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The Ubyssey Nov 7, 1986

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXIX, No. 18
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November 7,1986
,48        228-2301
tJgC Archives Serial
Special
Peace Issue
Hanford could be next Chernobyl
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian University Press
With an aging nuclear reactor 300
kilometres south of the B.C. border
at Hanford, Washington could
become the world's next Chernobyl, an activist from Portland
said Monday.
"The nuclear reactor is 23 years
old and the graphite core is warped
and aging," Joanne Oleksiak,
director of the Hanford Clearinghouse told 200 people at the
Robson Square Media Centre.
"It has valves that are so worn
away that they look like rusted out
scrap metal," she said. "There is
serious concern that this could
result in an accident similar to the
one at Chernobyl."
Oleksiak said the Hanford reactor has a graphite core, like the one
which burned and damaged the fuel
rods at the Chernobyl facility April
26. And because of fuel failures, the
plant has been shut down six times
since January, she said.
Experts at a May 19 federal hearing in Portland criticized both the
reactor's graphite core and metallic
uranium fuel as making the plant
potentially more dangerous than its
Soviet counterpart.
Another major worry was the
plant's confinement structure,
designed to withstand pressures of
only five pounds per square inch,
while the Chernobyl facility was
made to withstand over 25, and
American commercial reactors
commonly call for 60.
An additional strain on the reactor, said Oleksiak, was its modification in 1980 to produce nuclear
weapons grade plutonium.
And in the period from January
1985 to June 1986 there were 16
"unusual occurences at the N reactor. In November 1985, for exam
ple, a set of bolts attached to valves
in the plant's primary cooling
system came loose, rattled through
the reactor and were never found.
Oleksiak said the N reactor was
the last of nine plutonium production plants still operating at the 570
square mile Hanford nuclear reservation, located near the junction of
the Yakima and Columbia rivers in
southeastern Washington.
The complex manufactured the
plutonium for the Nagasaki bomb
and over 60 per cent of the nation's
plutonium since then, she said.
Oleksiak documented a number
of other accidents at the Hanford
complex including the release of
plutonium oxide in 1984 and the
spill  of  over   1,500,000 litres  of
radioactive fluid during the
plutonium-uranium separation process in the 1970s.
Oleksiak said Hanford still seems
the favored choice in the current
selection of a dump site for over
70,000 tonnes of nuclear waste,
although the combination of waste
storage and plutonium processing
facilities is a deadly one.
"One parallel occurred in the
Urals in the Soviet Union in 1958,
when there was a huge explosion involving plutonium processing
facilities and radioactive waste
storage. We don't know a lot about
that accident, but we do know that
the plutonium processing plant was
built as a copy, pipe by pipe, of the
extraction plant at Hanford."
Candidates rated
SMILING VET PINS poppy on smiling student, who would no doubt agree that wearing a poppy commemorates the fallen of past wars, and their commitment to the ideals of peace and freedom. The Legion will
continue to distribute poppies until Remembrance Day around UBC.
By BRAD NEWCOMBE
A campaign to allow every voter
in B.C. to grade each candidate in
the next federal election according
to where he or she stands on peace
and disarmament issues is underway.
Thirty thousand "peace vote"
pledge cards have been distributed
to B.C. residents by a coalition of
B.C. peace groups and more are being printed.
The 'Peace Vote' Pledge Campaign is part of an election strategy
to highlight disarmament issues and
to pressure politicians to take a
stand on nuclear issues said vice-
president of End The Arms Race,
Shana Lambert.
The grassroots movement is co-
sponsored by End The Arms Race,
a coalition of 320 peace support
groups in B.C., including UBC's
Students for Peace and Mutual
Disarmament, and the Coalition of
Riding Committees.
Everyone who signs the pledge
cards will receive a detailed account
Vancouver will definitely be a target in WW HI
By JANICE IRVING
The sound is so loud and the one megaton
ground burst missile could have exploded on
campus instead of its target of Vancouver International Airport.
Every window in Gage Towers shatters
simultaneously as the buildings crumple in upon
themselves.
A student lies in the nearby parking lot —
huge shards of shattered glass protruding from
her body.
Others were crushed by the Buchanan Tower
as it fell.
SUB is a concrete heap, like every other
building on campus, except the wooden ones —
they are on fire from the distant heat surge.
Another student, suffering second-degree
burns screams when he discovers he has been
blinded from watching the blast.
Black smoke rises from the South part of the
burning Endowment Lands.
Another distant explosion from Vancouver
Harbour resounds as a one megaton air burst
destroys most ofthe lower mainland, from UBC
to Simon Eraser University.
A hurricane-like wind whips dust and radioactive debris everywhere.
There is another explosion as a half megaton
air burst hits Port Moody and Coquitlam.
In a matter of minutes, 90 per cent of the people in the lower mainland are dead or dying.
On campus, about 60 per cent of the population is dead.
The city of Vancouver is smouldering rubble.
This is only the first assault of World War III.
Crawford Killian is a man with a manuscript
— but no publisher.
The writer, columnist and Capilano College
professor, has writen a manuscript called No
Man's Land, about Canada in the Third World
War.
Kilian has successfully published several
science fiction novels as well as last year's
"School Wars", an analysis of the education
system in B.C., but editors won't publish No
Man's Land because it's "too grim" says Kilian.
He says he wrote the manuscript in an attempt
to replace Canadian's fears about war with
facts.
Vancouver would be hit by about
2!/2 megatons, which is the equivalent of almost
200 Hiroshimas, according to Kilian's research.
B.C. post-nuclear war survivors of the first
strike would live in small communities far from
any industrial centres because these would be
destroyed, he says.
". . .They would have to make B.C. unable to
sustain a large population with an industrial
economy. That means destroying its agriculture,
forests, mines and manufacturing as well as the
greatest possible number of its most highly skilled people," Kilian wrote in a 1985 Province
newspaper story.
He says the war would end only when both
combatants — the U.S. and the Soviets are
unable to continue fighting.
"Missile warfare is based on the use it or lose
it theory," he says, because if missiles are not
launched in the first seven minutes, they never
will be.
Hit by a total of 10 megatons, B.C. could be
considered "lucky" when compared to it's sister
U.S. coastal city, Los Angeles, which would te
hit by 251 megatons, Kilian says.
"Survivors would have no water, no electricity and little food," Kilian writes. "Many would
be severely burned, maimed, and in shock. Those
exposed to lethal doses of fallout (debris from
the explosions) would die within two or three
days. Those with less severe doses would suffer
vomiting, diarrhea and other symptoms. With
adequate care they would recover, but with
weakened immune systems and a strong chance
of developing cancer.
Vancouver and its surrounding mountains
would be destroyed in a firestorm which could
cause a nuclear winter, or in B.C.'s case, a
"nuclear autumn," says Kilian. This would be
less severe than the intense cold the rest of the
continent would endure.
But, Killian says B.C. would suffer violent
hurricanes, acid and radioactive rain, contaminating virtually all fresh water.
Society as we know it would be gone, he says,
and survivors would exist in feudal conditions,
struggling to survive.
Some local peace organizations have recently
expressed concern about the increased number
of U.S. warships which visit Vancouver.
Kilian says even if Vancovuer does not
become a U.S. naval base it will be at risk.
"We'd still be a target."
The only way a nuclear holocaust can be
avoided is if Canadians banc together and lobby
the Federal government to stop all activities that
promote war, including the manufacture and
sale of plutonium, he says.
"We must put steady pressure on our politicians if we are to survive this," he says. "We
can't afford to blindly follow the Americans
anymore."
of federal candidates' positions on
the presence of ships carrying
nuclear warheads in Canadian
waters, NATO low-level flight
testing of bombers in Labrador,
continued testing of the cruise
missile, Canada's participation in
Star Wars and a comprehensive
nuclear weapons test ban.
"We are putting in place a structure through which the peace movement can operate and channel its
concerns," said Lambert.
The campaign was launched in
April 1986 following the September
Walk for Peace, a door-to-door
canvass which took place in Vancouver to raise awareness of nuclear
issues. The group initiating the
campaign is non-partisan and "will
never tell anyone how to vote," said
Lambert.
By receiving federal ministers
responses to the cards, and knowing
the stance of opposition candidates,
citizens will be able to vote intelligently in the next federal election and encourage the Canadian
government to adopt policies consistent with the goals of End The
Arms Race, said Lambert.
The campaign also seeks to press
for the reduction and eventual
elimination of all nuclear weapons
and the money saved will be
diverted to fund human needs instead .
Thomas Perry Sr., a UBC professor in the faculty of medicine
and a campaign volunteer, is active
in the Vancouver-Quadra riding
monitoring what Opposition
Leader John Turner 'says or
doesn't say' on peace issues. He
gives Turner almost "zero marks"
on any issue relating to peace and
disarmament.
The local Vancouver riding committee involved in the "peace vote"
campaign has met with Turner on
several occasions, and Perry said
Turner has said on record he sup-
portes the testing of the cruise
missile. He has also held back on insisting Canada urge the U.S. to stop
nuclear weapons testing and respond positively to the Soviet concessions on test bans proposed at
Reykjavik.
The "peace vote" campaign involves many volunteers and needs
broad public support because, "the
prevention of nuclear war should be
the primary issue for all
Canadians," said Perry.
He believes that it is "criminal"
that billions of dollars are being
wasted on arms while people suffer
around the world, including the
thousands of families in B.C. who
rely on food banks to survive. Page 2
-iU
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7,1986
Uranium mining protested
By ROSS McLAREN
B.C. environment groups say
they will protest if B.C. uranium exploration starts again next spring
after a seven-year moratorium.
Uranium mining will be brought
up next month when a government
task force meets mining industry officials to discuss ways to revitalize
the ailing industry, said Jake
Banky, B.C. government communication branch director.
But environmental groups
haven't been invited to participate
in the task force with the B.C. Mining Associations the Coal Association of B.C. and the B.C. and
Yukon Chamber of Mines.
Uranium exploration in B.C. was
discontinued seven years ago when
citizen groups in the Interior and
national environmental groups like
Greenpeace and the Sierra club protested.
The goups said existing
technology was not capable of
preventing uranium in tailing ponds
from "leeching" into rivers and
lakes used for drinking water.
Katy   Madsen,   a   Sierra   club
RED LEAF
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Mon.-Fri.  11:30-9:00 p.-n
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays   '
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Opposite Chevron Station
THE UNIVERSITY
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FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
THE
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NOVEMBER 12 - 25
Matinees - Nov. 20& 25 at 12:30p.m.
Special Previews/Nov. 12 & 13
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Box Office * Frederic Wood Theatre * Room 207
Transcendental
Meditation
Find Out How You Can
• Reduce stress and anxiety
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Attend a Special Free
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Mon., Nov. 10, 12:30 p.m.
Buchanan B212
Students International
Meditation Society
263-2655
member involved in the 1979 protest, said the Kelowna Health Unit
found abnormally high levels of
radiation in Kelowna's drinking
water after several companies drilled for uranium near Kelowna's
watershed.
Then—premier Bill Bennett applied the moratorium as a result.
"It is clearly the mood of the
people of this province that they are
not prepared to live with uranium
mining," he said at the time.
Now that the moratorium is near
its end, the mining industry is
pushing for uranium exploration.
Jack Patterson, managing director of the B.C. and Yukon
Chamber of Mines, said the
moratorium was a mistake that put
B.C. mining back ten years.
"Uranium mining is as safe as
driving a car. If the conditions are
safe, if the car is safe, and safe
drivers are on the road, there will be
no accidents," he said.
Poppies to remember
Poppies are shooting up all over
campus, but don't worry, UBC is
not in danger of becoming an
opium den.
Veterans from the Point Grey
Royal Canadian Legion are selling
decorative versions of the symbolic
flower in order to support needy
veterans.
The veterans, who sell the flowers
every year to honor those who died
in combat for Canada, say the
response from the unversity has
been "most generous".
The veterans will be in SUB today
and will visit Safeways throughout
Vancouver.
One veteran said the response this
year has been "tremendous."
"They even chased me to get a
poppy." He said he was "unsure if
(his female pursuer) wanted a poppy or a date."
There will be a Remembrance service at the War Memorial Gym on
Tuesday at 11 a.m. and members
from the West Point Grey branch
of the Legion will be representees
there.
CATCH
CARL WOLFSON
tonight at
THE COMEDY
SHOPPE
at the Skyline
Shows: 8 & 10 p.m.
Call
278-5161
for reservations
SKYLINE AIRPORT
HOTEL
3031 No. 3 Road, Richmond
MULTIPLY YOUR
EMPLOYMENT
OPPORTUNITIES
Copy your resume at Kinko's. A lot
of companies would like to know
about you, and our low prices on
quality copies will help you reach
them.
kinko's
GREAT COPIES GREAT PEOPLE
5706 University Blvd.
222-1688
M-TH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
LECTURE
DR. WILDER-SMITH
World-renowned scientist,
author, movie producer
"Why I, As A Natural
Scientist, Am A Christian"
SAT., NOV. 8
7:30 p.m.
Auditorium—Gladtidings
3456 Fraser St.,
Vancouver
Free will donation at door
SPONSORED BY CREATION SCIENCE ASSOC.
MORE
FREE WORKSHOPS
TIME MANAGEMENT
A one hour introduction to methods of improving
your use of time.
Monday,    Nov.    17   or   Wednesday,    Nov.
19—12:30-1:30 p.m.
PREPARING FOR EXAMS
An examination of various methods of preparing
for and writing exams.
Tuesday,    Nov.    18    or    Thursday,    Nov.
20—12:30-1:30 p.m.
Workshops are free. Interested students should sign up at:
STUDENT COUNSELLING AND
RESOURCES CENTRE
Room 200, Brock Hall
h .*♦> mm$w®%®®mt!®
University of Alberta
Scholarships for
Graduate Studies
University of Alberta is a large university and research center offering a full range of academic programs to over 28.000 students.
Approximately 3.500 students are pursuing graduate studies through
the 75 departments which belong to the Faculty of Graduate Studies
and Research.
University of Alberta offers a large array of scholarships to superior
graduate students, including the following:
1. Graduate Faculty Fellowship - an additional $2,000 per annum to
all graduate students who hold major awards from MRC,
NSERC, and SSHRC.
2. Approximately 60 Province of Alberta Graduate Scholarships and
Fellowships valued at $8,100 - $9,300.
3. Approximately 20 Dissertation Fellowships of $11.500 for completing Ph.D. students.
4. 20 Andrew Stewart Prizes of $2,500 to senior Ph.D. students in
recognition of excellent research.
5. Over 140 Alberta Heritage Medical Research Foundation Studentships of $12,000 (plus $2,500 research grant) to graduate
students in the medical sciences.
6. Approximately 20 Izaak Walton Killam Memorial Scholarships of
$11,500 available to Canadian and international graduate students.
7. Many  more  major and  minor awards listed in  the  Graduate
Calendar.
In  addition,  we  have  a  fully  competitive  program  of  graduate
assistantships for teaching and research, and a program of research
travel support available to students.
For further information write to:
Graduate Registrar
Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research
University of Alberta
Edmonton. Alberta T6G 2J9
SHARP
DAY
Wednesday, Nov. 12
Demonstrations will include the powerful SHARP PC7000
Portable Computer and SHARP TYPEWRITERS. Sharp
Representatives will be at the Bookstore from 10:00 a.m. ■
3:00 p.m. to answer your technical questions.
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20% off all Duracell Batteries until Dec. 24/86
BOOKSTORE Friday, November 7, 1986
THE    UBYoSEY
Page 3
Student proposes new agenda
By RICK HIEBERT
Robert Sanzalone, a third year
Arts major, is running for a position on the Vancouver School
Board in the November 15
municipal election. The Nonpartisan Association candidate
wants to increase education funding, help reform the School Board
and promote a city-wide high
school student council.
"I'd like to represent a different
part of the community — the
students," Sanzalone said. A student perspective would be a "different perspective and, 1 think, a
valuable one."
Sanzalone, who ran as an independent for the School Board in
1984, said "I observed that there
was definitely a need for more
money. Teachers weren't screaming
for nothing." There was something
wrong with that policy, he said.
"I think there's i
needed, but you can't
COPE (the Commi
gressive Electors) wa
said Sanzalone.
"If you're going
scream at someone, ;
ing to get anything ac
you can sit down a
say 'look, this is \
more,' then maybe ;
somewhere," he said
nore funding
get ii the way
ttee of Pro-
its to do it,"
to sit and
ou'rc not go-
hieved. But if
nd negotiate,
yhy we need
'ou might get
Sanzalone said the confrontational approach of the COPE majority on the School Board led the
Socreds to dissolve it in 1985.
Sanzalone argues for reform of
the Vancouver School Board: "The
administrative element of the Vancouver School Board is top heavy,
and there's a lot of inefficiencies in
the administration. We want to funnel all resources to the classroom."
He said an NPA controlled
School Board would examine this
administrative problem and "if we
find it necessary, we'll streamline
it."
Sanzalone also likes the idea of a
city-wide student council, with one
representative, probably the student
council president, from each of the
city's 18 high schools. This council,
said Sanzalone, could give students
a forum to discuss education issues
and would help guarantee student
input into the-system.
Sanzalone doesn't think much of
Students Allied for Vancouver
Education, the high school group
concerned with education restraint.
"Most of the people, most of the
students involved with SAVE are
sons or daughters or friends of, it
they aren't people who are very
closely related to, COPE. They're
like the COPE farm team," he said.
Sanzalone commented on the
planned city-wide student conference on education planned by
SAVE for November 13.
"The reason why they are putting
it (the conference) together is to
legitimatize themselves and their
own policies. They're not representative of the student's opinions at
all. They're going to go to the
media and say "this is what the
students of Vancouver think, but
it's not."
Carling ties kept
NURSING FULLBACK RUNS downfield while chased by Home Ec.
during the annual Tea Cup football game yesterday.
— rory a   photo
defender. The two faculties locked horns
By CORINNE BJORGE
A motion to sever business ties
with Carling O'Keefe and
Rothmans products because of their
South American connections was
defeated Wednesday by student
council.
The motion, which required a
two-thirds majority to pass, was
defeated 23-13. AMS director of
finance Jamie Collins said Carling
sales in the Pit Pub and Gallery
Lounge are about $270,000 a year
— 30 per cent of total bar sales.
AMS president Simon Seashadri
has said that council makes decisions that affect students as
students while apartheid affects
students as people.
Michael Moeti of Students for a
Free South Africa, said he was appalled by council's decision not to
boycott Carling.
"They took no account of the
outside world", he said. "They
seemed more pre-occupied in how it
would hurt themselves."
Don Holubitsky, Board of
Governors student representative,
cautioned council against moral absolutes. "In the case where there is
not the possibility of a moral
choice, then the AMS should take
U.S. government pushing Stair Wars research
By JOHN GUSHUE
Canadian University Press
OTTAWA (CUP) — The U.S.
government is pushing for completion of Strategic Defence Initiative
research, despite protests from the
world research community, say
some researchers.
David Parnas, the University of
Victoria computer scientist who
became a celebrity last year when he
resigned from a panel advising on
SDI software, says the U.S. government is awarding Star Wars contracts to most any researcher,
regardless of their qualifications.
"They're supporting a lot of second rate work. I've had some insight into the work (so far), and it's
quite second rate," said Parnas,
now at Queen's University in
Kingston.
Although many prominent scientists have denounced Star Wars as
unfeasible, and in many cases immoral, Parnas said the Reagan administration "has studiously ignored" anti-SDI petitions.
Parnas resigned from the advisory panel saying it is impossible
to design software that will match
the Pentagon's demands for first -
time success.
"We have never had software
that works completely the first time
that it's used," said Parnas.
"And there's no way that this
software would work on the first
time, and there wouldn't be a se
cond time," he said.
Petitions against SDI were circulated last year on several Canadian campuses, including McMaster,
Waterloo and British Columbia.
Researchers at McGill recently signed a petition to refuse SDI funding.
The Mulroney government decided a year ago that although Canada
would not participate directly in the
program, Canadian researchers and
businesses were eligible to compete
for lucrative Star Wars grants.
However, John Hepburn, a laser
specialist who signed the petition at
the University of Waterloo, fears
the petition did little to affect
government military policy.
"They were well received in the
academic community, but they
weren't (by government)," said
Hepburn. "I think they were put in
a box and left there."
Hepburn doubts there is much
Star Wars research in Canada. "I'd
be surprised if nobody (in Canada)
had any money, but I'd be more
surprised if there's a lot of money
here," he said.
But Hepburn said if there is Star
Wars money in Canada, it is due
more to the poor status of research
here than opposition to the program.
"Why should they bother with
Canadian universities? They're falling apart. They'd do better with the
Americans or the Japanese," said
Hepburn.
Allan Sharp, pres dent of the
Canadian Association of University
Teachers, fears an exodus of top
Canadian research talent, heading
for research dollars in the U.S.
"The research clim.ite in Canada
is so terrible, that it's not surprising
that people go south of the border
where there's money," said Sharp.
"We disagree very strongly with
Canadian participation in Star
Wars," he said. "That's not where
research efforts should be going,
but it's inevitable that some will
leave."
r
B> COR1NNE BJORGE
B.C. Transit shauld introduce special fares for post-secondary
students and improve bus routes, said Civic Independants municipal
candidate Sandra Bruneau.
"We must establish a regional transit authority so that local
citizens make decisions, not far-away bureacrates," she said.
Bruneau, a UBC faculty advisor and student placement coordinator, said her work with students has given her an understanding
Of issues that concern them.
"I think I should speak to the academic community and students
in particular...I'm concerned about accessiblity to education," she
said.
Bruneau said the civic Independent party provides a balanced addition to council.
- "Bill Yee is in touch with the Pacific Rim, David Levi has a
business background and I have a lot of connections with women's
groups," she said.
Bruneau feels comfortable with the cooperative campaign run by
the civic Independents and COPE.
•   "I support a number of their issues, <fbut I won't.be bound by
COPE," she said.
Stressing the importance of women geing involved in politics,
Bruneau said conewned women should get involved in the political
process.
Bruneau is also concerned about Post-Expo development.
"It will take special measures for Vancouver to lure and keep new
jobs and business."
action".
But a handout from Students for
a Free South Africa says that the
argument against making a moral
choice was "silly." It says individual students did not have
freedom to choose which breweries
the Pit deals with.
Council member Phil Ross said
the debate centres on who the AMS
chooses to do business with.
"Retail sales is not an a moral
act," he said.
A count of faculty representatives who had approached their
constituents on the question of a
boycott showed the majority were
against AMS approval of the motion.
Moeti said that the constituent
vote against the motion was due to
a lack of information.
"We were not invited to participate in discussions by the
representatives," he said.
Seshadri disagreed. "At this time
they (the faculties) got as balanced a
view as they're going to get. They're
pretty indicative of the views on
campus. . .I'm surprised that Moeti
said that considering that he was
quite ready to have council vote on
it at the previous meeting without
all the information in front of
them," said Seshadri.
Council passed a separate motion
condemning apartheid and considered a motion to send $500 to
South Africa through the International Defence and Aid Fund which
gives assistance to political
prisoners and their families.
Several council members backed
the motion as a more concrete action than economic sanctions.
But John Graham, Oxfam official, said economic sanctions were
more important than giving $500.
Moeti agreed.
"What is $500 going to do when
you prop up a company (like Carling)," he said. "It's an insult to the
oppressed in South Africa."
The decision to send $500 was
tabled by council until further
research could be done into the
fund.
Council also passed a motion to
hold a referendum in the issue during the student elections on January
28-30. The referendum will ask
students to vote on a boycott of
Carling and Rothmans' products. It
will require a quorum of ten per
cent of the students, with a 50.1 per
cent majority vote.
Moeti said he was optimistic the
referendum would show students
support a boycott.
Seshadri said that the result of
the referendum would depend a lot
on the voter turnout. "It seems that
in emotional votes like this, holding
the referendum with the election
will give a better voter turnout and
a more representative view of campus." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Peace
Friday, November 7, 1986
Despite Canada's claim to be a nuclear
weapons free country, our harbours continue to
be invaded by American ships, often nuclear
powered and carrying nuclear arms.
There are two reasons to be alarmed about
this. The first is the possibility of an accident.
U.S. submarines coming into B.C.'s harbours
are powered by nuclear reactors slightly less than
one-tenth the size of the one at Chernobyl.
What's more, these reactors are uncontained
since it is unfeasible for a submarine to carry
enough concrete to make an encasement.
Nuclear reactors are prone to meltdowns, and
there is no reason that what happened at Three
Mile Island and at Chernobyl could not soon be
happening in Vancouver.
What is even more disturbing, is that by allowing U.S. warships into our harbours, we are
assisting the development of American first
strike capability. Right now, all that stands between the USA and a successful first strike is
Soviet missile carrying submarines which would
retain the ability to strike even after the USSR
itself was incapacitated.
But U.S. submarines in Nanoose Bay and
Vancouver Island are now perfecting tactical
weapons which would enable them to track
down and destroy Soviet subs, facilitiating a
U.S. first strike.
The Canadian government has a policy which
bans nuclear weapons from the country. There is
no reason why American warships should be
allowed to contravene this policy.
Admitting nuclear armed ships and submarines while claiming to be a nuclear weapons
free state is nothing short of hypocrisy.
Canadian lives are endangered, and the arms
race is being promoted because our government
lacks the conviction to enforce its policies. If
Canada's decision to be free of nuclear weapons
was serious, ships carrying nuclear weapons
would not be tolerated in our harbours.
V - T Jf
CASC cops out on cruddy smut in Pit Pub
Coalition Against Sexism on
Campus, where hast thou gone?
That bastion of righteousness
which we have come to trust to defend our interests in all matters concerning truth, justice, dnd the
academic way (not to mention protect us from all things sexist and
degrading), appears to have
deserted us in this, our greatest
hour of need.
Why, just last night I happened
by the SUB, looking forward to a
much needed (though not entirely
deserved) frosty cool one, when my
unprepared senses were assaulted
by an heinous act against humanity.
It was (you guessed it) "ladies
night" on campus!
As I stood before the door of the
offending establishment my
thoughts alternated between indignation (from being barred from
entry merely because of my sex) and
horror (as I contemplated the depths to which some poor, defenseless
male strippers were being
degraded). Why, the scene practically demanded intervention by
those   stalwart   Crusaders   Against
Smut and Crud.
Surely, I thought, such a scene of
wanton immorality and human
degradation would justify intervention by CASC on behalf of those
unfortunates who might stumble inadvertently upon the place, or those
who derive profit or pleasure from
the unfolding display.
Was it just last year, I asked
myself, that the above group successfully campaigned in the (permanent?) cancellation of a certain
equestrian event, held annually by
that irreverent mob, the engineers?
Surely this latest display, taking
place in similar public place, should
also merit the same fierce opposition?
Apparently not, my ideals were
dismayed to admit. Perhaps it was
the choice in location which spared
Wednesday's festivities from the
brunt of CASC's wrath. After all, a
horse-and motor-cade down Main
Mall is far more visible and accessible by those who might blunder
upon the offending sight.
Pity the poor fool who is unfortunate enough to stumble into the
path of the parade, oblivious to the
sounds of band and crowd alike as
he walks, perhaps engrossed in a
book of medieval English history.
How shocked he would be to
"accidentaly" push his way
through the throng (traditionally
one of the largest during the
academic year) just in time to
glimpse the back of a professional
stripper, likely as not to be at least
partially clad against the cold. The
mind boggles.
Likewise, the poor waif being
abused on the horse bears no
resemblance to the much more acceptable entertainment on display
in the warm interior of the SUB, the
closed door to which now stood
before me.
Illusions shattered, I sadly shuffled off to more moral climes, while
an inescapable conclusion formed
disturbingly in my mind: perhaps
CASC was not after all the objective crusader persuing tirelessly all
affronts to man's dignity. I guess
there ain't no such thing as a hero
no more. Ron Byres
Grad Studies, Civil Engineering
IR students ponder program
"Registration is crazy! ... I can't
get into a seminar ... I won't
graduate! ... I can't believe that
there are people in my seminar who
never open their mouths — what's
the use of having them in the class?
. . . Am 1 supposed to specialize in a
particular area? . . . Can you actually get a degree in International
Relations?"
These questions surface constantly in the realm of the International
Relations (I.R.) program UBC. The
program, which has yet to obtain
departmental status, is an interdisciplinary one which a student can
enter after two years. Courses are
Race faces feces and the future
My recent research into the past
history of the Chariot Race has
revealed some interesting facts
which have been unknown for
years. According to newspaper articles and photographs, the first
Chariot Race occurred in 1952
along the Main Mall. It was initially
an event that raised money for
various charities. The race proceeded without undue violence and no
feces thrown around. Since then,
people have almost lost arms, broke
legs, had their faces blown apart by
fire crackers, and suffered from
concussions. Before this the
Chariot Race was a respected event,
and many people participated
besides Engineers. The race used to
be a part of homecoming and was
encouraged by faculty and administration alike. This is not the
case today. Over the years the
Chariot Race has deteriorated into
obscurity and is ignored by university administration and many
students.
I can understand why the univer-
THE UBYSSEY
November 7, 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Brrrrlng. "Hello?"
"Hello there! This Is Rockin David Ferman of CRUD radio and we rock Ruskin. We'll give you, Mr.
Svetozar Kontic, $5 million and the keys to Evelyn Jacob's Peanut mobile If you can name all the people who helped on this issue of the Ubyssey in 30 seconds, starting NOW!"
"Uh... Malcolm Pearson, Jennifer Lyall, Corinne Bjorge, Michael Groberman, Robert Beynon,
Scott MacDonald, Patricia Foster, James Young, Ross McLaren, Janice Irving, Peter MacDougatl,
Brad Newcombe ... oh God! Only Fifteen Seconds left! . . . Uhhh Peter BerlinShariBteAb-
dullahCassandraFreemanSharonKnappAdamJonesRonStewart and ... the red-haired gomerthat
wears glasses . . . smells like decomposing fish . . . Uh . . ."
"NEEEEFT. Sorry Mr. Kontic, not fast enough! Now here's that number one hit you've been asking
for all morning, it's Little Dougie Dundas'" I was cleaning out the treatment plant when the smell
reminded me of Guess Who?"
sity would be embarrassed about a
bunch of drunken college students
throwing cow feces at each other.
For all of you who may be
wondering, how did the feces get incorporated into the race? The Aggies were responsible for bringing
feces in to the race in the late 1950s.
It is unfortunate that such a unique
race among Canadian universities
has been degraded to the low level
that it is at today. I think its time
that we all re-evaluate what sort of
public image we would like to portray the true "tradition" of the
Chariot Race. I would like to suggest a Charity Chariot Race for
Rick Hansen. I think its about time
that councils at this university take
the initiative and help Science to
restore the Chariot Race to its
former respected state. Anyone
from any faculty wishing further information on history of Chariot
Races, or anyone interested in helping to organize this worthy cause,
please see Brian Pataky in the SUS
office in CPAX. (228-4626).
May I take this opportunity to
thank Iolanda Weisz, of UBC Archives, for her patience, help and
support in gathering the above information.
Brian Pataky
SUS 2nd Vice Prez.
taken from several faculties, including Political Science, History,
and Economics.
There are approximately 180
students majoring in IR, a dramatic
increase from about 50 students only five years ago (260%). With program enrolment skyrocketing, the
time is opportune to assess the
IR program and its weaknesses and
implement changes.
A recurring problem is that
students in lower level arts courses
have never heard about IR. Many
of us in the program now simply
stumbled upon and were immediately drawn into this
fascinating field. It was easy enough
to gain admission, there arc no
academic requirements and few
prerequisites. We then, almost randomly, chose courses from the huge
list given  IR accreditation.
Many students in an IR program
find that there is a lack of structure,
focus, and academic standards.
Many fourth year seminars have no
prerequisites and students are
graduating  without  knowledge of
what most would consider "fundamental".
The IR Students Association (IR-
SA) among its various other
endeavours, has taken on the task
of compiling information and
preparing a proposal suggesting
changes to the program. To begin
this we have a "suggestion
envelope" outside the Institute of
International Relations office in
Buchanan C'456. On behalf of the
IRSA I would like to encourage
students who are in or have an interest in IR to submit any ideas concerning curricula changes, academic
standards or prerequisites — for entrance to courses, restructuring of
the program, language requirements, etc., by November 4.
Please put your suggestions in the
envelope outside of Buchanan C
456 by Tuesday, November 4, or
come to our meetings, every Tuesday at 12:30 in International
House. (228-5021).
What's IR? Lets' make this question an anomoly. Margie Parikh
President, IRSA
Always check your sources
I am the advertising manager
for SUBFILMS presented by the
UBC Film Society. When 1 was
running Sunday's film, F/X, I
was surprised to find people
showing up at 9:30 expecting to
see a second show. However,
no second show had been
advertised. I would like to
apologize to our patrons who
came Sunday only to be turned
away. To prevent this from happening again, various sources
of information are available.
These sources provide information about the movie itself, the
dates, and show times. The
sources are listed below starting with the most reliable:
— SUBFILMS display case
across from the Gallery Lounge
in SUB.
— Poster above the entrance to
the SUB Auditorium.
— Weekly posters  found around
campus.
— Term Flyers
— Ubyssey's tween classes
— Poster   on   the   roof   outside
the front of SUB.
I would like to take this opportunity to warn people that the
schedule for the last six films of
this term has been changed to
take advantage of new releases
that have just been made
available to us. A new flyer,
green in color, has been
prepared and will be posted
around campus this week. We
would like to encourage all
students, faculty and staff to
come out and enjoy these great
movies. Please check one of the
sources above to confirm the
movie and the show times.
Keith MacCrimmon
I BC Film SocieH Friday, November 7, 1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Start spread in'
the news
an interview with Nicola Cavendish
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
N
steve chan photo
CAVENDISH, AWAKENED BY her interviewer, apologizing
for sleeping through the appointed hour.
steve chan photo
CAVENDISH AS SHE appeared during the interview.
Painting and sculpture merge
By SHARON KNAPP
Yvonne Parent's Carousel project mesmerized the crowd at its
opening at the Pitt Gallery on Tues^
day. The almost lifesize red
carousel features 16 large reindeer
cutouts moving backwards, while
the deer reflected in the band of
mirrors at the carousel's centre,
move forward at a graceful gallop.
gallery
Carousel Project
By Yvonne Parent
Pitt International Galleries
until November 22
It's a fact of animation, and the
contradictions between the
backwards and forwards motion fit
into Parent's intentions for the
piece.
She explained, "I wanted to say
something optimistic this -time,
since most of my previous work has
been pretty bleak, so I used the
carousel, which is the epitome of
optimism and sweetness.
"The reindeer represent the contradictions we find around us; we
can't escape our past, it's part of
our moving forwards. Even when
we're going through a bad cycle,
repeating old patterns, life keeps on
going. The reindeer, which are wild
animals, also recall the seasonal
cycles."
The highlight of the evening was
Parent's use of strobe lights on the
piece. Suddenly, the cutouts and
the reflections both appeared to be
moving forwards in their separate
directions, and sent giant shadows
racing around the walls of the
gallery.
Parent was inspired by Edward
Muybridge's 19th century motion
studies. With the help of a series of
cameras, Muybridge won a bet by
proving that at one point in the
gallop, all four horses' hooves leave
the ground.
Muybridge went on to record a
series of motion studies of people
and animals, including reindeer.
The photos were frequently
mounted on cardboard cylinders
called zootropes. When spun, they
created the illusion of movement.
Why reindeer on a carousel?
"I've been using reindeer in my art
for the last five years," said Parent,
"For some people, deer are a sexual
reference. Myself, I find it easy to
identify with the deer. They're very
easy to personify."
While Parent began as a painter,
she started to explore the area between painting and sculpture in 1984
with several lifesize origami deer
made from tarpaper. The Explorations Grant she received from the
Canada Council the following year
allowed her to continue her experiments.
In Carousel, black and white
paint blend on the reindeer's flat
plywood bodies in a way that recalls
sketching practices. The gallery
walls continue the black and white
theme with figure studies from
Greek mythology, which Parent
discovered was prominent in the
carousel's early history.
Painting and sculpture merge in
the carousel's mirrors; the muted
greys provide a perfect backdrop
for the crisp outlines of the moving
deer.
In addition to the Carousel Project, an unusual installation of
David Pan's African influenced
paintings and sculpture and Jim
Campbell's painted bas reliefs have
also opened at the Pitt. This combination provides the strongest
showing at the Pitt, since last summer, and it's worth a visit before it
closes November 22.
icola Cavendish explains that director Brian Bedford "saw me do this
15 year old disturbed girl and decided I'd be perfect for the maid."
The Vancouver actress was offered the role in a Broadway production of Blithe Spirit, opposite
Geraldine Page and Richard
Chamberlain, set to open this
winter. The offer was made eight
months ago, but she did not make a
decision until two weeks ago.
The thought of going to Broadway was not immediately appealing.
"I like greenery, I like to be able
to say, 'fuck this, I need to get
out of here...' What I'm apprehensive about is that six and a half
months in New York will cause a
small sort of schism in me, like a
crack in the plaster at the top of my
brain."
Cavendish grew up in the
Okanagan, leaving home to find
herself at UBC. She found theatre
instead.
Four years and one degree later,
she got work with a short-lived
young company at the Vancouver
Playhouse.
After years as a Playhouse
regular, Cavendish embarked on a
new career as a writer: North Shore
Live, which she wrote and performed with Tom Wood in 1981.
Cavendish left Vancouver to take
the role of Eliza Dolittle in the
Shaw Festival's Pygmalion in 1982.
More Shaw shows followed. She is
currently a regular cast member of
C.B.C.'s Red Serge Wives.
Last Christmas, the Arts Club
produced It's Snowing on Saltspring, written by Nicola Cavendish. It
will be restaged this Christmas.
Tomorrow night, Cavendish
opens in David King's new comedy,
Life Skills, at the Firehall Theatre.
It is a two-person comedy in which
the actors play many different
characters, "It feels like a hundred
million characters — a jillion
characters.
"I've done that  sort  of thing
before, and I'm getting old."
But she does like the play. Referring to writer and co-star David
King, she says, "He's a much more
cerebral person than I am. He's
very funny, very clever. There's a
psychology woven between the lines
of his work."
Although she does not find New.
York particularity entincing, she is
amused at the size of the salaries on
Broadway. "The Sex Tips cast is
making $230 a week off
Broadway," she says referring to
the Vancouver play which has been
playing for over a month in New
York.
She describes the role she would
play in Blithe Spirit, "The play is
this big," she says, stretching her
arms far apart, "and my part is this
big," she holds an index finger
close to a thumb. "I'll make $1350
a week (pause) American — put
that in big bold letters."
■ There are two things Cavendish
wants to do "before I go to my
grave or am content to sell apples
without the need to perform." She
wants to perform the one-woman
show she is writing, and she wants
to work in London. "If this opportunity had been in London, I would
have decided like that." She snaps
her fingers.
"I was sitting in the bar at the
Princeton Hotel," she recalls, "and
I was talking to this stranger. I asked him what he did. He asked me
what I did, and we started to gab. I
told him about New York. I didn't
want to go. The love of Broadway
wasn't there. It's not a goal, and it
means leaving the man I live with.
He answered, 'Don't be silly, little
girl. This will be the opportunity of
a lifetime. It'll be over before you
want it to be, and then you'll be
back home."
If you're in New York this spring, look for Noel Coward's Blithe
Spirit starring Richard Chamberlain,
Geraldine Page, and...Nicola
Cavendish.
PORTRAIT OF THE artist with her wooden reindeer.
. donna hagerman photo Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1986
i   THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
BLOW SMOKE
By PETER BERLIN
Five minutes into Round Midnight Dexter Gordon and a small,
high-class band launch into a
distinctive treatment of one of the
most famous film tunes of all.
Round Midnight
Directed by
Bertrand Tavernier
Capitol 6
film
They play As Time Goes By with
a style and structure that
foreshadows the way Bertrand
Tavernier, the director, handles the
whole film.
The musicians toy with the
familiar tune, playing tantilizing
chunks of the melody just as Tavernier plays with the structure of the
movie. Their arrangement is
dominated by the warm*, unhurried
and medidative tenor saxophone of
Gordon just as the whole leisurely,
affectionate film is dominated by
his playing and acting.
Tavernier and his cast and musicians don't just love jazz, they capture its essence in the film without
ever losing sight of its darker
shadings.
The film, set in the late '50s, tells
the simple tale of . an aging,
alcoholic musician, Dale Gordon
who quits New York for one last
roll of the dice in Paris, which at the
time was a haven for black musicians. There, he settles in a hotel
filled with black American musicians presided over by the matriarch
Buttercup, Lanette McKee.
She holds the money from his
concerts and keeps a careful eye on
him. But although she locks him in
his room, she can't protect him
from himself.
Gordon's playing attracts the attention of a penniless French illustrator Francis (Francois Clujet)
for whom jazz has been an inspiration. Francis rescues Dale from the
jails and hospitals where he often
ends up, takes him in and cries over
his bed when he thinks Dale is on
the point of death. That love inspires the musician to renounce
drink and write music again.
But the story, though it is important and moving, is only half of the
movie. It serves to bracket and
enhance the many long jazz
numbers lovingly filmed in smokey
recreations of the cellar jazz clubs
of the era.
Tavernier's camera lingers lovingly over the musicians who include such jazz titans as Herbie
Hancock, Cedar Walton and
Wayne Shorter: all dominated by
Gordon himself.
When the action moves away
from the club, the music lingers on
the soundtrack. Tavernier is not
afraid of long gaps in the dialogue;
he lets the music and his camera
work make up for that. The streets
around the Blue Note club are
studio mock ups reminiscent of
those in Absolute Beginners,
another film infatuated with
recreating the music-scene in 1950s
Europe. But Tavernier also moves
out to the seaside and eventually to
New York where Gordon returns to
face painful, gritty reality.
Some of the acting is a little
awkward but Gordon is marvelous.
His low, growl is indistinct at first
but when one becomes attuned to
his strange slow delivery and eccentric, poetic use of language it
becomes as fascinating as his playing. He seems to choose every word"
as carefully as he picks each note, to
convey accurately and fully the
depth and complexity of his feeling
and his strange, off-centre wisdom.
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
It is misleading that the current
play at the Vancouver Playhouse
bears the same title as the published
diary of a young Jewish girl who
recorded her experiences of hiding
in an attic for two years during the
Holocaust.
The book is a moving,
thoughtful   account   of
an   adolescent's     experience of life
in fear,   and
her hope for a
future. The
play is
an at
tempt to dramatize the domestic life
in which this well-known diarist lived.
The play is a domestic comedy —
black comedy, full of unsubtle
dramatic irony. The only power this
The Diary of Anne Frank
Dramatized  by Frances Goodrich
and Albert Hackett
Directed by William Davis
The   Vancouver   Playhouse   until
November 29
Weak script mars Diary production
pla\   has is  the result  ol   the au
diencc's Lonsiani knowledge ih.n all
ol these people, save \nnc\ l.uhei,
will he killed in Vi/i LOiiwCii-
11.IUOI1   Lj||]|h.
H.inv  MlRGiclmi
Is  CAiClll'lll   lis
Anne's kithci,
11 eating
  „  ., a   L'emle,
loving man who is the dominant
figure in the group which consists
of Mr. and Mrs. Frank, their two
daughters, the Van Daans and their
son Peter, and Mr. Dussell, the dentist.
As Mr. Frank, MacGregor
asserts authority sparingly. He
establishes house rules, which are
rigid, but tempers the rules with a
special warmth. "You must never
go beyond that door. I'm sorry, it
will be hard, I know, but remember
this: there are no chains that anyone
can place on your mind."
He comforts his daughter Anne,
addressing her with love, visibly
struggling to appear in control of a
situation clearly beyond his control:
"You will never have to practice the
piano, it will be a fine life for you
here."
The opening scene is after the
war. Mr. Frank returns to the attic
hiding place for the first time since
the family's arrest and removal to
concentration camps.
MacGregor, without speaking,
establishes his familiarity with the
room, and his discomfort —
something is wrong. He walks slowly, thoughtfully, around the room,
eyeing items that call up memories,
and he weakens, briefly, in recognition.
He finds a scarf hanging on a
post, stares at it, grasps it firmly in
his hands, puts it gently around his
neck, and buries his face in it. He
walks, as in a trance, to a chair and
sits. The first line of the play is
spoken by another character who
enters the room and addresses Mr.
Frank.
The rest of the play is a flashback
as he reads Anne's diary for the
first time.
Robin Stevan is excitable, hyper,
extroverted, and slightly obnoxious
as the thirteen year-old Anne.
She is unlike anyone who would
keep so thoughtful a diary as that
from which the play takes its title.
Voice-overs of Anne reciting
passages from her diary are out of
character for the girl who can't sit
still and often says things without
thinking. Robin Stevan is a talented
actress. Her comedy is funny, her
explosions of rage clearly
developed, her experience of a new
sexual awareness, poignant. But she
never incorporates these facets into
one character. She plays the moment but not the part.
Stevan's problem is not her ability to act, but her ability to create a
character, and one consistant with
the text. One would have thought
that director William Davis would
have exercised some control over
his title character.
But given the general tone of this
shnw , ii appears that instead of trying to
fi counter the text's
| %t ___
tendency to situation comedy by
making the characters more
thoughtful, more aware of the horror outside the walls of their self-
imposed prison, Davis chooses to
play the Holocaust awareness and
domestic strife vignettes as
unrelated. The result is an uneven
comedy with heavy, dramatic
scenes interspersed — scenes which
are effective unto themselves, but
which are incongruent with the
comedy.
Donald B. Scarrow's set, another
realistic monster in the Playhouse
tradition^, misses an essential
thematic point: these people feel
confined. Indeed, living in an attic
with seven other people, albeit a
spacious attic, for two years, must
be a claustrophobic experience. We
have no sense of limited space in the
spacious four-room condo that
stretches across the Playhouse
stage.
The set also thrusts too far forward. During the diary excerpt
voice-overs, the Playhouse curtain
is lowered, and minor set changes
occured. There was much human-
curtain contact as the technical crew
squeezed between the set and the
curtain, The moving curtain was
distracting.
Good in individual vignettes, this
play has a structure that is severely
flawed. And this production, with
some fine acting, ignores the flaws
and presents a play as uneven and
thematically weak as the script
Itself.
=A">*
Nieto captures pride, tension and mystery
:,?v
3s
/
By ADAM JONES
Steve Winwood takes the coliseum stage, and for the next coupte
of hours two generations of rock,
pop and blues c^exts^nto^Wy.
Winwood is over 40 now but he
** singS "^he6 Sptnc^ D^s
wailed   on   the   Spencer    "
Sroup's "Gimme Some Lovm^     a
milennium or so ago. ™ lram
£ the iate Sixties, Winwood turned
out "timeless songs, some of the
ff, including the superb Arc
°fTAhS album, Back in the High
Life marks Winwood's return to
working with a backing bjnd^tt.
"mire   pop   for   now   people,
light on spontaneity.
*- Despite an old
.Traffic chestnut
. for an opener,
k and
Winwood's
eloquent
vocals on
"Slowdown
, Sundown"
from Arc
of A
I Diver, the
concert didn't hit its stride until
halfway through. Winwood is an
aSle enough performer, but a
little stiff without the bank ot
keyboards to hide behind.
Winwood ploughed into "White
You See A Chance," the beautiful
"Arc of A Diver," and a rollicking
"Valerie." Then the dry ice came
Sndled the Joe Walsh guitar hck
with delicious grunginess. Win
Tood yowled. The Coliseum began
to cook.
All eight members of the backup
band  piled around Winwood on a
jaunty multi-level stage scrim, were
first-class. How refreshing it would
be I thought, to see a nice extended
ble  a  chance  to  really  show  its
chops.
Lo and behold, Winwood the
min°d-reader pulled out the Traffic
aeain and things settled into a
Sky' groove ^.Something
called "I'm A Bad Man,   I think.
"Higher Love" closed the show:
one of this year's best singles infectious and unpretentious, "taitlesdy
catchy. Winwood wooed his
SS singer (Dolett, McDonald
lately with Sting on the I*eamot
Ihe Blue Turtles" alburrland war)
He loosened up enough to lead a
Sap-along   with   the   delighted
throng.
The crowd stayed on its feet
thiugh an encore of 'Back in the
Hieh Life Again" and — yes
"G?mme Some LovinV Winwood
rioX off terrific old tune-warp
Irishes on his Hammond organ
and bade us all farewell. I
By CASSANDRA FREEMAN
You have not experienced the
potential for drama in dance until
you have seen flamenco. Enter
Oscar Nieto, artistic director,
dancer and singer for Mozaico
Flamenco Heresy, a group of musi
cians and dancers who performed at
the Vancouver East Cultural Centre
over the Halowe'en weekend.
Halfway through his dance solo,
Allegria, Nieto captures all the
pride, tension, mystery and defiance of this powerful art form.
Nieto's performance is  accom
panied by the dynamic duo of lively
flamenco guitar played by Gerardo
Alcala, and the raw emotive voice
of Spanish cantador, Jose Luis
Lara. Arched like a cobra ready to
strike, Nieto struts slowly and defiantly across the stage, a serious
and trance-like expression engraved
upon his face.
*****" entertains! dance
;modore Ballroom'?tTPedC^'»-   j
,f"nfcy sno        ™; ft was a goojgJ
>Iues Played more/h S'C ChicW
■"* Cotton's CdTannTmen>h
,'P**ed but ?hose p,aCewas»''
were more than * .atte"dancc
,l°n's voicP 7 apPreaative. Co/
'brake a^Tu^ '*e a £ "
lhe Wues abont ey' What ^ i'
, highlight of the?' anyWay- T^ I
fr down" aid's* *« a grin-'
M™nish Boy' r£y rendition oil
,^ow consist 0fbhJ.rehf of the
!dardslike 'Sweet rhb'Uesstan-J
assortment ofthe'tof80' and an
and Left Me'gt^^'s Gone
■7' if"ote4S^ entertain-
blues. *"UMve,  evening 0f
Mozaico Flamenco Heresy
Vancouver East Cultural Center
October 30, 31 and Nov. 1
Suddenly, as if driven by a fierce
necessity, Nieto's feet strike the
floor beating out a series of intricate Spanish rhythms. These percussive notes burst out sharp and
clear despite the rubbery protective
floor covering that inhibits much of
the sound. The power of Nieto's
steps are felt through the seats of
the audience nearby and they watch
entranced, pulled into the drama of
the moment.
In Cafe de Chinitas it is the two
women in the company, Maria Ber-
mudez and La Romera, who release
the spirit of flamenco. Wearing the
traditional frilled flamenco dress
and the authentic anguished expression of the flamenco dancer, Ber-
mudez moves with energy and
elegance, her upper body held proudly above her often feverish footwork.
Next, led by Bermudez and
Nieto's driving rhythmic clapping
La Romera's solo slowly builds up
into a chaotic flurry of heels and
full white skirts. But while
Romera's interpretation is passionate and invigorating her footwork lacks the clarity of the other
dancers.
A problem with Cafe de Chinitas
as well as many of the other
danceworks is the time it takes for
the various themes to develop. In
this work the audience waited too
long for the dancers to begin their
solos. Also there were a few times
during the evening when the drama
of the dances were cut short as in
Maria Bermudez's solo in this same
piece. While the dancing Thursday
night was traditional, the Flamenco
Heresy band lived up to their name
playing a series of latin, Spanish,
flamenco, jazz and afro-cuban
melodies and rhythms with a
heretical combination of instruments.
In Spanish Sunrise the two
acoustic guitars, electric guitar, saxaphone, base, castanets and percussion instruments sounded suprising-
ly well rounded playing together.
While all the band's arrangements were successful musical
mixtures their numbers often went
on too long on the same theme. An
occasional saxaphone or even base
solo would have been welcome but
never materialized.
Whether on their own or together
with the band Andre Thibault, Ian
McConkey, Micheal Dunn and
Gerardo Alcala were wonderfully
proficient on the guitar. In Danza,
Mora Thibault used his technical
expertise in an enchanting and
original way as he reinacted the fall
of the Ottoman Empire — all on his
guitar.
Thibault used his knuckles and
fingers on the wood and strings of
the acoustic guitar to reproduce the
sounds of horses running, soldiers
marching, and cannon balls firing.
These convincing imitations were
woven together with refined versions of British and Turkish
melodies.
Overall, experiencing Mozaico
Flamenco Heresy was an exciting
visual and aural adventure but
because the program was roughly
divided between dance and musical
pieces one left with the sense of seeing two shows that might have been
even more exciting if allowed to
develop more fully on their own.
fc
■* '
NIETO...electrifying. Page 6
THE     WBTOSC
Ttiay,  Move
r-7, ig©6
vista
Cheers to...sherry
Vancouver has a free Arts Hotline where a
living human being, not a recording, answers
all your questions about entertainment. Call
10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday to Saturday:
734-ARTS.
stage
Many theatre tickets can be purchased for
half-price on the day of the performance at
Front Row Centre (1025 Robson, 683-2017).
The Diary of Anne Frank, a moving
tribute to a courageous woman who wrote
one of the most gripping accounts of the Nazi
reign of terror, at the Vancouver Playhouse
(Hamilton and Dunsmuir, 873-331), Monday
to Saturday at 8 p.m., Saturday matinee at
2:30 p.m., until Nov. 1-29.
Letter from Wingfield Farm, well, they
liked it in Ontario, so it would necessarily
follow that ... at the Richmond Gateway
Theatre (6500 Gilpin Road, 270-1812), Tuesday to Saturday at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m.,
Oct. 31-Nov. 9.
Life Skills, a new comedy by David King
which stars David and the incredibly popular,
multi-talented playwright, actress, television
star, UBC graduate who is no stranger to the
pages of this vile rag, Nicola (Nicky to her
friends) Cavendish, in what is certain to be a
very fine, memorable production, at the
Firehall Theatre (280 East Cordova,
687-8737), Tuesday to Sunday at 8 p.m., except Saturdays at 6:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m.,
Tuesdays 2 for 1, Nov. 6-29.
The Farm Show, by Toronto's most progressive, interesting theatre company.
Theatre Passe Murialle, has no story or plot,
simply a series of recitations skits and songs
as actors dramatize discoveries made on a
farm in Ontario, at Catherine Caines' new
theatre school. Presentation House (333
Chesterfield, North Van, 986-1351), Tuesday
to Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 6 p.m. and 9
p.m., Sunday at 2:30 p.m., 2 for 1
Wednesdays, November 5-22, preview Nov. 4
at 8 p.m.
The Crucible, the oldest modern play ever
written, by Arthur Miller, is the long version of
the Exorcist but without head rotation, appears to indicate a'new progressive edge in1
Freddy Wood's seasons, at the Frederic
Wood Theatre (on campus, across from the
Faculty Club, 228-2678), Monday to Saturday
at 8 p.m., Nov. 8, 12-22.
Vaudeville Nouveau in Aesthetic Peril,
a new and special kind of theatre on the cutting edge of California's New Vaudevill movement (they juggle), at Vancouver East
Cultural Centre (1895 Venables, 254-9578),
at 8 p.m., also Sunday matinee at 2.30, until
November 9.
Main Street Players, a brand new professional theatre company will present five new
works, with an emphasis on B.C. playwrights,
at Vancouver Little Theatre (in the basement of Heritage Hall, Main and 15th,
876-4165) at 8 p.m. November 13-15, 20-22
and 27-29.
Everyman in the '80s. a lively update of
the medieval classic by a brand new professional theatre company called Theatre at Lrge,
whose artistic directors both went to UBC, at
Heritage Hall, (Main and 15th, 683-2257),
November 22-December 5.
18 Wheels, a musical by John Gray (who
wrote Billy Bishop), in a production by one of
the best theatres in Vancouver, Studio 58
(Langara Campus, 100 W. 49th, 324-5227),
where their last production. Dreaming and
Duelling, was the best production in this city
in October, November 14-December 7, Tuesday to Saturday at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2:30
and 8 p.m., previews November 12, 13 at 8
p.m., are half price. Tickets are $6.
film
Decline  of  the  American   Empire,   s
French film from Quebec that features a lot ol
university profs talking about sex — a fictional
story, at The Varsity (4375 W. 10th,
224-3730), 7 p.m. and 9 p.m., nightly.
Romeo and Juliet, the beautiful Zeffirelli
version that took out the clothes and soliloquies, and added music and violence, in the
SUB auditorium, Monday November 10, at 7
p.m. and 9:30 p.m.
Back to School, Rodney Dangerfield visits
a university and acts really stupid, SUB
auditorium. November 6, 8, 9 at 7 p.m. and
9:30 p.m.
Out of Africa, with Meryl and Bob, in
which Meryl says "I had a farm in Africa," at
SUB auditorium, November 12-16, at 7
p.m., Friday and Saturday at 6:30 and 9:30
p.m.
Seeing Red and Matter or Heart, interviews with Americans who belonged to the
communist party in the 1930s, and a
documentary portrait of Carl Jung, at Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial,
253-5455), November 7-9 at 7:30 and 9:25
p.m., respectively.
Diva and Subway, the story of a concert
singer and the story of two upmarket punks
who are seduced into a strange netherworld
of social misfits in Paris, at Vancouver East
Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455),
November 10, 11 at 7:30 and 9:35 p.m.
respectively.
Letters to an Unknown Lover, Harry is
having an affair. Three years have passes
since that moment of truth and yet Edna can
still feel the shock; the dark slip into collapse
and devastation, at the Ridge (16th and Arbutus, 738-6311), Novemeber 7-13 at 7:30 and
9:30 p.m.
GRANT
AMS#
Fogg AMS #
71073860
13
IfXL /v" J§ You are this week's lucky
I ^*iSB8KHssi«»i"'®^ ^°99 n Suds AMS Card Winner.
I Everything   UBC  wants Call 73-BEERS,
^in a Restaurant. For less. Fogg on 4th
Al Stewart, at The Commodore Ballroom
(870 Granville, 681-7838), at 8 p.m.,
November 7.
S.N.F.U. and the Guttersnypes, a heavy
Edmonton outfit and the frontman for the
Enigmas, at the Town Pump (66 Water
Street, 683-6695), Sunday, November 9 at 2
and 8 p.m., no minors at night.
EVERYONE WELCOME. . .
GREAT GOLF! BEAUTIFUL CLUBHOUSE! FABULOUS FOOD!
music
Rhythm and noise, ambient synthesized
melodies to violent bursts of new age percussion, they are prone to using scavenged metal
as part of their stage propping and instrumentation, at Luv-a-Fair (1275 Seymour,
685-3288), November 13 at 9 p.m.
Jonathan Richman and the Modern
Lovers, the most engaging and unique performer of our times, with a contemporary
back-up ensemble, at the Vancouver East
Cultural Centre (1895 Venables, 254-9578),
November 10, 11.
Vancouver   Symphony   Orchestra,
featured soloist is Camille Churchfield, principal flute with the VSO, conductor is Rudolf
Barshai, in a concert featuring Schubert,
Vivaldi, Mozart and Strauss, ath the Orpheum (Smithe at Semour, 280-3311),
November 16th at 2:30 p.m., 17th at 8:30 p.m.
and 18th at 7:30 p.m.
Mozart's Requiem, a new scholarly edition of the big finish from Amadeus where
Mozart dictated to Saliere, at Christ Church
Cathedral    (690    Burrard,
November 11 at 8 p.m.
682-3848),
THE ALL NEW PUBLIC
UNIVERSITY GOLF CLUB
An Outstanding Public Course and Clubhouse
The West Point Dining Room
features
Sunday Brunch
11:00 a.m. -2:00 p.m.
reservations
suggested
Luncheon Buffet
$7.95
(Monday through Friday)
11:00 a.m. -2:00 p.m.
224-7513
The Thunderbird Lounge at the University
Golf Club is pleased to present its Fall
Entertainment Schedule by presenting:
DOUG CARLSON
Thurs.-Fri.-Sat., Nov. 6-7-8—8 p.m.-12:00 a.m.
We can honestly say we have the best prices in town!
University Golf Club
5185 UNIVERSITY BLVD.. VANCOUVER, B.C.
Banquet & Office Phone: 224-7513
Pro Shop Phone: 224-1818
.!i0m
VISITS
TIMOTHY FINDLEY
ALICE MUNRO
MONDAY NOV 10
AT THE UBC BOOKSTORE
We are delighted to welcome two of Canada's foremost
writers of fiction:
TIMOTHY FINDLEY will be signing copies of
THE TELLING OF LIES ($22.95) from 11:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m.
After this, Mr. Findley will be reading from his work in Henry Angus 110.
ALICE MUNRO will be signing THE PROGRESS OF
LOVE ($22.95) from 12:30-1:00 pm
Sorry, we cannot guarantee autographed copies of either book if you are unable to attend the signings.
CALL 228-4741
BOOKSTORE Friday, November 7,1986
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
pook the subs
By LEAH MALKINSON
Victoria, (B.C.) (CUP) — Dressed in fiendish costumes, chanting
and singing protest songs, around
50 people gathered at Victoria's
Clover Point Oct. 26 to 'spook the
war machine.'
The University of Victoria's Stop
the Warships Club and the Greater
Victoria Nuclear Disarmament
Group organized the 'Danse
Macabre,' an event used in the Middle Ages to dispel the Plague, to
protest the passing of the seventh
Trident Submarine, the USS
Alaska, through the Strait of Juan
de Fuca. The ceremony was a "raising of the spirits of horror at the
evil presence in our waters" and
held in conjunction with an
American Ground Zero Protest
near Bangor, Washington, the
Alaska's destination.
The Alaska passed through the
Strait of Juan de Fuca on its way to
the Trident Base at Bangor,
Washington, only  50 miles  from
Victoria, where it was to be armed
with nuclear weapons. Protestors
believe Bangor is close enough that
any explosions or leaks would have
devastating consequences for Victoria.
"The Trident's passing through
the Juan de Fuca Strait is a danger
to us and to world peace also," said
Pam Hall, a member of UVic's
Stop the Warships Club. She said
the 'Danse Macabre' was "an attempt to gain public attention and
to do something different, focussing on the timely event of Halloween to dress up and spook the warships."
The USS Alaska is an Ohio class
long-range ballistic missile submarine. It is 560 feet (or two football fields) in length and when armed, carries 24 Trident I missiles.
Each missile has eight independently targeted thermonuclear
warheads, giving the sub the
capability of destroying 192 different cities.
Beer for Buchanan
Beer gardens will again be allowed in the Buchanan building, the
arts dean said Thursday.
Robert Will said he will again
allow liquor licenses to student
organizations after receiving recommendations on the issue from the
president's office.
Will cancelled student events requiring liquor licenses in Buchanan
after a student fell to his death in
Totem Park in September. The
death was liquor related.
At the time Will said he would
have to examine the legal implications to the arts faculty of allowing
beer gardens in the Buchanan
building.
"I think we can resume our issuing of liquor licenses," he said in an
interview. "We'll have to ensure the
law of the land is actually followed
at these events," he added.
He  said  the  faculty  will  place
emphasis on making sure the
signators of the liquor license attend the event as is legally required.
The only new recommendation,
Will said, is that non-alcoholic
beverages also be served at beer
gardens and similar events.
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Amngrapij
Phone now for your
COMPLIMENTARY SITTING
Choose from 18 previews (proofs)
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADWAY
Resume photos as low as
75c in colour.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1986 AUTUMN LECTURES
KEITH GRIFFIN
Dr. Keith Griffin is President of Magdalen College, Oxford and Director of the Contemporary China Centre. He is a prominent development economist with a special interest in the
issue of poverty and income inequality in the Third World. He has served as an advisor and
consultant to various governments, international agencies and academic institutions in Asia,
Latin America and North Africa. His most recent research has focused on rural China and
forms the basis of his lectures in Vancouver.
RURAL POVERTY IN ASIA
Monday, November 10        In Room A-106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
DOUBTS ABOUT FOREIGN AID
Wednesday, November 12  In Room A-106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
THE ROLE OF COMMUNAL TENURE IN RURAL DEVELOPMENT
Thursday, November 13     In Room 207/209, Anthropology/Sociology Building, at 1:00 p.m.
WORLD HUNGER AND THE WORLD ECONOMY
Saturday, November 15       In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, at 8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
SIDE DOOR
2291 West Broadway
Come Sundays, Mondays, Tuesdays...
You'll be Glad you Did!
Eank When you Like-
DaycrNifiht...
.   .   .   Our   Personal   Touch   Banking
machines are available 24 hours a day!
Bank during YOUR hours anytime, day or
night at any conveniently placed machine.
If your hectic classroom schedule keeps you
from doing your banking during regular hours,
see us about a Royal Bank Client Card. With
it you can make deposits, withdrawals, transfers and payments - after you choose your
own Personal Security Code! Cards without credit entitlement are available to all
ages! ^
There are over 80 Personal Touch Banking
locations in the Lower Mainland. And your
Client Card also gives you withdrawal
privileges through any banking machine in
Canada and the U.S. displaying one of these
symbols: J_^ ^
^Plus \
^System    'B
ROYAL BANK Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1986
tween classes
TODAY
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Post-mortem Midterm Bash (Bzzr garden), 4-S
p.m., SUB 206.
ROCKERS
Meeting for bands interested in gigs, noon, SUB
241A.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet level 2 and 3, 8:30-10 a.m., SUB Party-
room.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Sports nite feeturing badminton and volleyball.
Members bring along a friend, cost is only $1 per
person, 8-10 p.m., Osborne Gymn A.
LA CHARLA (SPANISH CONVERSATIONAL CLUB)
Fiesta: Live Flamenco dance, guitar, free admission, 8 p.m.. International House, Gate 4.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House.
PRE MEDIACAL SOCIETY
Football Challenge, 4:30-6 p.m.. Grass field
behind Osborn Gym.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Kuhlau Bicentennial Concert, 8 p.m., UBC
School of Music, Recital Hall.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
University Chamber Singers. Cortland Hultberg
Director, Repeat of Nov. 6 concert, noon, UBC
School of Music Recital Hall.
PACIFIC RIM CLUB
Bzzr Garden, 4-9 p.m., SUB Room 206.
SUB FILMS. PART OF UBC FILM SOCIETY
The Colour Purple, 6:30 and 9:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTING CLUB
Second Sports Nite featuring volleyball and badminton. Members and friends welcome, $1 admission, 8-9:30 p.m., Osborne Gymnasium.
UBC CHAPLAINS
Seminar: Mark Thompson "Morality and the
Marketplace," noon, St. Marks College.
UBC CHAPLAINS
Audio visual and discussion: Bryan Teixeira and
hot flash
FYSC NEEDS SUPPORT:
Calling all froshes — Is being a
first year student getting you down?
Do you feel like the only person on
campus who doesn't know what is
going on? Well, cheer up! The First
Year Students' Committee is now
underway, planning events and get-
togethers for all freshpeople. The
ideas so far for this year's events include parties, intramural sports
teams, and dances. In fact, The
Post Bzzr Garden Bash has already
been scheduled for November 7th in
the SUB Partyroom (tickets on sale
soon — see you there!).
The FYSC meets every Thursday
in the SUB conference room from
12:30 to 1:30, and is open to any
suggestions, comment, or queries
from first year students. If you have
an opinion to voice, or just want to
see what goes on, come on out!
Remember this is your committee
froshes, so get involved!
Brad Newcombe — Is the Free Market Setting
Canda Free?, noon, Buch Penthouse.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film "Arms Bazaar", a disturbing look at how
the defence industry markets its products to the
Pentagon, noon, SUB 205.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Dance (Post—Bzzr Garden Bash), 7 p.m., SUB
Partyroom and patio.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Post  Expo  tack  tourist   night,  6  p.m..   Gage
residence lounge.
THE UBYSSEY
Newswriting seminar, 3:30 p.m., SUB 241K.
TOOLS FOR PEACE
Nicaragua Week,  slide show and discussion,
noon. Graduate Student Centre.
SATURDAY
DEPARTMENT OF ASIAN STUDIES
Indian Katmak dance recital, 8 p.m., Asian Centre Auditorium.
SUBFILMS (PART OF UBC FILM SOCIETY)
"Back to School," 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
UBC SQUASH CLUB
Intermediate clinic, members only, 9:30 a.m. and
10:15 a.m.. Winter Sports Centre.
SUNDAY
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Party (tickets in office), 8 p.m.. Insomnia, 801
Brunette, Coquitlam.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Communion Service, 10 a.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
"Plants of the Bible," an exhibition of silkscreen,
scrolls and sketches. Artists: Mala Zilberman,
11-5 p.m., free admission. Opening reception
Sunday Nov. 9, 2-5 p.m. Show until November
19, daily, Asian Centre Auditorium.
UBC SAILING CLUB
Regatta, 9 a.m., Jericho Sailing Club. Also, Party, 12 p.m., Jericho, Surf 'N Turf Lounge.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Worship Service, 12 p.m., 2490 W. 2nd., basement of Kits United Church.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Potluck dinner, an international feast, RSVP by
Nov. 7, 228-6249. 7 p.m.. International House.
MONDAY
AMS ART GALLERY
Nov. 10-14, Art show — Elaine Briere, 10 a.m.-4
p.m., AMS Art Gallery.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International film night; Italy,  France and Ger-
VIRGINIA
SATIR
WORLD RENOWNED
FAMILY THERAPIST
A 2-Day Workshop
"Treating the
Family"
Nov. 21-22
UBC, SUB BALLROOM
$110
For more information
 591-9269	
JERRY'S COVE
NEIGHBORHOOD PLB
Minutes away from UBC Campus -^—
Remember "DAILY SPECIALS"
Hot & Cold Food from 11:30 a.m. until Midnight
3681 West 4th (4ti. & am     734-1205
UBtT(E-XC
•E • L-L-E-N -T) m r
Th e
EAT E R 1  *l
.1 FREE BUK6EE7
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF a TOFU BURGERS ONLY,
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJOY YOUR BURG AND HAVE A NICE DAY!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5296
UBC RUGBY CLUB
DANCE
featuring
THE INVADERS
SAT., NOV. 8-8 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
TICKETS $5
Available from Players
or AMS Box Office
many, 1900, 7:30 p.m., International House Gate
4.
ROCKERS
Big Bash Before Bancruptcy, noon, SUB 241A.
STUOENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
General   meeting,   everyone   welcome,   noon,
Graduate Student Centre.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Jazz level one and two, 8:30-10 a.m.; Dancercise, 12:30-1 :X p.m.; Tap, 1:30-3 p.m. Now offering 5 class tickets, $20. All classes SUB plaza
south. Jazz one and two, SUB Partyroom.
UBC FILM SOCIETY (SUBFILMS)
Film: Franco Zeffirelli's 'Romeo and Juliet,' 7
p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB Auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
General meeting of IBM users and the compatibles, noon, Hebb 12-
TUESDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Jazz one and two, 8:30-10 a.m.. Stretch and
strength, 12:30-1:30 p.m.; Jazz one, 1:30-3
p.m., alt classes SUB Partyroom.
WEDNESDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Atari users group meeting 4:30 p.m., SUB 212A.
Amiga users group meeting, 12:30 p.m., Buch
B319.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Ballet one and two, 8:30-10 a.m.; Beginners
ballet, 12:30-1:30 p.m.; Ballet one, 5:30-7 p.m.,
all classes SUB Partyroom. Jazz one, SUB plaza
South.
GRAD STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night featuring James Hill cellist, 8:30-11
p.m.. Garden Lounge, Grad Student Centre.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Film:    'Witness   to   Apartheid',    noon,    SUB
auditorium.
GRAD STUDENT SOCIETY
Theatresports: Improvisational theatre, 8 p.m.,
grad Centre Ballroom.
THURSDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Jazz one and two, 8:30-10 a.m.; Dancercise,
12:30-1:30 p.m.; Tap, 1:30-3 p.m. All classes
SUB Plaza South, Jazz one and two, SUB Party-
room.
SIKH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Seminar—Careers Day (sponsored by EISA),
12:30-2:30 p.m., SUB 207, 209.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Speaker series. The need for the Vancouver
Connection in the Community', noon, SUB 211,
all welcome.
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Special event, 'Stress management', refreshments will be served, noon-2 p.m.. Wood 1.
UBC SKI CLUB
Broomball Game, 4:30-6 p.m.. Winter Sports
Centre, Rink 2.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Combined meeting of Apple people and Commodore users, noon-2:30 p.m., Buch B319.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible Study and Fellowship, 7 p.m., 1868 Knox
Road.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Divestment Rally, 1:30 p.m., Old Administration
Building.
FRENCH CLUB
Babette Deggan will speak about Summer
language and painting workshops in France,
noon. International House.
LE CLUB FRANCAISE
Come socialize, noon. International House.
TOOLS FOR PEACE NICARAGUA WEEK
Isabel McDonald speaks and shows slides on a
nurses' tour of Nicaragua, noon. Woodward IRC 1 ■
hot flash
Intrepid reporter Patti Flather,
fresh from assignments in Asia and
B.C. talks on newswriting Friday,
everything from taking assignments
to interviewing bureaucrats. Get the
scoop. All welcome. Newstaffers
encouraged to come. Flather, a
former Ubyssey editor, has written
for The Vancouver Sun and
freelanced to The South China
Morning Post, The Globe and Mail
and other publications. The action
starts at 3:30 in SUB 241k, The
Ubyssey. Plan to be there, in on the
action.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977 ''     ^I^A
5 - COMING EVENTS
SKI & PARTY this New Years!! Join 1500
skiers Dec. 28-Jan. 2, 1967. 5 days & 5
nites, only $248. 25 buses!! Ski Big White &
Tod Mtn. Call Dan today at 736-6166.
GIVE PEAS A CHANCE! All we are saying
is join AGORA FOOD CO-OP, Dunbar &
17th. Nuclear-free groceries.
20 - HOUSING
80 - TUTORING
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Nov. 8
CANADA
AND THE
AMERICAN QUESTION
Prof. Cole Harris,
Geography, UBC
Lecture Hall 2,
UBC Woodward Building
at 8:15 p.m.
ATTENTION!
ESCAPE 86
Annual Christmas Dance
Hyatt Regency Hotel
Regency Ballroom
Fri. Dec. 19th
8:00 p.m. - 1:30 a.m.
Admission: $10
(includes door prizes)
CALL 879-1149
255-0448
STUDENT
HOUSING
Available in Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s
newest single student residence. Occupancy from November 1st. Situated
just behind the University Village, all 4-,
5-, and 6-bedroom townhouses are completely furnished and rent includes all
utilities. Amenities include dishwashers,
deluxe furnishing and satellite television
reception capability. Prices start as low as
$250 per month and applicants must be at
least 21 years of age by December 31st,
1986 in order to qualify. Please apply at
the Student Housing Office, 2071 West
Mall (weekdays 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.), or
call 228-2811.
FRENCH OR SPANISH courses with PhD
Franco-Argentine student. High school,
continuing education, Univ. help experience. Translations. Call Oscar 738-4102.
MATH TUTOR - Experienced, qualified,
reliable, flexible for ALL your math needs.
Call anytime 931-6014.
85 - TYPING
1 BEDROOM BASEMENT SUITE avail,
immed. for 6 mths. Near UBC $400/ mo. ph.
228-0044 after 6 p.m.
40 - MESSAGES	
DEVIANT. Chicago's too cold for kittens.
Gonna come to Vancouver to get warm.
66 - SCANDALS
AWESOME    post-Halloween    bash,    guys!
When's the next party?
Ace
70 - SERVICES
11 - FOR SALE - Private
FURNITURE. Great prices! For livingroom,
bedroom and kitchen, couch, bed, T.V.
etc. 273-5113 eves. 8- weekends.
1974 TOYOTA TRUCK with canopy. Very
reliable. $1500 obo. Heather 738-7986.
FOR SALE. 1977 SUBARU 4WD WAGON.
Recond. engine. Rusting but good runner.
Offers? Call Dave 733-8643.
28 BAR CHAIRS $2 each or $35 TL., exc. man
typewr $40, 1975 Toyota SR5, nice car,
$1200 obo. Consider trades. Leo 734-2953.
LADIES BIKE FOR SALE. 5 gears. 3 mo.
used. $100. Ph. 224-0360 after 5 p.m.
PREGNANT? 731-1122
Free Tests — Confidential Help
UNIT I CO-OP NURSERY: under 3 daycare
has spaces available from Dec. 1 for part or
full time care. Located on the U.B.C. Campus. Open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday to
Friday 228-3019.
CRISIS PREGNANCY! Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (free
pregnancy tests).
IS - FOUND
FOUND   SHADES   in   Buchanan   building
Phone: 228-3909
20 - HOUSING
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED
AND PRESBYTERIAN
CONGREGATIONS
invite you to join us in worship
Sunday mornings at 10:20 a.m.
in the Epiphany Chapel,
Vancouver School of Theology
Young Adult Groups Sunday
or Monday evenings.
GARAGE SALE NOV. 15th
10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m.
South end of Acadia Rd.
PHONE 224-6377
6050 Chancellor Boulevard
GAGE. TOTEM PARK. PLACE VANIER &
FAIRVIEW CRESCENT: room and board,
and room only: Available for men 8- women
in the student residences. For information,
apply at the student housing office, 2071
West Mall, Ponderosa Bldg., or call
228-2811, Weekdays: 8:30 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
LGE. BRIGHT FURN. 1 BR. basement
suite. Full kitchen, full bathroom. Private
ent. N/S only. $400 util incl. 228-1957.
RESEARCH PAPERS
16,278 to choose from—all subjects
Save Time and Improve Your Grades!
Order Catalog Today with Visa/MC or COD
E%^213-477-8226 E/.'
C" ash $2 00 to Research Assistance
11322 Idaho Ave. 206-SN, Los Angeles, CA 90025
Custom research also available—all levels
MINIMUM  NOTICE  REQUIRED-Essays,
term   papers,   resumes,   theses,   reports,
UBC location (Village) 224-2662.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students. 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
JUDITH FILTNESS, quality typist. 3206 West
38th Ave. 263-0351.
WORD    PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.    U
write,  we type theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, evenings, wknds., 736-1208.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
WORDWEAVERS - word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st. Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
ACADEMIC and BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reas. rates. Days/evenings. 263-4862.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 a.m.-10 p.m. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
WORD PROCESSING. EDITING, writing:
resumes, theses, papers, letters. Pick-up &
delivery avail. 324-9924.
TYPING? YOU BET! Theses, papers,
essays, whatever. Experienced, reasonable.
Short notice. Kits area. June 738-1378.
TYPING Er WORDPROCESSING: Fast &
accurate. Student rates OR rent your own
station/hr. on our U-Type plan. 734-1612.
ACCENT WORD PROCESSING - 278-0764.
Francais - English - Italian. Delivery on campus - letter quality.
W/P TYPING: Term papers, theses, mscpts,
essays, tech. equations, letters, resumes.
Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
TYPING. Quality work at reasonable rates.
Fraser-Kingsway area. Paula, 873-2227 24
hrs.
TYPING/WORDPROCESSING. Seventh &
Vine. 731-9955.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
resumes, etc. UBC Village, behind Kinko's
Copies, 224-0763. Student rates.
THE  GOOD  WORD  PROCESSING  CO.
Spelling, grammar expertise. Days, eves,
wknds. Stud, rates. Call Nancy 266-1768.
TYPING SERVICE - will type your essays,
reports, letters, manuscripts, resumes, etc
255-3195.
WILL DO TYPING in my Kits apartment.
Undergrad. degree and small
business/executive-clerical experience.
Reas. rates. Prof'l appearance. Don
734-1715. Friday, November 7, 1986
THE'UBYSSEY
Page 11
War toys are no fun says peace activist
By PATRICIA FOSTER
Little Billy's He-Man toy is not
just creating fun, it is promoting
violent behaviour, a Vancouver
peace activist said yesterday.
He-Man is one of many war toys
that distort childrens' views of reality and make them more violent,
says Helen Spiegelman.
Spiegelman's group,  Families  for
Peace, has launched a campaign to
raise public awareness about the
dangers involved in letting children
play with war toys and watch war
toy cartoons, like He-Man and
Rambo.
The campaign is being advertised
across Canada by both the Canadian Peace Alliance and the B.C.
Peace Network.
Spiegelman points to children
between four and eight years old as
the age group "probably the most
susceptible" to the negative effects
of war toys and cartoons.
Spiegelman isn't convinced "pro-
social" cartoons designed to show
children that violence is wrong
overcome the violence of other programs .
"They're trying to lard this
violence with preaching . . . The
bottom line is still violence," she
said.
Families for Peace, run completely by volunteers, has prepared "war
toy free-zone" kits for parents.
Each kit contains a form letter, addresses of war toy manufacturers,
and a "war toy free zone" sign for
a child's playroom and a petition.
Spiegelman said she plans to present the petitions to the Toy Trade
Fair in January of 1987 at Toronto.
She said her aim is to "alert
manufacturers and distributors that
there is consumer concern and that
(people) would prefer to buy more
constructive toys."
/VOVV YOU  CA/V TWI^T OI'/:M    ThIC   TASTii   THAT'LL   /TOP You   COLD Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 7, 1986
Marzari ousts McGeer in Point Grey riding
By EVELYN JACOB
Just forty votes.
That was the margin of victory
NDP candidate Darlene Marzari
finally had when she won the second Point Grey seat displacing Pat
McGeer who has occupied the
riding for 24 years.
"I feel great," said Marzari in a
telephone interview Wednesday.
Section 80 ballots which were
counted Wednesday gave Marzari
the slim 40 vote lead over Social
Credit MLA and former Science
and International Trade minister
McGeer.
Marzari, who polled 18,271 to
McGeer's 18,231 credits students
with the extra 650 votes she picked
up from Section 80 voters.
"I want to thank UBC students
for their support," said Marzari.
Although Chief Electoral Officer
Harry Goldberg said Thursday he
has no way of telling how many of
the 5,000 Point Grey Section 80
voters were students, Marzari said
she "knows" they were mostly
students.
She said there were over 400 Section 80 ballots counted at the
University Hill elementary school
polling station, and many through
the Kitsilano area where students
live.
Marzari said Tuesday night she
would not be adverse to a recounting of ballots if McGeer requested one. McGeer said Thursday
he does not know yet if he will seek
a judicial recount.
McGeer wished Marzari well "in
opposition but not in government."
"It's   important   to   keep   free
enterprise alive in the province,"
said McGeer who expressed no surprise at Wednesday's results.
McGeer, who spent all Thursday
in his lab at UBC, said he will now
have   more   time   to   pursue   his
science career at the university.
Simon Seshadri, Alma Mater
Society president, said he is pleased
with Marzari's victory because she
will make education a focal point in
the Point Grey riding.
David De Rosa, Biology 2, who
voted for Marzari, said she will
keep the Socreds "on their toes."
Shamir's temperament threatens peace
By CORINNE BJORGE
Transfer of power in Israel 10
days ago in an agreement signed by
the National Unity Government
makes Yitzhak Shamir the new
head of government and brings a
more pessimistic outlook for the
peace process in the Middle East,
said visiting professor Michael
Cohen in a speech to about 25
students Thursday.
"The next two years are not going to be very easy ones for peace, if
only because of Shamir's temperament," said Cohen. "Perhaps we
will see some of the more traditional blunders."
International terror is also going
to play a large part in slowing down
the peace process in the Middle
East.
"Terror has become a way of
life....I don't think Yasser Arafat
can control the PLO any longer,"
he said.
Cohen said in the past two years
UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT
Israel has indicated an interest in
peace between sovereign countries,
and in addition has only added one
new settlement in the disputed Gaza
strip/West Bank area instead of the
dozens in the past. However things
are changing he said.
"The number of Israelis unwilling to compromise over the Gaza
strip/West Bank region is increasing."
DEYONG
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■ AM/FM stereo cassette recorder
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/AWARENES
2053  WEST  41st   AVE
VANCOUVER
263-0878
\--,\V 'r'\~'iKi-d\-'•-<-■ i>" i- C?.x/0 ,'/n^:^\':v-,\-,   <- -^,- 'i<'-'v- .-'•

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