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The Ubyssey Nov 25, 1966

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Array THE UBYSSEY
for
president
Vol. XLVIII, No. 30
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 25,  1966
Mac listens
as students
offer pot
People trotted in all day
Thursday to see their leader.
Almost twenty people saw
president John Macdonald
when the second monthly
crack in the door appeared.
They had ideas, complaints,
advice and one student demanded to "see the Boss."
Lower Mall council was worried about paying off their debt
and Charlie Boylan made the
second of his monthly appearances still muttering about finances.
Two students came in the
morning and casually asked
whether the president wanted
to take LSD.
Denies LSD
counselling
UBC President John Macdonald said he has no knowledge of faculty members counselling students to use marijuana or LSD.
The charge against members
of university faculties was laid
Tuesday by Magistrate Les
Bewley of Vancouver.
Macdonald said he has no
evidence of any members of
UBC faculty so counselling and
has no idea where and how
Bewley got his information.
"If any member of the faculty advised his students to
indulge in the drug he would
be 'breaking the law," said
Macdonald.
As far as LSD was concerned, Macdonald said there is
no reason for not legalizing the
drug for careful clinical
treatment, specifically in the
psychiatric treatment of alcoholism.
FREEDOM
Bewley's statements about
marijuana and UBC faculty
represent an attack on academic freedom, according to
UBC philosophy lecturer Donald Todd.
"I wish to refute the magistrate's view that it is a tragedy when scientists make public the results of their research," Todd said Thursday.
He was referring to statements made by Bewley which
claimed that professors encourage use of drugs on campus.
"Members of the faculty
have said that on the basis of
scientific research, marijuana
was found to be medically
harmless," he said.
"But no member of faculty
has ever implied that it follows from the medical harm-
lessness of marijuana that
people should break the law.
"To say that scientists should
keep secret the results of their
research because some students break the law is to
threaten academic freedom.
"Judging from Bewley's remarks, if he had lived in ancient Athens, he would have
been one of the executors of
Socrates," Todd said.
—dermis gans
MY NAME IS John Macdonald. I am president (for seven
more months) of UBC. Yes, I will crack the door, and only
the door, again  in January. No,  I am  not high on  pot.
Ubyssey goes underground
till next week, exam fever
Alas fond readers, The Ubyssey will not be found
in ashrtays, on toilet tops or between sandwiches until
a week today.
Exams are such a bore, but even we must stop in
remembrance and consider all who have fallen before us.
Next Friday's Ubyssey will be a decidedly cool ski
issue for all who wish to run to the mountains after the
annual Christmas ordeal.
But no fear dear, we shall return next year.
224-3916
5 to bid
in Mac race;
12 cited now
By ROD WILCZAK and NORMAN GIDNEY
UBC's presidential sweepstakes are on, with two groups
seeking qualified candidates for the race.
Both the board of governors
and the Alma Mater Society
will nominate candidates for
the position made vacant by
UBC president John Macdonald.
The board has already received a dozen suggestions and
the AMS will nominate its man
in January 1967.
The board is responsible for
the selection of the president
and hopes to find a suitable
candidate before July  1967.
DOZEN NAMES
Stuart Keate, member of a
four-man board of governors'
committee to select a new
president, said Thursday the
committee has received at least
a dozen names.
Asked about the qualifications for the position, Keate
said: "The usual thing is to
write letters to possible candidates and take soundings, then
get personal interviews."
Donovan Miller, a second
member of the committee, said
it has not released the names
yet.
"This could Ibe an embarass-
ing situation," said Miller. "A
lot of people will have had
their names submitted by
friends who have not consulted them."
"It's not like a political nomination or an application in
business," said Miller. "It's
more a case of receiving applications, then gathering as much
information as possible."
HIGHLY QUALIFIED
"We're looking for a highly
qualified individual,"  he said.
The committee, chaired by
Mr. Justice Nathan Nemetz,
will meet over the week-end
to discuss guidelines for qualifications.
AMS president Peter Braund
told The Ubyssey Thursday
Council would define selection
criteria and make several nominations for the position.
Council.will send a letter to
Nemetz containing the student
position. The letter will be
made public at the same time.
RECOMMENDATIONS
Nemetz said in an interview
Wednesday: "The board would
be delighted to receive recommendations not only from
alumni and faculty, but the
student body."
Braund cited several criteria
he would like to see the board
use.
"The new president must be
BRAUND
. . . must encourage
renowned in his field. He must
have favorable relationships
with faculty and students. He
must be articulate enough to
deal with the provincial government.
"He must have a life goal of
the advancement of higher
education. He must be moderate enough to deal with all
the divisive elements within
the university."
"Most important of all, he
must encourage faculty and
student participation in university government."
Braund said the new president must come from within
Canada, but preferably not
from UBC.
Champs turn
pro-Semitic
for cup fund
The Ubyssey debating team
is planning to reassert its position as campus champion.
Team members Gabor Mate
and John Kelsey have challenged engineering president Eric
Newell and science president
Frank Flynn to debate resolved Christmas is part of the international Jewish conspiracy.
The Ubyssey team will argue the negative.
The debate will be held Friday, Dec. 2, in Brock lounge.
Admission will be ten cents,
with proceeds to the cup of
beer fund.
PSYCHEDELIC
SERVICE
(SEE PAGE 3) Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 25,  1966
—kurt hilger
BLIND PAINTER, GILMORE HANKO, talked about and displayed his work Thursday in
Buchanan. He overcomes his handicap by using a special pallate and by spreading
paint thickly on the canvas remembering which thickness is which color. He therefore
can visualize his work. Hats off to Hanko.
AT    THE    PLAYHOUSE
WORLD PREMIERE & CENTENNIAL PRODUCTION
U>untdown
* a *l
mM§Mmat^r»^m:mmmm
rmaqeddon
iiBiiiiiiMI
I l**IVE I J now on sale al Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton
St., MU 3-3255; all Eaton's stores (charge them), and Town and Country
Home Furnishings, Kerrisdale and Richmond.
Half-Price Student Tickets now on Sale at Vancouver Ticket Centre
'Goons' create panic
in Cariboo campaign
By VAL  THOM
"The Socreds were paniced
by our campaign — We had a
real impact."
So said Don Wise, one of the
three gowned horsemen of the
Cariboo, when he returned to
UBC Thursday.
"The Socreds called us the
'paid goons' of the NDP."
"We were interested in education and the NDP and the
Liberals have offered better
deals than the Socreds, but this
was coincidental," Wise explained.
Wise, Dave Zirnhelt, and
Doug Poelvoorde left last
Thursday to make higher education an issue in the Cariboo
by-election.
During the five day invasion the students posted notices
on billboards, in store windows,
and in schools.
At their William Lake headquarters the group sponsored
a mass demonstration for higher education.
Wise, Zirhelt, and Poelvoorde, on horseback, led the
procession of over 100 people
through downtown Williams
Lake.
At a court house rally, Dave
Barrett and Ray Parkinson,
NDP MLAs, were guest
speakers.
Neither Liberals nor Socreds
had sent guest speakers, though
they were invited to do so.
At a meeting with Socred
party members, the students
were called "obnoxious pups
and morally degenerate
people."
"We were also called NDP
hacks. The Socreds constantly
■ ■yV-_-.._^».lV-..yJ«_
The   modern  way  to   see  is   with
Contact Lenses
Have   them   expertly   fitted   at  a
reasonable price by
LAWRENCE CALVERT
MU 3-1816 705 Birks Bldg.
accused us of being paid by
the NDP."
In Quesnel, classes were cancelled so the senior high school
students could meet with Wise,
Zirnhelt, and Poelvoorde.
The students joined the trio
after school in their demonstration in downtown Quesnel.
Every student carried posters
and phamphlets. The school
cheerleaders turned out in uniform to accompany the march.
NDP speakers were Robert
Strachan and Hartley Dent, the
NDP candidate for the Cariboo
riding.
The procession passed Socred
candidate Robert Bonner who
was in Quesnel campaigning.
He refused to address the
crowds.
"You have done more damage to higher education than
everything else combined in
the last five years," a Socred
MLA told Wise. He refused to
identify himself, Wise said.
The trio appeared on Cariboo open-line radio programs
and TV programs.
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This weekend don't be left out . . . join the "in crowd"
Dance to Terry and The Viscounts
featuring
ic Bud Cui
Friday and  Saturday  Night at the
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
—kurt hilger
TENSION IS HIGH as Ubyssey photographer Chris Blake watches the final heat of the
Build-a-Better-Body Bug races. The spots you see are the bugs, dummy. Races are held
each day in the Graham mansion bathtub and are sponsored by the Committee for
Non-Violent Action against Dry Pool Bottoms.
Someone pulled plug;
communal bath unused
By MARY USSNER
It's empty, locked up and
unused.
The indoor pool adjacent to
the former Graham mansion,
now UBC school of social work,
has no water and no swimmers.
"The faculty wanted to explore the possibility of opening the pool," said bursar William White, "but funds were
not available. There is not sufficient interest to put it into
operation."
"Faculty made an approach
but certainly no one else did.
It is a small pool and the facilities are quite minimal," he
added. "I don't think the dressing rooms would accommodate
more than a dozen people."
"There are people studying
in the library and the rest of
the school," said White. "I
think the proposal by the winter sports   centre  to   build a
covered pool is a better arrangement. A brief about this
has been submitted to the
board of governors."
"It would be great to use
the Graham pool when Empire
pool is closed down in the winter. It could even be used as a
communal bath for Fort
Camp," said Hartmut Hilger,
Ubyssey fotog, who was allowed to see the pool only after
swimming through an ocean of
red tape.
Beer beggars bring
chaos to Kootenay
By AUBREY  OOP
It is hard to say "No!" when the destitute, gouged hordes
gather frantically around for a handout and there is no
more.
It is also dangerous.
A van had arrived at the
doorway to Kootenay House at
UBC with relief for residence
students impoverished through
a fee hike in the dormitory.
The people had waited for
weeks, their ribs stuck out
through stretched skins, their
Ibellies bloated, and their tongues lolling aimlessly from dry
lips.
The Cup of Beer fund had
given out tickets to those the
residence dons judged most
needy, although most were in
need. There simply was not
enough beer to go around.
The dons and resident fellows manned their stations, the
university shambulance providing a barrier between them and
the thirsting, parched and sere
horde.
"It was simply awful," Shambulance driver said. "As we
moved to open the spigots,
their tongues began to loll
faster and faster, and they
began to jingle their mugs
against the asphalt roadway in
anticipation."
"Ker-surge. It was that opening quaff that did it," Belawg
said. "They stormed the truck,
overturned it, and you know
what happens to beer when its
equilibrium is disturbed.
"Foam all over the goddam
roadway, that's what, and like
dogs they lapped it up, letting
the stuff trickle down the
fronts of their ragged shirts
and howling for more."
Donations to the cup of beer
fund will be accepted in The
Ubyssey office in Brock Hall
until Christmas day.
Lawyer hits
student court
OTTAWA (CUP)—A crown
attorney here recently questioned the validity of student
courts and their right to try
and  fine  student  offenders.
Using Queen's University as
an example, Frontenac County
crown attorney J. E. Sampson
said the Queen's student court
had no right to interfere with
Canadian laws by trying and
fineing students involved in
a raid on the Royal Military
College in Kingston earlier this
month.
"There is one law and it applies to everyone in the city,
county  or  country,"  he  said.
"They had no right to interfere with the laws which have
governed this country since
Confederation."
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SEASON'S GREETINGS FROM THE STAFF
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224-4384
GO-GO   GOD
Church high
on LSD take-off
By BO HANSEN
The  church   takes   a  trip   this   Sunday,   complete   with
electric guitars, stroboscopic lights and go-go girls.
Conductor for the "trip with
out acid" psychedelic service is
Rev. Jim McKibbon, minister
of St. Anselm's Anglican.
Take-off is at 8 p.m. at University Hill United Church.
"We hope there will also be
dancing in the aisle," said Mc-
Kibbon Thursday.
Backing McKibbon will be
the Bobby Taylor group, currently appearing at a downtown night club.
McKibbon says he came upon
the idea after talking with
people who have taken LSD
and finding they fell back on
conventional religious mystical terminology.
"The psychedelic sub-culture
raises questions about excessive dogmatism and rigidity to
the church," he added.
"This is an attempt to use
the contemporary idiom to
communicate."
McKibbon says the trip will
be "an imitation of the authentic psychedelics, tracing birth
to life through despair to rebirth."
But he said he is skeptical
the service can achieve even
near the same effect as LSD.
Along with the Bobby Taylor group, the service will include readings from contemporary poets Allan Ginsberg
and Lawrence Ferlinghetti as
well as from Auden, Eliot and
Thomas Wolfe.
The service will be filmed
Friday at 7:30 at University
Hill United by the CBC and
will be broadcast on the network's "Sunday" program at
10 p.m. Sunday.
McKibbon says the program
is open to anyone though it has
been staged primarily for students.
"II will be an interesting artistic experiment," he added.
"However I don't think it
could be a regular thing because of the amount of work
and rehearsals it involves."
'Keep hiding'
UBC prof
tells dodgers
If foreign police are wandering around in Canada, chasing
American draft-dodgers, local
authorities don't know about
it.
The problem came up in the
Commons Wednesday when
discussion centered on the
draft-dodgers entering Canada.
Dr. Benson Brown, UBC professor and member of the Vancouver Committee to Aid
American War Objectors, said
the committee has not been
contacted by the police. He
could not confirm rumours that
American service police have
been searching Vancouver for
U.S. draft dodgers.
The committee gives information to prospective American immigrants about Canadian immigration laws and advises draft dodgers of their legal status and responsibility
once they are in Canada.
Dr. Brown said about 25
American students have been
in contact with the committee.
LEOMARP LYTUGOE
cowrnicroR.
.'UHN/VVIEPE ___-■   __« L-«-TVAM/LTIHUl't
coNpucrorc. Swm&K        cosipvctok
i$m*
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
presents
Four Original One-Act- Ploys
December 5th, 8:00 - December 6th, 12:30, 8:00
The Transport Survey
and
Sex, Cold Cons, and a Coffin
December 8, 8:00 - December 9th, 12:30, 8:00
No Farmer's Daughter
and
Pregnant Daffodils
Frederic Wood Theatre
Admission Free THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorised
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
Here are some of the unpleasant'st words
that ever blotted paper.
—William Shakespeare
NOVEMBER 25,  1966
X'mas dinner
Hee hee, we invite Andrew Wilson and all his friends
in the registrar's office to a banquet at which he must
give a long speech.
But we're not telling where the banquet is, or when.
That's the same deal the registrar handed students
this year, promising to post final exam schedules a neat
two weeks—count 'em—before exams statt.
Happy cram to the poor slobs who left everything
to the last minute, and now don't know what to cram
first, since the schedule isn't up until Monday.
Joyeux noel to everybody, trying to go home for
Christmas, airline strike and all — we wish you much
luck trying to make last minute reservations on holiday-
packed trains and busses.
And a merry yule to all who cannot come back next
term without a Christmas job—maybe your blackguard
employer will hold the crumby job open even without
knowing when you can start.
Children's hour
"As for the fact that one person in every 16 is a
madman, he (your uncle Les Bewley) will use it as a
basis for estimating that 49.5 of the 793 professors, lecturers and assistants on this campus are raving maniacs."
So wrote city magistrate Les Bewley in his weekly
column, The Children's Hour, in the 1947 Ubyssey.
Apparently what undergraduate Bewley thought
facetious, Magistrate Bewley takes seriously, for a
similar dictum crept into his court Wednesday as a
charge that university professors urge their students to
try smoking marijuana.
Bewley said the lippy profs should be charged and
sentenced, not the experimenting smokers.
Maybe Bewley could name some names, so someone
else could hear professors advocating pot.
Or maybe he should forget it until he can substantiate his charges.
For president...
The Ubyssey editorial board, as a Christmas
present to the board of governors, offers 17 names
as possible UBC presidents. Some are offered seriously, and some are fraudulent.
We invite students to vote preferentially for
their choice, and mail the completed ballot to
Stuart Keate, honorary secretary, UBC board of
governors, c/o The Sun, 2250 Granville.
Norman Alcock, farmer-physicist  Q
Earle Birney, writer  Q
Robert Bonner, unemployed .  Q
Charlie Boylan, grad student  Q
Prince Charles, official adult  r~J
Brock Chisolm, retired doctor  Q
John Diefenbaker, nearly retired  [—|
Randall Enomoto, nearly chancellor  Q
Allen Ginsberg, visionary .  r-j
Irving Layton, poet-professor  r-j
Timothy Leary, guru  Q
Jean Lesage, unemployed  Q
Walter Mulligan,  retired  cop  r~|
Louis Riel, unemployed  rj
Louis St. Laurent, retired  r-]
Gordon Shrum, physicist  r-j
More guesses?	
ft
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'GSA off council'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Regarding the motion of the
AMS council that certain
members be instructed to fulfil the responsibilities of their
positions and start attending
meetings regularly, I would
like to explain the position of
the president of the Graduate Student Association.
No graduate student, under
the weight of his normal research program, can possibly
fulfil the positions of GSA
president and AMS petty-
politician adequately. Since
the GSA president's first extra-academic obligation must
be to his association, and since
business seldom has a direct
influence upon graduate students, the position which must
suffer is that of AMS councillor.
I have sat on council when
I have had time, as the graduate students' representative.
Should there be discontent as
to my participation in council
meetings, then surely this
should be expressed by graduate students, since it is they
who will suffer, if anyone at
all will suffer.
In conclusion, I must say
that if the present situation
appears intolerable to AMS
councillors, and yet meets
with no concern from graduate students, perhaps the time
is near when the Graduate
Student Association should
leave AMS.
GORDON G. C.
ROBINSON
President.
Graduate Student
Association
Valkyries  alight'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The other day we met a dog
and were patting it when two
of Sir Ouvry's valkyries
alighted beside us.
"Do you own that dog?"
We did not.
"Here boy."  It ran away.
He noted in his book, "Dog
sighted, unable to apprehend."
How well he understood
that university is a function
of men and automobiles, with
dogs external to the proposition.
The following week we were
standing in the roadway. The
ubiquitous patrolman arrived,
and suggested we get off the
road. We were not, after all,
automobiles. Did we want to
get hit? What a fine perception!
Cars are virtually banished
from campus on the assumption that they are. a nuisance
to people. Yet his mind is of
such exquisite balance that he
knows also that people can be
a nuisance to cars. He perceives rightly that turning the
wheel of a car constitutes a
violence to efficiency.
I think of this man going
home one evening, and saying,
"There's a dead man in my
living room. That doesn't seem
right somehow."
And making a note to that
effect in the notebook he
keeps under his pillow.
DAVID GARLING
Arts 4
Don't cuss me, mummy,
or 111 open your box
By MIKE COLEMAN
Delightful reading in the
paper the other day—a little
item noting an ancient mummy is to be opened in France,
with full television coverage.
(No mention made as to
whether it will be in living
color.)
There's only one hitch —
the mummy has a curse
which purportedly will zilch
anyone who views the desecration.
This conjures up all sorts
of stupefying visions. For instance, is this all a gigantic
plot against the French? And
if the plot is successful, who
must be successful in finding
a gigantic plot for the
French?
To estimate the danger involved, we must turn to history. There we find that such
curses have, in the past, been
hideously effective.
The most recent example
wherein a mummy's hex was
ignored saw the death of
each and every participant in
the deed.
The supernatural horror of
the incident may be mitigated somewhat, however, by
the fact that no-one finds the
demise of desecrators surpris
ing. Indeed, it would be more
surprising if they were still
alive — the violation occurred in 1842.
We would like to pass on
to all those Frenchmen one
sober piece of advice to rein ember before they glue
themselves to their television
sets for this historic occasion:
for reasons of health, messieurs, it is always better to
combine your TV-watching
with a suitable amount of
exorcising.
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing  ._...__     Richard Blair
News    . -.        Carol Wilson
City       -_   Danny Stoffman
Photo   Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    -          Claudia Gwinn
Focus      __ Rosemary Hyman
Sports :  Sue Gransby
CUP -       Bert Hill
Ass't News         Pat Hrushowy
Ass't City Tom Morris
Ass't Photo   Kurt Hilger
Slithering through a mound of
chow mein, spare ribs and sesame
seeds were Peter the barber Van
Dyke, Boni Lee, Norman Gldney,
Dave Cursons, Murray the morguer
MacMillan, Joan Fogarty, Bo Ban-
sen, Val Thom, John Appleby,
Mary Ussner, Kris Emmott and
Val Zuker. Din Tse-hsu, weilding
fierce chopsticks, felt at home.
Rookies Tony Hodge, Dick Dong
and Mike Jessen wrote sports.
So did veteran Jim Maddin.
Cameroids were Derrek Webb,
Dennis Gans, Al Harvey, Chris
Blake,  Don Kydd and Hilger. ,t t> - '.   ,-.- ■■■■
Would
you
believe
By   PETER   LINCOLN
The Credible Day Dorm
of Makeshift piece Macgre-
gor.
In Unconceivably Sudan
Sureprize, Merry Jane a
poplar girgle with the boisterous, as well as being a
remember of an imported
sorareity on the campwe, to
find one of such an arm, let-
go, figlure and personbana-
lity founded herselfsame present and reaching womben-
hood but much to her dis
mantle there had been no
pop questioned and now
was forceped much to the
dismust of her payrents
who had painted out
at all dimes the popsicles
a wrong the load of rife be-
header, but to no available,
(Heavan only knows, they
cried, to be brought to such
an end, may the aforemen
tioned long hold her head in
shame for the damnage she
has done) to a nunnery other
than to spend her life as a
reckless, deadicated to the
Holy Toast, Cup and Saucer
and the Trinightly but it
wasn't tlong before she was
back off her feet again as
she was said to have a dein-
finite reclination or tendoncy
to do this, her crackter be
ing laughter all, an inscrew-
able nymphonoyesmaniac
(futurtive investnegations at-
trebutted this to an early ex-
pertunce sufficed before
conches that was in handle
due to a callous deficiency
in her mudders diet pryer to
birth.)
Though the pint had not
been raised, the farther of
the villageintimate barstud
was roomered to be one Ro-
geroneoftheboys, a youngish
lad, membrane of an inchi
esive braternity whose other
such later to be reputed as
Lester the Piano Key and In
Out the Door, to name a
fyou, regardoled by oneand-
al to be a good sort of guise
who wloud do the bringing
bayou, an learound gould
chapel, a crock of the itty-
commun, with a misachiev-
ing winkle in his I (later re-
examing all the artifilfacts,
aded that it was claused by
an overslight of the octupal
nerve, a condite very comin'
in that aegis) frowned upon
by the established but in a
gnawing and overstatoding
way, a mankey with a rub-
and all that rahrahrot, just as
and all that rahrahrot, just a
boisterous as they will be,
but give them enough rope
and they hagle themselves
everytime, just you hark my
works, witness the case of
Henry Pantstoolongforhis-
legs, who rapid some free-
male, only to fine doubt that
it was no pranktickle choke,
but owl in awl he was always baseically at hart a
glued buoy. pf
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
It's what's not happening
NOV. 25, 1966
ON THE COVER:
Would you believe an
Al Harvey  photo.
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants: judy bing
sue richter
carol wilson
The Theatre Dept. just
isn't going to give up.
Even with the exam
schedules nearly ready
for posting and Marat/
Sade in its last days of
glory, they're only pausing for a deep breath before staging four student
plays.
Not only are the forthcoming dramas directed
and portrayed by students but are also the
original works of student
playwrights.
The authors are members of the Creative Writing Dept. and winners
of the Alumni Association Playwriting Contest.
The directors are graduate (M.A.) students in
the Theatre  Dept.
On the first bill Dec. 5
and 6, will be The Transport Survey by Elizabeth
Gourlay -— director Judith Freiman and Sex,
Cold Cans and a Coffin
by Chris Johnson—director,  Ray Michal.
Brian Home's No Farmer's Daughter directed
by Sherry Darcus and
Pregnant Daffodils another of Chris Johson's
works directed toy Judith
Penner are scheduled
Dec. 8 and 9.
The latter also won
second place in the CUS
playwriting competition.
Poets too are persevering with more and more
talents.
Very Stone House a
new publishing venture
in the west has conceived
ed its embryo publication
Letters From The Savage Mind (pf 6). Three
more books will issue
forth from the jaws of
its press this month by
Bill Bissett, Jim Brown
and Seymour Mayne, respectively.
The purpose of the
House is to promote the
writings of young, unes-
stablished poets and/or
material which for some
reason will not be
handled by the commercial publishers.
SABA
pf 2wo
At Canadian army
base Saba makes the
kill for peace scene
By ARNOLD SABA
Something definitely IS happening.
The Yorkville people have proclaimed
the shape of things to come. In one
week, Maclean's, The Star Weekly, and
the Saturday Evening Post all quoted
Bob Dylan's Ballad of a Thin Man:
"Somethin' is happening here and you
dunno what it is, do you Mr. Jones?"
So where am I, at a time when even
the mass-circulation weeklies have gone
hip?
At a Canadian army
base   in   West   Ger- j
many,   that's   where.
Washing     dishes.
Brother, here they've I
not only never heard
of Bob Dylan, they've ,
never even heard of
Mr. Jones. And they
DON'T   know   some-1
thing's happening.
They still float in a world of their
own, far, far removed from the rest
of us.
This is a private talking. He's twenty.
He'll tell you how things are.
"Oh, they'll have conscription in
Canada, all right. I'd say toy 1970 for
sure. They need it or they won't have
any army!
"But they've got to keep it up! That's
why they'll have conscription. They'll
realize that. The Canadian Army is just
one big police force, that's all it is. You
know what'd happen if all the allied
troops left? Why, they estimate that in
forty-eight hours, all of Europe would
be taken over by Communists. It'd take
only 38 minutes for Germany to
capitulate!
•        •        •
"Why, even with us here, we're only
a deterrent force to slow down the
Commies as they come, to give the
people at home a chance to get ready.
"In the case of a ibug-out, we don't
stand a chance of stopping them. We'd
just take off and fight, wherever we
could. We'd iblow this fort up behind
us, and just keep resisting until we
dropped.
"Oh, yeh, this fort is all mined! Right
now, you're probably sitting over a
couple of tons of TNT. The minute the
last truck leaves this fort — BAM! Up
in smoke! All the secret papers and
records, all the facilities! Scorched
earth policy.
"We have to keep ready. Five times
a year, we go out on a scheme. That's
a war practice, but it's the closest thing
to a friggin' war I've even seen! Mortar
shells flying, grenades, machine guns!
"They're kind of fun, really. Climb
in one of them big APC's, and take off.
If the officer says the enemy is a
certain way, take off, straight line! Go
through a pig sty, or a barn, too bad!
That's the fun of it, going through the
gardens — hell with it! Blow up a
shed!
"An assessor goes after us, checking
the damage. The Deutschers don't like
it, but they can't do sweet boom-all
about it. Their government approved
it! They may not get what the barn cost
them, but that's OK, you know . . .
"Ah, those Deutschers! Squareheads!
They hate us, you know. We wreck
their farms, run their government, go
to town and get drunk, rape their
women! But look what'd happen if we
left, eh? Look at a town like Soest, now!
Where would it ibe? They're living off
us.
"Each payday, that town makes a
mint off the Canadians! And the girls
do OK. Maybe they get laid, tout OK,
they get presents from the guys!
"Hey, you been down the. allies in
Amsterdam yet? You oughta go! It's
only 54 marks for a weekend, and the
prosties there are the greatest! You can
get stoned for a whole weekend, or a
whole leave even.
"The girls there don't mind how you
treat 'em, they know they're pigs. You
say 'Hey, come here, you goddam
whore', and they'll lap it up. You know
their motto? Business is money, Love is
bullshit. I darn near killed myself laughing the first time I heard that.
"Oh, God, this food's bloody awful!
I can't eat that! You know what they
charge us for this food — forty-five
bucks a month! And twenty bucks for
rent. We clear only about two twent-
five a month. That's for a single guy.
That's marks, not dollars.
"Cigarette? Don't smoke, eh? We get
'em for 15c a pack!
"You know, the discipline's tough
here, so when a guy gets a leave, he
naturally heads for Amsterdam, to blow
off a little, eh? You can spend 500
marks in two days and not know where
it went.
"That place is wild. The Canucks
throw all the Yanks in the canal. You
know, everyone's afraid of the Canadians! We got a real reputation, boy!
I know one guy who took on seven
Yanks at once. He was only five foot
three. He's not here now — in the first
regiment, I think.
"I'm looking forward to my big leave
at Christmas. I get 38 days then! Thirty-
eight days of freedom! I'm not going to
cut my hair the whole friggin' time.
That's the privilege of leave—freedom.
"I'm glad I joined the army, though.
It takes you away from civvy street.
That's a rat-race. Here you learn discipline, you gotta take orders. Even if
you don't stay in the army all the time,
that's good for you — everyone's gotta
do things they don't wanna do sometimes.
"And you learn skills you wouldn't
learn on civvy street. You learn about
rifles, the different gauges, the different
types of artillery. If you learn it all, if
you're qualified to kill, you get more
pay, too.
"I wouldn't mind going to Viet Nam.
You get $85 a month more. And I'd
love to get one of those Cong and just
KILL the bastard!
"Of course the drinks there are expensive. But Cyprus is a good place.
They're really having a ball down there
in Cyprus. And whenever their time's
nearly up, somebody gets shot and you
get sent back there for another two
years. The Cypriots want the Canadians
there, they're good for the economy.
"But it's not bad here really, unless
you get sent to the D.B. for a while.
They make you mark time all day, even
on the can, and you gotta polish things.
You got the best pair of boots in the
army when you get outta there.
"If you don't get a hair cut, you get
a $25 fine and a spell in the D.B., and
you get the hair cut, too — about one-
eighth of an inch above your scalp!
"If I stick it long enough, I can be a
sergeant, maybe higher. My old man's
a major. You just gotta watch yourself,
ibe a good soldier, and be a good guy.
You'll make it.
"Hey, you should join the army, eh?
Why not? It's a great life!
"The people of Canada don't appreciate us, you know. I mean, we're
here, serving them.
"That's what browns us off. The guy
on civvy street don't even know there is
an army!"
Oh yeh. Something's happening. But
not here. They're waiting for the world
to come around to them.
And the shape of things to come will
never come, so long as this army rules
our world.
So this is the army — Mr. Jones.
Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 25,  1966 i~,*~*    V.'.   '   '^i<   ^<    -
'HiV< S* !**!■' V 'imWto *M
No simple answers, says Vietnamese
Editor,  Page  Friday:
This is in answer to an
article in Page Friday, Nov.
18, by M. C. J. entitled
Salon Reds not Factual.
First of all, the stake in
the Viet Nam War is not
simply that "poor jungle
country" but the whole of
South East Asia; that is
Thailand, Burma, Malaysia,
former French Indochina,
Indonesia. This area is the
richest part of Asia in terms
of mineral resources and
food; also the area is relatively underpopulated compared  to  India   and   China.
The writer also stated:
"The money they (the Americans) have been losing
could not be gained from
that country (Viet Nam) in
the next five hundred
years.". I would like to
point out that the U.S. is
not losing money in Viet
Nam; on the contrary, because of the Viet Nam war,
American economy is booming, especially the war industry and unemployment is
at an  all  time  low at  this
very moment. Moreover the
largest part of the ten billion odd dollars spent on the
Viet Nam war per year is
not spent on improving the
lot of the Vietnamese peasant, but on making more
bombs, guns, planes, ships,
and on the wages of 325,-
000 American G.I.'s in order
to kill that very Vietnamese
peasant. As a matter of fact
the standard of living in
Viet Nam has lowered since
the influx of the American
dollar. Inflation goes unchecked, and prices have
tripled since last year.
Further along, M. C. J.
wrote: "It is a regime whose
policy is far from the interests ... of the majority
of the people."
I dare say that president
Ho Chi Minh has done more
for the Vietnamese people
than all the U.S.-supported
Vietnamese generals put together. Ho Chi Minh, with
the support of the majority
of the Vietnamese people,
has rid his country of the
French    colonialists    and
this, I assure you, every
Vietnamese does not forget.
Similarly, it is a fact that
C h a ir m an Mao has done
more for the Chinese people
since 1949 than Generalissimo Chiang Kai Shek has.
On the other hand, it is American supported dictatorships such as Batista's in
Cuba, Chiang Kai Shek's in
Formosa et cetera which do
not have the interests of
their people in mind.
And further along I read:
"The pathetic truth is that
the bad guys coming from
the North are forced to fight
against their convictions
. . .". I ask M. C. J. what he
would do if some foreign
power starts moving 325,-
000 troops into Canada and
starts shooting Canadians;
whether it would be against
his convictions to take up
arms and fight back.
I have no sympathy for
the dogma, the propaganda,
the lack of freedom and the
Dodger won't compromise
pf: Why are you in Canada?
R: I am here for a three day visit to see
if Vancouver is a good place to live if I am
drafted and decide to leave the U.S.
pf: Why don't you want to get drafted?
R: In the first place I don't like the idea
of the army, and I particularly don't wish to
fight in the Viet Nam war. I think I would
Bill Rukeyser is a second year political
science and journalism major at Berkeley's
experimental college. He talks with Page
Friday's Gabor Mate.
have fought in some other wars, like for the
democratic side in the Spanish Civil War,
or for the Allied forces in the Second World
War, but in a war which so blatantly supports
a dictatorship and is so obviously a war
against the people of the country, I could
never take part.
pf: Aren't you afraid that you will damage
your position in the U.S. by making these
statements up here?
R: The Berkeley campus is filled with
government agents these days. At the Tast
Viet Nam Day demonstration there were
photographers from at least four intelligence
services, the FBI, the CIA, Air Force, and
Naval Intelligence. The government by now
knows how each individual anti-war student
feels, and who these anti-war students are.
pf: What about the argument that by
coming to Canada draft-dodgers are shirking
their responsibility to stay and oppose the
war?
R: There are those who believe that it is
useful to burn draftcards and go to jail, but
I disagree with this. I'll stay and oppose the
war as long as I can, but there comes the
time when conditions become so intolerable
that there is nothing immoral about leaving.
For me this time would come if I had to
fight in a war which I consider immoral, or
if I had to go to jail for my refusal to fight.
America was founded by people who left
their homelands to escape what they believed
to ibe injustice.
pf: Could you describe the degree of
support and opposition to the war on the
Berkeley campus?
Friday, November 25, 1966
R: There have been no polls taken, but
it is estimated that about a quarter of the
approximately 27,000 students are satisfied
with the way the war is toeing conducted. A
very small percentage favor intensification
of the war.
A majority of the remaining three-
quarters are in basic sympathy with Johnson's expressed war aims, but differ with
him on matters of policy. Some think Ky
should be got rid of, some would like to halt
the bomlbing of the north, others are afraid
of a conflict with China, and so on.
About twenty per cent of the students
are strongly opposed to the war on moral
and political grounds.
pf: How many of this last twenty per
cent would carry their opposition to the
point of going to jail or leaving the country
if drafted?
R: No more than five hundred at the very
most. There is a very strong argument for
staying in the mainstream of society no
matter what compromises you have to make.
Going to jail or leaving the country involves going against the mainstream or
completely tearing up your roots. The latter
means leaving your friends, your home, and
your family without any prospect of ever
being able to resume normal life in the U.S.
Therefore I find it difficult to condemn
those who are forced to make the compromise.
pf: To what extent is Berkeley representative of American public opinion?
R: I don't think it is representative at all.
It is said 'by some that if the American people
only knew the facts, they would oppose the
war. But they have had the idea of anti-
Communism at any price drummed into them
for so long that they would support the war
even if they were told exactly what was
going on in Viet Nam. As it is, the war enjoys
overwhelming support.
pf: What will you do in Canada if you
decide to come here?
R: I would try to complete at least my
undergraduate education first. Then I would
try to get work here, and apply for my
Canadian citizenship. At the moment I am
trying to gather information about immigration procedure and educational opportunity.
THE      UBYSSEY
fanaticism of a communist
regime either, but I feel that
one should not state untrue "facts" in defence of
freedom for one then defeats one's very purpose.
Certainly the North Vietnamese and the Viet Cong
are not all good and the
Americans are not all bad.
The problem is much more
complicated than a struggle
between the good guys and
the bad guys as Mr. M. C. J.
understands. Life would be
too simple; there would be
no doubt. If only I knew for
sure that the North Vietnamese are absolutely
wrong, or bad, I would be
the first one to say "let's
bomb the hell out of them."
I have lived in both North
and South Viet Nam and
also in the United States.
LE  DINH  CHINH
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AROUND THE WORLD
ON $117 A MONTH
Adventurers set out on a 12-month
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Like the idea? Mail this coupon.
To: Travel Master's Guild, P.O. Box 3093, Vancottver,
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Please send full details of your "Around the World on
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This tour is planned for those who wish to broaden their
understanding of peoples from other lands ... to comprehend
their reactions and motivations . . . and to learn from them.
It is planned for you—the thoughtful adventurer.
The quest begins on board the Canberra at 6:00 p.m. on
July 13. You sail south via the Panama Canal to the warm
Caribbean. Thence north to Lisbon and Southampton where
an energetic sojourn in an International Work Camp will
replenish your pocket money. Next, the Continent Work or
idle your way through Holland, Scandinavia, or the Mediterranean countries—wherever you please. On November 15th
assemble in Athens before leaving for Israel and a life on
a Kibbutzim. In mid-January, join the Penn Overland bus
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Rates begin at $1,500 depending on shipboard accommodation. This includes all sea, rail and bus fares. However, the
real value to you of such a tour is incalculable.
TRUEMAN S TRAVEL      GODFREYS TRAVEL
Play trips into hell
The persecution and assassination
of man through alienation and doubt
By NELSON MILLER
Marat/Sade is mad as hell. Hell is men
at war with themselves. Madness is the
cause/effect state of mind indigenous to the
environment of violent acts. The world becomes an insane asylum in which men
become:
1. Audience participant.
A tenuous position held by erecting conditioned walls of social convention and
wealth behind which dishonesty and compromise allow a person to disavow any part
in the madness except as an amused spectator. Yet simultaneously he can toe a manager of institutions, which while providing
him with material comfort, create a hell for
mankind. He is the normal schizophrenic
member of the bourgeoisie.
2. Creator/participant (DeSade).
He looks around and sees a hellish world
of pain. He experiences that pain, however
he is aware enough to inquire why the world
is this way. Powers of rationalization tied
in with a sado-masochistic sensibility brings
him to the conclusion that man enjoys hell,
self destruction. So he creates pleasure out
of pain and use his fellow man as a toy to
express his demented creations.
3. Saviour/participant (Marat, Corday).
At a conceptual level Marat declares that
man is a rational humane being and it is
only the social institutions that make him
vicious and mad. Destroy the institutions
and the enemy who controls them, then
society and man will be rational and just.
However, Marat's experience opposes his
idealism. In an attempt to lead the people
out of hell, he plunges himself into it by
creating a bloodbath. Doubt about his own
humanity makes him paranoidally suspicious
about man's. The people whom he is going
to save become threatening, deadly. Everyone is a potential enemy to his paranoid
mind.
Charlotte Corday has been raised to believe that all desires of the flesh are sinful;
whatever lot a man is born into he must
accept. Therefore the individual causes his
own suffering by coveting his neighbor's
property; exploitative attitudes or values
expressed in the social institutions men
create have nothing to do with the continuation or intensity of suffering.
Nor does the alleviation of man's physical
needs make his sinful state less likely. Since
love is only lust as embodied in her relationship with the effete sensualist Duperret,
destruction of the devil who is masquerading
as a saviour of the people, is the only possible
way to deliver herself and others from suffering and sin. In Corday, schizophrenic repression breeds intense hatred.
4. Actor/participant.
The majority of men react to the hell they
live in by a mad pursuit of things which
are denied them. They are totally immersed
in hell, and in times of crisis and chaos, cry
out madly for a deliverance from their suffering. In them resides the hope of redemption from madness and hell. Weiss leaves
them in hell and therefore, whether a better
community of man is possible, is open to the
doubt or faith of the individual participant.
After all we are all participants in the hell
he portrays. What type of participant are
you? In order not to belong to any of Weiss'
categories, you must have no doubt about
yourself and therefore others.
Words lose to mad fury
txmt
ulnlm.
6aiM
GLOBETROTTER TRAVEL      WRIGHTS   TRAVEL
INMATE at the asylum of
Charenton, Blain Culling,
backstage at the Freddy
Wood.
By ROGER SEAMON
Peter Weiss's Marat/Sade
is hauled mightily into fine
theatrical shape by the talents and energies of a cast
that's on stage continuously
and by the direction of John
Brockington.
Although the play is spectacular in an obvious way
(perhaps opt of a certain desperation on the author's
part, or perhaps out of the
director's sense that it had to
be that way), one felt that
the spectacle came as much
from within the madness of
the inmates who are the actors, as it did from the desire to assault the senses and
feelings of the audience.
Action is stronger than
words. More was suggested
by the sight of de Sade thinking and being whipped simultaneously than by any of
the thoughts offered by various characters.
The philosophy — and let
not the playwright plead
it's only his characters talking — couldn't keep pace
with the fury of the chained
and distorted minds that
were flung about all evening.
The tremblings, shakings,
twichings, itching and mad
copulation were made vivid
pf 4our
by the actors, and in relation to that level of action
the words had a hollow
sound.
The play with perspectives
— audience in theatre, audience on stage, de Sade directing his own play in which he
is also directed — sometimes
seemed potentially rich, and
at others rather wooden.
The latter was the case in
the references to contemporary events; one doesn't need
the Marat/Sade to inform
us that napalm is insane.
And there was one awful
bit where Marat the revolutionary hero has a nightmare
in which his mother and
father copulate. "What's the
good of a revolution without
general copulation?"
Freud and Marx fight to
a pointless draw here, or both
are defeated by Weiss.
The intellectual contest
between radical individualism and radical social action
also seemed like a draw to
me. One draws pleasure and
blood where one can; if revolution will do it, up the
revolution, if not give us
money.
In the midst of such recognitions the murderess of
Marat is still forced, like de
Sade, to ask the human
question: "What is this city?
What are these streets?" We
still don't and may never
know but we'll keep asking.
Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 25, 1966 Blood
lust
By   MILTON   STEPHENS
Once   again   Modern   Man
makes  his  annual   pilgrimage
for the performance of sensual
and wild revels.
The cult practised by this
sect today differs only in degree from those practised in
remoter times by the Romans, Ghengis Khan and the
Spanish Inquisitors, those
honorable forebears of MAN
1966. The blood lust is the
principle doctrine of this
cult and the means of employing it to their own end
is their dogma.
This weekend the Spirits
of the forebears will smile
benignly as they watch their
successors assemble for this
year's convention and spectacle. Debauchery and
feuding will cease as some
twenty-six thousand key
members pack themselves
into the arena to gaze in
awe at the main ceremony.
This is the Battle of the
Gladiators. Highly trained,
highly prized slaves of the
Money Barons will give
their best performance.
Suppressed by modern
civilization, MAN 1966 has
to be content to see oniy a
second rate show with very,
very little blood. But he has
been conditioned for this, in
fact he can be conditioned
to anything. He still thrills
as the two armies of combatants face each other to do
battle, mauling and gouging
on the pretence of trying to
gain possession of a piece of
rubber encased in animal
hide.
Comment — futility.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos   Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
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GRADUATION,
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Every man with any job hunting experience knows
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not
And yet, we think it has some validity. After all, a man's
growth can depend as much on the company he works
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We'd be pleased to tell you in detail, about the individualized training programmes (with pay), the challenging
assignments and the opportunities for advancement we
offer to young engineers looking for careers in
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k Technical Sales
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Should you be interested in becoming a U.S. resident, the
Timken Company also offers excellent career opportunities
in engineering, research and sales there.
Our brochure is now available at the Placement Office
and our representatives will be on campus.
Tuesday, November 29th
Applications for interviews may be made with your
Placement Officer.
Canadian Timken, Limited
St. Thomas, Ontario
QUALITY TURNS ON
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BEARINGS
Friday, November 25,  1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9 A tome Energy of Canada Limited
will conduct
Campus Interviews
on
Monday & Tuesday, December 5-6, 1966
for
Administrators Engineers
Biologists Mathematicians
Chemists Metallurgists
Commerce Graduates Physicists
Continuing staff appointments available at
• Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories
Chalk River, Ontario
• Commercial Products
Ottawa, Ontario
• Power Projects
Toronto, Ontario
• Whiteshell Nuclear Research
Establishment
Pinawa, Manitoba
For job description and interview appointment,
please visit your university Placement Office
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville ot 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers, rubbers and
umbrellas.
What ever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's.  Pay them a  visit — see the exciting  new
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Honest
letters
By ROY STARRS
Because most recent poets
have believed in complexities simply stated and simplicities complexly stated it
has been necessary for them
to be famous, to conform
to all our myths about what
they are, to publish in the
right places, to die young
etc. because Baudelaire died
a long time ago and everyone expects words to have
meanings.
But what if suddenly a
Patrick Lane happens along
whom you know bugger-all
about except that he is an
honest poet who shares most
of your concerns and who
writes the honest sort of
poetry you would write if
only you had the time?
Maybe you would pick up
a copy of Letters from the
Savage Mind, the first publication of a promising new
publishing house called
Very Stone House which has
emerged from the quagmire
of Vancouver poetry.
pf 6ix
Open, Sasamat
By BEWILDERED
LSD is a can-opener for the tin minds of the weak
But it hasn't let in any Greek.
What tripping-up could be more chaotic
Than saying psychedelic when you mean psychodelolic?
YMCA.  Ski School Alma Branch
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ARTS and
GRADUATES
For:
MacMILLAN BLOEDEL LIMITED
"Canada's largest integrated Forest Products Company
Invites you to discuss Career Opportunities in our Wood
Products and Pulp and Paper Groups
Interviews will be held on campus November 28, 29, 30,
Dec. 1, 2
For information and appointments please see your
Student  Placement  Office
Page  10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 25,  1966 Pompeii
George Stanley has published three volumes
of poetry. The following is taken from his current
book Tete Rouge and Flowers.
When I read this poem I think of Pompeii.
When they dug up Pompeii the poems were gone,
flower-like and fragile in the stone,
giving nothing to the stone,
honey alloyed to the stone,
making nothing sweet.
The eyes of the matrons burned on the dark blue
walls,
under their eyes in shallow pools,
the bell of a xylophone, silver,
bell of an ambulance,
bell of a burglar alarm,
a trying to watch the slowest of motion,
a grinding explosion,
change everything in the complexity of a second.
When I read this poem I know Pompeii is at hand.
They were unready.   It came at the wrong
hour for them, the silver bell.
Some  little  dignity  argued  a  minute  with  the
enclosing,
and all that was left then was the gesture,
virginity, the little lost dog come home
leaping and leaping caught as in a cartoon.
When I read this poem I know Pompeii is imminent,
I know we are moving easily into frenzy,
I feel like taking off my hat to Pompeii
before running.
I should talk like the elder Pliny
until I die and then like the younger
reporting my own death:
I was too tired
to go see the eruption. Besides,
Uncle had set me a reading in Cicero.
I read it.    I bathed and took dinner.
My uncle died there with a silly cocked hat
on his head like a real admiral.   When the wind
changed sparks began to fall.    Mother and I
went north.   I had to carry her.
Now it is beautiful weather.
I am still reading.    Cicero's style
is most Roman of all.
Dear Tacitus,
my uncle died there,
he died stoically I am told,
all his debts were paid,
Mother and I are well.
My dear Pliny, they were such
nice people, the dead.
We are moving so easily into frenzy,
with never a backward glance, so graciously,
the silver bell will ring in the afternoon,
bell of a xylophone,
bell of an ambulance,
bell of a burglar alarm,
and Pompeii, the dull unconscious lurch
exploding under the bay.
We will be prepared, but unready.
Speech will be on our lips then,
light winged, watching the light flame
flowing under your flesh, translucent,
becoming conscious of
the dark flame, the dark red
wall collapsing behind the flying soot,
and your two white hands are
shriveled to black twigs,
unable to say,
gesturing bone.
What it is you were going to say
will remain unsaid, even the flattening
words will ripple in pools of stone
and die between our lips in the hardening hill.
There was a time for consolation
in   the   morning   of   the   state,   you   and   me,
Republicans,
read, "the unexamined life is not worth living."
That could console us..   But now we cannot
get consolation from Greek maxims
when everybody is licking his lips, expectant.
Bell of a xylophone,
Bell of an ambulance,
Bell of a burglar alarm, silver.
Now time has fallen into our hands
out of all the clocks.   You look to me
for consolation, and the hot wind
pours by unconcerned, flushing our steepled faces,
and the thick flow of death winnows down the
window like grass.
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total of 550 CUSO people altogether in
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How do you apply? Get more information and application forms from local
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CUSO
The Canadian Peace Corps
Friday, November 25,  1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11 zr^mimmw s.w^wxm^r t*w& w:."fSKr\«
Happiness is?
By NELSON MILLER
Done in soft, impressionistic hues, Le Bonheur is a
gentle, loving film.
Everyone speaks softly;
they touch and kiss; each
is concerned about the
other; all of them smile a
lot, and the crafts performed, carpentry and housekeeping, are done with careful and gentle hands.
The film is a fairytale
about love of a man for two
women and the effect of this
love relationship on the participants. It is a kind of love
that maintains a delicate
balance between needing
and giving.
In this film, women are
dependent on a monogamous relationship, whereas
men can give themselves to
more than one relationship.
Because of this imbalance of
dependence and the childlike naivete of the participants, a death occurs.
Innocently, the husband
tells his wife aibout his mistress. She is unable to accept
her husband's sharing of his
love and she commits suicide.
Experience destroys one
person and brings another
to the recognition of death.
However, this awareness
does not destroy the man;
he accepts the loss and life
continues with a Garden of
Eden innocence.
But with experience, one
cannot return to the original
state of innocence that is
intuitive and unconscious of
itself. Within the self, a development of an innocence
that knows itself is necessary to move beyond what
experience imposes on the
consciousness.
The film is an incomplete
vision of love.
—"■srapi—gi
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Page 12
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, November 25, 1^66 Friday, November 25, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  13
PAYS LIP SERVICE
Faculty pulls snow job
By BO HANSEN
The head of the education
action program charged Thursday faculty is doing a "snow
job" on the education student-
faculty liaison committee.
"The committee is an important step, however small,"
said Fred Spencer, "but students should realize in reality
it won't accomplish much."
The committee consists of
ten student and ten faculty
members.
Spencer charged the selection committee, headed by
Mat Hassen, has chosen only
students who will sit and be
complacent.
"Anyone who might argue
and tear down the present
curriculum structure has been
barred."
Faculty agreed to the formation of the committee to appease the students but hasn't
given up anything in reality
because of the structure of
the committee, Spencer continued.
"Faculty is snowing us by
giving lip service to our role
in faculty affairs.
"How can such a committee
be constructive?"
Head of the selection committee, Mat Hassen, was quick
to refut Spencer's criticism.
"The structure of the committee is designed to encourage discussion of a man-to-man
basis between faculty and students," he said.
"The faculty members were
picked because of their inter
est in furthering this type of
student-faculty  liaison."
"The students chosen to sit
on the committee are all capable, competent, free-thinking
individuals who would have
no fear of speaking their
minds.
"I am sure they will be able
to air problems and faculty
will participate in good faith."
Hassen added he has the
position of ombudsman on the
committee and members of
the committee who want an
issue brought up but don't
know how it will be received
can refer the issue to him.
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(W'lfc Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, November 25,  1966
BULLDOGS FAVORED
Tough tourney
The UBC Thunderbirds again will face the powerful
Alberni Athletics in the sixteenth annual Totem Basketball
Tournament starting tonight and climaxing Saturday night.
UBC last year narrowly lost
out to the Athletics, 83-81 in
the first game. The Athletics
went on to take over the Tournament.
At 7:30 p.m. Friday Gonzaga
from Spokane will battle St.
Martin's of Olympia. At 9:15
p.m. the Birds and the experienced Athletics will clash.
Saturday night the winners
will fight for the championship.
The Bulldogs from Gonzaga
are rated as favourites. Last
year they won the Big Sky
Conference   with   Gary   Lech-
man averaging a phenomenal
21.3 points per game.
St. Martin's will bring a
huge contingent of supporters
and their own band and cheerleaders.
This is a rebuilding year for
the Birds. Only four players
have returned from last year's
squad — Ian Dixon, Morris
Douglas, Neil Murray, and Jack
Turpin.
But the Birds have gained
experience and shown good
power by bopping the Senior
"A" White Spots 63-59 last
weekend.
GARY LECHMAN
. . . tough to beat
THE PRINT CENTRE
2760 W. Broadway      -      Vancouver      -      RE 8-1421
" David Silverberg Exhibition"
(GRAPHIC   PROFESSOR  MT.  ALLISON   UNIVERSITY)
Coloured Engravings - Nov. 22 - Dec. 3
PSYCHEDELIC
WORSHIP
A Trip In the Church With
(Rev.) Jim McKibbon, Tommy Chong and The Vancouvers
at
UNIVERSITY  HILL UNITED  CHURCH
'SUNDAY
25,   7:30   P.M.
27,   8:00   P.M.
CBC—Nov. 2
intramurals
Faculty competition in the
Intramural program finds the
Engineers out in front by thirty points.
Complete results up to today are as follows:
Engineers 324; P. E. 294;
Forestry 269; Fijis 202; Phi
Delts 178.
As authorized by the recent General Meeting of the Graduate Student Association
the executive council of the G.S.A. would here make public the following letter to
the Premier of B.C.
GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION
University of British Columbia
Thea Koerner House
Graduate Student Centre
Vancouver 8, B.C.
November 14, 1966
The Hon. W.A.C. Bennett,
Premier,
The Province of British Columbia,
Parliament Buildings,
Victoria, B. C.
Dear Sir,
At a recent general meeting of the Graduate Student
Association of the University of British Columbia, it was agreed
that I write to you on behalf of our membership concerning a resolution passed at that meeting.
On the occasion of the resignation of President John
B. Macdonald from the University of British Columbia we wish to affirm
strongly our support of his policies on higher education in this
Province, and to express our deep regret at the Provincial Government's
lack of full co-operation in implementing all of those policies. U.B.C,
is in the process of establishing itself as a strong graduate school,
and yet in the last provincial grant it received $648 less than Simon
Fraser University and $363 less than the University of Victoria per
student — a discrepancy which was only slightly lessened by the
Federal grant.  If graduate students are to come to British Columbia
they will come to U.B.C, since a university of its standing cannot
be created in a couple of years.  If there is insufficient money at
U.B.C. to support and equip the graduate student in his research he
may not come at all, or if he is a British Columbian he may go elsewhere.  In both cases British Columbia will have weakened her research
potential and her future.
In conclusion, we would express our regret at the
failure of the Provincial Government in establishing an effective and
true grants committee. Only through such a body can there be accurate
consideration of grants to the Universities of B.C.
Yours truly,
Gordon G.C. Robinson
President,
Graduate Student Association. Friday, November 25,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
Relay runs
out season
By MIKE JESSEN
Dec. 3 will be a tough day for the UBC cross country
team.
But the day will end on a
pleasant social note. The team
is competing in the B.C. Centennial Road Relay to be run
from Nanaimo to HMCS Na-
den in Esquimau — a distance
of 75 miles.
The race is organized by
the Vancouver Island Track
and Field Council and is a centennial  project.
Among those participating
will be teams from the University of Oregon, Oregon
State University, the University of Washington, Washington State University, the Vancouver Olympic Club, the Optimist Striders, the Richmond
Track and Field Club and, of
course,  UBC.
Each team will consist of 20
members who will each run
between two and six miles, depending on the topography,
before passing the baton on to
the next runner.
Such famous runners as Jim
Grelle, Jerry Lindgren and
Jim Freeman will be competing. Roger Jackson, the Olympic gold medallist in rowing,
will  also  be  running.
Pugh said he had no trouble
at all finding 20 runners for
the team. "In fact we have
more people than we need,"
he  said.
Three Faculty of Physical
Education members are running and all are in good shape
for the race.
The day will end with an
award banquet at the Empress
Hotel.      Governor -General
Swimming  begins
with  newcomers
in  Birds  meet
The new, improved version
of the UBC Thunderbirds Swim
Team takes to the water on
Sunday.
The Birds will be competing
with 22 other teams from the
Pacific Northwest in their own
Thunderbird   Relays.
Two schools from which the
Bird's coach Jack Pomfret is
expecting much trouble, are
the University of Washington
Huskies and a strong team
from SFA.
Tom Dinsley has returned to
compete for the Birds diving
team after practising for three
years at the University of Indiana.
Two members of last year's
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Union runner-up team,
leading this year, are captain
Rick Mansell and four year
man Bill Gillespie.
Preliminaries for the meet
start at 10:00 a.m. Sunday with
the diving events starting at
1:00 p_m. and the swimming
finals at 4:00 p.m. The Meet
will be at Percy Norman Memorial Pool, 30th and Ontario.
George Pearkes will be in attendance.
On the whole the team has
put in lots of preparation for'
this final race of the season.
More scores
for the fans
The UBC Rugby Thunderbirds will play in the Tisdall
Cup final after all.
League officials settled the
"A" Division title on a points
scored for, points scored
against basis. Kats came out
with a better record than
Meralomas and will meet the
Birds.
The Tisdall Cup final will go
as originally planned, December 3rd at 2:30 p.m. on Wolfson Field.
The Thunderbirds go against
Rowing Club at 12:00 p.m.,
Nov. 27.
A combined UBC third team
plays Trojans II at 1:30 p.m.,
and the Braves play Trojans I
at 2:30 p.m.
• •     •
The UBC Soccer Thunderbirds moved into a first place
tie with a 3-0 win over St.
Andrews on Nov. 20.
Ash Valdai led the team
with two goals. Harvey Tom
scored the other.
The team is tied with Victoria and North Shore for first
place.
• •     •
Results of the past week in
field hockey proved interesting as the Junior Varsity
Braves recorded an upset win
over India, 2-0.
The Tomahawks lost 2-0 to
Wasps in their Nov. 19 game.
• •     •
The UBC Thunderettes took
first place in the Pacific
Northwest Grasshockey Tournament, held at Ellensburg,
Washington, last weekend.
Although no official winner
is  recognized   in   the   tourna-
Grey Cup
moves games
This weekend's sports schedule has been revised due to
Grey Cup activities.
Basketball
The sixteenth annual Totem
Basketball Tournament will be
held in the War Memorial
Gym, Friday and Saturday at
7:30 and 9:15 p.m.
Ice Hockey
The UBC Thunderbirds meet
the Chilliwack Army squad
Friday. Gametime is 8:00 p.m.
at the UBC Winter Sports
Centre.
The Birds will be representing B.C. at the Canada Winter
Games in Quebec this February.
Wrestling
Seven UBC wrestlers will
compete for berths in the Canada Winter Games.
The Winter Games Trials
take place Saturday, starting
at 2:00 p.m. in the Education
Gym.
Coach Paul Nemeth has entered his men in six classes,
from 136-lb. Ron Turner to
heavyweight, Chris Nemeth.
The other hopefuls are Gary
Caulfield, Colin McLeod, Ron
Parlee, Ken Kerluke, and Bob
Scott.
Soccer
The UBC Thunderbirds play
University of Oregon Sunday,
2:00 p.m. at Mclnnes Field,
UBC.
An important game for the
Birds is at Callister Park, Dec.
4, against Columbus.
Swimming
The Thunderbird Relays
start at 10:00 a.m. Sunday.
This is the first of a number
of swim meets to be held at
Percy Norman Pool this season.
Field Hockey
The Birds meet North Shore
"A" Sunday, 1:30 p.m. at Wolfson Field. In Junior Varsity
action the Tomahawks play
Pitt Meadows "B" also at
Wolfson, 3:00 p.m. The Braves
face Vancouver "A", 3:00 p.m.
at Spencer Field.
ment, UBC and Victoria College shared the best record of
wins.
The Thunderettes tied Vic-
t o r i a ; defeated Washington
University 5-0; downed University of Oregon 1-0; whipped Central Washington State
College 6-0; and allowed Simon Fraser Academy to score
one goal against their three.
Excellent Tutors, Moderate Rates
Do Well On Christmas Exams
History
French
Spanish
Russian
Italian
Mathematics
Physics
Law
Courses in English Composition & Literature a Specialty
EXTRA  COACHING  MAY  MAKE THE   DIFFERENCE
PHONE 736-6923 AT ANY TIME
Graduate Student News
Christmas Dinner
At Thea Koerner House
DATE: Friday.  Dec.   16th
TIMES: FIRST SITTING — 5:00 - 6:00 p.m.
SECOND SITTING — 6:15 - 7:00 p.m.
COST:    ADVANCE  RESERVED  SEAT
TICKETS ONLY — $1.75
Tickets on sale in G.S.C. Office
Wine will be served with supper
(Cost Extra)
The Regular Club Night will follow
=^\
For a fully array of Ski
Equipment and the finest
Winter Fashion, drop in and
see the knowledgable staff
at Vancouver's newest Ski
Shop, The ALPINE HUT in
Park   Royal.
Gary Taylor and Eugene
Ruelle (Thunderbird ski team
1961-66) will be pleased
to assist you.
Exclusive agents for Rose-
mount Boots and Spinnerin
Slacks.
10% discount for University
Students
imfm
Park Royal - South Mall 926-2524      J
XMAS MARKS??
On most campus bulletin boards, starting Dec. 5, you
will find "XMAS MARK CARDS". To find out your
marks early (like before Christmas) pick up a card,
and follow the instructions on it.
IT'S FREE . . . IT'S EASY .  . .  !
ALUMNI ANNUAL GIVING, GREEN  PARK, UBC
An  extra   measure
for excellence. Page  16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 25,  1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Powder puffers meet
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Ladies division gymkhana
for club members only, Sunday
at 9:30 a.m. at the top of C-lot.
Classes for yank tanks down
through hondas.
HENRI COMMITTEE
Meeting today at noon in
Robson 325, for all new members. Ayn Rofilac rites will be
performed for the newly virtuous.
LSM
Zoologist   Van   Heusen   and
preacher Thelin discuss Freeze
Now,  Live  Later, Monday at
noon in Bu. 104.
EL CIRCULO
J. Macdonald discusses Am-
ericanistas   versus   Hispanistas
in Latin America, today at noon
in Bu. 204.
NEWMAN CENTRE
Monseigneu R.  Murray  discusses   Authentic   Ideals   for
Canadians,   today  at  noon   in
Bu. 100.
MUSSOC
Those interested in playing
in  the  orchestra  for  How to
Succeed in Business Without
Really Trying are asked to contact the musical director at 228-
8659 or in the clubroom above
the auditorium stage.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting today at noon in IH,
film peintre et poete will be
shown.
AQUA SOC
Meeting for those going on
Christmas Dive, today at noon
in the clubroom.
PRE SOCIAL WORK
(Meeting Monday at noon in
Bu. 204.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
204.
ALPHA OMEGA
Choir   practice   Monday   at
7:30 p.m. in Bu. 100.
PHRATERES
Meeting today at noon in Bu.
104.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting Monday at noon in
Bu. 225 to discuss the banquet.
HELLENIC SOC
W. Choukalos presents a Pictorial Review of Recent Bridges
Holiday games with pay;
We'll all play post office
You work from September to December.
And now you can work some more.
The Vancouver post office needs male carriers and
porters at $1.50 an hour and female sorters at $1.25 an
hour to start work by 8 a.m., Dec. 16.
Male and female registration for Christmas employment at the post office starts at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6,
in hut M-4.
And further information about work may be obtained
from the student placement office hut M-7.
in Canada, Monday at 7:30 in
IH.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
Meeting   today   at   noon   in
Gym. 211.
VCF
Young   Life   director   Cliff
Erikson speaks on Adam and
the Atom,   today  at  noon  in
Ang. 110.
GERMAN CLUB
The film Europe Today will
be shown today at noon in Bu.
203.
EAST ASIA SOC
Two colour films, Television
Age in Japan, and Japanese
Press in. Action, will be shown
today at noon in Bu. 106.
SATURDAY
NIGHT
NOVEMBER 26
INDOOR
AUTO RACES
FOREIGN STOCKS
A  spectacular  cross
between a stock car race
and a demolition derby.
AGR0D0ME
Time trials 7:30 - Races 8:30
Adult $2.00, Student $1.25
Children under 12 Free with Adults!
For Mod men
They're cool—PLAYBOYS Mod slip-ons. Crafted in deep-
glowing black Living Leather, (stays newer looking five times
longer than ordinary leather) these Carnaby slip-ons are for the
man who's with it. Styled with the tapered "in" heel, built with
steel shanks for extra support, comfort.
Why not take a pair of PLAYBOYS Mod slip-ons home
today. Do it for about $14.95
PLAYBOYS
BY
a division of Shoe Corporation of Canada Limited
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
WOULD THE PEESON WHO TOOK
my Geo 201 and ED 332 note books
from Lower Mall, Common Block
last Mon. please return to Wayne
Robson,   417.   224-9730.
LOST.   GREY  PURSE,   CH   150   ON
Wed.   10:30.   Call   Norma,  224-7289.
POUND. MAN'S RING IN WASH-
room on basement floor of Angus
building.   Phone   Ted,   943-3359.	
IF YOU TOOK FROM BUS STOP
Cafe my black London fog raincoat, phone Pete 922-6908. I have
your  coat.   Exchange.
LOST —SMALL OBLONG POCKET
watch, pigskin case. EMA 101 or
Brock lot. Reward, Jane Rule,
Bu  2260  or  224-0557.
REWARD FOR RETURN OF
blue bag containing skates,
gloves. M. Kerr, etc. Phone Peter
224-7809.
Coming Dances
12A
AFTERTHOUGHT HAPPENING
presents:
"BRAVE   NEW  WORLD"
Tom Northcott Trio
Friday,   November  25,   8:30  p.m.
DANCE TO "LA PLATA" AND HIS
exotic Latin American Band. I.H.
Dec. 2nd, 8:30. Members $1.00, non
members, $1.25.
Special Notices
13
ANYONE WITNESSING REAR-
end collision between white 1962
Chevy II and 1963 Dodge station-
wagon, corner Cornwall & Larch
Oct. 21 about 7:30 a.m. requested
to call Mr. Warren 685-6367 or
Gerrie   987-2174,   very   urgent.	
SKIERS SPECIAL RATES.
Double Rooms. Phone 492-2969.
Write Braemore Lodge. Reservations 2402 South Main St., Penticton.
SPECIAL ANTIQUE SALE — OLD
mugs. Selling at real low prices.
See Miscellaneous For Sale.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED 8:30-5:00 MON.-
Thurs. from 12th & Granville.
Phone   Ron   733-6927   evenings.
RIDE DESPERATELY NEEDED
from vie. of 27th & Nanaimo, a.m.
except Thurs. Call Diane after 6
at  TR  6-9672.
RIDE WANTED TO CALGARY
leaving after Dec. 16. Share gas,
driving, Bill, 224-5373.	
RIDE WANTED FROM 70TH AND
Montcalm. 9:30-5:30 lectures, phone
Dave,  AM  6-2732  or FA 5-5860.
Wanted
15
I   AM   LOOKING   FOR   A   SET   OF
used  VW  rims.   CR  8-0853.
Travel Opportunities
16
AVAILABLE UBC CHARTER
flight; 2 tickets London to Vancouver, August 25, 1967. Phone Ed,
876-8069.
AUTOMOTIVE   ft  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale 21
1956 AUSTIN, $100. MUST SELL —
leaving country.   CA  4-6990  eves.
SALE: '58 VW DELUXE EXCEL-
lent condition, spotless inside and
out.   $490 or offer,  Blair,   224-5214.
1960 MORRIS 850. RELIABLE AND
economical transportation. $425 or
best offer. 266-7482 after 6 p.m.
'54 HILLMAN. EXCELLENT CON-
dition, $145.00 or best offer. Dave,
CA   4-4593.
1954 CHEVROLET IN GOOD RUN-
ning order. Good battery, tires
and radio. Car is on the Campus.
Phone Ed, 224-9667.
TR3   WELL   MAINTAINED,    CITY
tested. RE 8-5537.
FOR SALE: 1967 JAG XK140. NEW!
Motor, clutch, top, exhaust system,
carbs. Phone 733-4090 after 6 p.m.
Sunday,  anytime.	
MUST SELL ! '59 SINGER GA-
zelle, 4 dr. Saloon, 27,000 mi. Mech.
exc. Body good. WA 2-1675.	
•57 STUDE HAWK V8, STICK.
New trans., orig. owner. Good
cond. 433-8611;  eves. 526-6884.
FOR    SALE,    1957    AUSTIN    A-56.
Call 228-2794 after 6 p.m. Ask for
Don.	
'54 FORD V8 AUTO. SOUND BODY,
snow   tires.    4572   Main   St.,    Ph.
TR 6-7675. Best offer.
'64   FURY   CONV.   383.   P.S.   &   P.B.
Bucket seats, auto. 879-6427.
URGENT! MUST SELL '64 MGB.
Mint condition. Wire wheels, new
tires, head rests, ski rack. Must
be sold by this weekend. Must see.
WA 2-8954.
1960 AUSTIN A-40 WAGON.   GOOD
condition. YU 5-3058.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
CUT IT SHORTER AND KEEP IT
longer—why not try it! Campus
Barber Shop, Brock ext.
Typing
43
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS, THESES
accurately typed. Phone 224-5046
after 6 p.m.	
NORTH   SHORE   STUDENTS
Typing done in my home. Reasonable rates.  Phone 922-1685.
Professional  Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LIMITED
70th   & Granville  Street        263-4530
PROFESSORS
Fully   exp.   in   the   typing   of  your
theses.  Reas.  rates.  Ref.  Inger 872-
7380. .	
STUDENTS!
Am once again free to accept your
typing   requirements.   Elec.   Type-
writer.   Inger   872-7380.	
LEGAL SECRETARY NEEDS EX-
tra work! Will type: essays, thesis,
notes. Call AL 5-8588 (after 6 p.m.)
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL DO
essays and thesis at home, 25c per
page. Mrs. Hay, 5-3963 Bond St.,
Bby. 1, 433-6565 after 6 p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
MATHS & PHYSICS STUDENTS,
final years or graduates to teach
high school and first first two
years of university. Phone between 6:00 and 8:00 p.m. on Nov.
28. 738-1368.
WANTED: YOUNG MAN TO TAKE
group of boys from private school
skiing on Mount Seymour on
Saturdays next January and February.  Phone CA 4-1304 daytime.
INSTRUCTION — SCHOOLS
Instruction-Tutoring
64
LESSONS IN GERMAN FOR STU-
dents and persons eager to learn
to speak the language. $2.00 per
lesson.   325-4902.
ENGLISH, FRENCH HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. 736-6923. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish,
German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
66
Instruction Wanted
TUTOR WANTED FOR PHYSICS
103. Pref. someone who knows the
course. Phone Anne 261-7119 and
leave   message.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
ONE PAIR MEN'S STROLTZ SKI
boots, size 9. One pair Ladies' Tyrol ski boots, size 6. Phone 738-
3240.
205'S "ATOMIC" HICORY LAMI-
nated skis. Lift-marker saftey
binding. Also size 11 boots. Call
Bob,   AM   1-1878.
PORTABLE TAPE RECORDER 110
or 6 volt, $50.00. Like new. Dave
CA   4-4593.
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available. Now. Limited
Number. Buy now, only 76 cents
from Publications Office, Brock
Hall,  or the Bookstore.	
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life so
we are selling 19(4, 19(6 and ltM
issues for only SO cents — Pub-
lications office in Brock.	
SPECIAL SALE OF "OLD MUGS"
in old Totem Grad Books. 1966
issues now $2.00, 1965's only $1.00
(No 1964's), 1963's, $1.00. Publica-
tlons  Office,   Brock  Hall.	
ONE MATCHED PAIR OF KNEIS-
sel Black Star skis, 200 cm. Never
used.  Phone Murray, 224-9662.
RADIO AND SPEAKER FOR 1960
Ford for sale — $45. Contact R.
Blair at noon in Ubyssey office.
GUITAR AMP, $125, TREMOLO, 12"
speaker, bass treble, vol. controls.
Phone Bob after 7, 277-5061.
BELTONE ELECTRIC BASS AMP.
45' wiatt output, two heavy-duty
12-inch speakers, $190.00 Cash or
terms. Phone John after 6:00 p.m.
at 435-8389.
RENTALS  ft  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
TWO SLEEPING ROOMS, MALE
students. Phone after 7:00 p.m.
224-1631.
GIRLS
FURNISHED   ROOM   FOR   RENT,
3461 West 3rd. Phone 738-6980.
ROOM OR SUITE WANTED CLOSE
to   UBC.    Phone   Mary,    224-3103,
after 5.
Room ft Board
82
SHORT OF FUNDS? ENJOY COOK-
ing? Music? Room and board close
to Gates in return for cooking family evening meal five days a week.
Optional additional light domestic
work  paid  by  the hour.   224-7574.
Furn. Houses ft Apts.
^5
BSMT. STE. PTE. ENT. SHOWER
etc. Frig & ht. pit. $55 mo. .1 pers.
AM 3-8778. W.  48th loc.
BSMT. HSKG. ACCOM. AVAIL-
able immed. for male (non-smoker)
student   to  share.   Phone   224-5287.

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