AMS housing coordinator
Ray Larsen, reporting on the
housing action program,
asked that a clients committee be set up to advise the
architect who will design
new dormitories.
"The administration and
board of governors are opposed to the cluster-type of
housing we students want,"
Larsen said.
"We must get our thoughts
across to the architect and
advise him as to what we
want."
Council will recommend to
UBC president (John Macdonald that the committee
consist of faculty members,
the AMS housing coordinator
and students representing
residences, the school of
architecture, and the AMS
executive.
"This committee is intended to be permanent and use
ful," said AMS president
Peter Braund.
"It will have a little more
authority than a mere advisory committee; it will put
across students' viewpoints
in a constructive manner."
Council also approved the
concept of a student advisory
committee to the director of
residences suggested in Macdonald's welcoming address
to students Sept. 30.
Second vice-president Carolyn Tate recommended that
one of the four resident students on the advisory committee be a woman. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13,  1966
DOMINIQUE CHARLIE
. rain dance
Fish feast, dance starts
homecoming week
Homecoming week will start to the sound of Indian
drums this year.
Ten Indians from the Lower Mainland will host
the homecoming Salmon Bake Monday at 12:30 p.m.
in front of the field house.
The featured attraction will be 200 pounds of
salmon  donated by B.C.  Packers.
The Indians, including such colorful figures as
famous weather forecaster, Dominique Char he, Chief
Simon Baker of Squamish and medicine man and
historian Chief Khatsilano will perform some of their
tribal rituals including a rain dance.
If the dance is a success, then the feed will be held
in the  stadium.
'CANT COPE'
(Continued from Page 1)
frosh are mature enough for
the new program.
McGregor thinks frosh are
not mature enough to cope with
the amount of academic freedom the revision includes.
Replied Young: "If the university has to take the first
year student and continue the
processes of high school then it
is just a bigger high school with
dirtier dances."
"You have to assume the
student comes out of high
school reasonably prepared to
take his place in the university," he added.
The new program will be
adaptable to any specialty but
the planners agree the choice
should not be made until second year.
TWO EAMPLES
Last weekend two illustrations of a possible arts 1 program were distributed to arts
faculty members.
One example calls for studies in communications, war,
tyranny, imperialism and
Utopia.
These topics were chosen
largely on the basis of interest
among faculty members and
relevance.
Second example includes
war, love, death, work and education.
Each general topic would be
studied for five to six weeks
with a lecture each week, sup-
CAMP
(Continued from. Page 1)
need of change for change's
sake, and this issue is beyond
any party or individual.
"What any politician really
has to fear is being confronted
with a host of members who
are more patriots than partisans."
Camp said his ambition is to
be among the new demoocrats
of a new party system.
"I stand for renewal. All
Canadians really want change.
Canada has never had a Jack-
sonian age, never had a Kennedy era, never had a political
renaissance.
NEW CADRE
"Politics needs a new cadre
of practitioners, a political
revolution — by that I mean a
rapid, highly condensed period
of adjustment to the changes
that have taken place in our
society."
The Conservative party will
become an artifact of history if
not among the first to reform,
Camp said.
He called for a new unity for
the sake of party and country.
THE         SPECIAL     EVENTS
RANDY   peen
RAYMENX
QUINTET
First in a Series of Jazz Concerts
NOON TODAY          BROCK 35c
plemented  by  tutorial  discussion.
Asked how much work students would end up with under
the new program, Young said:
"It will call for less time in
lectures but the student will
end up doing more work because he is involved,—because
he is fascinated."
The proposals and illustrations produced so far are for
discussion only and not a final
draft, Healy emphasized.
Healy said he has repeatedly
asked for student opinion but
so far little has been received.
The invitation still stands
and interested students are
asked to call at the dean's
office, Buchannan 474, or write
to him stating their particular
point of interest.
STUDENT INITIATIVE
"Some initiative has to come
from the students," Healy said.
"The extent to which students
take part in discussions will
effect the ultimate result of the
first year course."
Classical Guitar
Instruction  in   Technique
and  Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096 or 874-3547
Studio   at 2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
SUNDAY
Auto Race
Spectacular
SUPER STOCKS
FIGURE EIGHT
FOREIGN  STOCKS
Season
Grand Finale
Time Trails 12:30, Racing 7:30 p.m.
EVERGREEN
SPfEEDWA Y
MONROE
30   Minutes   from    Seattle   and
Renton   on  the   Bellevue-
Woodinville   Freeway
Watch Evergreen Racing
Tuesday Night 10 p.m., Channel 11
NOTICE
TO MOTHERS EVERYWHERE
FEED YOUR SONS AND DAUGHTERS WELL. BRING THEIR
LUNCHES OUT TO UBC FOR THEM. GIVE THEM KIND AND
LOVING CARE. SMILE AT THEM. LOOK YOUR PRETTIEST
AT ALL TIMES. FAILURE TO FOLLOW THESE SIMPLE BUT
ESSENTIAL RULES MEANS YOU WILL LOSE THEM TO THE
FRIAR AT 4423 W. 10TH WHERE THE FOOD IS GOOD,
THE DELIVERIES FAST (EVEN TO UBC AT NOON). THE
THE SERVICE IS WITH A SMILE AND THE WAITRESSES ARE
AT THEIR PRETTIEST.
The Friar ... is inn 4423 W. 10th, CA. 4-0833
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CANADIAN AMERICAN SEMINAR:
C.U.S. Committee is receiving applications for the
Canadian American Seminar to be held at the University of Windsor, Nov. 2-4, 1966, on "An Independent
Canadian Foreign Policy: 1'act or Fiction?" Applications must (be in by Oct. 20th, Box 153, Brock. More
information is available from the CUS office, Brock
Extension 258.
COMPANY OF YOUNG CANADIANS:
Students interested in (a) programming or (to) recruiting for the Company of Young Canadians, and
interested in forming a local U.B.C. committee to
form a communications liaison with the national headquarters are asked to apply in writing (stating interest,
experience, faculty and year) to the A.M.S. Secretary,
Box 54, Brock Hall.
HIGH  SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
ASSISTANT PUBLIC OFFICER:
Applications are being received for the position of
Assistant Public Officer for the Alma Mater Society.
Qualification is a belief in the value of active student
participation in university and community affairs.
Apply in writing to Box 54 or to Brock 210 for further
information
FINANCE COMMITTEE:
Grant Request Forms for conferences to toe held during the first term, 1966-1967, will be accepted by the
Treasurer until 4:00 p.m., Thursday, October 27, 1966.
("Request Forms" are available from the Accountant,
Mrs. Hyslop, in the A.M.S. Office). Thursday, October   13,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
NEW SENATOR SAYS
—kurt  hilger photo
GODDAM   NOISE,   says   crochety   derrick   operator   Joe
Beethoven, who  refused  to come out of  his  shack  atop
the boom to be photographed by The Ubyssey. Joe figures
his  job  on   new   music   building   beside  armory  will   be
over by September, 1967.
Liberals furn journalists,
plan Ubyssey opposition
UBC   Liberals   will   attempt journalism   this  year
when the organization publishes a club newsletter.
Date for the first edition was not set at the club's
general meeting Thursday.
Elected to the club executive at the meeting were:
Diane Shoemaker, secretary; Kent Pearson, public relations officer; and John Stewart, Dave Robertson, and
David Dick, members at large.
Cash will ease crowds7
Senator Vern Housez says
he is "very concerned" about
certain problems at UBC.
Housez was recently appointed to the UBC senate
by the Alumni Association.
"I think the students have
made a forthright attempt
in presenting the problem of
overcrowding," he said in an
interview   Wednesday.
"It's very commendable."
"But president John Macdonald understands the problem as well as everyone else;
it's really a question of
money."
Housez said there has been
a great deal of financial support from the  governments.
VERN HOUSEZ
. . . "concerned"
"I feel that, over the years,
this will ease overcrowding,"
he said.
He said he was "contemplating" the possibility of
students on the senate.
"If people of my vintage
are unable to communicate
with the students, then students should be on the
senate."
Housez graduated in 1957.
Tuition should not be discriminatory, Housez said.
"Everyone should have
the right to go to university," he said.
"But the gradual elimination of fees depends on the
government's ability to pay
this additional expense."
CUS-man
sits, chats
with students
Doug Ward wants students
to talk to him.
Ward, president of the Canadian Union of Students, will
be sitting in the Ponderosa tonight between 6 and 7 p.m.
Anyone with problems or
questions concerning CUS may
go to the specially reserved
table for informal conversation.
Ward will leave the Ponderosa at 7 p.m. to talk with
student leaders in the graduate student centre.
At 9 p.m. he will again be
available for students in the
lounge at Lower Mall. All
gatherings will be informal.
Ward will address leadership conference Friday — on
Decision-making in the University.
Ward will also speak at
Simon Fraser Academy and
UVIC during the B.C. trip.
Cost of Ward's visit will be
shared by the three institutions.
UBC undergraduate societies have been asked to contribute $5 each toward the
cost.
But what happens
if everyone comes?
Almost nine hundred more parking stickers have  been
issued this year than last year.
This   year   the   UBC   traffic   	
Tree people
bleed better
than anyone
year
office has issued 10,234 stickers  for  8,000  parking  spaces,
compared to 9,337 stickers last
year.
Traffic czar Sir Ouvry Roberts
explained that only aibout two-
thirds of the cars are on campus at once.
"On the first day of term
there were 173 unoccupied
spaces, and the figure is growing every day," he said.
"As traffic levels off with
the formation of or pools, we'll
issue more stickers."
Sir Ouvry said that traffic
congestion has not been as bad
as he feared.
"The government has cooperated by keeping two lanes
open on Marine Drive at rush
hours," he said.
Sir Ouvry said that white
warning tickets are no longer
being issued for traffic violations.
"But if you get a blue ticket,
report at once to the traffic
office and your fine will probably be cancelled if it's a first
offence," he said.
More than half of UBC's
foresters made the supreme
sacrifice in last week's Red
Cross blood drive.
Forestry won the inter-
faculty competion with 58.8
per cent of the faculty giving
blood.
Runners-up were agriculture, 32.5 per cent; dentistry,
30 per cent; applied scicence,
21.4 per cent; and pharmacy,
17.3 per cent.
Loser was graduate studies
"with only 4.2 per cent donating.
Fort Camp led the residences with 190 registered
donors, edging out Lower Mall
with 185. Totem's 76 victims
put it in third place, and St.
Andrew's finished last with
just three on the list.
GREEKS A-PLEDGING FLOOD ANGUS PLAZA
I  harvoy  photo i  >v
m ubyssey
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Pdst Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The  Ubyssey   publishes  Page   Friday,   a   weekly  commentary   and   review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
OCTOBER  13,  1966
/ hove ever confined myself to tacts
—Rudolf Erich Raspe
Travel of Baron Munchausen
V
lftC.D0Nm.CrS T
[OPSH-Boofc VwWJ
Splitsville
The little quarrel fuming within the arts faculty
over Dean Dennis Healy's curriculum revision outline
is made of fluff rather than substance.
Rolling up the wool is classics head Dr. Malcolm
McGregor, who thinks first year students are not mature
enough to participate intelligently in seminar discussions.
He wants students to specialize as early as possible to
gather a sound but narrow knowledge base.
His argument is specious because it forgets that
specialization requires a fai greater maturity than
general, liberal education.
Rare is the freshman who knows what he wants and
where he's going, and who doesn't change his mind after
two  years at university.
Contrary to McGregor, . a president's committee
on academic goals in 1964 decided that free-wheeling
seminar groups teach faster and more thoroughly than
rigid formal lectures.
Certainly, the first and second year student will be
talking on a basis of ignorance in seminar groups —
but only at first.
Arts education is for nothing if not to teach a student to think, to research, to write, and to communicate.
Sitting at the back of an echoing theatre listening to
a pedant regurgitate a good text book just wastes time
and produces volumes of illegible notes.
But engaging in active discussion, researching,
writing papers, and bouncing ideas off both peers and
professors regularly and informally — the essence of the
seminar — does educate, and is the only way to eradicate
the ignorance McGregor fears will consume first and
second year classes.
. .. and on down
Another spurious herring which stinks of responsibility shirking is several professorial comments that
frosh from B.C. high schools aren't ready for a university, especially a university with curriculum, revisions.
Say the profs, the high schools are bad and don't
prepare students to cope with academic freedom.
But then, profs have been saying this for years.
And bloody little has been done about it.
Those same profs can and ought to let the provincial
department of education know what they think, and back
that up with alternate proposals.
Not necessarily curriculum revision in high school,
simply ways to teach it better.
Maybe those ideas could be extended into UBC's
faculty of education, for the quality of students there
finally determines the quality of the high school.
University professors., at the high end of the
academic spectrum have a duty to constructively criticize the high school program.
Nobody else gets a better look at its product.
And if that duty is taken seriously, maybe the high
school can improve, and with it, the university.
The two do go together.
Pneumonia
Don't (snoofle) inhale this paper.
At last count, two Ubyssey editors (wheeze) had
certified cases of pneumonia, and the rest of the office
probably has it too.
One reporter went to hospital (honk honk):
another cold-ridden dozen faithfully remained at their
posts through travail, storm and angry readers (kahack).
So that's (snnnngfff) why this paper is a little fuzzy
about the edges.
We're (snaffsnaff) kind of fuzzy too (ahackahacka-
hackahackahack).
. and for missing English lectures,
you'll do three essays penance.
LETTERS
Grieved
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I was enlightened and
grieved by your editorial,
"Dear Ralph ..."
Enlightened by your revelation of my shrewd news
management in UBC Reports,
of which I was totally unaware.
Grieved by the short life of
the mastery in rasing picayune points which you bestowed on me in paragraph one,
only to snatch it away for
yourself by paragraph five.
RALPH DALY
Director of
Information  Services
I went to a lot of trouble
to get Miss Gwinn to agree
that if she wanted to use my
review and change any of it,
to tell me in advance. Apparently the pressures to get
out Page Friday were too
much for her to be able to
extend me that courtesy.
My point is: you were the
one that asked for writers for
The Ubyssey. You published
that appeal in your pages. If
you get writers (as you got
me once) and treat them in
such a manner what kind of
results do you expect? I'd like
to know, where's your responsibility in this?
STAN PERSKY
Anthropology
Letters    to    t he    editor
should   be   sent   to   The    VjOClf VCF
Ubyssey. Brock Hall, UBC.
or delivered to our offices
in Brock's north basement.
We shall edit for grammar
and brevity. Letters must
include the writer's name and
address, although pseudonyms will be used if the
writer desires.
Review  denied
Editor, The Ubyssey.
'In last Friday's issue of
The Ubyssey there's an article about Ed Dorn's novel,
The Riles of Passage, which
has my name attached to it
as the reviewer. I'd like to
enter a disclaimer. I didn't
write the thing you printed.
Whatever the quality of
the field as I saw it, the product that appeared in your
pages was a mulch ground
out by Claudia Gwinn, your
Page Friday editor, who rewrote my piece, cut it, and
added sentences of her own
(thought I don't think she's
read the book I was talking
about). The result may Ibe
good journalism (I personally
doubt it), but, in any case it's
not what I wrote. Not at all.
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We wish to express our
consternation and ire concerning the wording of a column by one Gabor Mate,
which appeared Friday in The
Ubyssey.
Said writer referred to a
certain lady acquaintance of
our in a manner certainly
uncomplimentary and probably libelous.
We are aware that the tone
of Mate's article is whimsical,
but at the same time we feel
that some editorial restraint
on his syntax should be exercised.
It is unfortunate that a person's reputation can be slandered in so irresponsible a
manner, and on behalf of the
aforementioned lady, we request an apology from. Mate
and his superiors.
ERIC NEWELL,
Engineering Undergraduate  Society
MORE LETTERS
... SEE PAGE 6
Actually J.,
bottomless
waiters
By GABOR MATE
As our contribution towards
reducing unemployment on
campus, the Advance Mattress
Coffeehouse is now taking applications from male students
to work as bottomless waiters.
It is our way of "being one up
on the topless waitresses at the
Bunkhouse.
The suggestion came from
our addict friend, Actually
Josephine, who was sitting in
the corner munching morning
glory seeds while we were discussing the problem of how to
handle our bare-bosomed competition. (If you think that
was a terrible pun, just keep
reading.)
"The only question is," said
Actually J., "is how long . . ."
"It doesn't matter how
long," I interrupted. "It will
be difficult enough to find
waiters without worrying
about details."
"THAT," said Actually J.
indignantly, "is NOT what I
meant. I was saying that the
only question is how long
the waiters will be able to
keep it up."
"Well," I replied, "I should
hope nothing like THAT happens around here!"
"What I meant was," explained Actually J. "that in
the chill of the winter the
waiters might get . . . uh . . .
cold . . . uh . . . feet."
We decided that wasn't
really the seat of the problem The problem was City
Hall.
"I will get to the bottom of
this," said Actually J. resolutely. (The puns, you may
have noticed, are becoming
worse and worse.)
He phoned City Hall. "Hello,
mayor-baby?" he began.
"This is Actually Josephine from the Advance Mattress Coffeehouse inquiring
about your bottomless waiter
policy."
"This is who from where
doing which about what?"
asked an irritated voice. Actually J. repeated the question. By way of reply the
voice hung up.
"They seem to be very disorganized," remarked Actually J. (That could be construed
as a pun, but you have to
think about it.)
Thus it is that the Advance
Mattress Coffeehouse is looking for bottomless waiters.
The pay is two dollars an
hour, plus anything else you
can get out of it.
EDITOR: John Kebey
Managing Richard Blair
Newt Carol Wibon
City Danny Stoffman
Photo Powell Hargrave
Pag* Friday Claudia Gwinn
Features        Rosemary  Hyman
Ate't Newt...Pat Hrushowy, Anne BaK
fcst't Photo Dennis Gans
Valuable were some Vals —
Zuker and Thorn. Lin (Dragon)
Tse-hsu, Boni Lee, Heather Macintosh, Jill Green, Byrce Howard,
Norman Gidney, Mary Ussner,
and Sue Gransby made and managed news. Council squad was
Kris  Emmott and  Zuker.
Cameras were Kurt Hilgec,
Derrek  Webb  and  Do'n   Kydd.
Sports were Hank Pakasaar and
Arden Ostrander.
For staff orgyist next party is
Saturday. Come down to find
out where and when. rhursday,  October   13,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
Cash comes and goes...
This is AMS treasurer Lome Hudson's proposed budget for 1966-67, to be
put before student council Monday for approval.
Statement of Estimated Gross Revenue and Proposed Expenditure
YEAR ENDING MAY 31, 1967
REVENUE
Direct to A.M.S.
Alma Mater Society Fees  $443,700
Rental Income  2,500
Interest Income  5,000
Sundry Income ~~  4,000      $455,200
Revenue from Subsidiary Organizations
A.M.S. Charter Flight  65,300
Campus Activities and Events  30,028
College  Shop    40,552
Publications  ~ - ~~ 61,930
Undergraduate Societies, etc., Schedule 2 98,537
University Clubs Committee  32,513        328,860
Revenue of Associated Organizations
Grad Class     - - -  17,900
Men's Athletics -  46,950
Women's Athletics    8,000          72,850
Total Revenue    $856,910
ALLOCATION OF FEES COLLECTED
Non Discretionary
Student Union Building	
Accident Benefit Fund 	
Brock Art Fund	
Brock Management Fund	
Canadian Union of Students .._	
Men's Athletic Committee	
Women's Athletic Committee  —
Discretionary
Undergraduate Societies, etcs. Schedule 2
Intramural Fund     __	
Open House  Reserve   	
World University  Service Committee ....
EXPENDITURE
A.M.S. and Subsidiary Organizations
A.M.S. Charter Flight  .._	
Campus Activities & Events	
College  Shop	
Publications    _.	
Registration Photographs	
University Clubs Committee 	
Administration & General Expenses
Schedule 1 _...	
Associated Organizations
Grad Class      _	
Men's Athletics  	
Women's Athletics 	
Total Allocation & Expenditure ___	
MARGIN
$229,500
1,530
1,500
7,650
9,180
64,260
12,240
107,692
2,500
1,000
10,290
65,300
44,428
37,552
78,630
4,250
37,513
325,860
121,482
46,860        314,533
17,900
46,950
8,000
72,850
...to these groups, things
Statement of Estimated Net Revenue and Proposed Expenditure
YEAR  ENDING   MAY  31,  1967
REVENUE
Alma Mater Society Fees
Profit from College Shop
Rental Income 	
Interest Income  —	
Sundry  Income	
Total Revenue .__	
ALLOCATION OF FEES COLLECTED
Non Discretionary
Student Union Building  	
Accident Benefit Fund	
Brock Art Fund  	
Brock Management Fund  __..
Canadian Union of Students 	
Men's Athletic Committee	
Women's Athletic Committee 	
Discretionary
Students' Associations, Schedule 2 .
Academic Symposium, Schedule 2 .
C.U.S. Co-op Home 	
Radio Society, Schedule 2	
Intramural Fund	
Men's Athletic Committee 	
Office Equipment Reserve	
Open House Reserve	
Women's Athletic Committee  	
W.U.S.C.	
Proposed
1967
$443,700
3,000
2,500
5,000
4,000
$458,200
$229,500
1,530
1,500
7,650
9,180
64,260
12,240
325,860
8,755
400
Pet. of
Budget
96.84%
.65
.55
1.09
.87
100.00%
50.09%
.33
.33
1.67
2.00
14.03
2.67
71.12
1.91
.09
EXPENDITURE
Campus Activities & Events, Schedule 3 ..
Publications, Schedule 3	
Registration Photographs	
University Clubs Committee	
Administrative & General Expenses,
Schedule   1	
2,500
1,000
10,290
22,945
14,400
16,700
4,250
5,000
Total Allocation & Expenses
MARGIN
  46,860
87,210
436,015
22,185
$458,200
(Undergraduate society's budget on Page
.55
.22
2.24
5.01
3.14
3.64
.93
1.09
10.23
19.03
95.16
4.84
100.00%
6)
Total
1966
$450,474
4,428
2,526
24,478
4,701
$486,607
$230,070
1,534
1,500
7,669
9,203
64,420
12,270
326,666
11,249
400
200
215
1,540
700
7,500
1,000
700
11,524
35,028
29,887
18,461
5,026
5,367
49,416
108,157
469,851
16,756
$486,607
FREE
FREE    -    FREE
—     A staged reading of a new play     —
Do You Remember
One September Afternoon
by David Watmough
directed by Moyra  Mulholland
with
Dorothy Davies, Rae Brown and Barbara Tremain
Monday, October 17 - 12:30 p.m.
Some tickets for  Sunday,  Oct.  16 at 8:00 p.m.
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'yOJUJL    ShofL' Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13,  1966
MORE LETTERS
FROM PAGE 4
Sound scalps listeners
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Paid $11.00 to take my
wife and four children to
hear Buffy Sainte-Marie last
Tuesday. She was great, but
the sound system was a disgrace, and I imagine about
2000 other people thought so
too. We could hear the music,
we could see her and feel her
personality (after moving
down close), but we couldn't
hear her words.
The loudspeakers should
have provided clear sound for
the balcony but they didn't
Twenty years ago I had a
similar problem of providing
sound for the Swarthmore
College field house, a little
smaller than your hall. It was
solved only by placing three
good speakers in ordinary
box baffles fanning out from
a basketball basket which
happened to be directly over
the artists.
This gave a one-point
source which worked well
without echo (after carefully
phasing the speaker connections so that all three cones
moved forward and back at
the same time, not reversing
each other). You should try
it here, although you might
need five 15" wide range
speakers (such as the Tannoy
dual-concentric) instead of
the one 15 and two 12s I
used; and you would need to
supply some frame to mount
them on.
The take on tickets must
have been well over $3,000.
I hope Buffy got most of
that. It's time we started to
pay back the Indians. Certainly UBC dijdn't deserve
much of it. The white man
really got scalped last night.
C. P. VALENTINE
Vancouver
Making  a  joke
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I find it extremely hard to
believe that the editorial
board of the Ubyssey has
named    the    Simon    Fraser
Academy Peak the best high-
school newspaper in British
Columbia.
My complaint is not necessarily that the Peak is an inferior publication, but that
the Pearson Mike of Lester
Pearson high school was deprived of a deserving honor
simply because of childlike intercollegiate  rivalry.
Although I consider the
Ubyssey to be an outstanding
university publication I would
highly recommend that the
individuals of your Point
Grey Junior College keep
your thoughts of SFA silenced
until you have the guts to
play that school in football.
As a former member of the
editorial staff of the New
Westminster high school newspaper, I feel you are making
a joke out of a once serious
and coveted award.
Surely, you must be kidding.
DON WRIGHT
Sports Editor
The WSU Daily Evergreen
Pullman, Washington
Loans  explained
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In a recent edition of The
Ubyssey, I noticed an article
by Mike Coleman, "Students
Need Deals For Ideals", referring to the difficulty of
students applying for the
Company of Young Canadians or CUSO if they had
borrowed funds under the
Canada student loan flan.
I thought I would write to
you to say that this was a
matter which engaged our attention immediately on the
inception of the company. As
arrangements stand now, anyone accepted for service with
the company can arrange to
defer repayment of his loan
during his period of service
with the company.
During that time, the com
pany would be responsible
for paying for any interest on
such a loan. While this would
in .no way alter the total size
of the debt to such a volunteer, it would mean that
there would be no repayments required during his
period of CYC service.
In his article, Coleman
went on to mention that the
federal government might incorporate in the Canada stu-
detn loan plan an option of
volunteer service, in Canada
and overseas, in lieu of repayment.
I just wanted to mention
that, even though the company itself has no responsibilities for the terms or conditions operative under the
Canada student loan plan, it
is giving consideration to the
whole question of arranging
for potential volunteers who
may have loans outstanding
under this or other schemes.
This would apply to university students and others.
The company wishes to attract as wide a cross section
of volunteers as possible and
we are concerned about financial obstacles, which prevent
some persons from applying.
WM. McWHINNEY
Interim Director
More money for under grads
Prop. Bal.
Alloc. Alloc. May 31
1967 1966 1966
Agriculture        $   400 $   326 $ 34Q
Architecture          300 174 (182)
Arts                — — 3
B.Comm.-C.A. Students               120 120 6
Commerce    ...         685 400 —
Education                 500 1,044 —
Engineering          1,245 1,192 —
Forestry                 300 152 200
Graduate Students' Association              650 350 584
Home Economics          220 57 275
Law                755 783 (89)
Librarianship                 150 117 8
Medical & Dental             495 731 99
Music Students          300 218 (276)
Nursing                                       200 174 34
Pharmacy          300 239 (487)
Physical Education             135 191 (109)
Rehabilitation   Medicine             100 83 164
Science          700 692 (461)
Social Work            200 152 —
Undergraduate Societies Committee          — — 642
Margin             1,000 290 —
$8,755 $7,135 $ 751
Academic Symposium     $   400 $   400 $(338)
Radio Society     $    — $   215 $(761)
'Bracketed amounts are deficits
Mellow moods
of lorn
ras
In this new album, Los Indios Tabajaras
once again display their remarkable
talents as they set a mellow mood for
romance with their tender renditions of
"As Time Goes By," "La Mer," "Who Can
I Turn To," "Make Believe," "The Song
Is Ended," "Time Was" and 6 more
favorites. The mood is mellow, the setting
is romantic, the listening is great.
RCAyiCTOROk
@Themosttrustednameinsound   tU^
ROYAL BANK
Centennial Award
The Royal Bank of Canada feels that
outstanding achievements by Canadians
in the past hundred years have not
always been sufficiently rewarded. With
this in mind it has established the
Royal Bank Centennial Award as part
of its contribution toward the celebration
of the Centennial of Canadian
Confederation.
$50,000 awards
Each year $50,000 will be awarded, if
warranted in the opinion of an
independent Selection Committee. The
awards will continue over a five year
period starting in 1967. In this way the
bank feels that suitable recognition will
be given for outstanding achievements
that "contribute to the common good
and human welfare of Canada and the
world society".
Eligibility and Range of Activity
Candidates must be Canadian Citizens,
persons domiciled in Canada, or a
team of such individuals.
The range of activity is extremely broad
and includes: the natural and social
sciences, the arts, humanities and the
business and industrial worlds.
Prospective winners must be proposed
and recommended by two or more
persons. Evidence of an outstanding
achievement must be submitted in
writing to the Selection Committee by
February 28th of each year.
If an award is not made one year, or if
it is declined, two awards of $50,000
may be made the following year.
Not eligible: institutions or corporations;
persons elected by popular vote to the
Federal, Provincial or Municipal
governments; and officers or directors
of a chartered bank.
Selection Committee
Six distinguished Canadians —
G. Maxwell Bell, Calgary; The Hon.
J. V. Clyne, Vancouver; Dr. Roger
Gaudry, Montreal; The Rt. Hon.
J. L. Ilsley, Halifax; Dr. O. M. Solandt,
Toronto; Dr. A. W. Trueman
(Chairman), London, Ont. — are acting
as a Selection Committee. They are
a completely independent body with
full powers of decision in selecting
award winners.
Nominations should be addressed to:
The Secretary,
Selection Committee,
Royal Bank Centennial Award,
P.O. Box 1102,
Montreal 3, Quebec. WUS  community  development work  camp  in  Ghana
WUS brings students, profs together
to improve world  education facilities
AND
Filmsoc  Presents
HELP
A HARD DAYS
NIGHT
AUDITORIUM
ALL DAY
TODAY
By ANN BISHOP
The World University Service (WUS) is an international
university organization active
in more than 50 countries
throughout the world.
WUS encourages students,
professors and university administrators to work together
to improve facilities for higher education and operates
without racial, national, religious or political partisanship.
WUS is governed by an international General Assembly
consisting of students and
professors. Its work throughout the world is coordinated
by a secretariat based in
Geneva, Switzerland.
The organization enjoys consultative status with UNESCO
and other United Nations
agencies, and cooperates closely with the International Student Conference.
•      •      •
Each year WUS raises $400,-
000 to finance its international projects. Most of the
money comes from donations
by students and professors,
university administration and
the proceeds of campus fund-
raising events.
This money is used to:
• combat ill-health among
students by operating clinics,
supplying drugs, and building
sanitariums.
• provide material aid and
scholarship opportunities to
refugee students and professors.
• improve student living
conditions by assisting or establishing canteens, restaurants, hostels and community
centers.
• encourage the  develop
ment of student cooperatives
and supply textbooks, laboratory apparatus and teaching
equipment.
• •      •
WUS of Canada is governed by an annual National Assembly, consisting of two delegates (a student and a professor) from each Canadian
university plus delegations
from eight national university organizations.
The Canadian Secretariat is
located in Toronto.
WUS scholarships give both
undergraduate and graduate
students a chance to study
abroad. This year there are
seven scholars at UBC from
such countries as Egypt,
USSR, Yugoslavia and Japan.
Students from UBC are
studying in Spain, Japan,
Yugoslavia and USSR.
Students with an average
of 75 per cent can apply for
one of the scholarships to the
country of their choice.
Application deadline is the
end of February.
• •       •
An annual event at UBC
and campuses all across Canada is the WUS-sponsored
Treasure Van which comes to
UBC from Oct. 31 to Nov. 5.
From the bazaars of Asia, the
villages of Latin America, the
native craftsmen of Africa
and the South Pacific Islands,
come thousands of hand-made
items.
The goods will be sold at
International House ranging
in price from 50 cents to $150.
For sale will foe everything
from camel saddles and back
scratchers to Turkish wedding
rings and "wife:leaders."
One of the main fund-raising projects of the year is the
SHARE campaign held in
November. The money collected on campus goes toward the
International Assembly's Program of Action.
Funds raised this year will
be used to aid the University
of Ceylon at Paradeniya.
•     •      •
Since 1948 summer seminars have been held in various countries including Poland, Sweden, Japan, Algeria
and Turkey. Students and
professors from Canada go to
a country and for six weeks
study it in depth.
Cost to three UBC students
who went to Turkey last summer was only $250 as the rest
of the cost was paid by the
university administration and
WUS.
In the summer of 1967 delegates from all the countries
where these seminars have
been held are coming to
Canada as part of the Centennial Program.
Study    groups    from    the
seminar will go to the five
different areas of Canada:
the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario, Western Canada and the
Far North.
•      •       •
An equal number of Canadian students will be taking
part with two delegates being
sent from UBC.
Some of the other projects
sponsored by WUS include
providing information on opportunities for students to
study abroad, giving them
information on admission requirements, grants and scholarships available as well as
information on the country
itself.
WUS does not attempt to
provide all the funds necessary for a project such as the
building and equipping of a
library in Batsutoland, but
gives them the building materials and the books. The
actual construction of the library is done by the students
themselves.
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Try our delicious T-bone
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Student Meal Tickets
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Thursday, October   13,   1966
HE       UBYSSEY
Page 7 FOCUS
Student government: whither?
CUS Ward
on change
Doug Ward is president of the Canadian
Union of Students, of which all UBC students
are members.
He is 28 years old, married, two children.
A graduate of the University of Toronto, where
he was once assistant registrar. Ward also has
a degree in theology from an Anglican college.
He was one founder of the now almost defunct
Students' Union for Peace Action, and is presently chairman of the board of directors of the
Company of Young Canadians.
Ward arrived in Vancouver today, to speak
at the grad student centre early this evening,
and lo mingle informally with students in the
Lower Mall common block after 9 p.m.
He is the keynote speaker at the AMS-
sponsored leadership conference at Haney this
weeknd.
Ubyssey editor John Kelsey taped this interview with Ward at the 30th annual CUS congress in Halifax, in early September.
Ubyssey: Several times a*t this congress
you've said present student councils are inadequate. Can you propose some changes?
Ward: Sure. Councils must make some
pretty radical changes in budgeting. Rare is
the council which doesn't have its money all
earmarked at the start of the year for service
functions that don't really save the student any
money.
I think dances, should be self-liquidating,
I think the yearbook should pay for itself,
councils should be making money on travel
schemes, football games, whatever services they
want to provide.
And that money goes into the pot for supporting cultural and political and educational
programs.
Ubyssey: Okay, with budgeting changes,
what exactly is the council money used for?
Ward: Suppose a group of students say,
"There's real trouble in our faculty. We'd like
to print something for all the students to show
how bad it is."
And it's the kind of dispute the student
paper isn't going to be too interested in. GiVe
them some guys to help and a bit of cash to
print their leaflet.
Or say a group of students want to go away
for the weekend and hold a seminar or something. Say to them, "We'll provide you with
a couple of resource people and give you some
money." Then let them sign up more students
and give them their chance to get away to
think things out.
When you're doing that, you're just destroying the whole traditional way of running student councils, which ordinarily work only by
appointing people, firing them, setting up constitutions and all that stuff.
Ubyssey: Is there any way present councils
can operate this way?
Ward: If you're as big as UBC, I think your
council should be a brainstorming policy body
something like a cabinet which just makes
policy.
Ubyssey: How could it make its policy stick
on a student club?
Ward: What policy applies? I mean, if it's
a swimming club, if it's open to all students,
that's all you need for swimming, and councils
should support clubs which provide service
opportunities like that.
But there's a certain responsibility, if you've
got those student dollars in some sort of trust,
to confront people with the alternatives to use
them.
Ubyssey: Councillors here at the congress
seems to want some kind of change in universities, and passed the six universal accessibility-academic quality resolutions to get it.
But the campus situation doesn't seem very
close to effecting any of these moves.
Ward: Yeh, the problem is back on the
campus. We're not changing ourselves. We
have changed some ideas, we have formulated
some ideas. But there has been no social change.
The problem on the campus is after 12 years
of schooling people will accept almost any
comfortable form of authoritarianism.
Ubyssey: What kind of change does CUS
want?
Ward: We don't like who goes to university
and we don't like what they get.
Ubyssey: What should councils do?
Ward: There are people who feel we should
be administering and doing a little lobbying
for student aid for those who are already there.
Well, to me that's immoral. Because I'm
not happy with who's at the university or at
any other post-secondary institution. Because
I know a little about how they get selected.
Ubyssey: The middle class only?
Ward: Sure. The middle class is no better or
worse than any other social class, it's just that
everyone is paying for education through taxation, and it's only open to those who can kick
in another $1,500 a year.
Ubyssey: Changes of this nature imply students using political power of some sort. Does
CUS have any political power?
Ward: It has political influence, not power.
Ubyssey: Does it need political power?
Ward: Yes.
Ubyssey: How are students going to get it?
Ward: Starting in the university, we can
do internal work to reform it, then we can get
into the whole social animation field. We're
concerned about where the students are going
to come from, and what kind of education we
can provide for them.
Ubyssey: How about the lowering of the
votng age?
Ward: If the vote is lowered to 18, it's hard
to see whether that's relevant. I frankly fail to
see whether changing a few constituencies from
Tory to Liberal or Liberal to NOP is going to
make much difference.
Ubyssey: What forms do you see power taking in the university community?
Ward: Political influence is a little easier,
with influence in academic fields, with community action programs in university centres.
But it isn't just a matter of getting kids to stay
in school—that's just the business end of making sure people are educatable. I'm not interested in that particularly.
I think students have to go out into communities and shake open some alternatives to
the way things are now. It isn't just a question
of telling people they should be concerned with
education. It's promoting community change.
Ubyssey: That's still basically talking to
people. Is there any other kind of student
political power besides talking to people?
Ward: I'm not sure we should have an awful
lot more. If students want to change education,
and if it's an anti-elite kind of change they
want to bring about, they've got to re-invigorate communities so those communities have the
political power.
Ubyssey: All aiming at universal accessibility to higher education?
Ward: But it's still not enough just to make
education as attractive as possible, to break the
motivational barriers. At the same time as we
have these things, we've got to be leading programs in the remedial kindergartens and not
just saying the remedial kindergarten's important.
Ubyssey: Can you see students taking these
responsibilities?
Ward: Yes, there've even been some pilot
projects in the past year. Projects other than
"Let's go down to the slums and do Johnny's
work so that he can go on in school."
Ubyssey: That's tokenism.
Ward: It's fakery, and all you're doing is
making sure Johnny can read and write and do
arithmetic so he can be a better delivery boy.
And so that kind of project doesn't interest me
at all.
We've got to turn people on their heads in
the universities. There's no sense sending them
out into the community if they haven't been
turned around. Not hung-up, turned around.
There's been a lot of paralyzing hang-up in our
society and in the student movement, and I
think we're finally coming out of that.
Page  8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13, 1966 FOCUS.
UGEQ has one solution
PART 2
Two weeks ago, Daniel LaTouche outlined
the move of Quebec university student councils
towards action on the provincial and national
fronts.
The students of Quebec based their action
on student syndicalism, he said then.
"Basically student syndicalism defines the
student as a young intellectual worker; clearly
states there is no such thing as student problems, but only student aspects of national,
societal problems."
LaTouche discussed the withdrawal of Quebec students from the Canadian Union of Students—"they couldn't afford lo lose time plan
ning travel schemes, debating championships,
or Second Century Weeks."
And he noted the rise of political action and
stands by Quebec student councils, on such
issues as nationalization of a hydro-electric
company and abolition of tuition fees.
This week, LaTouche turns to English-
Canadian universities, and suggests action their
students could take toward "social animation."
In English Canada student leaders are discovering this second dimension of student
council. They are getting used to the idea of
playing an active role in the social life of their
community.
They might increase their actual participation. Some of you are even challenging the
administration of the university.
Since I've arrived here I never saw so many
people criticizing a university administration
on so many points and I thought that back
in Quebec we held the record for this sort of
activity.
But what do you do afterwards?
I agree with you that the "iboard of governors" is the most ridiculous structure ever
A board of governors is the most ridiculous
structure ever invented to run a university and
since Canada has now a universal pension plan,
there is no more need for a board of governors.
invented to run a university and since Canada
has now a universal pension plan there is no
more use for it.
But how do you replace it?
By putting a student on the board? Pure
alienation and everybody knows it doesn't
change it a single iota in the power structure
of the university.
By putting a majority of students and faculty
on the iboard?
This will not change a thing for the simple
reason that it's not because you are a student
and even less ibecause you're a professor that
you are able to administrate a university.
Students and professors put in the place of
actual governors will tend in the long run to
act the same way that the' actual governors
are. Look at how student administrations are
run. My experience is that throughout Canada,
Quebec and even other parts of the world student structures are the most reactionary, well-
established and pro-status-quo structures you
can think of.
Try to have something changed in a student
structure and it's just like Mr. Smith fighting
City Hall.
A reaction to this can toe found in the attitude of student voting in a group like SDS
(Student for a Democratic Society) or SUPA
in Canada.
They don't believe—with plenty of reasons—
in the effectiveness of actual student structures;
they've abolished them but without replacing
them.
Anarchy at a pure and scientific degree.
But I question the changes, the actual and
Students and professors put in the place of
actual governors will tend in the long run to act
the same ways the actual governors are. Look at
how student administrations are run: my experience is that throughout Canada student structures
are the most reactionary, well-established and pro
status quo structures you can think of.
concrete changes, they can bring forward in a
society.
You can feel very much at home in those
organizations, especially if you have had enough
of official structures.
It's very nice to have a meeting in a small
Writer Daniel LaTouche this year is a
grad student in political
science at UBC. Three
years ago, while editor
of Universite de Montreal's student newspaper
Le Quartier Latin, LaTouche helped form
L'Union Generale des
Etudiantes de Quebec
He served the past two
years as international
vice-president of UGEQ.
room where everybody sits on the floor and
listens to Bob Dylan. But it is still a small
minority of persons.
The problem then could easily, too easily,
be summarized in those terms. How can you
have structures that will allow a high degree
of effectiveness while still representing the
majority of the students?
If the university is to be a community of
students and professors, inevitably you will need
some form of structures that will enable the
majority, not just the elite, of students and
professors to run the university effectively.
These are the problems of the university
community.
If you look over at the relations between
students and the rest of society you will find
even more acute problems that your traditional
structure won't be able to solve.
Take for example the problem caused by
the effective participation of trade unions in
the decision-making process concerning labor
and economic problems of British Columbia.
If they participate in the decision does this
mean that they cannot ultimately fight this
decision? .
In the "democratic" system we have been
used to, they must accept this decision. But
what if the members don't approve df the
decision? What do you do next?
If students are to have any responsibility
in the university (and not only token responsibilities — like taking 10 months to decide
whether or not they should have a Student
Union Building), then they must accept the
obligations of those responsibilities.
I suppose it's because Quebec appears to be
a different type of province from the others
(didn't we elect Daniel Johnson—a friend of
// you look over at the relations between
students and the rest of society, you will find even
more acute problems that your traditional structure won't enable you to solve. . . . If students
are to have any responsibilities in the universities,
they must accept the obligations of these respon
sibilities.
former premier Duplessis?) that we had to try
something different from what students in the
rest of Canada were doing.
But also because the situation was quite
different: we could not afford two types of
student organizations—the traditional one and
a more revolutionary one.
We ha dto manage both roles at the same
time.
We had to manage both roles at the same
crats work together efficiently with the SUPA,
CNO or even potential FLQ anarchists.
We could not afford to spread our forces
in opposite directions.
Our solution was to go back to the students
and organize, within our actual traditional
structures, a centralization movement.
We will continue to have student councils
but parallel to them will be a different type of
structure, continuously challenging the first
one.
To achieve this goal on every campus, student leaders are training ordinary students to
be socially animated.
They are not professional activists or anarchists; their main task is to keep in close
contact with the students.
They meet with the students and have them
discuss their own problems. They don't represent anyibody but themselves and consequently
they do not try to convince the students to do
this or that.
If the students feel that the student council
is useless and should-be abolished, their job is
not to convince that in reality the president is a
nice guy and they should give him a chance.
It's up to the students to decide themselves
what they want.
The main student structure in Quebec --—
UGEQ — was the first one to get involved with
Strong resistance has appeared from the tradi-
ditional leaders who feel that all this question of
participation is nonsense and we should let them
manage since they are the ones who are interested.
But interest can have many faces.
this idea. By now more than 200 students have
been trained in those techniques. The first
difficulties are even now appearing.
In large sectors of our student population,
there is no concern at all for those questions
of student syndicalism.
'But at least a real communication channel
has been opened, not only to consult the student
on his needs but to have him participate in the
decision-making.
Of course, this is not the perfect solution.
Strong resistance has appeared from traditional leaders who feel that all this question of
participation is nonsense — that we should let
them manage since they're the ones who are
interested.
But interest can have many faces: it's not
because you don't want to lose one evening a
week at council meetings that you are not
interested.
You are simply not interested in one form of
participation.
We think this is the only way to to build a
real university community where students not
only vote twice a year but where they form
an integral part of the university life.
It's only if you can admire this integration
that you can hope to solve definitely the problems of relations between students and the
world surrounding them.
Students  and   student  government   must   tcke   on  active  role as citizens  in  society
Thursday, October  13,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9 ca«ipus dr,
ieces   «85
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te^ures Jit      ^ ^ Can.pus c        ^^ „-, ref,   f
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to evewhing ^  ^* ^ ^^
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Page  10
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13, 1966 FOCUS
Student councils sinners and winners revealed...
GAYLE GASKELL
. . . wary
—derrek webb  photo
FRANK FLYNN
. . . itchy
EVIE POPOFF
. . . tousled
v.
A GO GO
at
the
Sw&
presenting
"SOUND  UNLIMITED"
and  the
A GO GO GIRLS
Dancing 9 to 3 Every
FRIDAY   and    SATURDAY
Ample  Parking
821   RIVER  RD.,   RICHMOND
Available  for   Private   Functions
Monday to  Thursday
Reservations,   CR   8-2624
CHARLIE BOYLAN
. . . sleepy
PETER BRAUND
. . . pondering
PHIL WALTON
. . . teething
ERIC NEWELL
. . . thumb-struck
. in new Ubyssey column
By KRIS EMMOTT
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Council reporters go to
AMS meetings and report
the news.
This one goes to council
meetings and reports her
opinions.
There are twenty-six councillors. Some come to every
meeting, and some I have
never seen.
Some talk all the time
about everything, and some
never open their mouths.
President Peter Braund
talks the most.
If anybody else talks a
lot, Petey Bear bangs his
gavel.
He has round blue eyes
and a sweet smile, so I think
of his as Petey Bear.
Others think of him as a
pompous ass.
This is unfair to Petey.
Although he is not nearly as
jolly as the asinine picture
The Ubyssey usually prints,
he's not as mean as that
pounding gavel leads the
uninitiated to think.
Braund loves bumf.
In this he is aided and
abetted by the secretary,
Gayle Gaskell. She is quietly efficient.
She sees that every councillor gets at least forty
sheets of official bumf stuffed into his rfiailbox every
week.
The first vice-president is
Charlie Boylan. Nothing
escapes Charlie Boylan.
He brawls with Braund
about incredibly minor
points, and he makes many
motions.
Most votes in council run
along the lines of "that the
minutes of the last meeting
be   approved,"   or   "that   a
contract with Jaguar Enterprises to provide the Nocturnals for such and such a
dance he approved."
These votes are always
unanimous.
Then there are votes like,
"that we approve of Simon
Fraser's fight against the
Shell station."
Boylan argues about these
for twenty minutes and is
the only one to vote no.
Most of the other councillors always go along with
the gang.
The co-ordinator is Jim
Lightfoot, who slouches
silently and pays attention.
Lightfoot is an engineer.
He always wears his red
sweater.
Eric Newell is another
engineer. He runs the EUS.
He too always wears his red
sweater. He can smoke and
chew gum at the same time.
A rare thing.
Don Wise runs arts. Sort
of. He ran three noisy campaigns last year and succeeded in getting the arts
presidency.
He never said another
word.
Frank Flynn represents
science. He never makes a
motion, but he seconds
everyone else's.
Mike  Sywulych,  forestry,
sits     the     farthest -from
Braund   and  the   closest   to
The  Ubyssey  reporters.   He
says very little.
Alisson Rice, a nurse,
knits during meetings. She
never says anything, but
sometimes seconds before
Flynn does.
Hubert Williston, medicine, reads The Sun during
meetings. He rarely says
anything either.
There are more.
There is commerce's Phil
Walton,   who   is   an   active
talker when he is present.
Our candid camera caught
him in some lovely yawns.
And treasurer Lome Hudson, who usually looks very
weary and who argues and
natters about anything, only
more quietly than Boylan.
There is education president
Wayne Wiebe, one of the
very few in that faculty who
sports an education jacket.
And Jack Redenback, the
aggie, whose beautiful golden locks outshine any surfer
from Redondo Beach to La
Jolla.
That's what sits around
the table in the council
chamber, drinking cokes,
smoking, throwing paper on
the floor, eating crackers
and passing notes and sometimes paying attention.
DON  WISE
, . dumb-struck
Western Canada's Largest
Formal  Wear  Rentals
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
Full   Dress Shirts  & Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue  Blazers
Directors'  Coats 10%   UBC  Discount
2500 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608  Granville   (at 10th)  4691   Kingsway  (Bby.)
RE 3-6727 (by  Sears)   HE  5-1160
COMING OCT. 23—8 p.m,
"the fabulous swinging
entertainment of"
The
Serendipity
Singers
In Concert
Tickets: $4, $3.50, $3, $2.50, $2
From the Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St.
Phone 683-3255 or through all Eaton's Stores
PRESENTED BY THE ELLISON-WHITE BUREAU
Thursday, October   13,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11 Page   .2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13, 1966
CUP-UNS ROUNDUP
—kurt   hilger photo
HERE'S THREE-EIGHTHS of the New Folk singers making
music for a packed Brock lounge Thursday, courtesy of
UBC's special events committee.
Charter flight
to hit London
The Alma Mater Society has
appointed Bryan Davis, law 3,
charter flight director for
1966-67.
Davis said one plane has already been chartered, leaving
Vancouver for London, England May 11, and returning
Aug. 25.
The return trip will cost less
than $400.
If enough students show an
interest, .planes to other destinations will be chartered.
Students interested in the
flight should contact Davis in
the AMS office or ask there
for further information.
STUDENTS !
UNIVERSITY
READING     LIST
TITLES
AVAILABLE!
BOOK
BaRRet^
891  Granville St.
OPEN DAILY
From 10 o.m.
to MIDNIGHT
(Noon to Midnight Sunday)
Out-of-towners:
Send for
catalogue
Tel. MU 5-5814
Transportation  Problems?
Lease-A-Honda
$28.95 per month
Incl. helmet, insur., servicing
MU 2-7912
Student boycott
shuts down caf
MONTREAL (CUP) — The University of Montreal administration has closed the campus cafeteria as students, refusing to pay increased prices, are boycotting it.
Students will organize their
own food distribution centres
"as long as the shutdown persists", said Jean Villiard, vice-
presdent of Association Gen-
erale des Etudiants de l'Uni-
versite de Montreal (AGEUM).
Administrative action fo 1-
lowed complaints from cafeteria staff that students were
paying the old prices after the
new prices were announced.
•    •    •
CYC wheels roll
OTTAWA (UNS)—A permanent executive director and
another associate director have
been appointed to the Company
of Young Canadians.
New executive director is
Alan M. Clarke, 37, who will
assume duties at the end of
October. Jaques Noel, 28, joins
director Stewart Goodings as
the company's associate direct-
ector.
Goodings will be on campus
later this term when he visits
UBC, Simon Fraser Academy
and Victoria University to set
up a liaison between students
and CYC.
¥    *    *
'Pay medics'
BRANTFORD (CUP) — A
prominent    Conservative    MP
has just suggested the federal
government pay medical students to keep them at university all year round.
Speaking at a party meeting,
George Hees said medical care
insurance will be a major failure unless Ottawa undertakes
crash programs to train more
health personnel and expand
medical research.
"Those in training to become
doctors, dentists, nurses and
technicians must be paid on a
12-month-per-year basis," he
said.
This would increase the output of medical schools by one-
third and attract young men
and women who cannot afford
to attend university, Hess said.
•    •    •
2nd degree given
BURNABY (UNS)—A Simon
Fraser Academy sociology
assistant has become the second
person to receive a master of
arts degree from the institution.
Michael Mulkay, a graduate
of the London School of Economics, received the degree last
week.
His thesis', The Recruitment
of Scientists—a Case Study in
Canada, was completed under
the supervision of Prof. T. B.
Bottomore.
FULLY
MR CONDITIONED
■* W*. WiHiam ton
Swiss Specialty Restaurant
722 Richards at Georgia
Excellent Service in 14th Century
Decor
5:30 p.m. to Midnight
Reservations: MU 3-8810
2 min. from Queen Elizabeth Theatre
SWISS CHEESE FONDUE -
BEEF FONDUE BOURGUIGNONNE
MAUD: I'm just admiring your
new high-neck sweater with the
Raglan sleeves that are designed
on angle to make your chest look
broader than it really is.
DON: It's a honey. Made by
Byford and designed by Hardy
Amies.
MAUD: Amies! He's world
famous for his styling knowledge.
DON: I like the way it fits.
MAUD: That sweater makes you
look like I want you to look.
Feel that man-size ribbing and
those one, two, three, four, five,
six sexy leather buttons.
DON: I am. I am!
.MAUD: Anyone who understands
quality in sweaters, knows
Byford. They're British.
this exclusive, made in England,
at better stares
everywhere.
BYFORD DESIGN CONSULTANT: HARDY AMIES
Newman Centre Presents:
"Cnyltik Xeatker"
with "THE MODS" (5 piece band)
Fri., Oct. 14-8:00- 12:00
St. Mark's College
$1.00 PERSON
REFRESHMENTS AVAILABLE
TODAY!
don't  miss  the  Beatles
Help&
A Hard Days Night
12:30 noon — 11  p.m.
Auditorium 50c
ubc film society
SHOWING TIMES OF
HELP
A HARD DATS NIGHT
Beginning     12:30 with Help
2:02 A Hard Days Night
3:27 Intermission
3:30 Help
5:02 A Hard Days Night
6:27 Intermission
6:30 Help
8:02 A Hard Days Night
9:27 Intermission
9:30 Help finishes at 11:02
TODAY
AUDITORIUM
SEE ALL SEVEN SHOWINGS FOR 50c
HARVARD BUSINESS
SCHOOL VISITOR
Assistant Dean Anthony G. Athos, Director of Admissions, of the Harvard Graduate School of Business
Administration, will visit the University of British Columbia on Thursday, October 20th, to talk to students in-
, terested in business as a career of excitement and creative
opportunity.
Requirements for admission to the two-year course,
leading to a degree of Master in Business Administration
(MBA), include a college degree in any field of concentration, a standing.in at least the top third of the
class, and a record of progressive achievement in campus activities, business, the military, or elsewhere.
The MBA Program at the Harvard Business School
is based on the experience-oriented case method, pioneered at the Harvard Business School to develop the practical, analytical, and decision-making capacities that are
the key to managerial effectiveness.
For outstanding students in each first-year class
(of roughly 690) there are 60 fellowships available. Approximately, 40 per cent of the Harvard Business School
student body also makes use of the Deferred Payment
or Loan Program which enables all students admitted
to the Harvard MBA Program to attend even though
their sources of funds are inadequate.
Seniors, or others, wishing to talk to Dr. Athos may
make an appointment through the office of Mr. J. C.
Craik, Placement  Officer. Thursday, October   13,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page  13
NO POACHERS
Research forest
open to hunters
—kurt   hilger photo
FROSH  QUEEN  for   1966-67   is  pretty Mary  McLaughlin,
chosen   Saturday   night  at   annual   frosh   Armory   bash.
UBC's Research Forest will
hunting clubs this season.
The Board of Governors has
approved renewal of an agreement giving Port Coquitlam
and District Hunting and Fishing Club and the Maple Ridge
Rod and Gun Club access to
the forest.
The 10,000-acre tract near
Haney will be opened on weekends and holidays during hunting season.
The UBC forestry department receives no payment for
this privilege ,which has been
in effect since 1962.
Forestry professor Dr. R. W.
Wellwood said that only mem-
ibers of the clubs are permitted
to hunt there.
"Rod and gun members are
responsible people who don't
fire at shadows," he said.
Forestry students are normally in the area only during
May and September camp periods.
Research in forestry genetics,
wood anatomy, pruning and
thinning, and aspects of logging and road building is carried on in the area.
Forestry students also study
the area's forest measures and
silviculture and apply engineering and surveying knowledge.
remain open to two district
DEAD, BURIED
McGill students croak
MONTREAL (CUP)—Controversial McGill lecturer
Laurier LaPierre has lambasted McGill students for
"comfortably install ing
themselves in their apathy."
Addressing students at
their first Hyde Park session this fall, the former
co-host of the now defunct
CBC television program
This Hour has Seven Days
said:
"You sit on your rear ends
Sign Wednesday
for deaf course
A sign language course is
being offered at UBC for
those interested in communication with deaf-mutes.
The course, sponsored by
the Pacific Deaf Fellowship,
will register Wednesday,
Oct. 19 at 12:30 in Angus
214.
Film
Salt of the Earth
Sunday, Oct. 16th
8:00 p.m.
875 East Hastings
Admission 50c
Sponsored by
Progressive Workers
Movement
and contemplate two balls
of lint in your belly button,
while the world passes you
by. You might as well be
dead because you're already
buried."
LaPierre, an associate professor in McGill's history
department, contended that
students' council, with its
apolitical stand is "sanctify
ing the  Right"   on  the  McGill campus.
"Once students refuse to
stand up and be counted —
they are denying the possibility of democratic action," and this is the first
step in the development of
a fascist community, he
charged.
Furniture Bargains Galore!
Good Single Beds $14.95 each
Bed Chesterfields $15.00 and up
Refrigerators $39.50 and up
Large Selection  of  Unpainted   Furniture
at Low Prices
Many more bargains you should see at
KLASSEN'S USED FURNITURE MART
3207 W. Broadway RE 6-0712
Beer Bottle Drive-In at Rear of Store
eartft
RESTAURANT
and
Dining Room
4544 W. 10th Ave.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
Full Dining
Facilities
Take
Home
Service
Wise wants
SUS out'
Arts undergraduate society
president Don Wise Tuesday
demanded termination of "in-
mature" interference in AUS
business toy UBC's sciencemen.
Wise was addressing student
council on a motion to have
the new AUS constitution investigated by student court.
The motion was directed at
the original constitution received at a general arts meeting last spring, which was attended by sciencemen still
eligible to vote under the old
constitution.
The new arts consitution has
been revised again over the
summer and will be presented
to council next Monday night,
Wise said.
AND
Filmsoc Presents
HELP
A HARD DAYS
NIGHT
AUDITORIUM
ALL DAY
TODAY
WHOSE
God Is Dead?
What's behind the Death of
God movement which believes
God is irrelevant in modern
life, that His death must be
accepted and the churches
must learn to get along without
Him? October Reader's Digest
features a penetrating interview with one of the greatest
ministers of this century, Dr.
Harry Emerson Fosdick, who
suggests, "Perhaps... there are
many concepts of God that
should die." Read this revealing article which explains why
so many have lost their faith
in God and of how our idea of
God should change as we
mature. October Reader's Digest — on sale now.
^can
wear them.
...Since they've come into my life
I wouldn't think of wearing anything
else! So marvelous in textures and
colors, small wonder they make the
simplest of apparel positively
scintillating! It's the naked truth!
epnst
TIES.  OF  COURSE
DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORES
4445 W. 10th
near  Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
at  Mackenzie
AN   INVITATION  TO
STUDENTS OF ALL FACULTIES
ESPECIALLY CLASS OF  1967
PANEL
DISCUSSION
"A Career For YOU in the Public Service of Canada"
Statisticians
Archivists
Finance Officers
Personal Administrators
Foreign Service Officers
Economists
Historians
Management Analysts
Administrative Officers
Commercial  or  Industrial
Analysts
Panelists represent several
Federal Government Departments
Date: October 14
Location:  Buchanan  Bldg.,  Room   106,
Time:  12:30 p.m. Page 14
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13, 1966
SWEET NOTHING awaits Portland State College defensive halfback Tom Oberg (22) in
first quarter action of UBC Thunderbirds' 14-0 victory Saturday in Varsity Stadium.
Here Bird .halfback Bob Sweet (18) cuts sharply to his right while Oberg is shifting
weight  in   opposite  direction.
Rule fools
Birds; they
take third
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds were well enough known
to be invited to represent Canadian colleges at an invitational tournament in St. Louis,
Mo., but they didn't go prepared with some knowledge of
their own.
St. Louis University, National Collegiate Athletic Association champions for the last two
years, heard about UBC's title
performance i in a California
tourney last year and made the
Birds one of three guests at
their annual fall tourney.
The Birds went east ready
to win, but had to settle for
third place in the double-loss
knockout competition.
Unknown to UBC, the tourney was run under NCAA
rules, which permit unlimited
substitution.
UBC took 13 players, one
less than their usual complement because Jim Berry was
in hospital with an ankle injury.
St. Louis dressed no fewer
than 26 men, five of them
goalies, and simply wore the
Birds down.
The home club beat UBC 1-0
after 29 minutes of overtime
play Saturday.
Sunday the Birds still had
enough soccer left in them to
dump a senior team from St.
Louis 1-0 in the consolation
final. Ash Valdai scored the
goal.
UBC met North Shore in
Pacific Coast League soccer
game Wednesday night at Callister Park.
•'•«* #r
TOUCHDOWN TAND__M of quarterback Dick Gibbons and
halfback Ren Kincade prepare for one of 35 UBC passes
in Portland State game. Gibbons threw Kincade a scoring
toss in third  quarter to ice  14-0 win.
Same old greensward,
but   the   name's   new
You know all the green playing fields west of the
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre at the south end of
the  campus ?
The  ones   everybody  calls  Wolfson  Field ?
Well, they're not, at least any more.
An athletic department representative has informed
The Ubyssey that the fields are now referred to as the
Ihunderbird Playing Fields.
He said only the field hockey pitch,, which requires
scecial groundskeeping, is properly called Wolfson
Field.
Frustration
mars first
football win
UBC Thunderbird quarterback Dick Gibbons dropped
back to pass, rolled to his left when his blocking broke
down, then scampered desperately back to the right as
defensive linemen loomed all around him.
Then he saw halfback Ron Kincade yelling and waving
his arms at the left sideline 30 yards downfield.
Gibbons drilled the ball to Kincade, who wheeled and
pointed out a Portland State College Viking for Bird end
Lance Fletcher.
Fletcher obligingly levelled the defender, and Kincade
sprinted into the end zone for UBC's second touchdown.
The play was typical of the Birds' brilliant but baffled
offence in their first victory of the season, a 14-0 triumph
over Portland State College in Varsity Stadium Saturday.
The Birds have lost two games and tied one.
Birds take their time
The UBC dominated play
throughout the game, but
couldn't capitalize in apparent
scoring situations.
They penetrated to Portland's 12 and later to their
eight, where Glen Brandt's
weak field goal attempt lost its
fight with a gusty north wind.
When UBC finally did score,
it was with only 34 seconds
remaining in the first half.
In the best tradition of ball-
control football, they took al
most six minutes to drive from
their own 39 to the Portland
seven.
Key play in the march was a
fourth-down sweep by punter
Chip Barrett, who lined up to
kick with the ball at the Viking 45.
Barrett went to his right for
19 yards and a first down at
the PSC 26.
Gibbons threw to Lance
Fletcher, then hit Kincade on
a screen pass which carried to
the seven.
Smith's catch gets six
From there, the Birds had
the ball one yard from the
goal line on fourth down, but
an illegal procedure penalty
made it fourth-and-goal just
outside the five yard line.
Gibbons rifled a pass to end
Rod Smith, who had hooked
on the goal line, and Smith
struggled through the arms of
two Viking defenders to score.
Glen Brandt converted, and
UBC led 7-0.
UBC started strong in the
third quarter, scoring a second touchdown on the Gib-
bons-to - Kincade combination,
which covered 55 yards. Brandt
kicked the extra point to give
the Birds their 14-0 margin,
and UBC's frustrations resumed.
Dave Corcoran recovered a
fumbled punt, then refumbled
it to Mike Rohan, who lugged
the ball to the Portland State
41.
But Gibbons lost 12 yards attempting to pass, and the Birds
had to kick again.
The visiting Vikings couldn't
move against UBC's rampaging
defence, and punter Jerry
Oldenburg was merely trying
to get rid of the ball when
husky Mo Hayden bounded up
to block the kick.
Oldenburg didn't see. the
ball roll off towards the left
sideline, but neither did Hayden, who had 20 yards of daylight between him and a touchdown.
The ball eventually meandered out of bounds at the Viking
17, and the Thunderbird offence took over there.
The best they could do was
gain nine yards in four downs,
though, and the ball went over
again.
It went that way all after
noon. UBC looked about five
touchdowns better than Portland State, except when it
came time to score those
touchdowns.
As the game wore on and
the Vikings became even more
frustrated than UBC, tempers
wore thin and a couple of unscheduled jousts occurred between individual players.
Jayvees run
well, but
lose anyway
The UBC football Junior
Varsity left its pass blocking
at home Sunday when it travelled to Mt. Vernon, Wash.,
to play the semi-professional
Bell-Jets.
The result of their forget-
fulness was a 13-7 loss, their
third this season against one
win.
The Jayveees' much improved running game needs
a viable passing attack to
balance it, but the blocking
protection didn't materialize
for quarterback Gordon
Hardy.
Fullback Don Walden
scored UBC's touchdown and
gained 95 yards to lead Jay-
vee rushers.
Diminutive John Bellamy
turned in an outstanding performance at corner linebacker.
The Jayvees meet the unpredictable Seattle' Cavaliers
Sunday at 2 p.m. on the
Thunderbird Playing Field
next to the Winter Sports
Centre. Thursday,  October   13,   1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page  15
Vl™   l,\  * ...   !   .  .   .V*s  ?V- -*-\7T :.^_...
TOUGH DEFENCE of UBC Thunderbirds (dark jerseys)
held Portland State College Vikings to meagre five
first downs and 109 yards total offence in 14-0 win
Saturday. Chip Barrett (19) cracks into Viking quarterback Ed Gorman (14) as Glen Brandt (37) hurries to help.
Sports car buffs rally
round for autumn runs
RUNS, PASSES, KICKS
Toronto player stars
KINGSTON (CUP) —Starry
University of Toronto quarterback Bryce Taylor ran and
kicked his way to an all-
time individual scoring lead
in the Ontario-Quebec Athletic
Association Saturday, while
leading his team to first place
in the league.
Taylor scored two touchdowns on runs of three and
seven yards, kicked four converts and completed 19 of 33
passes for 297 yards as Toronto
stopped top-rated Queen's
Golden Gaels 28-19 in Kingston.
The five-year Toronto star
now has 158 points, surpassing by six the lifetime mark
of Ron Stewart, former Gael
now playing with the professional Ottawa Rough Riders.
Queen's defeat dropped them
into a second-place tie in the
four-team league with Western
Ontario, who defeated McGill
24-8 Saturday in London.
Halfback Dave Garland and
fullback Art Froese led the
Western attack, carrying for
91 and 84 yards respectively.
Garland    scored    two    touch
downs, while Froese contributed a touchdown and two converts.
Meanwhile, Alberta Golden
Bears withstood a late rally by
Calgary at the weekend to defeat the Dinosaurs 17-14 in
Edmonton.
The game, played in a cold
wind, was decided by a 20-yard
field gold scored by Laudwig
Daubner. Touchdowns by Gil
Mather and John Violini for
Edmonton were matched by
Calgary's Whitey Tuff and Don
Green.
.yv <J-)iamond with y^onnden
ence
Special  10%  Discount to all UBC Students
on Diamond Engagement Rings
DOWNTOWN
BRENTWOOD
PARK ROYAL
The UBC Sports Car Club
will hold its first major rally
of the season Oct. 30.
Called the Totem Rally, it
will foe a 300-mile event held
entirely in the Fraser Valley.
Primarily for novice rally-
ists, it will be a relatively
easy event.
This year's rally will not be
hard on cars for it will be run
on good roads in the valley
with rally speeds always under
posted road speeds.
The club will hold noon-
hour rallyettes Thursday and
the following Thursday.
The annual Homecoming
Rally will be run on Friday,
Oct. 28.
These will all be short
events with a small entry fee,
and will be good practice for
the Totem.
A rally school for all those
interested is being arranged
and will be publicized later
in The Utoyssey.
(Bowling, ampm,?
T, W, Th, F - 9:30 a.m.
T,W, F- 11:30 a.m.
No Charges — Instruction Free
Faculty  Welcome — Grads,  too
School of PE & REC,
Voluntary Rec. Program
Phone 228-2401
'.SKIING!
FULL WINTER
SPORTS
ACCESSORIES
PARKAS AND SWEATERS
GLOVES,  TOQUES  AND  GOGGLES
ERBACHER AND GRESUIG SKIS
E.C.L. TYROL AND LADOLOMITE BOOTS
North Western Sporting
Goods Ltd.
10th and Alma
224-5040
Give a girl a whirl in Forward Fashion Coats and Slacks. There's a thrust in the
shoulder, a lean line of lapel that they fall for. The Daroff Personal Touch does
it with tapered-trim design, a custom collection of fabrics and proud tailoring.
If you get hounded, sourrounded, you'll have to figure out how to send a girl
home reluctantly, but firmly. You'll need this technique while enjoying all
'Bontany'   500  Forward   Fashions.   Sport   Coats   from   $49.50.,   Slacks   from   $25.00.
§ a all the way with
•«i j
sport coats
00' tailored by Daroff
slacks • suits • outercoats
M^
DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORES
4445 West 10th Ave. — East of Sasamat
2901 West Broadway at Mackenzie
* * m m.XM Page  16
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 13,  1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Gearmen grind gravel
SPORTS   CAR   CLUB
Noon-hour rally starts at top
of C-lot. A city map is advisable.
POETRY
Milton   Acorn   reads   poetry
Friday noon in Ang.  104.
EAST ASIA SOC
First   party,   discussion   Friday,   8   p.m.,   6630   Churchill.
Bring own refreshments.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Dance at St. Mark's College.
"English    feather    with    the
Mods",   Friday   8-12.   $1   per
person.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
General    meeting     Monday
noon in Bu. 203.
CURLING CLUB
Student teams enter now for
homecoming bonspeil Oct.  20-
23. Deadline, Monday, Oct. 17.
Call 261-6103.
VCF
Friday   noon   Cathy   Nichol
speaks on "God Our Contemporary."
NEWMAN  CLUB
Meeting for those who want
to work on the children's
Christmas party, 1 p.m. today
in the bridge room at St.
Mark's.
COMM. U.S.
Student-professor     coffee
party,    grad    student    centre,
2:30-4:30 p.m.
CHRISTIAN   SCIENCE
Testimony    meeting    every
Friday noon. Hut 0-12.
DEBATING UNION
Debating clinic, Friday noon,
Bu. 217.
CURLING CLUB
Students  interested  in  Sunday curling, meet in Bu. 223,
noon Friday.
ARCHEOLOGY
All members going on the
field trip meet outside the
archeology   lab   11   a.m.   Sun
day. Wear old warm clothes
and bring lunch. Rain will
cancel the trip.
VIET NAM COMMITTEE
General meeting Friday, Bu.
212.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Otis Trio, Brock, 35 cents.
PRE  MED   SOC
All    those    at   last    week's
meeting—attend   meeting   Friday noon, Wes. 201.
ACE
Last  chance  to join  Thursday and Friday at noon in Ed.
lounge.   Candy   sale   for   ACE
projects.
FOLK  SONG  SOC
First general meeting noon
today in Bu. 102. All welcome.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
Members   of   all   campus
parties,     important     meeting
noon in Bu. 205.
COMMUNITY PLANNING
Moshe   Safdie,   architect   of
Habitat   '67,   speaks   on   "The
Urban   Way   of   Life"   Friday
noon, Lass. 104.
FILM SOC
Beatles in the Aud. all day.
Last show is 9:30 p.m. 50 cents
for as long as you can stand it.
GEOLOGY   DEPT.
Geology museum now open
Mon.-Fri., 12:30-1:30, F&G 116.
SAILING   TEAM
Meeting noon in Hut B-3.
GRADUATE THEATRE
Open auditions. Thurs. 12:30-
2:30; Tues. 7-9:00 p.m. Fr.
Wood Rm. 16.
Casting four short plays by
UBC authors: Pregnant Daffodils, The Transport Survey,
No Farmer's Daughter and
Sex, Cold Cans and a Coffin.
Variety of fascinating roles,
public performances.
NDP
Tom    Berger    (Vancouver-
Burrard)   speaks   on   the  problems facing B.C. today. Brock
lounge Friday noon.
MUSSOC
Meeting Friday noon in the
club room above the Aud. for
everyone    interested    in    on-
campus publicity.
DEBATING UNION
I     UBC Debating team tryouts
EYEGLASS FRAMES
TO CHOOSE FROM    &#%   QC
WITH YOUR 4^^J« # J
PRESCRIPTION FOR GLASSES ^W      ^
Priced from only JJ      wMU
Money Back Guarantee
EYE EXAMINATIONS
No Appointment Needed
Contact Lenses &T.:  »49.5t
Check For Yourtelt. Lowett Priee$ in Town!
♦FREE CREDIT TO STUDENTS
L
GRANVILLE OPTICAL ltd
861 GRANVILLE, VANCOUVER, MUtuol 3-8921
Open dally Inoludlng Saturday — No appointment needed
J
Wed.,  Oct.   19.  Apply to Box
30  AMS   office  by  noon  Fri-|
day. I
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Organizational meeting noon
in IH 400.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Jazz concert Brock noon, 35
cents. The Randy Rayment
Quintet.
SPECIAL  EVENTS
Last minute tickets still
available for Vancouver Opera
Association products of I Pag-
liacci and Cavalleria Rusti-
cana. Apply special events office Br. Ext. 255.
~c?
ff       U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER  SPORTS  CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE -  1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15, 1967
TUESDAYS   —
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS   —
SATURDAYS   -
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.*
2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.**
SUNDAYS   —
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.**
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
♦Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons  —    Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings      —    Students .50      Adults .75
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST FRIDAY: LEATHER NOTE-
book; initials C.F. Phone 224-9728.
WOULD ANYONE FINDING MY
Physical Chemistry Text please
call  266-8621.
LOST PAIR BROWN MEN'S
glasses in brown leather case,
Oct. 6, noon, Library Pond. Phone
433-6370.
LOST LEFT BLACK LEATHER
glove, fur-lined, 8:30 a.m., Tues.,
between bookstore and F.W. Theatre. Please phone Carol, 224-7666.
REWARD OF $25.00 FOR INFO
leading to return of two tandem
bicycles. Call Cap's Cycles and
Museum   Centre  at  524-3611.
FOUND TEXT BOOK PLANT BIO
Chemistry Davies Giovanni, A.P.
Rees.   Phone   922-1342.
Greetings
12
Coming Dances
12A
HOMECOMING '66 BALL, SAT.,
Oct. 22. Tickets on sale now at
AMS Office, $3.75 per couple,
Armouries   &   Fieldhouse.        	
NEWMAN CENTRE PRESENTS
"English Leather" with "The
Mods" Friday, Oct. 14, 8-12, St.
Mark's College, $1.00 a person. Re.
freshments   available.
Special   Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted  Elliott,   224-6707
BLABNIGHT AT THE ADVANCE
Mattress Coffeehouse (Tenth and
Alma). Make your own harangue
or comedy on stage. Tonight and
every  Thursday.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — F & G-116
open Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students Faculty and Staff Welcome. 	
PIZZA PATIO CONTINUES TO
expand, specializing in Pizza
take-out and delivery. Pizza Patio's normal policy of making
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week is
again in effect. Openings are
available at anyone of their six
locations. For further information contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,   736-9422.
WHAT MAKES PEOPLE TICK?
Introductory lecture on the philosophy of human behaviour, Oak-
ridge Auditorium, Oct. 19, 8 p.m.
Tickets  $1  at  A.M.S.
TO ALL MOTORCYCLISTS WHO
have been given tickets for inadequate exhaust mufflers":
Meet Hugh Macdonald at Suite
207—2190 Bellevue, West Vancou
ver, B.C., on October 15 at 1 p.m.
Transportation
14
DESPERATE — RIDE NEEDED
vicinity 10th Ave. Burnaby for
8:30's Monday to Friday. Ph. 526-
2149.	
RIDE NEEDED FOR TWO FROM
Marpole 8:30's staying late three
nights   a   week.    Kathy,    277-2996.
RIDE WANTED FROM U.B.C. TO
vicinity Marine and Hudson at
4:30.   Phone   Bob,   261-4481.	
RIDE INTO OBLIVION TODAY
during nine solid hours of Beat-
les.  Auditorium  today.   50c.	
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30's M-F,
from Arbutus and S.W. Marine.
Can  drive  one  day.  263-3457.
Wanted
15
WANTED: A SECOND-HAND
plug-in radio. Call Susan, 266-7663.
WANTED: SECOND-HAND BOY'S
3-speed bicycle. Will pay approx.
$25.   Phone   Ed,   224-9667.
AUTOMOTIVE   & MARINE     Auditions
Automobiles For Sale
21
1957 MORRIS 1000 CITY TESTED,
Starts well, runs well, (to 70),
$275 or best offer 224 7793 after 6.
CORVAIR CORSA 2 DR. H.T. 140
H.P. Posi-traction, adj. steering,
reverb. HE 3-6906.	
'61 SIMCA HARDTOP, LOW MILE-
age,   lady-driven,   phone   988-8668.
1963 M.G. Midget, 21,000 miles; engine, body & accessories in excellent condition. Best offer. RE 8
9661.
1959 HILMAN SEDAN, REASON-
able condition, as is, $200.
Brakes repaired. $250. Phone
Matt,   733-1636,   9-5.	
1959 VOLVO P.V. 444, IMMACU
late condition. Phone 738-0685
after   5   p.m.   Ask  for  Wally.
'53 CHEV. FOR SALE. GOOD
shape. Good motor. Clean. 584-
5170. 	
CAR LOCATOR: TAKE ADVAN-
tage of me! What price and type
of vehicle do you want?—new or
used. Use my time to get the
best possible deal for yourself.
NO CHARGE! Phone Ian, 261-
2503 after 6 p.m.	
'58 V.W. NEW ENGINE, BRAKES,
muffler, brakes, tires. Best offer
over   $500.   684-3050   evenings.	
MUST SELL 1956 CHEV. FOUR-
Door V-8. Blue and white. Good
campus car. Phone Bill Phillips,
224-4814  day,   or  731-6921   after   5.
1960     VOLKSWAGEN,     $550.     TEL.
921-7059.
1954 ZEPHYR SIX-CYLINDER
two-tone green, very good condition.   Phone   Bernie,   224-9064.
'58 RAMBLER 4-DR. STANDARD
trans., radio, pulmanized, city-
tested,   $350.   733-7108.
Accessories & Repairs
22
2—6.50 x 13 WHITEWALL SNOW
tires with 4-hole rims. Doug Jensen, 7130 Curtis St., Burnaby,
298-5361.
Motorcycles
27
'66 YAMAHA 80-CC, 3,200 MI.
Good condition. $250 or offer.
327-5056.
1964 HONDA 150. 7,000 MILES.
Excellent oond. Lots of extras.
$325\   After   6:30,   224-5853.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Scandals
39A
THE
BNW
SOON
Sewing  8.  Alterations
40
DRESSMAKING; REMODELLING:
skirts, separates, etc. Special attention to wedding gowns. Reasonable  Rates.  CA  4-6471.
Typewriters  &  Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
EMPLOYMENT
Help  Wanted
51
A 2nd OR 3rd YEAR STUDENT TO
sell advertising for the UBYSSEY.
This is an excellent opportunity
to gain sales experience and to
earn commission. Must be hard
working, well organized and be
able to work 8-10 hrs. a week. If
sincerely interested apply to Publications   Office.   Brock   Hall.
STUDENTS WANTED TO WATCH
nine hours of Beatles today Auditorium noon.  50c.
61
OPEN AUDITIONS THUR. 12:30-
2:30, Tues. 7:00-9:00, Fr. Wood 16,
casting 4. Short plays by UBC
authors   for   public   performance.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
Instruction Wanted
66
TUTOR WANTED FOR CHEM.
200 phone 261-7119 and leave message.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office, Brock Hall.
FOR SALE: SEVERAL PROFES-
sionally completed manuscripts —
Authors Agency, 767 Kingsway,
TR  6-6362.
6 STR. ELEC. GUIT. WITH CASE,
exc. cond., orig. $70, now only
$30.   224-3380,   Chris.
REMINGTON PORTABLE TYPE
writer, stand, keyboard and tabulator. Regular type, $55. Phone
Matt,   733-1636.
TRUMPET    AND    CASE    IN    A-l
condition,    $50.    Phone    942r4106.
TWO GREAT BEATLE MOVIES.
Help plus Hard Day's Night today,   Auditorium,   50c.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
RENT THE AUDITORIUM FOR
50c and sleep through nine hours
of   Beatles   today.	
NEW TRAILER AVAILABLE
Oct. 17th. Two girls or young
married couple, abstainers. For
particulars   phone   224-9139.	
4 HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS FOR
male students, vicinity 15th and
Dunbar, $50 per month. Phone
733-8801. 	
LARGE FURNISHED ROOM FOR
one or two senior students, private campus home five minutes
walk from libraries, private entrance, parking facilities, washroom.   Available  Oct.   15.   224-7030.
ACCOMMODATION IN PRIVATE
home, two male students. 4453
W.   12th.   Phone   224-3391.
ROOM AND BREAKFAST FOR
male student (non-drinker or
smoker)   in   adult  home.   266-4752.
LARGE SLEEPING ROOM, LIM-
ited use house, breakfast optional.   261-1873.
Room & Board
sa
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
for one girl. Phone after 6 p.m.
266 8581.	
ROOM FOR GIRL STUDENT, %
blk. east Blanca on W. 7th. CA 4
3654.   Board  if  desired.	
ROOM AND BOARD FOR MALE
on campus, 5 minutes from class.
224-9660,   ask   for   Barrie.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
THIRD OR FOURTH YEAR GIRL
wanted to share apartment in
Kerrisdale. Call 263-8809 after 6
p.m.
CLASSIFIED
BUY  -   SELL   -   RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY

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