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The Ubyssey Nov 21, 1968

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 •••••" pow-Ml iMrQrovt photo
'NOUS SOMMES PRETS, messrs. et mesdames les senateurs.' Thafs SFU actio g pres Kenneth Strand, perturbed. Story below.
Vol. t. No. 30
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1968
228-2305
ACCREDITATION...
...AT  SFU
Senate snub brings invasion
By  JOHN  TWIGG
BURNABY (Staff)—Chaos broke out at Simon
Fraser University Wednesday night as students carried their campaign for improvement in SFU's accreditation and admission policies to a climax.
Students, prompted by the inaction of a verbose
and stubborn senate, took over the SFU administration building.
In  taking  over  the  building,  students started
~searching through the registrar's files in search of
evidence they hope will back up their charges of
admissions discrimination.
Wednesday night the senate so frustrated student
„ demonstrators   over   the    accreditation - admissions
policy issue that students took over the building.
The senate rejected four student demands in a
31-3 vote. Those demands were:
• adoption of a definite policy of accreditation
for courses resulting in freedom of transfer
between post-secondary institutions',
• establishments of an elected admission board
to hear appeals and general policy, with equal
representation from faculty and students;
"* • opening of the SFU registrar's files to student
representatives for further investigation of
this discrimination;
• university support for an increase in the government financial aid to education to release
the freeze on school construction.
The senate meeting, which refused to compromise
or even consider the students' plight, sparked any
actions that will follow.
It was well known that students planned a takeover of the administration building if their demands
were rejected by senate. Observers say senators
must have been aware of this too, particularly after
UBC's faculty club sit-in.
The senate was also expecting a student delegation, but did not bring loudspeakers and microphones so all concerned could hear and talk.
But the administration building take-over wasn't
an event which developed overnight.
The student unrest has beeing going on for almost a week now over the accreditation issue. Students, particularly those from Vancouver City College,
claim they are not given adequate credit at SFU
when transferring there from other institutions.
Charges of personal and political discrimination
against hopeful applicants to SFU have also been
aired, but SFU associate registrar Douglas Meyers
has been out of town and unable to reply to the
charges.
Greater Vancouver students took steps to rectify
the admissions situation by demonstrating for their
cause.
The  first  demonstration,   Nov.   15,  saw  pickets
parade outside the academic services building, and in-
the second demonstration, Nov. 18, students picketed
inside the building.
The Wednesday events started with the chartering of two buses by the VCC branch of Students
for a Democratic University (SDU).
The buses first stopped at UBC, picked up about
60 passengers, went to VCJC, and finally arrived at
SFU about noon, just in time for a rally.
The SDU is the co-ordinating and unifying body
for the students, but the demonstrators are by no
means all "anarchist radical SDU members". The
majority of students have legitimate grievances.
The SDU, which has branches at UBC, SFU and
VCC is acting as the liaison group.
The afternoon included the rally, and a teach-in,
but it was really an excuse to gather students for the
senate meet scheduled for 7:30 p.m. that night.
Senate started right on time, with 34 senators
in the faculty lounge, along with several hundred
students.
Students presented their four demands, the senate
called the question and then thoroughly rejected the
demands by the 31-3 vote.
The demonstrators, obviously incensed, debated
with senate for another hour, then marched out in
frustration.
To Page 2 — See: MORE
Council grills Loney, Russell    Math man canned
By JOHN GIBBS
The Canadian Union of Students was grilled
for two and a half hours at Monday night's
council meeting.
The discussion extended the meeting to after
1 a.m., making it the longest yet this year, and
featured for the defense Martin Loney, presi-
<* dent-elect of CUS, and western regional field
worker, Jim Russell.
The discussion was called for by Russ Grierson, commerce rep, in light of the general controversy over whether CUS was relevant to the
majority of students.
Loney was questioned about what CUS was
doing for UBC and why Russell hadn't been
on campus more often.
Russell's poor attendance was explained by
his abundance of' activities in the interior, particularly at Notre Dame University in Nelson
and Selkirk College in Castlegar.
This was followed by charges that these
places weren't even members of CUS and that
UBC money should not be used to subsidize
activities in these schools.
Loney answered these attacks with what
his supporters and opponents alike described as
"impeccable rhetoric".
To Page 2 — See: COUNCIL
UBC assistant mathematics professor Eugene Sobel was
fined $1000 and sentenced to one day in jail for possession
of hashish, but Sobel chose not to pay the fine.
He chose to serve five months in jail in lieu of the fine.
Sobel was arrested Aug. 11 at Vancouver International
airport while returning from a summer teaching post in
Australia.
He was caught with approximately $25 worth of the
drug.
Sobel arrived at UBC in July, 1967 from a post at
Stanford university. He's currently oh a one year leave of
absence. Page "2
THE*       UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
--------- John frizoH photo
THIS MYSTERIOUS OBJECT draws hundreds of unsuspecting
students everyday into its sphere of influence — SUB.
Pres out,
claims union
corporate
MONTREAL (CUP) — Paul
Bourbeau has resigned as president of L'Union Generale des
Etudiants de Quebec after a
disagreement with the union's
executive over the power of the
presidency.
The executive accused him
of failing to carry out his jurisdictional duties. Bourbeau
agreed, but in doing so explained he felt to carry out his
duties as defined would be
tantamount to accepting authoritarian control not in conformity with "present student
aspirations."
Bourbeau attacked the structure of UGEQ in his resignation
statement and called for a
radical change in its make-up.
"The time has come for us
to reject the individualistic
concept of authority and to stop
playing the consumer corporation's game."
MORE OCCUPATION
From Page 1
The hadn't given up though. They took
over the administration building, and then had
a vote on whether or not to occupy the building.
The vote passed overwhelmingly, with a
few scattered abstentions.
The next step was to expel all the downtown
news media from the take-over for fear of
misrepresentation. Student media were not
evicted though, particularly The Ubyssey and
The Peak.
The downtown press tried taking pictures
through the windows, but old papers were stuck
on the windows.
Entrance to the building was restricted to
students by chained doors, files in halls, and
a few determined demonstrators.
The demonstrators weren't just biding their
time in the building though, as stores have been
laid in which will last at least until the weekend.
They were singing, mostly improvised verses
to "We shall overcome" ("the senators are bastards, we shall not be moved") and discussing
the sit-in.
Discussion groups of 10 or so people had
been formed, each with a 'spokesman who was
a member of the central oo-ordinating group.
**,
Among the crowd was CUS president Martin   Loney,   there   in   an   unofficial   role.   He
blamed the whole mess on a Stubborn' senate.
The students are equally determined though.
It looks like the sit-in could go on for quite
a while.
COUNCIL & CUS
From Page 1
He said that organization of autonomous
student councils in these places was necessary
to enable the students to launch campaigns
against the Socred government and "hopefully
defeat education minister Donald Brothers in
his own riding".
He called Russell's activities "political education" of the students and, indirectly, of the
voters of the interior.
Asked just what concrete accomplishments
CUS could name, he mentioned the CUS lobby
in Ottawa as having produced student loans
and getting student fees tax deductable.
This was met with cries that the CUS lobby
was the "laughing stock of Ottawa", that it was
to no avail, and that the student loans had just
been a concession from the Liberal government
in place of its campaign promise of ten thousand scholarships, rather than a CUS victory.
As the discussion gradually became a mara-
Einar's out
Einar Gunderson, former B.C. Social
Credit finance minister, has resigned from
UBC's board of governors.
Gunderson, who is a government appointee to the board, first joined it in
1958.
Gunderson was reappointed to the
board twice and when his third term expired in 1966 this term was extended to
December 1968.
A spokesman for the president's office said Gunderson felt that 12 years was
long enough on the board and it was time
to find someone new.
1
thon talk-in Loney featured less in the exchanges and the members made small speeches,
pro and con, on the question of CUS.
Dave Zirnhelt, council president, along with
external affairs officer Tobin Robbins, supported the union.
Isobel Semple, AMS secretary, supported
the union saying that the political education of
Canadian youth they had at least attempted
justified support from UBC.
Grierson called for an end of UBC support
of the union, saying that although he fought
"tooth and nail" last spring to support CUS,
he has since reconsidered.
Shaun Sullivan, last year's AMS president,
spoke from the wings in opposition to CUS.
He said his experience last year as a western
board member of the organization had shown
it to be "grossly inefficient".
Peter Braund, also a past president and now
law rep, made a long speech calling for the
support of CUS.
He said the fact that the organization represented such a wide range of students and
political factions together in one organization
made it justifiable in a country the size of
Canada.
There was also a call from several members
to make CUS a federation of strong provincial
unions rather than a federation of student councils as it is now.
Loney said that this was not viable because
of the weakness and proven failure of provincial unions in the past.
The discussion went on into the wee hours
with council members feeling out each others'
position on the subject in face of the expected
referendum in the new year on whether or not
to continue UBC membership in CUS.
TONIGHT
8:15 P.M.
Totem Park Residences
The first of two Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures by . . .
PROFESSOR C. NORTHCOTE PARKINSON
Creator of "Parkinson's Law" and
a noted historian and political scientist
"MRS. PARKINSON'S LAW"
TOMORROW
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
12:15 P.M.
Professor Parkinson speaks on
"THE SCIENCE OF POLITICS"
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
REGULAR OFFICER TRAINING PLAN
Have you considered the advantages of
joining the ROTP? While attending University members receive the following
benefits:-
-FULL TUITION FEES PAID
-$187.00 PER MONTH PAY
-BOOK AND INSTRUMENT ALLOWANCE
-MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE
-30 DAYS ANNUAL LEAVE (PLUS TRAVELLING TIME)
-ALL OTHER BENEFITS THAT MEMBERS OF
THE FORCES RECEIVE
On graduation you step into a position
of responsibility as a leader and manager of  men.
FOR FULL DETAILS CONTACT THE
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre
545 Seymour St.—684-7341
NOW
ONE OFTHE MOST CONTROVERSIAL
BOOKS EVER PUBLISHED IN CANADA
at the
UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE Thursday, November 21, 1968
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 3
Queen's cowboys ride!     \ Grad  students
Big bust starts again
— lawrence woodd photo
MY GOD, MOTHER! We've got termites! Six of them in fact.
With heavy boots. And shiny badges. More of your money
gone to pay for doors heavy-footed narcs kicked in.
By JAMES CONCHIE
Ubyssey Grass Reporter
Big Brother is putting the
heat on again.
At 10:30 Wednesday morning, Mark Derrick, former
owner of the Village Bistro
on Fourth Ave., was awakened in his bedroom by six
narcotics squad cops.
The narcs, who claimed to
have a "writ", which they
did not show Derrick, had
kicked in the front door of
the house at 2215 Stephens
St. and his bedroom door to
enter the bedroom.
While Derrick was still in
bed, the bulls ignored his
offer to unlock a door to a
connecting room and kicked
it in.
"They hardly looked
around at all, they just seemed interested in hassling
people. They didn't show
me any ID, they just told
me their names," he said.
Derrick said he contacted
alderman Harry Rankin,
who lodged a complaint
against the police department.
Derrick also contacted a
Sergeant Smith of the RCMP
who said the horsemen
would pay for the damage
to the house, "even though
we are not responsible for
it."
The Derrick bust and
other recent events indicate
the narcs are planning another massive hassle.
An official courthouse
source told me a large number of blank search warrants
have been issued to the narc
squad in the last week.
Monday I talked to a local
hash dealer (who needless to
say must remain nameless)
who told me a number of
people have been busted for
possession but have been
released without being
charged.
What all of this means to
you is trouble. A big bust
is definitely on the way.
Get rid of your stuff and
stay clean for a while. The
last thing anyone needs is
to get busted on a ridiculous
rap like possession.
' ->* >    ^ ■dssmMtfi- "
Council appoints Aven VP
Treasurer  Donn Aven  was named acting
Alma Mater Society vice-president at Monday's
council meeting in the wake of Carey Linde's
_, resignation.
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt said the
reasons for the lack of a by-election were the
high cost and the fact that the term is almost
over.
He said exams prevented an election before
Christmas and next year's executive council
elections in February made one impractical
in the new year.
Zirnhelt said Aven was best qualified to
deal with the technical aspects of the job.
Minutes earlier, council accepted Linde's
."unofficial" resignation, with regret.
Several councillors questioned whether or
not Linde had resigned at all because he had
submitted no formal statement of resignation.
His only statement was made in a Ubyssey
article Nov. 15.
But council waived the technical point
when several members reported Linde had told
them personally of his decision and that it was
a firm one.
The impersonal motion of acceptance was
softened by the universally supported addition
of "regret".
Several councillors, including agriculture
representative Ken Newcomb, made emotional
statements of regret and hoped that he could be
persuaded to return.
Zirnhelt and internal affairs officer Ruth
Dworkin, speaking for Linde attested that he
had no intention of returning.
They cited disillusionment and frustration
as his reasons.
may open  GSC
By ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON
Should students control the graduate student centre?
That question will be debated at the graduate student association general meeting in Hebb theatre at noon today.
On the agenda of the meeting are incorporation of the
grad student centre as a society and opening its membership
to the whole academic community.
The executive of the GSA voted 8-1 Monday night to recommend to today's general meeting that the board of directors
of the incorporated grad centre be composed of four grad
students, three faculty members elected by the GSA, and three
members appointed by the UBC administration.
Anne Roberts, GSA secretary, was the only member of the
executive to vote against this proposal.
"Students want democratization of this university — more
control over their own affairs," she said.
"Students should be in the majority on the board of directors.'
Gordon Alexander, another executive member, said Monday
incorporation would allow the centre to issue a debenture to
finance construction of an extension to the centre.
"Incorporation would make financial aspects of running the
centre much easier. The board would be purely administrators,"
he said.
Executive member Harold Davis said, "Students are not
capable of handling finances." He did not elaborate.
GSA president John Tilley justified the proposal by saying,
"The European student co-operative movement has shown the
best results come when students elect a majority, but are not
themselves in the majority."
The GSA executive also voted Monday night that the initial
motion at the general meeting be: "That the grad student centre
be open to the whole academic community."
Miss Roberts said some members of the executive had run
for election on a platform of opening the grad centre.
"We want to end elitism on the campus," she said.
GSA second vice-president, John Stewart, said in an interview Wednesday, "The best place to start an egalitarian society
is with an egalitarian campus."
If the membership regulations are changed to include the
entire academic community, the grad centre board of directors
may include undergraduates.
— lawrence woodd photo
"WHY DONT CHARACTERS under 50 follow me?" disgruntled
co-ed seems to be thinking. Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
THI UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university years
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305. Other
calls, 228-2301 editor; Page Friday 228-2309; sports 228-2308; qdvertising
228-3977. Telex 04-6843.
Faculty-
Intellectuals or Clerks
NOVEMBER 21, 1968
i£&&K"r :■     -"""-"' " YT.   '.-'"--♦,".-"        ' '  *       .
By DR. GEORGE HAGGAR
From The Cord Weekly
Canadian University Press
The fundamental issue facing university faculties
in Canada is whether our "intellectuals" will continue to act as sales clerks or begin to act as intel*
lectuals. Doubtless, most of them as "liberal-minded
people" consider the question before us irrelevant
as a social issue, but significant as an academic exercise in this world of liberal harmony and "fellowship".
The exponents of harmony in this country have
of late discovered that students in fact have passions
and those untutored minds are people.
What is amazing, however, is that those consumers are raising questions about the quality of the
sold products and sometimes the manufacturing skill
of the producers. And most irritating of all, is the
fact that the students are asking the higher clerks —
the administrators — about the conditions of work
for the producers, the environment in which they
are shopping and above all, the management of the
factory system.
STUDENTS REVOLUTIONARY CATALYSTS
As catalysts of the coming revolution, the students are the harbingers and the heralds of a new
civilization — a civilization that asserts that man is
not a speck in the cosmic dust, nor a chattel to be
bargained about, nor a child to be assuaged by a
pacifier. They are saying no to dehumanization, no
to pleasant platitudes, no to programmed education;
they are proclaming their humanity is a debauched
milieu and they know who is responsible for this
monstrosity.
In their quest of self-discovery, human commitment and social emancipation, the students have put
their seniors on the  defensive and the latter have
reacted in typical ruling-class manner.
ELDERS WITHDRAW OR CO-OPT
They have either withdrawn into their shells
hoping that this "generational gap" is a temporary
phenomenon; or, having noticed the mounting tide
of the onslaught, they have tried to harness it so
as to reinforce the existing order and demonstrate
their liberality. Thus, the new "public relations" in
the universities, the commissions, the joint committees and the new "fellowship". But all this utilitarian
activity and this "humanism" seems to have whetted
the appetites of the consumers who are no longer
satisfied  with  "joint partnership"  and are seeking
the substance of power, not its shadow.
Here, I think, is the crux of the matter. The students have learned here and elsewhere that in fact,
the supporters of the status quo have no intention
of sharing in the government of the university and
do not plan to abdicate or surrender. Moreover, the
faculties have become the Girondists in "this best
of all possible worlds". And since they do not want
any basic change — they merely want to be "in" on
the secrets of empire and to achieve this "historic
mission"—some of them would like to have a united
front for the students. Though most professors are
contemptuous of "student power" they think that
the "radicals" are a small but a useful minority
whose immense energies could best be channeled to
advance professional interests.
To illustrate this principle, let us cite our campus
— the best of all possible campuses. Here we merely
have an ecological community — a personalized environment of monads linked together by a physical
plant and a "benign" administration whose members.,
prepare and distribute the monthly "diet". The faculties protest and they grumble in their "palatial"
faculty lounge, and they even talk about "power",
but the moment someone has access to power, his
information becomes privileged and it cannot be
divulged, etc., etc., etc.
INTELLECTUAL RESPONSE  NEEDED
The difficulties of the professors are compounded
by their lack of collective consciousness as a group
and thus their relationships with the students cannot be any more than transactional. For these reasons, the faculties are half-victims, half-accomplices
This articles originally appeared in the Cord Weekly
at Waterloo Lutheran University last November, and is
reprinted as a commentary on the committee co-option
game currently being played there.
George Haggar has a doctorate in political science
from Columbia. Throughout the three years he taught
at WLU, he was an outspoken critic of Western society,
and the university system in particular.
It was largely because of the appearance of this
article that his contract was dropped last year. As then
administration president Henry Endress said: "George
Haggar has made it very evident he is unhappy. He is
unsympathetic to the purposes and operations of this
institution." He added that Haggar was "a good teacher,
probably a very good one", and that he would have no
trouble finding a position at another Canadian university
more in accord with his own views.
The Canadian Association of University Teachers
condemned the actions of the administration as "unac-
ceptably authoritarian" but did not seek Haggaifs reinstatement and did not formally censure the school.    *
Haggar subsequently applied to 13 universities advertising positions in his field in the CAUT bulletin. He
was turned down at every one of them.
He has now left the country.
Put bluntly, professors have no regard for student radicalism, and have not examined its contents.
But they want to use it as an instrument to club the
administrators with rather than use it as a means of
opening new fields of student-faculty relations or
broadening the existing sources of co-operation and
communications. This opportunism is being slowly
detected by the students*, but as accredited clerks
and members of the new priesthood, the professors
will go on demanding a role commensurate with
their functions in the eternal design of the contemporary university, thinking that they can call in the
troops if the occasion requires them. Meanwhile they
will rely on "reason" to persuade the administration
that the "machine" can be operated more produc-
tivly and more efficiently if they sit in on more non-
accountable and non-functioning committees.
and therefore, half-human beings. And this leads me
to say: unless the intellectual replaces the clerk,
both the administrator and the teacher will become
superfluous clerks in this great private enterprise of
ours. Therefore, it follows that the intellectual as"
the interpreter of the "tradition" must become the
author of the tradition, and if he does not, or refuses
to, he, like his predecessors, must be consigned to
the dustbin of history.
Knowledge is pain and the demands of virtue
are onerous and only the great create great deeds.
And this epoch is a time of greatness, a time of quest,
and a time of love; a time of spring and a time of
passions; a time of brotherhood and a time of integrity; a time of choice and a time of authenticity;
a time of man becoming man and a time of freedom
and her majestic unfolding.
It is a time of revolution!
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
More GSA
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
The Graduate Student Association, as presently constituted, contributes to the separation of a campus "elite" from
the mainstream of learning.
Such a segregation is bound to
encourage attitudes within the
membership which are not conducive to free intellectual exchange with those who are
excluded. Many members of the
GSA are therefore in favor
of some form of expanded
membership along lines which
do not contravene the free
spirit of the university.
Comparison of the GSA to
the "special interest groups" on
the campus is not valid; no
single club segregates for its
membership a majority of our
experienced students, nor has
any special interest group a
one hundred percent captive
membership.
The principle involved in
broadening membership and
the nature of the changes to
be considered deserve the careful thought of the membership.
It is not the sharing of recreational facilities that is at issue,
it is segregation of graduate
from undergraduate; not a physical separation, but a segregation effected by a form of class
distinction which ought to be
completely foreign to a university.
I hope my fellow graduate
students are giving this matter
the careful thought it deserves.
Of course, no change requires
no thought, only a desire to
perpetuate for undemocratic-
ally restrictive purposes what
is in danger of becoming little
more than an expensive status
symbol.
D. LORNE BRUCE
graduate studies
department of microbiology
US. comment
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I used to write to The Ubyssey when it was sent to me
occasionally by former classmates at UBC. Now as a regular
subscriber, I have the sickening sensation of almost being
back at UBC. Actually, such
an overstuffed introduction is
meant to lead to comments on
tlue Nov. 7 issue, the Jerry
Rubin farce, the election, and
assorted other shit.
It is so marvelously safe in
quiet little old Vancouver
where you can look down
across the border and point
your accusing finger. America
proved no different than it has
always been. Now that Richard
M. Pig and Spiro T. Pig lead
the world, you will be surprised
to find that nothing will
change; I cannot look with
pride to Trudeau as a shining
light. Sure, I worked for him,
but even then I was aware of
his self-centred egotism, his
mock flamboyance, his arrogance. The pigs who rule this or
any other "free country" in the
western world are all the same
—it is ironic that the only
leaders I respect are the Czechs
whom we have allowed to
(1938-1968) be crushed as usual.
The war will still be long
and bitter and cruel and indefensible. Morality has never
had a part in war and never
will. Fat-ass Canadian sympathy for "the cause" does not
do shit: mock election results
are cute, but would you barricade the U.S. consulate? Would
you boycott Yankee products?
The usual defensive crap about
U.S. domination goes on and
on and all you provide are
token alternatives.
The concept of revolution
within the North American
social order is still very young
and very naive. Hell, Columbia
would never have happened
had not black students been
the first to take over buildings;
then Rudd could become the
white symbol. The discovery of
white middle class alienation
in North America, Mailer's interesting concept of the black
whiteman, is new — but the
European students (whose revolution has roots in vastly
different political and philosophical problems) have a tradition at least as old as the Paris
Commune of 1848.
But the growing mass alienation in North America will
grow as conditions get worse
by staying the same. There is
no revolution yet; if there was
Country Joe would still be
underground and Cleaver
would have been shot by now.
Much must be done: the way
the future looks at UBC, little^
can be done short of takeover.
The idea of 34,000 students is
disgusting. Finally, I would add
that   for   a paper  which  was
once the best university news- -
paper I had ever read on the
continent,   The   Ubyssey   has
degenerated to a flippant little
tabloid. It is not that I do not%
share  most of  your editorial
opinion and the  like, but its
presentation is so crude as to
be   laughable.  Che   once said
that "the aim of the revolution   '
is to free the mind from alienation"   —  gentlemen, you   fail
miserably.
J. M. FISHAUT*
Amherst  College
Massachusets
Lunacy
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
With reference to the com
tinuous criticism that The
Ubyssey is subjected to by the
vociferous lunatic fringe of
students who have nothing...
To Page 5
See:   MORE LETTERS Thursday, November 21, 1968
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
ft
GSA should open —
it initiates change
By JOHN STEWART
GSA 2nd Vice-president
In the history of the Graduate Student Association
no issue has caused more controversy than the motion to
open the centre to all members of the academic community. Unfortunately the controversy has been colored by a
misunderstanding of the reasons why the proposers of the
motion, Mark Waldman and myself, originally brought it
forward.
We decided that the issues behind the occupation of
the faculty club could not be allowed to become obscure
and forgotten. We wanted to encourage debate on the issues
rather than let them explode in violence or confrontation
in the future. If the opinions of both sides could be argued
in a reasonable manner for long enough we were sure that
the right decision determining the position of private clubs
on campus could be reached.
As both private members of the GSA and members
of its executive the most reasonable action we could then
take was to propose that the membership should be allowed to decide for itself whether the Thea Koerner house
should be open to all students and faculty of the university.
There are several technical changes which would occur
if the membership were open. Some of the comfort and
pleasure would be lost from the dining room due to overcrowding. However two factors tend to minimize this loss.
The motion may be made to take effect at any time; possibly early next year after the extension with 250 extra
dining seats, has been completed. Also as any new members
will have to pay the extra $26 to support the facilities,
membership by undergraduates may then be fairly unpopular.
The beer garden would have to be closely watched to
see that no one under 21 was admitted. This could be accomplished by showing both membership and AMS cards
at the door.
Without membership restrictions no liquor licence
could be obtained for the association. This is a fact which
must be accepted. My own opinion considers that a glass
of whisky is a poor price for which to sell principles.
One of the major pleasures some members have is
seeing the "Members Only" plaque on the door. Belonging
to an exclusive club with membership restricted to those
with bachelor degrees brings with it prestige in an academic community. However, I should hope that the prestige gained from knowledge and education should satisfy
anyone without needing extra prestige gained from being
a member of a private club.
Opening the centre would remove a barrier to this
communication between  teaching assistants and students.
Sooner or later the centre will be open, no matter
what is decided today. By opening it now we will be showing a foresight which will speed many needed reforms.
Universities have become reflections of society obeying all its prejudices and following all its social restrictions. Students judge campus activities by norms set down
by society.
I think the opposite should hold true. A university
should have its rules based on truth and goodwill between
individuals. It should strive to have as perfect an academic
community as possible where social experimentation is
allowed and not hampered by senseless violence or confrontation. Then society could look up to us for new ideas
and approaches to its own problems.
Above all a university should be a place to experiment
with new ideas, such as opening the graduate student centre to all members of the academic community.
MORE LETTERS TO   THE EDITOR
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better to do with their time: I
have no sympathy for their
point of view—why many of
these pseudo-intellectuals are
even inclined to criticize the
highly -respected Georgia
Straight in exactly the same
way.
I class myself as one of the
majority of average, clean-cut,
conservative, and well-contented UBC students. In this respect
your paper suits me and most
others perfectly and is therefore serving the community in
which it is distributed. After
all should not a paper give its
public what they want?
Your pragmatic views on
both campus and external
issues reflects the general bias
of most students. Your standard of English and literary style
presents your opinions in such
a way that the student's interest is aroused and that he
can understand what you are
saying. Obviously the absence
of any worthwhile news material around UBC makes it
essential that you concentrate
on subjective editorials. The
majority of students I have
spoken to appreciate your
doing this, and after being
brought up on the Vancouver
Sun, Time, etc., it is a natural
<**■ *»^«*,^;"s^",^*f ;•"■
EDITOR: Al Birnie
News  John Twigg
Ass't News   John Gibbs
City    Peter Ladner
Ass't   City       Alex   Volkoff
Managing   Bruce Curtis
Wire       Irene  Wasllewskl
Photo .... Dick Button, Powell Hargrave
Sports   Jim Maddin
Associate    Mike Finlay
Without  Portfolio      Paul   Knox
Page Friday  Andrew Horvat
The day of the big switch came off
without too much trouble, though Knox
swore he'd never do news desk again.
Knox was helped by a bumper crop of
transition   for   them   to  The
Ubyssey.
Let's face it, the critics are
in the main long-haired uncouth
Artsy types who do not fit into
our society anyway. It will be
a sad day when The Ubyssey
heeds such critics who have an
independent outlook on life,
who prefer news to be presented as factually and objectively as possible, who prefer
less dogmatic editorials, less
biased censorship, etc.
For Chrissake stay as you
are, we all love you and we
bear in mind Seneca's quote
"Galium in suo sterquilino
plurinum posse" (Every cock
is at his best on his own dunghill).
ROGER MITTON
graduate  studies
HIIRAGI
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
First let me introduce our
circle "HIIRAGI". Our circle
consists of students of the
Doshisha University which is
in Kyoto, Japan. Our subject
and aim is international correspondence. A long-cherished desire of our members is to establish  the group-correspondence
good art, produced by such stalwarts as
John Frizell, Gordie Tong, Lawrence
Woodd and Powell Hargrave. Helping
Twigg on city desk by writing stories
were the iceman, Erik Brynjolsson. and
Frank Flynn. Others working for the
paper were, John Gibbs, Peter Kennedy,
Ulf Ottho, who went driving, James
Conchie, James Vovernton, Elaine Tarz-
well, and our beloved Valley, who some-
home got a ticket after hitting a dog
when it wasn't her fault and they
couldn't find the dog because it ran
off unhurt. Sue Gransby said Itzeck
Bassman wanted his name in the paper.
You're  famous now, kid.
No-show for the day was Alex Volkoff.
between our circle and some
students of foreign universities.
We are ready to correspond
about various things, for example, political and economic
problems, customs, fashion, etc.
All of our members are looking
forward to this correspondence
which will promote international understanding.
Sincerely yours
International Correspondence
Circle
Tamisa Nishikubo
c/o Shuneiso Apartment House
53 Shunei-cho Sain Ukyo-ku
Kyoto City 615
Japan
Formal
Wear
Rentals and Sales
TUXEDOS  -  DINNER  JACKETS
MORNING COATS - TAILS
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Complete Size Range
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POLSON TYPEWRITERS ARE GONDUCTINC
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Open Daily and Saturdays 9-6 (Fridays 9-9) Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
^.tovfae
*ft OCHfKQS ^r
ie'.-ja-4'.eo *
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.    -       .      'I****",   -.J^t-ifU^!^
"*      '     '*       '*^#S»>«*,'**»^*,''"_
**% T* «■**»* **i«i**l#."*—
"AAAARRRRGGGGHH (copyright Charles M. Schulz) not another art photo!" screamed The Ubyssey's truculent  news editor.
But at least it's a good one. Lensman Gordie Tong did his thing with specially-developed Tri-X film.
Flowers & Gifts
• A COMPLETE FLORAL SERVICE
• WEDDINGSI & CORSAGES A
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Three  Short   Blocks   From   UBC   Gates
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Under  New  Management
Cue  to   Invitation:   p^b-dead
axe those prices   [speaks
A brand new enterprise started by a student to pay his fees
for the year is going down under the blows of free enterprise
and competition.
Due to the arrival of the CUE Enterprises cards on the
scene, Dave Norton, law 3, originator of 68 Invitation 69, has
had to lower his prices to $1.25 per booklet of coupons. This
compares with $1.50 for the Cue cards.
The drop in prices and the falling off in sales immediately
following the onset of Cue will make it likely that Norton will
just barely break even with his costs and have very little left
over.
The two enterprises, Cue and Invitation, are very similar
although Invitation offers more in the way of half-price movie
coupons and Cue has a directory of stores which offer 5 to 10
per cent discounts to holders of the card.
Norton said it seems pointless to have two services so alike
in a market that was barely supporting  one.
He said that Cue would probably not do very well either
as those who wanted that type of thing have probably already
bought his Invitation booklet.
Cue Enterprises Ltd. is a non-student organization.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Violent violet blorgs found they
had locked themselves out from the inside.
Members of the ruling grueling party of this island nation
found they could not resolve the dispute.
They didn't know that the violet blorgs were actually locked
in second place, in the first place, regardless.
An inside report from the outside proved that no-one had
the faintest idea what was going on on the inside, outside of the
well-bred red borgs, who admitted later that earlier on they
couldn't tell one side from the other.
UBC's dean of agriculture will address the Vancouver Institute this Saturday.
Dr. Michael Shaw will
speak in Buchanan 106 at
8:15 p.m.
He will discuss the importance of agriculture production in meeting the demands of the global social
crisis
Mcdonald, currie & co.
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
Representatives from our 'Firm will be on campus on the
following dates to interview students for positions available
in offices of our Firm throughout Canada.
Monday, November 25: Tuesday, November 26
and Wednesday, November 27,1968
These positions are available for the graduates in
Commerce, Arts, Science, Engineering and Law.
Further information and arrangement* for interviews
are available through the Placement Office.
CUSO
AFRICAN
SYMPOSIUM
New Year's Eve Cruise
on the
"MALIBU  PRINCESS"
with the
FILMS, SPEAKERS, DISCUSSION
SAT., NOV. 23rd
'Spectres'
Welcome aboard the "Malibu Princess" for a New Year's Eve Cruise up
Indian Arm with dancing to the "Spectres". The price includes a hot and
cold smorgasbord and a free professional bar. Call 922-9470 (Thurs. 9:30-
11:00 p.m. or Sun. 1:00-3:00 p.m.) for tickets or information. Don't delay.
Numbers are limited. Cost: $25.00 a couple.
10:00 A.M.  -  1:30 P.M.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Coffee Served — Bring Your Lunch t
%
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SKIING
IS Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
Now All Girls Can Ski
Fashion Wise—Be Casual
This season, ski fashions
have swung into a new casual
high. Girls everywhere are
turning onto the latest ski
fashions.
One of the most popular
items, and most important, in
a young co-ed's ski outfit, is her
pair of Texas Bogners known
to their friends as jeans. And
here's a hint, girls, wear them
outside your ski boots.
Now, every girl can ski because ski gloves are no longer
expensive as they were. All
the leading ladies of ski fashion
are wearing gardening gloves.
And don't forget a pair of inner
gloves for warmth.
One of the most exciting
trends in ski fashions today is
the rubber rain suit. These
daring outfits — the pants go
right over your ski jacket—can
be found at any army surplus
boutique.
For spring skiing, after exams
in May, you'll need shorts. Blue,
preferably light blue, is nice.
And don't forget to wear your
knee socks, love. The lovliest
skiing lasses are wearing red
zippers in their light blue ski
shorts — but  only if you feel
daring. It's like going topless
in the non-skiing world.
Ski accessorizing is a whole
new exciting field. There are
hats, hats, hats, and socks,
socks, socks, but let's not see
those socks outside your ski
pants. Please, no nose warmers,
we want to see your pretty
little pink nose. And don't
forget sunglasses for spring
skiing.
There you are all outfitted
and ready to face the most
wonderful of lives. Good luck,
my dears.
VOC  Is Fun. Fun, Fun
WOW! Christmas is — study,
free days, post exam celebrations, snow madness, snowball
fights, old friends, new friends,
singsongs, fireplaces, and SKIING. All of these rolled into
one becomes a VOC Christmas
Ski Trip.
"What is VOC?" VOO is a
group of people interested in
outdoor activities, specifically
climbing hiking, and skiing.
The club helps to bring people
who share these interests together.
So every year VOC'ers plan
months in advance to make the
most of their Christmas holiday. Then, after Christmas
dinner or early Boxing Day,
cars start from all points of
town heading for their favorite
ski hill.
This year there are five big
trips going to: Kimberley—an
annual invasion, Rossland, Silver Star, Schweitzer Basin —
powder snow and blue skies,
and, of course, Whistler. The
Whistler cabin overflows during the skiing season, especially
at Christmas.
Also popular among VOC'ers
at Christmas time are ski-
touring trips. For those of you
who don't know, you can rent
or buy skins which are easily
attached to any ski, plus a
touring plate and you're ready.
Pick your favorite area, be it
Garibaldi, Banff, or Kokanee,
and go! It's the best way to
beat the crowds and wow! all
that knee deep untraeked powder.
Get outdoors this Christmas.
Organize your own ski trip or
try touring. We'll see you on
the hills.
These wrote—John G. Stewart, Peter
Quinn, Jane Covernton, Paul Simms,
David Turner. Debby Barton, Liz Wat
kins, Susan Amundsen, Val Ward. Some
pictures by GODA (p. **5). Gerri typed
most everything. Thanx to all. Bruce.
^Kf *H©P t«
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VANCOUVER 3, B.C.
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amongst product businesses.
Graduates have the opportunity to advance rapidly
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while participating in the Company's formalized
Business Training Course.
A Company recruiting officer will visit
your campus to conduct interviews on:
November 27-28
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC
*\ Thursday, November 21, 1968
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
mcmmMmM^^
Men's Alpine Ski Team
Expecting A Good Year
.The Men's T-Bird Alpine Ski
Team is looking forward to a
successful racing season this
winter, and for good reason.
Many strong Alpine racers
are on hand to give the team
overall power and depth. Gary
Denton, A. C. Verigan, Allan
Vittery, and Elwood Peskett
"are strong A-class racers who
have skiied for the team in
previous years. They can be
(counted on to produce consistent results in the three
Alpine events; Slalom, Giant
,. Slalom, and Downhill.
A total of six to eight members are required to fill out the
team and this number will be
achieved after the results of the
Christmas camp at Rossland
are known. David Turner,
coach of the Men's team, has
made it clear that no one can
be guaranteed a berth with the
team until he has proven himself in the pre-season training
and Christmas camp. Some of
the new racers trying out are
pushing hard and they could
"make it tough for the veteran
members.
Murray Kennedy, Derek
Choukalos and David Pugh are
hard workers in the pre-season
dry-land training and if they
can extend this momentum to
the slopes they can look forward to a good season.
DAVID TURNER
As well as the several rookies
trying out, the team has a
rookie coach who has been
handling the team in an expert
and inspiring manner. Dave is
a former member of the team,
who has competed in Alpine
and Nordic Events. His experience and versatility make him
an ideal successor to Allan
Fisher who has coached the
team for the past nine seasons.
Turner is in peak physical condition and expects the same
from the team members.
The racing season begins
early in January with open ski
meets in B.C., Alberta, and
Washington state.
As well, the Alpine squad
wtill be in competition with
several other teams representing Pacific Northwest Universities. Last year, UBC competed
with the strongest skiing
schools in the U.S. and did exceptionally well.
Denver, Wyoming, University
of Washington, Montana State
and Idaho were some of the
participating universities in
last year's Banff International
Intercollegiate Ski Meet. They
will probably be taking part
again this year at Banff and
Crystal Mountain.
The big event of the year
will be the Canadian Alpine
Championships at Whistler
Mountain which will feature
the Canadian Alpine Ski Team
and several European and U.S.
racers. UBC ski team members
that can meet F.I.S. point requirements will be participating.
December 26th marks the beginning of the Christmas camp
and the Rossland ski week
which the Ski Team hosts concurrently. For the members of
the ski^week, it's a good time.
The boys trying out for the
high-flying Thunderbird ski-
team will find it hard work.
UBC Women's Ski Team Optimistic
This year promises to be a very exciting
one for the Women's ski team.
•* Thirty girls are vying for positions on the
eight member team. All the girls have been
dry-land training twice a week since university
began. Over Christmas the girls will be coached at Rossland. The team will be picked in
-January.
The eight girls from last year's team,
Babs Shapiro, Bev Zetner, Sue Amundsen, Liz
Watkins, Val Ward, Debbie Barton, Barb Ful
ton and Sherry Bie are by no means assured
of a position this year.
Last year at the P.N.W. Intercollegiate the
team did very well, and is determined to do
even better this year. Besides the P.N.W., the
girls will compete in a number of local meets
and will travel to Idaho for another Intercollegiate meet.
Coaches Sandi Pearce and Lee Brouson say
they are looking forward to seeing these keen
girls tackle the hills.
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— photo by Skiing Magazine
Cross-Country Skiing
Is For Transportation?
Cross-Country skiing was introduced by the Vikings as a
means of transportation throughout Northern Scandinavia.
It involved using wooden skiis for gliding over the snow
and using poles to propel the skier forward. Today, skiis and
equipment are extra light. Two skiis weigh less than two lbs.
Cross - country courses are usually one - third uphill, one - third
downhill and one-third flat.
Cross-country races consist of skiers racing at one minute
intervals over 15 kilometers (6.3 miles) and 30 kilometers (12.6
miles) with the fastest time winning.
Olympic Skier On
Cross Country Team
The Thunderbird Ski Team will be strongly represented this
year in cross-country skiing.
Headlining this impressive team will be Canada's Olympic
Team member Rolf Pettersen who competed for Canada at the
1968 Olympic Games at Grenoble. Racing alongside him will be
Jan Atlung, Western Canadian Champion, 1968, a perennial
standout for UBC in skiing.
Rounding out the team will be two other tough competitors,
Dave Turner and Tubs Omtvedt. This team has an excellent
chance of bringing top honors to UBC in the team cup at the
Banff Inter-Collegiate Ski Meet against the top U.S. collegiate
Ski Teams.
The Thunderbirds are running 5-10 miles, four times a week
and skiing Saturday and Sunday in an effort to get into top
shape for the winter ski meets.
THUNDERBIRD TOTEM
Basketball
Tournament
SATURDAY, NOV. 30
7:30 Portland State vs. Great Falls Montana College
9:15 - U.B.C. vs. S.F.U.
In order to ensure that regular U.B.C. supporters can obtain
admission to this game the following format has been
established.
All U.B.C. fans attending the UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA
GAME ON SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 23 will receive an advance admission ticket to the November 30 game of the
Totem Tournament. Page  10
76 Winter Olympics to Cost
An Estimated $80 Million
Estimated total cost of staging the 1976 Winter Olympics
at Garibaldi's Whistler Mountain has been set at $29,733,000.
This is based on a $12,500,000 investment, most of which has
already been scheduled to be spent by private investors and
$17,233,000 which would be required for games facilities.
Breakdown of expenditure is:
Sports  facilities  $5.2 million
Olympic Village  $5.9 million
Administrative    $1.6 million
Support    $2.2 million
Contingencies     $2.3 million
These figures are based upon the most up-to-date information available to the association subsequent to five yaers of planning, and extensive surveys of previous Winter Olympic sites.
The source of capital:
Federal   government    60%
Provincial   government    30%
B.C. municipal governments     5%
Businesses        5%
Returns from this expenditure will be realized through
attendance at the Games (estimated at more than 700,000), the
development of a $20 million permanent recreation facility, and
an increased tourist business following the games.
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
Y.M.C.A
SEYMOUR
FOR STUDENTS AND ADULTS
1. 7-Week Course incl. 2 hours of lifts per lesson.
2.1V. Hour Lesson.
3. Canadian Ski Alliance Instruction.
4. Graded Classes (Beg., Int., Adv.)
5. Bus Transportation Return.
COST       42.00 Non-YMCA
39.00 YMCA
8.00 Off for Transportation
CLASSES Commencing Jan. 6. Mon., Tues., Wed.,
Thurs.  Evening  ONLY.
BUSES       Bus Departs 6:30 p.m., Alma YMCA.
Complete  Information
Please Cal! Y Ski School
MU  1-0221-Local  55.
TEPEE
SPORTING   GOODS
A Compete Stock
of Skiing Equipment
HART
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1115 Robson 681-0511
3274 W. Broadway 731-5122
Canadian Olympic Assoc. Accej
By  PETER  QUINN
Garibaldi Olympic Development Association's
proposed site for the 1976 Winter Olympic Games
at Whistler Mountain was provisionally passed
in September of this year.
At that time the Canadian Olympic Association
accepted the Whistler site over the Banff bid for
the games. Together with Whistler, Montreal was
accepted as a site for the Summer Games.
From here the COA proposal will go before
the International Olympic Committee which will
render its final decision in January 1970.
Proposed events will include men's and
women's slalom, giant slalom, and downhill, 70
and 90 meter jumps, luge, bobsled, biatholon,
cross country courses, speed and figure skating,
and ice hockey. It is also hoped that curling and
dog sled racing events will be held.
Pending finalization of the Canadian bid to
the IOC, construction on the 70 meter jump,
downhill and giant slalom lifts and trails, and
cross country courses should begin in early 1969.
Following IOC acceptance of the site in 1970,
the final course construction would be completed:
slalom courses by 1972, the biatholon by 1973,
luge course by 1974, and the indoor ice rinks by
1975.
These facilities will allow GODA to stage
at least 15 major international competitions in all
events of the games before 1976.
The beauty of the Whistler site is the va.*
scope of the terrain which makes it possible t
choose the best course location from at least fou
alternatives.
All alpine events will be on the north face c
the mountain to assure steady snow conditions.
The period between Feb. 17 and Feb. 29, 5971
has been selected as the optimal weather cond
tions for the games, although this involves a thi
teen day period instead of the usual ten day limi
This increased duration, as was shown at Gn
noble, allows much greater flexibility and const
quently smoother operation of the Games.
Transportation to and from the Olympic si1
will be boosted by means of special bus and |rai
services to accommodate up to 60,000 spectatoi
on peak days.
The present two lane highway will be widene
to four, paved, all-weather lanes accommodatin
up to 2,500 cars per hour, with the possible add
tion of the Haney-Pemberton route adding man
more.
Helicopter service will be available for erne
gencies as well as speedy transportation to- an
from the Games site.
Parking   facilities   will   be   increased   to   1
million square feet to handle the large volume c
traffic, most of the lots being in the vicinttE
the Olympic Village.
One parking lot alone will be 2,500 feet t Thursday, November 21, 1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 11
ts Whistler's Bid for'76 Games
100 feet and will be well suited as an air strip
after the Games.
Accommodation within a 15-mile radius of the
Olympic Village will be adequate for up to 10,000
people during the Games, including hotels, the
athlete's village, condominiums, cottages and temporary housing.
Of these, 4,500 spaces will be in the Olympic
Village itself, the centre of Games activities and
ceremonies.
At the present time, in contrast, there are 500
beds in six lodges, 70 condominium units, and 120
cottages.
Along with the athletes village there is to be
a*, recreation area for the athletes complete with
lounges, a ballroom, cafeteria, snack bar, games
room, and theatre and television rooms.
Other facilities in the Olympic Village are:
the administration centre, communications centre,
medical clinic, fire station, post office, and food
Services facilities.
All of these will be  completed by   1974, although the deadline is set at 1975.
..   Hand  in  hand  with   the   actual  Games,  the
City of Vancouver is hoping to present its own
Olympics of the Arts.
This  involves   a  comprehensive   program  of
^peras, plays, musicals, ballets, children's entertainment, choral works, and a film festival.
Theatrical  events which would link the be
ginning of the western tradition with the beginning of the Olympic Games will be staged.
This woiild also emphasize that Vancouver is
an area which serves as a meeting place of the
Eastern and Western cultures.
At the same time special displays along the
lines of Expo '67 will be presented in the Vancouver museum and the art gallery.
There will also be an impressionist centennial
show, based on the 1876 Impressionist Exhibition
in Paris, the Vancouver International Print triennial, and special programs by the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra, the Playhouse Theatre Company and many others.
It is hoped that by the time the Games open
in 1976, Vancouver will also be able to offer an
improved metro-highway system providing speedy,
through-town traffic, as well as adequate links to
the Whistler highway.
This, in fact, might also be considered a prerequisite to the holding of the Games.
City planners should make every effort to
assure these services by 1976.
The importance of the Games to Canada in
general, and to Vancouver in particular, should
not be underestimated.
It would seem that Canada, one of the earliest
nations to join the Olympic Movement, is about
due for some consideration from th© international
committee.
New Ski School Director
Appointed at Garibaldi
The biggest news in the Whistler Mountain area today is
the new director of the Garibaldi Ski School — Jim McContey.
For the past four years he has been the director of the
Todd Mountain Ski School subsequent to teaching at Gray
Rocks Inn, Quebec and ten years instructing at Alta, Utah.
With his wife Glen, he will be taking over the instructing
at Whistler this season as well as operation of the ski shop
(now in its own new building), he hopes to staff a minimum of
five full-time instructors during the week and up to 50 on the
weekends, and has been running the B.C. Instructors course
at Whistler for the past nine weeks.
This year Whistler skiers will also notice the addition of
a new chairlift on the north face of the mountain. The Green
Chair as it is called runs roughly halfway down the north slope,
although a trail has been cut to the bottom allowing more enthusiastic skiers to ski right out to the 'gravel pit' on the road
to Pemberton. Garibaldi Lifts Ltd. hopes to run a shuttle-bus
service between the gravel-pit and the gondola on weeknds during the season to take some of the pressure off the Alpine Lifts.
This has, in past years, been a run strictly for powder-buffs
faced with a long walk back to the Lifts, but in fact is one of
the best of the off-the-track runs Whistler offers.
Other news to look for this year might be "The Waterfall',
'The Creek Bed' and the "Shale Slope' which all offer deep
powder and interesting terrain. Be ready for anything if you
ever find these trails.
Operation is now on a weekend-only schedule but will open
daily on December 11. Lift tickets cost $3 until daily opening
and -from then on will be $6 per day on weekends, and $5 per
day on weekdays.
Challenging Opportunities
In Mining
Career opportunities
in uranium and base metal
mines in Ontario, Quebec
and Saskatchewan, research
and development laboratories at Elliot Lake,
and exploration throughout
North America.
Engineers
Mining
Metallurgical
Chemical
Mechanical
Electrical
In Specialty Steelmaking
Career opportunities in
the Atlas Steels' steelmaking
operation in Welland,
Ontario, and Tracy, Quebec.
Administration and marketing careers are available
in both Canadian and worldwide metals distribution.
(Regular and Summer)
(Summer only)
(Summer only)
(Regular and Summer)
(Regular and Summer)
(Summer only)
B.   Degree,   M.   Degree   and
jobs.
*Geology
*Will   interview   undergrads,
Ph.D's  interested  in summer
See oar management team on campus
MONDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1968
A recruiting team from our organization will be available to
discuss employment opportunities, answer questions, and interview
prospective graduates in the above-named courses—on campus
on the dates shown. Undergraduates seeking summer
employment are also most welcome.
Company literature and further information on interview timetables
are available at your Placement Office.
Rio Algom
Rio Tinto
Atlas Steels Page  12
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
SKI BUMMING
A WAY OF LIFE
By  KATHY   STURGESS
Yes, it is still possible, or at least it was in the winter of '67,
to ski in Europe generally and St. Anton, Austria, on a minimum
amount of cash.
For the ski bum, St. Anton is a good resort, for there it is
possible to get on a packing crew for the winter season, and in
exchange for two and a half hours work on the hill per day,
receive a lift pass for all but the top cable car and chair lift.
And it is even possible for a non-German-speaking girl to find
employment in a "pension", Gasthaus, or restaurant-discotheque
establishment, doing such exciting chores as making beds, peeling
potatoes, or serving drinks. But all for the most worthy cause
of skiing.
St. Anton am Arlberg, my home for six weeks last winter,
is also the home of Hannes Schneider's famous Arlberg Ski
Schule and the Arlberg-Kandahar race. It is also the most popular
ski resort for the Swedish people. So, if you're a boy looking for
a blond, and skiing, St. Anton is the place for the winter. Nestled
in a narrow valley, and literally hemmed in on all sides by
mountains, the tiny village of St. Anton contains all the prerequisites of a terrific skiing holiday. Everything from saunas to
discotheques and, needless to say, good alpine skiing conditions,
which are sunshine, and powder snow, can be found here.
No car is necessary to get to the ski hill from any of the
pensions or hotels, but walking the main street requires a certain
amount of "vorsicht" (caution) on the part of the innocent
pedestrians, or they will be knocked down by a speedily-driven
European car that doesn't know about the value of a human life.
Served by three cable cars, two double chair lifts and seven
tow lifts (which are POMA-type lifts), the St. Anton area offers
long challenging runs as well as gentle beginner slopes. It is even
possible to ski from the top of the mountain to another town
a few kilometers away.
From the peak of the Kiluga Mountain (the highest) there
is an extraordinary panorama consisting of nothing but more
mountain peaks in every direction and for as far as the eye
can see.
There are no moderating influences such as oceans or lakes,
thus causing dry snow conditions all winter.
Skiing in Austria generally has a few added attractions to
skiing in B.C. There are quick warm-ups provided by the "tee
mit rhum" at a conventiently located warming hut at the top
or middle of the hill. The more civilized liquor laws, of course,
make this possible.
Apres-ski life has a different air as well. By 4:30 the hills
are barren, for the skiers have all gone to a tea-dance at one of
the hotels. The tea-dances usually have live music provided by
an Austrian group providing everything from the Polka to the
lastest Beatles hit.
Tea-dance over, next comes a sauna bath, especially for those
who were not in condition when they went on their skiing holiday. And finally dinner. For the budget-conscious it's off to the
railway station.
Here for $1 one can eat a full course dinner and for five
cents extra can have a glass of beer. The food actually comes
from the hotel across the street, which has one of the most expensive restaurants in the village.
If money has just arrived from home one can splurge at any
number of the terrific Tirolean restaurants in the village and
have Boeuf Bourguinon or Cheese Fondue, accompanied by the
"vin du maison". Dinner over, it's time for the discotheques,, one
of which is a good twenty-minute walk part-way up the mountain. The really keen discotheques don't swing too much past
midnight because they want to be in the first cable car at 7:45
a.m. to see the sun rise and to have the first run of the day
with no one to follow down the slopes.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1968-69
Effective September 28, 1968 to April 13, 1969
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 pjn.
FRIDAYS — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
SATURDAYS —        3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS — 12:45 to 2:45 pjn.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
•Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
November 1, 2, 15, 16, 29, 30
January 10, 11, 24, 25
February 14, 15
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. - Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
lets Co Skiing!
• Erbacher, Gresvig and A & T skis
• Val D'or, E.C.L., Tyrol and
La Dolomite Boots
• E.C.L., Tyrolia and Allais Harness
• Junior Ski Sets
• After Ski Boots and Slippers
• Toques, Parkas, Hoods, and Hats
COMPLETE SKI SETS AT $34.95
SPECIAL !
Limited Number of Ski Sweaters
25% Oft
SKI OUTFIT COMPLETE
Benner, German Skis
Salomon Allais W.E. Step-In Harness
Aluminum  Poles
Tyrol  Krista  Boots
$106.50
Sweaters and Sox
Goggles and Glasses
•
Repairs and
Installations
SKI
RENTALS
North Western Sporting Goods Ltd.
10TH AVE. AT ALMA ROAD
224-5040
1968-69 SEASON   FEATURES
ic Greatly improved highway access.
ie Chalet with Cafeteria and Dining Lounge
ic 3 T-Bars with an entirely new Westridge
T-Bar Area. No line-ups. 2,800 per hour
capacity.
ic Daily operation.
ic Group rates on request.
For further information write—
BIG WHITE SKI DEVELOPMENT LTD.
1481   Water  Street -  762-0402
Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada
ic Long November to May 1 season.
ic Dependable dry powder snow.
ic Beginners, intermediate runs packed by
new snowcal and packer.
ic Finest view from any B.C. Ski Area Chalet.
ic Accommodation on the Mountain includes
Dormitory, Motel, and Lodge accommodation in: The Kelowna Ski Club Dorm, Ten
Skiers Motel, Brian James Golden Labrador Lodge.
SKI SCHOOL
5 STEPS TO PARALLEL
Featuring the Fastest and Easiest
way to   Parallel  Skiing
^
THE HUGGER
SKI SLACKS
from Alpine of Vancouver
with revolutionary new four-way stretch
Slim Styled   -   Comfortable   -   Warm
Imported Fabric   -   Four-way Stretch   -   Guaranteed
Other Styles Available In
Prices Ranging From
$20.00 to $60.00
at all
LEADING SKI SHOPS AND DEPARTMENT STORES IN WESTERN CANADA Thursday, November 21, 1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 13
Timing, Movement
Main Elements
Competitive skiing is one of
those activities that requires
the skill of movement and precise timing that are so much
easier to see in "out forms"
such as ballet or gymnastics.
The strength and endurance
of the good competitor must be
combined w i t h a suppleness
that allows for very flowing
movement.
This then must be the objective of any training or conditioning program — to develop
strength and stamina around a
framework of suppleness. Both
Alpine (slalom, giant slalom,
downhill) and Nordic skiing
(cross-country, jumping) make
the above demands on the
competitive skier.
The methods used to develop
competitors in these three areas
are many and varied. Strength
and stamina can foe developed
through calisthenics and running.
Weight and circuit training
programs can also be very
beneficial. Of the three areas
mentioned, the development of
suppleness is by far the most
difficult.
Suppleness is very intimately
tied up with the many movements that make up skiing and
is therefore difficult to work
on away from the slopes. One
can, however, do stretching
exercises (special calisthenics)
that make the body very flexible and far more responsive
to the early season demands of
wanting to rapidly improve
technique. This then is a very
general approach to what conditioning must do for the competitive skier.
More specifically the program of training adopted must
be that one which will hopefully make the realization of
final objectives possible. At the
Skiing is:
Being stranded on a chairlift in the middle of a blizzard.
Wine parties and dancing.
Jfce Ski instructor.
Frighteing.
Pointing your boards down
the slope.
Falling off the lift.
Waiting hours in lift lines.
Getting stuck in the snow
bank.
Getting soaked strapping
chains on the car.
Rain, rain, and more rain!
The Ski Patrol.
My life!
university level of athletics
these objectives may widely
frame the point of view of individual athletes. Each individual will establish a set of
priorities which puts studies,
skiing, etc., into some kind of
perspective. Obtaining a
healthy balance can be very
difficult but equally rewarding.
Our dry-land training this fall
has been directed towards developing the above mentioned
areas. Many of the team members have also been able to get
in long hours of climbing and
cycling which break the monotony which can arise when
going through hard physical
workouts of running calisthenics.
At present we are getting
in two or more dry-land workouts and one day of skiing each
week Which should see us all
in good form for the Christmas
training camp at Rossland. Optimism is high for the coming
season.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
GARMENTS TO CHOOSE FROM
Full Dross (Tails)
Morning Coats
Directors' Coats
White & Blue Coats
Shirts & Accessories
Mail orders Invited
(Downstair*)
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe MU 3-2457
Are Skiers
Basically
Inhuman ?
DID YOU KNOW: Crosscountry racers
-    1.
*.   2.
£   5.
Have the longest life
span of any humans.
Have a heart capacity
of 45 litres/min. (normal person has 14-18
litres/min.).
Have the highest lung
capacity (top skiers have
90-105 ml/kg of body
wt. Normal person has
50 ml/kg of body wt.).
Have the lowest average pulse (38).
Have the highest oxygen
carrying capacity of
blood of 120 cc/litre
(normal person has 60
cc/litre).
Skiing s Expensive/
Know Equipment
By JOHN STEWART
Skiing is an expensive sport. Therefore I would like to give
a few pointers to those in the market for new equipment.
The first suggestion I would make is to deal with a reputable dealer. These people have a reputation to protect and want
your business again, therefore you can feel confident in dealing
with them.
The most important piece of equipment to be considered in
the purchase of new equipment is the harness. The value of
having a good safty harness cannot be underestimated. It is one of
the few components of a skier's equipment that with proper
maintenance and care will last for an indefinite period of time.
There are many different types of excellent safety bindings.
Be careful to select one which is suitable to your weight. Trust
the dealer. Skiing is his business. He probably knows more than
you.
Boots are the most important major piece of the skier's
basic equipment. There is a tremendous range of boots on the
market today. For the beginning skier I would suggest that the
minimum he should spend on boots is fifty dollars.
Contrary to popular belief, to the beginner, skis are not
the most important part of the novice's equipment. Adequate
skis should have steel edges and a good base (Kofex). These can
be purchased for $30 - $50. The length IS important. Most dealers have a chart which will inform you as to the length of ski
which corresponds to your height.
Poles are also important. Watch that you do not buy poles
which are too long for you. Good quality poles can be purchased
for about $10. These should be more than adequate for your
requirements.
You can ski! Take lessons, relax and above all think snow!
c
ELDORADO
j
ELDORADO  NUCLEAR LIMITED
ELDORADO NUCLEAIRE LiMITEE
Eldorado Representatives
will be available for interviews
on Campus
November 28th
Opportunities exist- in the following fields:
PERMANENT EMPLOYMENT:
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT:
Geologists
Geophysicists
Mining Engineers
Chemical or Metallurgical
Engineers
Geologists
(Post Grads & Undergrads)
Mining Engineers
Chemical Engineers
Metallurgical Engineers
Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
Contact the Student Placement Officer for
interview times and further information. Page 14
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
"k
■ i-. ■
z* .-■
. *- *t    ... . .  .
■\-4-iW-SB*. ■-■*>
.v.* .*■
^ «fl6fK«H>
- •»" ■/   ".V'
■JB* $A vtptgua. naci^^-tnteo the son didnt shine
' '■ It wa» aasowiofe and fcetidtag but -we. didnt mind .
■■-'- Wa --ttfexed Tip o«tr skis
" Beaded for tbe falQff
■-..Far another day of Axperimenta] spills
.. *. CHGsROS:
■ VWe steed aS day long
*'. And what did -we get
Another dozen bruises
And the worst times yet
St Peter don't you raJl us
Cause we can't go
We owe our souls to the wind and the snow
No matter what the conditions
■ To tiie hills we head
Sunday morning at six we get out of bed
Some think we're crazy, others insane
But the joy is something we just can't explain
Just think of those days of powder and sun
. ..Being the tost one down on an untrekked run
;■ You fly with the wind
The snow sprays -behind
A ri.-iv like that is one of a kind
Wi* l-i.*k forward Pin-h war to the first snow fall,
Tn ;ill nf Tih liuri' tin* lii'Hintains call
Wi- [>u1  away our 1-miks. pawn all we own
And aii-.wr-r thi* i.-ill of tin- m-nininins alone.
For the student who
finds time to  ski  .   .   .
quality sets to stay
within your budget.
For the skier who finds
time for his studies . . .
the finest equipment
and the selection you
require.
Shop where your fellow
U.B.C. students will
serve your every need.
iW/M
Park Royal - South Mall 926-2524
[fflflMIIKfrom Nov. to Jul/
on garibaldi s ^V Whistler Mtn.
Canada's D^§ Olympic Site(^^
Special Jo) day 1^x3 packages
4^©® foot vertical drop   y^
sen/iced by © modern lifts m q
ski-school (Jim-McConkey Director)
D© Accomodation facilities
°^aS^   Helicopter Skiing
Just *z7© miles *-^h* north of
Vancouver Hxj&, on highway §)
OARIBALDI'S
WHISTLER   MOUNTAIN
RESERVATION SERVICE TOR ALL
RUCIUTIES-CALL AREA CODE 604
932-5422
Representatives of
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY
OF CANADA, LIMITED
will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post-graduate students in
ENGINEERING ■ mining ■ metallurgical ■ chemical
■ electrical ■ mechanical ■ civil
CHEMISTRY GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
on December 5th and 6th
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held
with Geology and Geophysics students in 3rd, 4th
and post-graduate years
on December 5th and 6th
We invite you to arrange an interview through the Office
of Student Personnel Services
THE INTERNATIONAL NICKEL COMPANY
OF CANADA LIMITED
Copper Cliff, Ontario, Thompson, Manitoba Thursday, November 21, 1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 15
>»
' ",'■„  & .*
REMEMBER CHARLES WHITMAN? Ladner's last isn't the only good sniper location. If you want to throw balloons of water at engineers, tryThTtop° of brigus.
Mon Dieul Pas encore! Etudiants occupent CEGEPs
MONTREAL (CUP) — Repressive action by administrators has set off the second student occupation of Quebec's CEGEPs in two months.
Four of the province's junior colleges were in
student hands last weekend and three more may
be taken.
The following schools are occupied: Janqulere,
Chicoutimi, Lionel Groulx (Ste. Therese) and Lionel
Groulx (St. Jermore).
At Jonquiere, the administration called in 80
policemen early Friday morning to clear out 200
students occupying the campus. Five were arrested
but later released.
L'Union Generale des Etudiants du Quebec
(UGEQ) began occupation Monday of the ministry
of education, including the office of the minister
Jean-Guy Cardinal.
The new occupation movement began in Chicou
timi after seven students were expelled because
they had missed more than ten per cent of their
classes.
The ten per cent rule, effective in all CEGEPs,
is the major rallying point for the rebels who see
its enforcement as vindictive action against student
leaders.
UGEQ has called upon CEGEP system teachers
to co-operate by not reporting students who miss
more than the maximum number of classes.
The teachers are also governed by the ruling
and dislike it as much as the students do.
The defiant students point to CEGEP Jonquiere
as a prime example of administrative repressions.
Students there were forced to sign a pledge on re-
admission after the last occupation promising they
would "exclude themselves from the college if they
returned to their illegal activities."
UGEQ reports that many CEGEP students leaders around the province have not been permitted
to return to classes since they led occupations at
their various schools.
It is expected that unless the education ministry
takes action to loosen regulations at the CEGEPs,
the junior college students will again take over the
province's schools.
At the height of the occupation last month, 11
schools were occupied, seven tied up in perpetual
study sessions, and only five managed to conduct
normal classes.
CEGEP stands for College D'Enseignment General et Professionel and is the Quebec equivalent of
a junior college or trade school, a step between high
school and the university or industrial trade. The
CEGEP system is the first phase of a massive overhaul planned for the Quebec educational system.
PHARMACY
PRESENTS
THE GOOFBALL
SUB BALLROOM
November 23
8.30 - 1 a
Couples $2.75    +    Males $2.00    +    Females $1.50
Music by the Reformers
All IPHE Members Come Out Page     16
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
Censorships the game's name;
obscenity's the public enemy
By SUSIE SCHMIDT
(OPS-CUP) — American
college newspapers are running into heavy censorship this
fall from administrators, advisors (some college papers
have faculty members who
check their copy) and printers.
And they usually get it in
the neck for news stories, not
editorials or literary works.
In some cases, obscenity
charges are covers for political
or personal attacks on editors.
Two things are clear: the
people who run colleges are no
longer sure tbey really want
an independent student press;
and a great segment of academia can stomach their students' radical politics but still
have Daley-like gas pains when
they run into "obscenity."
The word fuck has sent
college printers (sic) into fits of
censorship. They refuse to print
papers and, in some cases,
attempt to force school discipline of editors.
At the University of Wisconsin last week, the Board of
Regents narrowly refrained
from firing Daily Cardinal editor Greg Graze and managing
editor Steve Reiner because the
paper printed a story containing "unfit language."
The story was a OPS release
on the SDS October National
Council meeting, quoting from
a member of the Up Against the
Wall/Mother-fucker faction.
The editorial board of the
Cardinal was instead ordered
to appear before the Regents
this winter with "a policy of
sanctions to prevent further
incidents."
The entire Cardinal staff and
its board of control signed a
front-page letter to the Regents,
calling the attack on the paper
"only a beachhead in the total
effort by the regents to exert
control over every aspect of the
university operation, student
life and faculty freedom."
The staff also printed paragraphs from books required by
many of the university's English classes, including Shakespeare, James Joyce and Norman Mailer, which contain language more obscene than that
in the news story.
Less than a week later, the
Michigan State University
State News printed a story
about the Wisconsin controversy, quoting from the CFS
story and from the. Cardinal's
literary selections.
The paper's adviser (or general manager, in bureaucratic
lingo) claimed the editors had
violated their contract with
their printer.
Since he had no power to fire
the staff, but does control the
paper's funds, the adviser,
Louis Berman, cut the salaries
of three top editors whom he
considered responsible fqr the
story.
At Purdue University, the
situation is even more serious
this week. Editor in chief
William Smoot was removed
from his position by the
school's vice-president for student affairs, who claimed in his
firing letter that the Exponent
had violated journalistic codes
and "offended the sensibilities
of the public."
The offensive item in this
case was a column critical of
the university president: "Regarding a vicious rumor concerning president Novde . . .
let us set the record straight.
Our president is not anal-
retentive ... he dumped on the
students just last week," the
column opened.
Although the administration
mandate provided that a new
editor should be chosen by the
Exponent's senior staff members, the 15 members of the
senior editorial board said the
paper's editorial policy would
be the same with or without
Smoot.
At a number of schools, the
paper's problem has been not
the administration but its
printer.
At New York City's Hunter
College, for example, the job
printer who handles many Of
the city's small college papers
refused to print the Envoy's
first edition this fall because a
story about the Chicago Democratic convention contained the
word "fuck". The paper got
another printer.
The Oakland (Mich.) University Observer in its second fall
issue ran a four-page supplement containing a long autobiographical piece by a black
student.
The Observer's printer also
refused to run the supplement.
The dispute still has not been
settled; the Observer has another printer.
In Putney, Vt., last week, the
printer of the Lion's Roar had
refused to print any more
issues of the paper.
In a letter to the president of
Windham College, which pub
lishes the paper, the printer
said the Lion's Roar was "not
the type of publication we
choose to print."
He objected to a Liberation
News Service article on "The
Myth of Vaginal Orgasm" and
a cartoon about LBJ and the
"credibility gap."
His refusal to print nearly
destroyed the small paper financially, since he owned the
only offset press in Putney and
if even one issue of the paper
were cancelled, the loss in advertising revenue" would have
been a disaster.
Other printers are more
subtle; they just change the
parts they don't like.
In a CPS story about the
Democratic convention which
quoted Realist editor Paul
Krassner telling a story about
LBJ defending the war: ("Son,
those commies are saying,
'Fuck you Lyndon Johnson,'
and nobody says 'Fuck you
Lyndon Johnson' and gets away
with it"), the printer of the
Stetson University Reporter cut
out the entire phrase "fuck
you", making the whole sentence patently absurd.
More than one student editor
has opened his paper in the
morning to discover censorship
by the printer /"
Last month the Daily Calif-
ornian in Berkeley, which ran
a story about a pamphlet being
distributed on campus by radical political groups, discovered
that their printer had a fondness fqr dashes in the middle of
some words.
Most of the trouble with
printers   comes   from   small
To Page 20
See: MORE OBSCENITY
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SWIR6 m
OIL CAN HARRY'S
752 THURLOW ST.
VANCOUVER,  B.C.    683-7306
tt
Deseret  Club   Presents
YOU!
n
A MEANINGFUL
EXISTENCE
Don't Miss This
Pictorial Display
Main Floor S.U.B. Nov. 21-23
(Thurs., Fri., Sat.)
South. £&LL QjfnpoJdA,
For Hand Carved
Woods
RE-OPENING
TUESDAY, NOV. 26
at
1411 ROBSON ST.
(hear Broughton)
Phone 681-0612
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
International Affairs Conference
Applications now being received for those interested in
attending the Ninth Annual Conference on International
Affairs from January 21 to 24, 1969 at the University
of Manitoba. This year's conference will center on the
theme — Latin America! Progress or Revolution in our
Hemisphere. Apply in writing to A.M.S. Secretary,
Room 248, S.U.B. before 4 p.m., Friday, November 22nd.
Chairman Required for Special Events
Applications are now being received for chairman of
the special events, performing arts committee. This
person will be responsible for planning events of a
specialized nature which are of campus wide interest.
Apply in writing to A.M.S. secretary, Room 248 S.U.B.
before 4 p.m. Friday, November 22.
Services Commission
For all those students who are concerned about the
bread and butter issues of university life housing, food,
traffic and parking, library etc. and who want to have
a say in these matters and a hand in decision making,
there will be a meeting noon Friday, November 22nd
in S.U.B. F.
THE CANADIAN ARMED FORCES
REGULAR OFFICERS TRAINING PLAN
A military career counsellor will be on the campus to provide details of the various government sponsorede university
training plans on the 29th and 30th of November.
There are many advantages to be gained by making a
career in the services and both graduates and undergraduates would be well advised to investigate the possibilities of such a career — arrangements for interviews
may be made through the Student Placement Office or by
contacting the
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre
545 Seymour St. 684-7341
TOMORROW
Lincoln Alexander
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE MP — HAMILTON WEST
72:30 — Angus 7 70 — FREE Thursday, November 21, 1968
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 17
i ns um**mi
BURAK tests durability of his underwear.
He was sure red,
but not blushing
There is no glory in wearing a UBC engineer's jacket — especially if you're not an
engineer.
Jack Burak, second year honors math and
chemistry, was spotted wearing an engineer
jacket at the UBC-SFU football game — and
yesterday, he   suffered  the   consequences.
At 10:30 a.m., he was apprehended en route
to math 221, decorated, and taken by legitimate redshirts on a tour of computer science
and SUB.
Burak was decorated with red paint, and
a lab coat — and that was just about his total
attire — except for an "engineers '72" sign in
the middle of his forehead.
He had been originally sentenced to death,
but was released because, as one of his assailants said, "We're very humane".
So says Northcote
Tonight at 8:15 p.m., in Totem Park residence, you can see the man who said, "Work
expands so as to fill the time available for its
completion".
Professor C. Northcote Parkinson will also
speak on "The Science of Politics", Friday
noon, in Freddy Wood theatre.
A noted historian and political scientist, he
became famous in 1957, when his book, Parkinson's Law, was published.
Lawmen
illegal sit-in
By VICTOR RABINOVITCH
LONDON (CUPI) — Over 40 of Britain's more esteemed defenders of law
and order last week resorted to an "illegal" sit-in in an effort to force reforms
on their education system.
Law students at Gray's Inn School in
London began the token sit-in Nov. 12
after a jam-packed meeting of the Bar
Students Reform Committee dissolved
into chaos.
The demands include:
• Abolition of a rule which limits
the number of times a student can attempt to pass his final Bar examinations;
• Creation of a central Union, elected by students from all four of the Inns
of Courts law schools;
• Immediate expansion of teaching
and staff facilities, generally regarded as
totally inadequate.
All British students who wish to be
accredited by the Bar must attend two
years of seminars and tutorials before
they are allowed to write their exams.
But the facilities provided are insufficient
and outmoded.
Until this year, for example, there
were no full-time staff members.
„-4
Czech students
occupy buildings
PRAGUE (CUPI) — Czechoslovakian students Sunday occupied universities here and in
Brno, capital city of Moravia,
in support of Alexander
Dubcek and his regime.
Hundreds of students quietly
took over buildings of the faculties of law, philosophy, medicine and engineering at Charles
University in Prague early
Sunday morning and commemorated the 29th anniversary of
the death of students and
workers during the Nazi occupation.
IN PERSON
Nov. 29 thru Dec. 7
*
Capitol
Recording Star of
"Ode to
Billy Joe"
THE
tBobbisx %swJthiL
*     SHOW
THEATRE RESTAURANT
26 HORNBY - VANCOUVER, CANADA
Students break fast
BERKELEY (CUPI) — Two students here ended an 18-day
fast after a professor of human nutrition told them "permanent
damage" would result if they continued.
The two, Konstantin Berlandt and Charles Palmer, went on
their hunger strike to demand a greater student role in decisionmaking at Berkeley. They were advised to cease the fast by Dr.
Sheldon Margen.
Berlandt is editor of the student newspaper the Daily Cali-
fornian and Palmer is the student president at Berkeley.
Lincoln Alexander, MP
talks Friday at UBC
Canada's first black member
of parliament, Lincoln Alexander, will speak on campus
Friday noon in Ang. 110.
A well known and respected
lawyer in his Hamilton-West,
riding, he has rejected the label
of a spokesman for the black
Canadian.
"However, I want to go on
record to show that I accept the
responsibility for speaking for
him and all others in this great
nation who feel that they are
the subjects of discrimination
because of race, creed or color,"
he said in his first speech
before parliament earlier this
year.
BOYS   -  BOYS
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752 THURLOW ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C. 683-730b
Lutheran Campus Centre
Across from  "The Village"
Worship, Anyway
10:30 a.m. Sunday
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VANCOUVER
677 Granville        -        Opp. The Bay        -        681-6174
NEW WESTMINSTER
675 Columbia      —      Opp. Army & Navy      —      521-0751
NORTH VANCOUVER
1825 Lonsdale
987-2264 Page  18
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
FANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Gangs of dung-covered crimson
blorgs and squealing ivory
blorgs meet here sometime next
week for the final of the annual
beet rolling, tulip-eating, and
storm-door construction competition, this island paradise's
national sport.
"We'll roll over the opposition, as well as eating them up
and shutting the door in their
faces," said Mordecai Ognap,
one of the opposing coaches.
An M.A.  Thesi;;   1'ro.luctfon
No Trifling With Love
By   Alfred   De   Munset
NEW SOMERSET STUDIO
Nov.  20-23 -  8:30 p.m.
Bex  Office:   Room   207
Frederic Wood Theatre
International game
Women's volleyball
The UBC women's volleyball
team has two girls who will be
playing with a B.C. represent-
o_
<
u
o
<
FIND US IF YOU CAN
2 HAMBURGERS (OR ANY OTHER BURGERS) FOR THE
PRICE OF ONE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 21 ONLY.
THIS SPECIAL IS GIVEN ONLY IF ASKED FOR WHEN
ORDERING.
CLUE TO OUR LOCATION - THE OWNER IS RUNNING
FOR ALDERAAAN.
@ Westinghouse
will be on Campus
November 25 •& 26
To Interview
1969 ENGINEERING GRADUATES
Electrical — Mechanical
A well-defined training program is offered to prepare candidates for positions of responsibility in:
DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
FACTORY ENGINEERING
SERVICE ENGINEERING
FIELD INSTALLATION
TECHNICAL MARKETING AND SALES
These positions will afford opportunity for career
development to graduates with potential.
Professional salary scale and increases based on
performance as well as excellent employee fringe
benefit plans.
Contact the Placement Office for detailed information, brochures and interview appointment.
ative team in an international
match on Thursday night at
8:00   p.m.   in   War  Memorial
gym.
Barb Lee and Nancy Wells
are the two Thunderettes who
will join the Calona Wines
team to play against the touring Czechoslovakian national
team.
The Czech team is considered
by the experts to be one of the
top five women's teams in the
world.
Several women from the
Canadian national team which
competed in the Pan-Am games
have been working out in preparation for this match.
A preliminary game at 7:00
p.m. will see the other Thunderettes play a team from the
Sunset Centre.
There will be a special student price for students to see
these high calibre games.
Tickets will be on sale at
the door.
The teams will go on to play
other matches, appearing on
Friday night in Nanaimo and
on Saturday in Kelowna.
EAT IN • TAKE OUT* DELIVERY-
willy van yperen
4410w. 10th avenue
Vancouver 8, b.c.
224-5412
contemporary
jewelry
design
READY AT LAST!
FILMSOC SUB OPENER!
THE TAMING OF THE SHREW
Today and Friday
50c - Th: 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
Fri: 6:30, 9:00 - Note Changes
TIC  ETS GO ON SALE AT 11:30 IN THE S.U.B. AUD. TICKET OFFICE.
GET TICKETS EARLY TO AVOID THE CROWDS.
11
Gnup interviewed
about his team
A candid interview with head
football coach Frank Gnup. Gnup
has been here for fifteen years
and has over the season put together a 54-81 record with 4 ties.
In a short gab session before
the interview when faced with the
facts Gnup admitted that he was
a much better coach than the
record showed, since he felt that
he was a better coach than most
of his opponents.
U by ssey;
Coach what
was the main
problem this
year?
Gnup: We
didn't have
enough per-
sonel, we had
five or six
good players
but that was
all.
Ubyssey:
Can you solve
this problem
for next year?
Gnup: Well
every year we
recruit, this
year we have
some grads out
ONUP
Gnup: Continuity. Take The
Ubyssey or Men's Athletic
Committee, they change every
year and no one knows what
went on the year before and
so they don't comprehend the
total picture. They all have
their own ideas and sports and
they want the best deal for it,
usually at the expense of football.
Ubyssey: What do you think
could change
that?
Gnup: Here
the director of
athletics is un-
der MAC
where as he
isn't anywhere
else. He knows
what he's doing from year
to year. He
knows what is
happen ing
(from lyear to
year better
than some
fresh kid who
never had a
jock strap on.
But then that's
the system,
sometimes the
kid    is    for
working     for
us, but a lot of the kids we talk    sports and other years he isn't
to don't even get into school
because of marks or other offers.
Ubyssey: Why does a school
of 20,000 people h a V e this
problem?
Gnup: Well Vancouver just
doesn't have that many athletes, and of them only a few
play football. Too few of the
high schools in the district play
football, for us to get any of
their players when we have to
come up against the guys up
on the hill and also the American schools.
Ubyssey: If the team was any
any better do you think you
would get more spectators?
Gnup: No, last year and this
year maybe the teams had
something to do with it but not
usually.
Ubyssey: Are you looking
forward to playing in Western
Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic  Association competition?
Gnup: Yes we will be competitive with these teams.
Ubyssey: Would you rather
play in a Canadian or Ameri-
leagues?
Gnup: Well me and the boys
like the American game better,
the four downse give us more
of a chance to move the ball
and get a first down, but it
evens out with the more interesting motion rules and lineups in the Canadian game.
Ubyssey: As far as athletics
on campus, what do you think
is the main problem?
Ubyssey: Athletics at UBC
usually says that it needs more
money, do you think it should
get it and how?
Gnup: Well what for? Inter-
murals? I think they could put
more money in that but you
also need extra-curricular
sports so you get the good ones
competing against the better
ones. Kids want to have some
place to show their promise.
The big thing about money is
the travel involved in playing
in the western league, it costs
a lot of money to do all the
travelling needed but if all
these new schools like Victoria
and the others come in then
maybe we'll get a western division and that will save more.
Ubyssey: Do you follow any
of the other sports on campus?
Gnup: Oh ya, I watch the
hockey and basketball teams
and I used to watch the baseball team, it near broke my
heart when they cut that because its my favorite sport,
except that we used to play
about eighteen games in two
or three weeks. But I like
watching Peter and the basketball team, especially sometimes only Peter and not the
team at all. I never watch
others like rugby or soccer unless they happen to be playing
when I'm walking my dog up
around those fields. Thursday, November 21, 1968
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 19
I agree with Mr. James that possibly UBC
has earned its apathy, but I feel I must correct
a mistake which he and other people make.
It concerns the fact that Bob Osbourne is
always cast as the villain in anything to do
with UBC athletics. This is not true, as Os-
bourne's position is only that of head of the
school of physical education. His job as it re-
LETTER
Editor, The Ubyssey, Si*:
I think it is time someone registered a protest against the archaic athletic policy perpetrated by this school. It appears to me that
something is wrong when, for example, a flute
player can get monetary aid to do his thing
while players on the so-called major and some
minor sports are lucky to get the time of day
from the hierarchy. Observe one varsity
hockey player, Glen Richards, who comes out
of Powell River with a broken nose and torn
knee ligaments — and what the hell for — so
he can play for the glory of UBC?
As it stands now football is a disgrace
when players capable of walking over Gnup's
team don't bother to turn out. Hockey is falling apart at the seams when more players quit
than stay with the team and basketball will
soon follow this pattern.
People who are in a position to do something about this, like Osborne, hand down
policy that went out with the dark ages. But
his type do not keep their jobs without support of the artsy-fartsy students on the AMS
and the fat cat coaches who benignly support
this policy for fear of losing their small time
jobs.
If Hare does one good thing during his tenure I hope it is the act of giving Osborne the
boot and recruiting a man who can turn the
situation around; a man who hires and fires on
the basis of results not on patronism; a man
who gives athletes some of the support they
deserve in order to justify good athletes turning out; and last, but not least, a man who can
sell his products to 20,000 students, to one
million people in Vancouver and to British
Columbia.
As it stands now UBC not only deserves the
apathy — it has earned it.
JACK D. JAMES
law II
lates to extra-mural athletics is not to hand
down policy, but to hire and fire if necessary,
teachers for his school.
These teachers take* on the coaching of
teams as an incidental job. Their success as a
coach relates in no way to their position in the
school or their employment as far as that goes.
Possibly, as James suggests, then this is
where the change should come from, but if
this is so, the people to decide this will be the
ten members of the men's athletic committee under the chairman ship of Dr. B. Burke.
This is a president's committee, which means
that it is responsible only to tbe president. It
consists of four students, with the addition of
another some time this year and five faculty
members. As far as I can see the only members
On this committee related to athletics are the
athletic director and athletic manager, who are
only advisors as well as the president and vice-
president of the men's athletic association.
This committee is basically in charge of
the athletic program at UBC because it controls
the purse strings. It has a basic amount of
money which comes from every student's athletic fee, to work with and it decides on various
indexes of its own choosing where the funds
should be allocated. This determines of course
where teams can travel to for competition and
who they can invite in return.
Since there is no one man who controls
the situation, the blame for the notoriously
bad UBC teams can not be laid at one person's
feet. Maybe it should be, maybe one person
should have to produce or lose his job, but who
would it be? Certainly no one on the staff now
could handle that job as well as his present
duties, but perhaps these present duties should
be changed.
To those concerned with holding the
purse-strings of the athletic program though,
these thoughts would appear heresy, because
they would necessitate the hiring of professional type coaches and if UBC has trouble
funding its program now, can you imagine what
it would be like if they had to pay pro coaching
wages on top of that?
Unless any of the teams do well this year,
now is the time the 'archaic' policy should be
changed and then players will be able to play
for the glory of UBC because they will hopefully be winning by then.
Cultured Pearls
GINZA
JAPAN ARTS
1045 Robson 684-6629
DANCING GROUP OF
THE REPUBLIC OF CHINA
Recently from the International
Cultural   Exhibition,   Olympic,   Mexico,   1968
SPECIAL CAMPUS PERFORMANCE
SATURDAY,  NOVEMBER 23,  1968
2:00  -   4:00   PM.
Admission: FREE
S.U.B.  Ballroom
Tickets Available From
International House Before Saturday
BIRD CALLS
THE UBC STUDENT
TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
is The Handiest Book On Cumpus
- ESPECIALLY AT CHRISTMAS TIME -
BUY  YOUR  COPY TODAY
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE
S.U.B.
UBC BOOKSTORE
INFORMATION DESK
S.U.B.
Thunderbird ski trip to Rossland
The annual Thunderbird Ski team sponsored trip
Rossland is ready to go once again.
The trip will leave on the 26th of December and will
return on the first of January.
The facilities at Rossland this year include two chair
lifts, one poma lift and two rope towns.
The price of the ticket is $99.99 all inclusive, and one
gets accommodation, transportation, apres ski parties, and
five full days of recreational skiing.
Tickets will be on sale this coming Thursday and Friday from noon to 2 p.m. in the SUB foyer.
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
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■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
■KERRISDALE   41st at YEW
Last Appearance Together!
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WITH
BIG BROTHER
AND THE
HOLDING COMPANY
Featuring
CHICAGO TRANSIT AUTHORITY
A COLUMBIA   RECORDS  LP
ALBUM AVAILABLE AT
ALL  RECORD STORES
PACIFIC
COLISEUM
NOV. 30
8:30 P.M.
$4.50, $3.50, $2.50
TICKETS NOW
AVAILABLE
The Bay Box Office
Main Floor, The Bay
Daily 10 to 5
Phone 681-3351
PHAROAHS   RETREAT
PRESENTS
THE TRIALS OF JASON HOOVER
Swinging six nights a week
New policy — Monday thru Saturday
Admission: $1.00 (weekends till 10:00 p.m.)
Water & Cordova (behind Eaton's Parking lot)
Reservations 681-0541
FULL FACILITIES Page 20
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday, November 21, 1968
Gestalt founder
starves in SUB
The founder of the Gestalt theory of psychology, Dr.
Frederick S. Perls, spoke Wednesday noon in SUB ballroom.
In his talk, Perls compared the young people of Berlin
after the first World War to young people today.
He then showed two films. In one, a boy possessed by
a demon turned the demon into his own strength.
The second film showed a girl learning to appreciate
herself by enacting the double role of orchestra conductor
and audience.
With the audience already leaving for 1:30 p.m.
classes, Perls talked about fitting together a whole personality. He said everything is taking place in the present
condition of "all anxiety jumping prematurely into the
future."
After Perls had finished his presentation, he asked for
feedback from the audience. He wasn't exactly force-fed.
MORE OBSCENITY
From Page 16
jobbers who edit all the copy
their typesetters set and have
set themselves up as protectors
of decency in the printed word.
Lou Sokall, manager of Alert
Printing Company in New York
City, which handles 20 local
student papers, said it all:
"Somewhere down along the
line somebody has to say something about smut. I'm just try
ing to do something to protect
those nice people who still
cringe when they see the word
(fuck) in print."
It's all very reminiscent of
Mayor Daley, yelling at Connecticut Senator Ribicoff to
"go fuck himself on the floor
of the Democratic convention,
and then complaining piously
about demonstrators outside
bad-mouthing cops.
'TWEEN CLASSES ...
Carry  on,
teach-in  spirit
'Tween classes appears today in an experimental
classified format. Recent complaints that notices do
not appear or appear without sufficient advance
notice have prompted The Ubyssey to set notices in
smaller print so that more can be used.
VARSITY   ROD   &  6UN
Meeting   today   noon,   SUB   room   C.
Last one before exams.
PHOTOSOC
Meeting today noon, Bu. 202.
MAMOOKS
Meeting today noon in the office.
UBCSCC
Gymkhana   comm.   today,   7:30   p.m.,
SUB 216.
FRIDAY
SUB   room
TODAY
TEACH-IN   STUDY   GROUP
Meeting   tonight,   8   P.m.,
F.
ENGLISH   LIT   UNION
Seminar on Man Is Man. Dr. Pinkus,
8 p.m.  tonight in North Brock  basement.
INTERNATIONAL VOLLEYBALL
Women's, Czechoslovakia vs. B.C., 8
p.m. in War Memorial gym. Preliminary: UBC Thunderettes vs. Sunset
Centre, 7 p.m. Student tickets $1 at
the door.
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Square dancing noon today, SUB L
& M.
VOC
Friday is last day for membership
fees.
AQUASOC
Sign list on club notice board today
for Deception Pass dive today.
MUSSOC
Dance rehearsal tonight, 7:30 p.m. in
Grace Macdonald studio. New male
dancers at 7 p.m. or phone 228-3073
before 5 p.m. Publicity meeting Monday noon.
FILMSOC
Taming of the Shrew, SUB auditorium.
Today 12:30, 3:30, 6, 8:30 p.m. Friday
6:30, 9 p.m. 50 cents.
FRENCH DEPT.
"L'ironie dans les pensees de Pascal."
Prof. Jen Menard from UofT. Today
noon, Bu. 2244.
DESERET CLUB
YOU according to the stick of Judah.
Pictorial display,  SUB main floor to
Saturday.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Want to learn how to speak French
rapidly? Join our speed - speaking
group, IH 402, 8-10 p.m. Mondays and
Thursdays. $10 per month for students.
SIMS
Daily   meditation,   SUB   213.   7:30   to
9:30 a.m. and 4 to 5:30 p.m. Meeting
today, SUB 125, 7:30 p.m.
CIASP
Spanish conversation Friday! noon,
SUB 105B.
CIRCLE   K
General meeting and  speaker Friday
noon, SUB council chamber.
DANCE CLUB
Hofbrauhaus beer garden party, SUB
ballroom,   Nov.   29.   Advance   tickets
S1.2S.
UBC   RADIO
Meeting   in   SUB   council   chambers,
noon   today   to   discuss   constitutional
revisions.
GERMAN  CLUB
Polka dance  teach-in,  noon,  IB  402-
404.
NDP
General  discussion  today  noon,  SUB
213
VARSITY DEMOLAY
Meeting 7:30 p.m.   tonight,  SUB 215.
Befreshmenta.
18th C  CLUB
Tickets available until Friday for dinner-dance at Cecil Green. Fourth floor
English office in Buchanan.
COSA
Skating party, Thunderbird arena, Friday 7:30-9:30 p.m. Refreshments afterwards.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Dr.   Grover  of   the   French   dept.   on
his     meetings     with     contemporary
French  authors,  Friday, 8 p.m., 3748
West  13th.
SFFEN
Meeting Friday noon, club workroom.
AMS SERVICES COMMITTEE
Fed up with the caf food, or walking
half a mile from the parking lot? Expound on these and other topics such
as library, housing, etc. Friday noon
in SUB room F.
VCF
Paul Little, "Christianity: dead or
alive", SUB ballroom Friday noon.
DEBATING   UNION
Friday  meet  cancelled.  Debate  Tuesday noon, Bu. 102.
PRE-LAW SOC
Faculty    club    pres.    Dr.    Huberman
speaks Friday noon, Ang. 215.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Lunch-in for all, SUB 211, noon, Friday.  Memberships available.
WEEKEND
COSA
Republic of China dancing group, SUB
auditorium, 2-4 p.m. Sat. Free tickets
in IH.
SKYDIVING   CLUB
Packing lessons Sunday, 7 p.m., SUB
party room.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Wine & cheese party, 7:30 p.m., Sunday in St. Mark's music room. Members only. RSVP & BYOB.
cuso
African Symposium, films, speakers,
discussion. 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday in IH. Bring lunch.
UBCSCC
Closed club gymkhana, 9 a.m. Sunday
in A lot. $1.
THEATRE   DEPT.
Audition for  M.A.  thesis  production,
Joe   Orton's  Entertaining  Mr.  Sloane.
Monday   7-9   p.m.,  Tuesday   noon-2:30
p.m., Freddy Wood room 16.
GERMAN CLUB
Polka party 8:30-12.30 Saturday in IH.
$1.25,  couples  $2.
—   CLASSIFIED   —
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 Unes. 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ad* are not accepted by telephone end
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office; 241  STUDENT UNION BLDG., UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.G,
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
GIANT STROBE LIGHT POR RENT.
Reserve early for your next party,
dance,  or  drunk.   Phone   922-1451.
BASH OP THE YEAR. FEATURING
The Apollos, Nov. 23, SUB. Advance
sales   Thursday,  Priday,   SUB  lobby.
SWING WITH THE WJGGY SYM-
phony at Totem Park this Saturday,
8:20  to midnight.
PHARMACY  PRESENTS   THE  GOOF
Ball.   Nov.  23,   SUB  Ballroom.
WELCOME TO THE HOPBRAU-
haus German Beer Garden Pariy.
SUB   Ballroom,   November 29.   $1.50,
GERMAN CLUB POLKA PARTY I.H.
Saturday, Nov. 23, 8:30-12:30. $1.25
each, $2.00 couple. Band, refreshments.   Everyone   welcome!
COMMERCE FACULTY — BOTH
Profs and Students Dance at the
Barn. Saturday 9 to 1. BYOB. Price
$3.00  per couple.
Greetings
12
I'HE GENTLEMEN OF LAW WEST
take, pleasure in announcing the
forthcoming marriage of Mr. Donald
R. Munroe and Miss C. Cote.
Xmas
SPECIAL
$1.25
68    -    INVITATION    -    69
Lott fc Found
13
LOST ONE MAN'S GREEN RAIN-
coat Thurs. Angus Rm. 315. Phone
738-6257. Ask for Brent.
LOST: UBC JACKET FROM COAT
rack, Place Vanier dance Pri. night.
Phone  Fraser   224-9927.
LOST: DARK BROWN SUEDE JAC-
ket at Interprofessional Symposium
Saturday. I have the one you left.
688-3155.
CAMERA LOST IN SUB SATURDAY.
Reward.   738-5383  after  6:00  p.m.
LOST:   BROWN   U.    TEXAS    CALU-
lus, UBC "?"—notebooks.  Text "Les
mains   Sales".   Peter,   Rm.   410,   224-
9017.
LOST BEIGE PURSE IN WESBROOK
Friday 1:00. Need I.D.. Please phone
Sherryl  434-6237 after 5  p.m.	
LOST FRIDAY, RED WALLET,
Freddy Wood parking lot. Please
return   to   Nancy,   874-3701.   Reward.
WOULD GIRL WHO LOST GRAY
sealskin change purse cal] Harvey,
278-1031.
LOST SMALL GOLD PIN WED.
morning on campus. Reward. Must
have back. Dave Lui, RE 3-0187 or
228-3073.
Rides fc Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED FOR TWO FROM
West Van. 20th & Gordon call 926-
1208   Max.
Special Notice*
15
M.P. FOR HAMILTON WEST—LIN-
coln Alexander — Tomorrow 12:30.
Angus  110.  Free!
MEET TARY, JIMMY AND DANA—
Tomorrow's Eyes — noon today,
SUB  Ballroom.
SEE SHREW TAMED IN SUB!
Auditorium today and Friday —
Thurs., 12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30 — Fri.,
6:30, 9:00. It's our SUB Opener!  50c.
THE GRIN BIN HAS POSTERS.
Jokes, Cards, Gifts and a Post
Office. Tou'll find It across from
th* Liquor Store at 3209 West
Broadway. __
THE NEW YORK LIFE AGENT ON
your campus is a good man to
know.
REDUCE THE COST OF YOUR IN-
surance by as much as 20%. All
risks insured and no cancellations.
Motor bikes also. Phone Ted Elliott.
299-9422.
C.U.S.O. WORKSHOP ON AFRICA.
Intn'l. Hse. Sat., Nov. 23, 10:00 a.m.-
1:30 p.m. Panel discussion will feature African Students and returned
volunteers. Everyone is welcome.
CHRISTMAS IS COMING BUT
Youth Cards are here Now. Fly half
fare until your 22nd birthday only
$3. Call to get yours delivered personally. Deirdre SwingAir Rep. 738-
1678.
Travel Opportunities 18
GOING SKIING IN AUSTRIA AT
Xmas. Like someone to go with.
Phone   Brian   922-4991.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
Q   T  <
and
SPITFIRES,
at
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
Special Consideration To Students
Ph.  Lee 682-7185 or WE C-2067
Auto. For Sale (Cont.)
21
YEAR END DISCOUNT SALE ON
new Peugeot — all models. Cal] at
1162  Seymour  St.
GRAND PRIX MOTORS
FOR SALE 1958 PONTIAC, GOOD
condition $300. Pone 224-9910. Ask
for Paul Adams.  Acadia 29-12.
MUST SELL, 1959 HILLMAN, GOOD
clean condition, newly over-hauled,
$300 or best offer. Phone 255-5548.
1965 MUSTANG FAST-BACK, 289 4-
speed. Good shape, red line tires.
Phone  688-5195.
1956 VW. NEW BRAKES, SOUND
engine, trans. $150. 536-6878 or 228-
2726.
MUST   SELL  '61  FIAT-TUDOR.
Good    condition.    Excel,    brakes,
clutch. $400 or best offer. Ph. 224-1677
betw.   7-8   p.m. 	
1965 CORVAIR CORSA—JUST TEST-
ed, everything perfect. Immaculate
blue exterior, black leather interior.
See it yourself. Offers from $1,400.
736-6281.
1960 METIOR, 4-DOOR V-8 AUTO,
trans., good motor, body fair condi-
tion.   $250.  Ph.   224-7660.	
GOOD       TRANSPORTATION.
Chev,   $100.   Phone   263-6180.
1952
GIRL FRIEND PREGNANT, MUST
sell 1961 Zephyer, $350 or best offer.
Fort   Camp   9-14   or   584-4494.
'56 CONSUL NEEDS TRANS. BUT
motor, rubber, brakes good. $69.50.
738-0214.
Automobile—Parts
23
WANTED     TWO     USED     45     DCOE
A^eber  carbs.   Phone   John   922-1451.
Motorcycles
26
>6 DUCATI 350CC S-BAGS, ACCES-
sories. $400 or best offer. Phone
228-9521 ask for Bill.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
Duplicating fc Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
SILK SCREEN POSTERS. BEAU-
tifully made. Lowest Possible cost.
24   hr.   service.   731-7301.
BUSES FOR CHARTER
Available in  Vancouver
For Rates That Please
SQUAMISH COACH LINES
580 Howe 684-0522
Home Entertainment
35
GUARANTEED EXPERT AND
EFFICIENT   REPAIRS
Color T.V.  — Black  and White  T.V.
Record Players — Radios
Stereo Equipment — Tape  Recorders
ALEXANDER AND AXELSON LTD.
4512 W. 10th — 228-9088
Complete   Record  Department
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals  37
RENT THE PAISLEY MULTICOL-
ored Strobic Light-Show to make
your party or dance happen. Reasonable rates. Paul 731-7301 .
THE GOOF BALL NOV. 23 SUB.
Final big blast before exams. BE
THERE. BAR
STEPHAN SHEEHAN SCIENCE 2
says tankings in Faculty Pond
rather   inconvenient.
DON'T FORGET THE BIG CONCERT
today noon, SUB Ballroom — To-
morrow's Eyes — and  only  50c.
DON'T BE A DROP-OUT! MAKE
sure you graduate by becoming one
of UBC's fastest readers. In eight
weeks you'll read dynamically and
have better comprehension of what
you read. To register for November
or  January  classes,  call  732-7696.
WE FINALLY MADE IT! SUB AT
last! See "Taming of The Shrew" in
SUB Aud. Thursday, 12:30, 3:30,
6:00,   8:30  —  Friday,   6:30,   9:00.   50c.
OTHER BANDS ADMIT THEY CAN-
not match the Wiggy Symphony.
Dance Saturday night, Totem Park.
CC. (THE KID) THURSDAY NIGHT
at the movies could be good. P.B.
was  the  Monday night grunts.  Gar.
WILL LORD TOPPINGTON APPEAF
as a suckling pig dancing an 18th
C. minuet Nov. 28? Buy your ticket
before Fri. and find out. English
office,   Buchanan,   4th   floor.	
LEAD SINGER NEEDED FOR COM-
mercial Rock Band. Call Hunt 985-
1646 or Ray 987-1706.
HORRORS! COMMERCE STUDENTS
and Profs dance together! Come
casual to the Barn, 9 to 1, Saturday.
Cost: a mere $3.00 per couple BYOB.
Typing
40
•GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
pho*ne   277-5640."
RELIABLE HOME TYPIST AVAIL-
able for essays, etc. Please call 435-
0882.
EXPERIENCED    TYPIST     30o    PER
page.   874-2661.	
EXPERIENCED     TYPIST.     ESSAYS,
etc.  Reas.   rates.   Phone 738-7881.
TYPING:    PHONE   731-7511,   9:00   TO
5:00.  After 6:00, 266-6662.
ypiiKj (Cont.)
40
ESSAYS, THESES AND PH.D'S EX-
pertly typed — Campbell method.
RE  1-3700.
Help Wanted—Female
51
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
THE CENTRAL VANCOUVER YMCA
requires four students to help with
Saturday morning youth program.
For further information please call:
681-0221,  Local  28.
X'MAS COMING — LIKE TO EARN
extra money in spare time? No obligation. Phone Mr. Wu 263-5982
weekdays  9  a.m.   -   12 noon.
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Tutoring
64
FIRST YEAR MATHS, CHEMISTRY,
physics lessons given by excellent
tutors.. 736-6923.
1st AND 2nd YEAR MATHS, CHEM.
physics by science and engineering
graduate.  731-1930  or 731-3491.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
YES, WE STILL HAVE COCONUT
oil best for your hair and akin. Plus
appointment service. Upper Tenth
Barber, 4574 West 10th Avenue, 224-
6622.
WESTINGHOUSE 19" PORTABLE
TV Model P-8969, new, guarantee,
reg. $279.00, will sell $250.00 or nearest offer. Phone 224-7230.
SKIS: BLIZZARD METAL 210CM
G.S. $90. KNEISSL EXPORT G.S.
215cm $60.  Phone 731-5181  evenings.
TWO 5.60/5.90x15 WHITEWALL
snow tires mounted in Volkswagen
rims. 2 month's use. $50.00. Phone
922-6364 ask for Skip or leave name
and number.
MEN'S SKI BOOTS SIZE 11. USED
one year, $20 and Marker Step-in
bindings.   Phone   327-1329.	
MARTIN GUITAR 018. CONCERT
mode! with case, as new. Best offer!
988-0752.  Must  sell!
MODERN CHESTERFIELD AND
two matching chairs for sale. Call
685-6057.
HOLIDAY  MAGIC COSMETICS
30% Discount All Products
Free Delivery — Call 581-8084
BLACK   HARDTOP    FOR    M.G.B.
Phone  263-0174 after  6 p.m.	
ENGLISH 200 NOTES SECT. "A".
Full term compiled by English Grad
student $2.00. 24 pages. 988-0847 or
926-1205.
The Handiest Book on Campus
BIRD        UBC's STUDENT
•£^L|_f*J    TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
Only 75c al Bookstore
Alio al Publications Office &
Information Office, SUB
RENTALS fc REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
FURNISHED HOUSEKEEPING RM.
telephone. Female student. $55.
261-4152, 3825 West 36th Ave.	
SLEEPING ROOM FOR RENT, OFF
street parking. $45 per month. 224-
9346.   Males  only.	
RIGHT AT GATES: 4500 BLOCK W.
11th. Fully furnished rooms: 1 large,
1 or 2 persons $60. 1 smaller single
$40. Private entrance, phone, kitchen, bathroom, all inclusive. Phone
874-9436 after 6. Available Dec. 1 or
soonef.
ALL STUDENT HOUSE. GOOD
studying facilities, kitchen, etc. 3rd
& Burrard. Phone 736-7128. Male
only.	
MALE STUDENT. SINGLE ROOM,
share frig, shower with another.
Kit. priv., sep. entrance. Non-
smoker.   Vacant   now.   $45.   733-8778.
ROOM FOR RENT. KITCHEN FA-
cilities. Separate entrance $35 per
month.   Call  733-975'8  after  7:00 p.m.
Room & Board
82
ON CAMPUS ST. ANDREW'S HALL,
Men's residence. Share double room,
224-7720  or   224-5742.
ROOM AND BOARD IN FRIENDLY
home near U.B.C. offered to female
student in return for baby sitting
and   light  duties.   Phone   224-7986.
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS,
2120 Wesbrook, 224-9074. Call after
5:30.  Quiet  hours,  good food.
Furn. Houses fc Apts.
83
TIRED OF LANDLORDS? OURS IS
dead! Have a room for senior student. Either sex. Cheap! Yew &
8th.   732-8074.	
WANTED   MALE   STUDENT   TO
share   West   End   apt.   with   same.
Phone   Neil   at   688-2074.	
WANTED      MALE      STUDENT      TO
share    apartment.    $75    per    month.
Phone  736-5196.
PRIVATE ROOM FOR GIRL IN
mixed Kits apartment to share
facilities and expenses with three
others. 733-5679.
ROOMMATE (GIRL) NEEDED, FUR-
nished 2 bedroom apartment, $160
inclusive.  733-5016.

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