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The Ubyssey Sep 29, 1972

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 im U8VSSEY
Vol. LIV, No. 6 VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,1972
48      228-2301
f
^ -Dirk  Visser
"OUCH," says Ubyssey editor John Andersen after a swan dive into an unknown, unseen covered pool
beside the school of social work. Damage to the pool was negligible. However, the head will be out of
commission for several weeks. See story this page.
Visa denial protested
Meszaros was a student of George Lukacs in
Budapest, and followed him into the short-lived
provisional government set up during the
Hungarian Revolution in 1956.
By ROD MICKLEBURGH
UBC faculty members and students are
rallying to the cause of Istvan Meszaros, internationally-known Marxist professor, who
has been denied landed immigrant status in
Canada by the immigration department.
A petition bearing 30 names was sent from
campus Tuesday to federal immigration
minister Bryce Mackasey, calling for a
reversal of the "deplorable" refusal of
Meszaros, which it termed "a disaster for
Canadian academic freedom".
Meszaros was hired by Toronto's York
University last spring to teach undergraduate
and graduate political theory courses, and
resigned his position at the University of Sussex
in England.
• However, in June the Canadian embassy
said it would not grant Meszaros a visa because
his entry was not "in the best interests of the
country".
Sponsor of the UBC petition is associate
professor J. M. Bak, of the history department,
a former colleague of Meszaros at the
University of Budapest.
Bak said the immigration department's
decision was not a "simple blunder" but a
"political matter".
"The point is the idiocy of this political
decision.
"We are not worried about the fate of
Meszaros. We're not rescuing a poor refugee.
"We're talking about the loss to a Canadian
university of an interesting, intellectual
scholar."
Following its defeat, he fled the country,
teaching in Italy and Scotland, before joining
the University of Sussex in 1966.
His publications include Marx's Theory of
Alienation, The Revolt of the Intellectuals in
Hungary, and Lukac's Concept of Dialectic.
Bak described him as a "very classical
Marxist. He's not engaged in agitation but
someone who's known for his theoretical views.
"In fact, most of the kids find him conservative."
Bak did not discount the possibility of
Russian influence in the immigration department's decision to deny Meszaros a visa.
"We want to sell our grain to Russia," he
explained, "and if the decision was made high
up, by Mackasey perhaps, it could be because
he thinks he (Meszaros) would offend the
Russians with his criticism from the left."
York university officials have protested the,
decision and Mackasey has promised a review
of the case, but Bak emphasized it was time "to
roll up the heaviest artillery and the more noise
the better".
He urged students and faculty members to
write to Mackasey on behalf of Meszaros
saying, "Hey, man, don't do these kind of silly
things."
Further information on the situation can be
obtained from Bak at 228-5181.
Two students
ran for board
By BOB BEAL
For the first time in UBC history students have been
nominated for positions on the board of governors.
Stan Persky, a graduate student, and Svend Robinson, a
science student, are student senate members and have been
nominated by senate to fill three vacancies on the BoG, along
with six other senators.
The board of governors has absolute legal control over the
operation of the university. In reality, it makes major financial
decisions and acts as a rubber stamp for senate decisions.
There are 11 members on the BoG, six appointed by the
provincial government and three by the senate. The president
and chancellor of the university are ex-officio board members.
The senate is the academic decision-making body of the
university. Its decisions must be ratified by the board. About
two-thirds of the senate's 98 members are faculty. There have
been students on the senate since 1967.
Both Robinson and Persky believe students have a right to
seats on the board.
"The time for student representation on the board is long
overdue," said Robinson. "It is ridiculous that there has been no
student representation before this. It is completely wrong that
the board should be dominated by big business as it is now.
"Students are the reason for the existence of the university
and, at this university, unlike at most others, they have no
representation on the body which most controls their university
lives."
The university is over-administrated and faculty and
students have little control over decisions said Persky.
"The people who are affected by the decisions should be
making them: The decisions should not be made by the administrators."
Both student candidates would also support faculty
representation on the BoG. At present, faculty are prevented by
the Universities Act from sitting on the board because they
receive salaries from it.
The students favor broadening the membership of the BoG
to include representatives from the community.
"The board clearly represents the ruling class interest but
this is going to change," said Persky.
"We must have representatives from labor groups, women
and other community groups so the public can truly control
their university," said Robinson.
Persky, Robinson and the other candiates are hampered
by a lack of knowledge of the workings of the board. All BoG
meetings are closed to the public.
"The most important thing," says Robinson, "is just finding out what's happening and providing student input. At
present, since the meetings are closed, we have no way of
knowing how the board really operates."
The possibility that students could now become members of
BoG met a mixed reaction from other candidates.
Ben Trevino, a lawyer and past (1957-58) AMS president,
thought students should be represented. However, he was
hampered by a lack of knowledge of the board's operation and
could "only give a really fair answer after being on the board
myself."
Chuck Connaughan, president of the Construction Labour
Relations Association and past (1958-59) AMS president said
"we have to realize that the university is all about students and
there has to be some input."
But he was not sure students should be BoG members.
Geophysical engineer, Aaro Aho, did not think students
should be represented as yet. He thought the board should
consider "a little more representation from the business
community."
Alumni association president Beverley Field, was  "concerned with the continuity of students."
She said a person must spend a number of years on the
board before being able to understand it.
"I am not sure students would have the time to spend on the
business of the board."
Past alumni association executive Frank Walden and
corporate lawyer David Williams, the other two candidates,
were unavailable for comment.
Secret pool bared
An indoor swimming pool already exists at UBC.
However, it is only used by spiders, moths and other
assorted varmints.
The pool was discovered Thursday afternoon by Ubyssey
staffers, acting on a tip from reader Peter Graham, arts 3.
The pool was once part of the $500,000 Freddy Graham
estate. Graham, who died in 1963, willed his house and land to
the university which now uises it for the school of social work.
The pool, measuring about 45 feet by 20 feet by eight feet,
became little more than a spider's nest after 1964, although it
appears suitable for human use.
UBC information officer Jim Banham said the university
made an attempt to keep the pool open, but eventually decided it
was uneconomical and put the pool in mothballs.
He added that the pool was once notorious as a place for
wine-soused students to cool off after Saturday night drunks.
Banham said the pool was clearly unsuited for mass student
use.
Alma Mater Society president Doug Aldridge and Grant
Burnyeat, chairman of the ad-hoc committee, were unavailable
for comment. Page 2
THE       U.BYS.SEY
Friday, September 29, 1972
One bike path definite
By SANDI SHREVE
University endowment lands officials have
proposed three bicycle routes to UBC but only
one is showing signs of success.
Construction of a path along Chancellor
Boulevard began in June and should be completed by the end of October, endowment lands
manager Robert Murdoch said Thursday.
But plans for improving the paths along
University Boulevard were stalled Monday
when physical plant administrator Neville
Smith told Murdoch the university will not give
financial assistance.
Plans to extend a proposed Southwest
Marine Drive path through university property
beyond Wesbrook and Sixteenth aren't on the
drawing board yet, said Smith.
Murdoch said endowment lands residents
along University Boulevard would share costs
for widening existing paths from four to six feet
because their children will be using it.
"But because a substantial number of
students will use it we asked the university,
through physical plant, to help out," he said.
"Financing for the route cannot be entirely
the ratepayers' (residents) responsibility."
But Smith said the route is outside
university jurisdiction.
"I took the question to my superior, deputy
administration president Bill White, and he
said no funds are available for it."
Murdoch declined to comment on whether
the university refusal would mean abandoning
the project, but said those-funds were crucial.'
The highways department will construct a
third route along Southwest Marine Drive,
from Forty-First to Imperial, after it completes
a road extending Wesbrook from Sixteenth to
Imperial, said Murdoch.
But continuation of the route through UBC
property from Sixteenth, is university
responsibility.
Smith said no designs have been made for a
route and until they are, no funds will be
provided.
The highways department is building the
Chancellor route in conjunction with construction extending the road to Fourth.
The department and endowment lands
residents are sharing this cost, said Murdoch.
The six-foot wide path will extend from
Tansmania to School Road and from there
cyclists can use the south sidewalk.
He called the paths "icing on the cake" for
cyclists, adding one at Sixteenth was not
considered because a September report from
the UBC bicycle club did not press for it.
He hastily added the decision to build paths
was not based solely on the clubs' demonstration earlier this month, when about 200
cyclists clogged University Boulevard traffic at
8:30 a.m.
"For the past year I have been in touch with
the club in an endeavour to work out something
suitable to them," he said.
"But their protest was not responsible for
the decision to build paths."
Bicycle club spokesman Wren Green said
the Chancellor path "looks okay now but I will
reserve judgment until it's complete."
Murdoch's reservations about the projects,
however, took a different tune:
"I hope the paths will be a lasting utility,"
he said.
"About five years ago we were pressed for
special Honda routes but now there are no
Hondas.
"I hope in six years we aren't wondering
where all the cyclists are."
A/MS budget 'technological garble'
Architecture rep Anton
Kolsti resigned Wednesday
from the finance committee to
protest the Alma Mater Society
budget's "technological
garble."
"Somebody should write
something to explain the
budget in ordinary language so
it can be understood by the
students — and the finance
committee," Kolsti told the
AMS council.
"And I resign on the grounds
that the budget should be clear
kistead of being the
technological garble it is now."
Open house committee
chairman John Keating
presented plans to the councillors, who objected to the
"irrevelance" of the three-day
affair planned for March, 1972.
Council later went in camera
to discuss the AMS nomination
for the Great Trek award,
presented annually to someone
considered to have contributed
to the university over a length
of time.
The executive nominated
former AMS general manager
Ron Pearson, fired for alleged
incompetence by the AMS
executive in 1971.
Councillors rejected the
proposal, and nominations for
the award remain open.
Previously suggested were
chancellor Nathan Nemetz
and student senator Stan
Persky.
NOTICE
TO ALL
STUDENTS
FACULTY & STAFF
HOW DOES THIS SOUND
TO YOU . . .
15% OFF
THE MANUFACTURERS SUGGESTED LIST
ON ALL OUR STEREO
COMPONENTS & ACCESSORIES
Bring in your I.D. card and receive our.opportunities for
youth  grant.
COME IN AND SEC OUR LARGE
SELECTION OF STEREO EQUIPMENT
MILLERS
4 STORES TO SERVE YOU
1123 DAVIE ST.
683-1326
Open 9 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Mon. to Fri.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
622 COLUMBIA ST
524-2016
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Sat.
Thurs. & Fri. 9 . 9
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9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Mon. to Sat.
Thurs. & Fri. 9 - 9
726 YATES ST.
388-6295
9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Mon.-Sat. Fri. 9 - 9
CHARGEX
EASY TERMS
LAYAWAY
CAMPUS CHURCHES
ON UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
Ministers: Rev. Luis 0. Curran & Dr. W. S. Taylor
SUNDAY SERVICES:
8 a.m.  Holy Communion at St. Anselm's Anglican
11 a.m. Holy Communion and Church School at both
St. Anselm's Anglican & University Hill United
INVITATION TO UBC STUDENTS - To an informal lunch
meeting on Oct 1 after the 11 a.m. Services at both churches.
Lunch held in University Hill Church.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PHONE: 224-7011 or 224-1410
F*
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One Month Trans-Sahara
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2 weeks Scandinavia
the popular Camping Tours of Europe
5 weeks, 6 weeks or 9 weeks,
student driver-guides to take the
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It  is not too early to make inquiries and reservations NOW! Capacities
restricted per departure because of the nature of the trips.
B.C.'s
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ORGANIZATION
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5700 University Blvd.
Phone 224-4391 Friday, September 29, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Armed forces spy on
Quebec labor leaders
— ed dubois photo
ROBERT BEST AND PATRICK TAM cross swords Thursday in a foil-fencing display
in the SUB auditorium. The display was part of the annual club's day display.
MONTREAL (CUP) — A secret
government document made public
earlier this month by Parti Quebecois
leader Rene Levesque reveals
Canadian armed forces intelligence
work on Quebec labor leaders.
Levesque declared: "Such activists
are usually carried out by military
regimes in occupied territories but
they are rather surprising in peacetime
and in a country supposedly under the
rule of law."
He said he brought the article to
public attention not because it contains
any startling new data but because he
felt such activity by the armed forces is
the type which occurs in occupied
territories.
The PQ leader said this conjures up
an "image of colonial control over
Quebec."
Marcel Pepin, Confederation of
National Trade Unions president,
charged that the report is full of blatant
factual errors and unfounded accusations.
The document, written in English,
starts with a short historical study of
the labor union.
It then proceeds to give an
enlightening sociological study of the
development of workers' militancy in
Quebec.
"The fear of falling behind in the
midst of rapid change is the most
pronounced phenomenon in Quebec
today and explains the militancy of
various groups who do not have the
education or financial advantages to
adequately protect their interests,"
said the report.
The army document traces the
failures of the CNTU to set up a "labor
party" and its subsequent adoption of
"a unique brand of Quebec Marxist-
socialism free from outside interference".
The document reveals the links the
labor  unions  have  with   "various
separatist and communist elements."
The conclusion  of the  ideological
section states: "Although it was
relatively easy to win over 1,400 labor
delegates to a united position, it will be
more difficult to galvanize labor into a
coherent voting block (sic). Attempts
have been made in the past and have
met with frustration."
The last section of the document is a
listing of the "top 18" of the Quebec
labor movement and their links with
various organizations and committees.
This personal information on CNTU
leaders deals with their political activities and criminal charges brought
against them for their activities.
The department of national defence
has acknowledged the authenticity of
the report. A statement issued by the
department said the material was for
use of military commanders and not
politicians.
Acting defence minister CM. Druqy
said all the material was obtained from
newspapers and the army was not
spying on unions.
However, a police informant said
military intelligence units in Quebec
expanded rapidly in recent months and
. they work in close liaison with the
RCMP, the provincial police and the
Montreal city police department.
The defence department statement
also said commands across the country
have compiled reports on their own
regions. It is not known on what
organizations or individuals information has been gathered.
The basis for stepped up armed
forces intelligence operations is the
white paper on defence policy
published in August 1971.
The white paper said the army must
have the capability to deal with
"violent revolutionaries" if "another
challenge to Canadian democracy"
like the October 1970 crisis and invasion of Quebec, happens again.
One-third of the mobile command,
20,000 troops are stationed in Quebec.
There are only 98,000 people in the
Canadian armed forces.
Tory leader leaves students cold
By MIKE SASGES
Conservative Party leader
Robert Stanfield Tuesday left
UBC students unconvinced of
the worthiness of a federal
Tory government.
Stanfield started his one hour
and 50 minute visit here in the
SUB ballroom a few minutes
after 12:30 p.m.
Very few people in the
packed ballroom stood to greet
him, even though the Stanfield
band from Ontario had been
warming up the audience with
'50s music and requests that
students get closer — "touch
knees" — to let Stanfield, his
aides and the media enter the,
room.
A feeling of indifference
floated above the majority of
the 1,500 persons.
He barely touched on the
important issues of unemployment and inflation, calling
the Liberal government's
response "most inadequate,"
before generalizing on the
"transcendent issue" of
change in Canada.
"The pace of change in the
world has been far too rapid to
permit further delay on our
part. If we don't develop our
own response to the change
that is taking place, others will
choose our priorities for us."
He then went on to speak of
the "tragedy" of 300,000
persons under 25 looking for
work during August.
He quickly learned UBC
students disapprove of
generalized reflection from
politicians.
"What are you going to do
about it?" yelled people, from
the front of Stanfield, from
behind him and on both sides of
him.
He explained unemployment
exists because prime minister
Trudeau's administration
slowed down the economy to
fight inflation.
"We know that," crowd
members replied.
A reduction of personal income taxes, said Stanfield,
would get the economy moving
again.
People asked how much. No
reply. Then more people, no
longer indifferent, yelled for a
commitment, as Stanfield
talked of the need for price and
wage controls to fight inflation.
Finally he could no longer
ignore f'.e hecklers.
"Personal income tax will be
sev,ii per cent lower then
ir.der the Trudeau government. That's a commitment."
Stressing the importance of
the under-25 vote at the Oct. 30
election and the necessity of
"involvement", Stanfield
ended his speech after 20
minutes.
It was then announced that
Stanfield would leave the stage
to answer individual questions.
This was greeted with loud,
long booing, rhythmic clapping
and crowd grumbling.
Stanfield stayed at the
microphone to answer
questions for. another 20
minutes.
He was pointedly questioned
on     the    continuation     of
Canadian-American military
research on Canadian campuses, the legalization of soft-
drug possession and of abortion, changes in the
homosexual laws and his income tax reduction proposal.
He said he would continue to
support military research and
the department of national
defence.
But this was only after
students urged him repeatedly
to answer the question,
because he started and appeared to end his remarks with
STANFIELD .  .  .   unconvincing
a reference to "the dirty war in'
Indochina."
Boos and jeers greeted his
reply that he opposes the
legalization of soft-drug
possession because the Ledain
Commission shows "that the
use of marijuana slows down
the maturization of boys into
men and men into women —
girls into women."
But he replied to the jeers by
saying that he disapproves of
the criminal prosecution of
soft-drug users.
When Maurice Flood,
chairman of the Gay Alliance
Towards Equality, questioned
Stanfield's attitudes towards
homosexuality, Stanfield
appeared embarrassed, turning his back on Flood and
pacing back-and-forth on the
stage.
The audience laughed, partly
at Flood and partly at Stanfield, then applauded Flood
when he ended.
"I just have to tell you very
bluntly and very frankly I want
to leave the laws the way they
are," replied Stanfield.
He also said he opposes the
legalization of abortions.
And he continued to come
under fire for his reduction
proposal.
Stanfield, answering one
question, claimed the seven-
per-cent personal income tax
reduction would raise employment levels because it
would give the consumer
"greater purchasing power."
One student yelled: "Learn
your economics."
Others went on loudly to
suggest Stanfield should return
to school.
He left the ballroom after a
few more questions, telling
students he believes if
Canadians are represented in
international corporations in
Canada and if a certain
percentage of each industrial
sector remains Canadian, the
problem of foreign investment
and ownership here would be
greatly alleviated.
However any further
"restrictions", said Stanfield,
would hurt Canadian unity
because various industries in
certain parts of Canada might
leave.
Stanfield and a small crowd
then went to the law faculty.
He visited a packed common
room for 30 minutes, shaking
hands and carrying on polite
small talk about the Canada-
Soviet hockey series and the
future of law students here.
Rag to struggle
All Ubyssey staffers and any
interested people are reminded
of the first-of-the-year dare to
struggle, dare to win Ubyssey
seminar at 1:30 p.m. Saturday
in the editorial office.
Co-editors John Andersen
and Jan O'Brien said Thursday
in a press release the meeting
may move to the clubs lounge
and those coming should bring
money for food.
Refreshments will be served. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1972
Board scored
We wish we coutd say we're impressed with the
nomination of two student senators for seats on the
UBC board of governors.
We wish we could, but we'fce not.
At first glance the nomination of students fpr the
board looks very impressive because, you see, the board
is a big thing at UBC.
For the uninitiated, the board is traditionally made
up of timber magnates and big-time fishpackers who
have a special interest in playing godfather to the
university. They control everything worth controlling at
UBC.
It follows that when the board is made up of the
local ruling elite, the result is a university shaped to fit
the needs of that elite. And students be damned.
Now at one time it was thought oh-so-terribly
radical to demand that a seat on the board be given to
students.
But recently it has become a commonplace for
student politicians on their way to better things in the
Liberal party to agree that it is a good thing for students
to be represented on the board.
And the once impossible dream now appears to be
within our grasp. Two students have actually been
nominated for seats on the board. The red, red
revolution is around the corner.
But is it? Look again.
Who is going to decide whether or not these
students will sit on the board? Not students.
It will be the 98 members of senate who decide
whether or not these two lucky students spend the next
three years sipping martinis with local bread merchants.
And how many of these 98 senators are students?
Twelve.
You don't have to be a political genius to see that
12 votes out of 98 doesn't carry much clout.
"But," you say, "even if these people don't get
elected at least students have been nominated for board
seats for the first time in UBC history."
Okay. But who nominated the two students? We
don't know for sure although we strongly suspect it was
the other student senators.
If this is true, we have a grand old political
circle-jerk going on. Student senators nominating other
student senators who are voted for by the same student
senators. A minority attempting to elect a minority.
And the campus continues to be controlled by the
same old gang.
It's evident that something basic has to be changed.
And that basic something is the Universities Act.
It should be mandatory under the act that students
sit on the board. These students should be chosen by
students, not by senators or faculty members or anyone
else. They should be chosen in campus-wide elections
the same way the Alma Mater Society executive is
chosen.
The Universities Act should also be changed to
allow faculty members on the board. How they are to
be chosen is the business of the faculty.
We hope students and faculty members take their
places on the board in the near future.
And when they do, we hope they are greeted by
government-appointed governors who can truly claim to
represent the community that the university should
serve.
J.A.
THI UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER   29,   1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
A national orgasm was declared Thursday following the victory of the local
puck rolling team over the Big Red Blorgs.'
"Okay, Andersen, no smut in the masthead," said co-head blorg. O'Brien
Disappointed, his dirty repressed mind turned to other matters. Like the
following list of names: Linda Hossie, Eric Hanson, Sandy Kass, Rod
Mickleburgh, Gary Coull, Steve Brown, Karin Nielsen, Bob Beal, Dirk
Visser, Sucha Singh, Ed Dubois, Lorri Rudland, Sandl Shreve, Mike Sasges,
Kent Spencer, Simon Truelove and Lesley Krueger. They all worked
Thanks people. And don't forget the staff seminar on Saturday.
WALLY GAGE TOWERS
going down
Gay rights
UBC students displayed both
maturity and backwardness at
the Stanfield meeting held in
SUB Tuesday.
Their refusal to be taken in
by canned election rhetoric
forced the opposition leader to
take questions from the floor
on a wide range of issues
concerning students, including
unemployment, defense
research on campus and
foreign control of the economy.
On the other hand, loud and
persistent hissing accompanied my raising the fact
that under the existing federal
criminal code the age of
consent in sexual relations is 18
for heterosexual whereas it is
21 for homosexuals. As well, I
pointed out that under the
Immigration Act gays are
barred from Canada and can
be deported for no other reason
than sexual perference.
These questions are of
concern to a number of gay
students on campus. The attempt to deny me my right to
speak was in sharp contradiction to the successful
effort of all of us to have that
an open public forum. It was
out of step with the best
traditions among students of
free expression of views.
Stanfield's smirk as he replied
to my question was pandering
to this hostile outburst. His
'blunt' statement that the laws
remain unchanged was a
contemptuous denial of basic
human rights, rights which
straights take for granted.
That straight students reflect
societal prejudices is to some
degree to be expected. The fear
of being labelled "queer" is
deeply ingrained in us from
early childhood. Anti-
homosexual phobia is one of
the main sources of sexual
Letters
neurosis in our society, oppressing millions who are gay
and causing unnecessary
anxiety among those who are
not.
Gay students, however, are
no longer willing to silently
endure the prejudices of their
fellow students or anyone else.
This past week gays on campus
formed an organization whose
purpose is to win justice and
dignity for their own community and to educate gays
and heterosexuals on the
naturalness of homosexuality.
It is in the interest of the
entire student body to welcome
this development.
Perhaps the fact that
students cheered when I
concluded my remarks (a fact
not reported in the media) is an
indication that the process of
breaking down the walls of
fear, ignorance, and prejudice,
is well underway. For it is only
when gays stand up and
demand respect that they will
get a hearing.
To take the issue of full
equality for homosexuals into
the federal election a Canada
wide GAY RIGHTS ELECTION COALITION has been
formed, for anyone desiring
further information telephone
681-4768.
Maurice Flood
Gay Alliance
Toward Equality
Michey
Mice
A great deal of scare
headline type of publicity has
been given to a temporary
teacher surplus during the past
few months. There has been, as
a result, a very serious drop off
in applicants to the teaching
profession — far in excess of
anything   warranted   by   the
present surplus.
The facts are that there is a
temporary surplus only. The
surplus is chiefly in the lower
mainland, not nearly so
noticeable in the rest of the
province. The surplus is
mainly in certain subject areas
such as English and social
studies. There is, on the other
hand, a grave shortage of
teachers of home economics.
There is a shortage of teachers
of French. There is a shortage
of lady teachers of physical
education. There is a general
shortage of excellent teachers.
If the present government
were to restore the 110 per cent
igrant to school districts or
move toward a reduction in
class size it is likely that a
shortage would immediately
result. Some figures often
quoted are totally unreliable.
And in any case the surplus is
relatively small and is not
sufficient to warrant such a
violent drop off in student
teacher enrolment all across
western Canada.
The dangers of teacher
shortage are far greater than
those of a relatively small and
temporary surplus.
N. V. Scarfe
education dean
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible, typed.
Pen names will be used when
the writer's real name is also
included for our information in
the letter, or when valid reasons
for anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste. Friday, September 29, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
The silent accomplice in Vietnam
The following article
Russel, UBC student mi
Dale Babcock of ihe Vi
In reporting the
incident between Pi
Shugalo of the Vh
Vancouver Sun take,
phrase "Canada's e|
The big business
tempt to obsci
scious   politicalf
government in
Does Ottawa*
aiding and abett
is this simply a .
radicals?
The record of
for itself.
Under the
Canada exports 1
parts and equip|
Besides this
resources are exj
They integrate!
industrial comt
national econor
annual budget ofj
of chemical anc
Because the'
per cent of all itsj
military researc
sticking" napah
defoliant 2,4-D
against Vietnar
But Canada's
beyond  this m\
brought to light (
that Ottawa's i
diplomatic and i
Canadian inv|
Geneva confere
named a mem!
supervise the ii
made there.
At Geneva. Fi
forced to neg"iiafe \|
revolutionarii s A del
into two sectms. Elf
were held oft i"r tw|
|on and China, vufao played a conscious
ng the Vietnamese to moderate thei:
d^parately," the report
ing pressed conscessions on
cipal  cospnuuM
<3otov, pflayafemajof'^
»jf!«tq£y
le hallmark
;,p*>.e-l,C-2)
a be
de directing Seaborn
jese the U.S. version of
ither with the threat:
ans of measuring the
jam's participation in
le war on South. Viet-
refully watching the
Seaborn is telling
[on to understand what
delivering threats to
tment. The Canadian
of Seaborn's activity,
U.S. instructions.
iilt-in*
E>k IX, pi
jPentagoifif
_..  ie ICC m order to i
move that j||ght hurt'll^iltS^fls of the U.S.
f^io^t^'tsCTiva, Canada carried out is com-
ep of the way.
Ebtten sellout h\ the erstwhile ,illies
enying them then rif
niggle for \ew$tofeafe
Icceptahlo^i' ,7WW-^
Th«#*te«adtOrB<sethe
y*e fltottffi Sonth Viot-
' neii waBrenj. stales of
Canada EtpckexTan KV
retail lo'jabide tip-the
rlR-aUirly" concewifiag
led VtS&a'a. actum as a-
••nf\ Bui the Canadian
concur, and pi osented a
iigon regime which the
body was esuhhshtjsfw «|Mw>;i«m«tj|Ni,
violations of tin a|^t^esife1^ftll^^«««.|^» ,
years, the U.S U.dmm^%ttmiS^lt^$^^Wm^
m power in Saiuoir. Tft^i^al^^i^A^^W^,'"
the country wi r bloc&fft, ixseatise, *S-ttJ* *-^*^>
Eisenhower liiN-r atltl^crinliis'
Minh (the ViH Mmtt _$ujtor)
percent of tin- vote t*'* .
The Pentagon pairs'
supervision was agreift m*      _ .
put on the ICC   "VUpelhe VfiC
beginning had pressor.   " —' '•"
supervision   ot   -:e*--i
agreements   c
delegations qui
Soviets took th
major   issue
procedure of the*
this agreement
minister) Moloto;
The Pentagoi
could not have
1»di;
k"revocati'
member of t
ority repoi
«tagon paperilliiJrfut Wa# a~ ci eaUOn" of the I'.S ,
not "formally engaged to abidebj the Accords".
s .,.„ "The Canadian judgment    ^.i>s Professor James
^sijSe of Carle|on Univet'MK    "was  ill founded
""  "$t andfraug^||i?ithevilton-equencfs I ihmk vie
'faceuptotheriorriblel.it I Hut wt> .ire partI> to
e for the present conftu t '
* .' On Aug. 4, 1964, the "Tonkin (.nil incident" im>l
* glaee, which according !8 1'S   propaganda   s> i •■
Jlojfth Vietnamese ships att u k two Amencan ships
' Johnson used this as his e>ciM to lautuh hnmhmg
-attacks «>n North Vietn*w>smd to push the "TonkJa
JMf resolution" under^tfai. U S intervention jy|
Wietnam, through fte UjMpiJjrev,
".;, As   the   Pejbtaf|&ii   «apars>   show    the   I S.
liberally   arraiiijgd   the   incident   in  ordei   £o
ovokeUie VietaafBjfgse, and thu^have «« excuse to
alate the war, M$ the Canadian g^ernmenL
the„activities $j£ Canadian diplorrtaO. .Blatit;
aborn^acted as d^ect agent for the, tfiS^gpsern&J
ikfh Gulf incident, % rv
feas delivered tcfljietC;
" «.
ently asked tojBa'
(to Hanoi) mak
after the
Structioi
Washi:
i«ns w
t ltf
I:
nam.and Laos,^
DEV's
thei#."IUak<sisI
n W&&
aw fr|
governme
and directed
Seaborn was not successful in convincing the
JMorth Vietname^toback do^n to U.S. threats and
aggression, Thefiatantly |«-o-U.S. character of his
missions so angered the Vietnamese by 1964 they
refused to speak to him.
In 1965, Poland and India presented a majority
ICC report condemning the U.S. bombing of North
Vietnam, Canada dissented and put the blame for
bombing on the flocth Vietnamese.
Though aptingju^poftscious agents and spies for
the U.S., the iitiadian government continued
through the whole peri§4 to pose as "peacemaker"
in Vietnam. OUawt i%eiled a series of "peace
initiatives'i^MPfeedly te end the war.
s% were always part and parcel ot
in Vietnam. Time after time, the U.S.
}lj? hstfcthe bombing of the North and
proposal that was clearly unac-
letnamese. Then, when the Viet-
ted the proposal a new escalation of
launched.
OCCasiotlf, it was the Canadian
lade these proposals. By having
._ _y neutral country in the conflict
ffljUattves". Washington was trying to
Cttt4ci;oi.s puBRfr'SBti war sentiment by putting the
'wiO»oh Jtftfr Vietnamese to bow to U.S. aggression
and  nufcbfe Nftrth  \i«'tnam  appear  to  be  the
•mm «-ssor    '"   '
i l.iiri- ( uHuoKsra innner hospital administrator
in \ ifin.itii lor th?;Canadian government, tells of
Can. i dun phony '•aid" She tells of Canadian funded
hospitals with Canadian built planes flying overhead
and of scorched bodies ol ihildren from Canadian
supplied TNT Such is a gr.iphic illustration of the
Complete h\ (nicfisv of the Literal and Conservative
governments
When Mitchell Sharp was in Vancouver May 12,
WJ he s.ud ih.it (Yiii.ida *\vdl continue to take a
ncuti.il posit um   jn the .war
Sut I' a st.iti-ment is a blatant lie to the Canadian
people
«tver ltsemht jear hisiory the Canadian anti-war
movement has exposed and built mass actions
^against Canada's(omphritv in the war. The demand
'to end Canada's complicity lays bare the whole
diplomatic, nuiitaiy and economic relationship
0f Canada to l!.f* imperialism, and dispels the
ttlusions caret ulK lofctpred by the government that
the Canadian f:overnni( nt is playing a progressive
role in world politics
Wje must rely only tm. ourselves to build a mass
.movement to Hid the Vietnam war and the role of our
|tevernment in it
*"Iti&to this end that the Vietnam Action Committee
falling a confei ence of all those who oppose the
war to work out demands and direction for the
movement at 10 a m Saturday at the Fisherman's
Hall, 138 East Conl'Jva
«A
OPTOMETRIST
J.D. MacKENZIE
3235 W.  Broadv
732-0311
Watch
for
Them!
Coming Soon
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for 75°
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4393 W. 10 Ave.
224-4144 — open 11-8 p.m.
HONG KONG CHINESE FOODS
•lust One Block from Campus in the Village
WE SER VEAU THEN TIC CHINESE FOOD
AT REASONABLE PRICES
EAT IN - TAKE OUT
We have enlarged our dining room to offer you
better service at no increase in prices!
Open Every Day from 4:30 p.m. to 11 p.m.
5732 University Blvd. Phone 224-6121
f±\   PUBLIC SERVICE OF CANADA
GRADUATES
Administration Trainee and Foreign
Service Officer Competition
WRITTEN EXAM
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1972
BUCHANAN 106 AT 7:00 P.M.
This exam is a prerequisite to the interview stage. Pre-register by
October 10, 1972 and obtain more information at your Office of
Student Services or at the Public Service Commission, No. 203 —
535 Thurlow Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
THIS COMPETITION IS OPEN
TO BOTH MEN AND WOMEN Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1972
Something for everyone
By GARY COULL
If you are a linguist, an
athlete, a politico or a cultural
erudite, UBC has a club for
you.
Thursday was clubs day and
more than 50 clubs participated. Organizations from
all over the campus set up
displays to publicize their
activities throughout SUB.
The topics were concentrated in four major areas:
athletics, religion, politics and
culture.
Most clubs reported
favorable response from the
students and general meetings
are upcoming for all groups.
Politics held most of the
attention during the noon-hour
as the, NDP Club and the
Progressive Conservative Club
invited federal candidates to
their booths. John Fraser of
the Conservatives and Ron
Johnson of the NDP were on
hand to talk to students.
The Young Liberal Club was
also represented although they
said they are waiting until
October to bring their candidates on campus. They are
holding an "Information
Week" from October 9 to 15
featuring consumer affairs
minister Ron Basford and
Vancouver-Quadra MP Grant
Deachman.
A new political group this
year is the Asian Canadian
Coalition. President Don Jang
said that the purpose of his
organization is "to increase
Asian awareness a,nd identity
in the white society".
The Young Socialists were
also there to distribute their
literature. A spokesman said
that the group is hoping for
student approval of the constitutional amendment in the
upcoming election. If it passes
they will run a full slate of
candidates in the February
Alma Mater Society election.
Besides the politicking there
were numerous booths housing
religous organizations. Latter
Day Saints, Christian Science
and the Campus Christian
Community were represented.
Also there was the group from
Eckankar — the ancient
science of soul travel.
Representatives from the
eight sororities told
prospective members about
their organization. Each
sorority works in conjunction
with a charity group in the
Vancouver area supplying
volunteers.
The music society publicized
their two productions for this
season: "MacBeth" and
"Promises, Promises". They
said they will be "pulling,
stunts" on campus to draw
attention to the productions.
Diana        Austman,        a
spokeswoman for the B.C.
women's coalition for abortion
repeal announced the upcoming demonstration on
Oct. 21 which will coincide with
the American demonstration
protesting existing abortion
laws.
Clubs for French, German,
and Spanish speaking students
were also represented. The
clubs are concerned with the
cultural rather than the
linguistical aspect of the
countries.
The pre-medical society and
the pre-dentistry society
supplied information to
students thinking of careers in
these fields.
Amateuf athletes are invited
to join any of the athletic clubs
offered. Rowing, curling,
canoeing, fencing, sky diving
and skiing are all open to experts and novices.
And then there were the
people from Smegma, a
medical term for excretion
from the ear. In reality they
are a new club designed to
organize parties and social
functions for interested
students.
Vogue
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12:30, 2:40, 4:45
6:55, 9:05
WOODY ALLEN'S
"EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT SEX*
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ItTT^WHM JONY RANDALL- LYNN REDGRAVE • BURT REYNOLDS • GENE WILDER
Tl'IBHIIrlB   _^**HBaW_B__(fc       _    SHOWTIMES: 12:20, 2:15, 4:05
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ot_>-os_[»      and swear!ng_ R_ W- Mcdonald, b.c. Dir.
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12:00, 1:55
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Kurt     Vonnegut's     Jr.'s
intellectually  Intriguing story.
SHOW TIMES:7:30, 9:30.
Warning:     Occasional    coarse
language and swearing. R. W.
Mcdonald, b.c. Dir.
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WINNER 1972 CANNES FILM
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Oedipal story about
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LOUIS MALLE S m
murmur of
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SHOW TIMES: 7:30, 9:30  theBOOKFINDER
• COLES NOTES
• SCHAUMS
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WE SELL BOOKS ON CONSIGNMENT!
4444 W. 10th Ave.
228-8933
A SUB FILMSOC PRESENTATION
A Film from Ingmar Bergman
'SKAMMEN'
- SHAME
Thurs. 28th 7:00
Friday 29th & Saturday 30th 7:00 & 9:30 \
I Sunday Oct. 1 3:00
SUB AUD.
WESTWATER LECTURES
WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT
IN ROMANIA
Speaker: Irving K. Fox, Director, Westwater Research Centre.
Time: 3:00 P.M., Friday, September 29,1972.
Place:  Lecture Hall No.  1, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre.
Everyone Welcome: Open to all interested.
This is the second of a series of lectures concerning environmental
management sponsored by the Westwater Research Centre.
For further information call 228-4956
Comics,
TbmWrtfe
4 aadakng-
., stressed
Rollins
j. Stones
-v> album
Those Fabulous Sixties
Relive with us ihe fun-filled days of
that dizzy decade: the zany assassinations, the kooky cult murders, the
colorful race riots, the amusing repressions, the meaningless drug
deaths, the madcap war in Vietnam,
and the pointless pop culture. All of
it in the October issue of the National
Lampoon, at your local newsstand.
Shopping
They even sell
sheet music
In sympathy with the the worn-out, ripped-off
student in search of books, PFoffers some advice
on where to get a good deal off-campus.
By ANNE PETRIE
Used is the only way to buy books. It's
cheaper than getting them new, less nerve-
wracking than stealing and happens to be
one of the more pleasant ways to spend what
little money you've got. And anything is
better than the high mark-ups and
frustrating inefficiency of the UBC
bookstore.
There are dozens of second-hand
bookstores in Vancouver. They all sell, they
all buy and most of them are run by nice
people who go out of their way to help you
find what you want at a price you can afford.
The best place for a UBC student to start
cheap book-buying, of course, is the Alternate Bookstore in the SUB basement. They
have a good variety of required text books
and although their prices are fairly high it's
because they're giving a 60 per cent return
on the original retail price to the people who
put their books up for sale. The standard
buying rate at most other bookstores is one
quarter to one-third of the original retail, so
if you're selling try the Alternate Bookstore
first.
Better Buy Books, 4394 W. 10th (open until
8 p.m. most nights) and The Busy Bee, 146
W. Hastings are the only other places that
really make an effort to deal in university
textbooks. By the way, they both know
what's current so don't expect a very good
price for anything no longer in use. The lady
at Better Buy also specializes in study notes
(Coles, Monarch, etc. used and new) and has
trade-ins on general fiction.
Aside from required texts, there are
always endless reading lists of supplementary books. You can probably find a
lot of them at good used prices. The only field
I really know is English literature and
practically all second-hand bookstores are
well-stocked in this area. You can find
almost any novel second-hand (unless you're
picky about editions) and for critical
material probably Falstaff's 4529 W. 10th,
the Busy Bee and MacLeod's at 350 W.
Pender are the best, though Stephen
Mclntyre at 833 Davie also has an excellent
selection.
As far as the social sciences go, my
research assistant says you won't find too
many undergraduate required texts but for
graduate work or research on a particular
paper you have a good chance of finding
what you need at Ahrens', 756 Davie,
MacLeod's and the used section of The Book-
finder, 4444 W. 10th. For science, try the
Busy Bee.
If you happen to be interested in old sheet
music ("When the Lovebird Leaves the
Nest, Does She Fly to the East or the
West?", "Hiawatha's Melody of Love") try
the Busy Bee and a new store at Broadway
and Alma, Once Upon a Time. Don't pay
more than a dime.
Canadiana is "big" this year and most
second-hand dealers are building up a good
stock. Bond's, 523 Dunsmuir specializes in
Canadiana, particularly histories of the
Northwest; MacLeod's has an interesting
selection of Canadian memorabilia (motor
touring in Ontario circa 1912???) and for
more "academic" material Ahrens' and the
Bookfinder are worth checking out.
Besides buying, used bookstores are good
just for looking. Usually nobody bugs you, so
you can take your time and really explore. If
you just want to find out what a good secondhand bookstore is like, I think Ahrens' on
Davie is one of the best places to spend an
afternoon. It's a funny old cramped-up store
with floor-to-ceiling books and decorated
with little signs that tell you to "Wake Up
and Read" and that "A Book is a Man's Best
Friend".
Ahrens' prices are reasonable and the
selection excellent (mostly hardback). The
owner is very approachable and much more
concerned with people who like books than
those who- just want to buy cheap or "who
handle books like lumber". If you're interested in a special area, he'll keep your
name on file and let you know whenever
anything new comes in. Ahrens' is open 11
a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday till Friday.
For science fiction, mysteries, westerns
and other popular fiction Ted Fraser's Book
Bin on Granville, Better Buy Books,
Evelyn's Bookstores at two locations on
West Broadway and The Book Mantle, a new
store at 2551 Alma are probably the best.
You can buy cheap (one-third to one-half
original retail) but you won't make much
selling (less than one-quarter usually). Its
probably better to trade, which you can do at
both Ted Fraser's and Better Buy. Most of
these stores also have back issues of popular
magazines and comics. Evelyn has at least a
million old National Geographies and (if you
fancy them) what must be the complete set
of "True Front Page Detective Stories."
There are lots of other used bookstores in
town besides the ones I've mentioned. I
stopped at Sixteenth, didn't go east of Main
and have no idea what's in North or West
Van. But between the university and
downtown there's at least a dozen good used
stores which you should investigate before
getting anything new. The best way to buy
books is to think of the UBC bookstore as
your very last resort.
Here are a few sample prices:
Reich, Mass Psychology of Fascism (pbk)
Showalter, ed. Women's Liberation and Literature (pbk)
Petersen, Field Guide to Ferns (hard)
Aiken, Collected Short Stories
New
Used
Where
$3.75
$2.00
Busy Bee
3.85
2.00
McLeod's
5.95
3.50
Ahrens'
2.95
1.50
Falstaffs
All about Page Friday
Last week we were a little disorganized and by
the time all the dust had settled we realized we
hadn't told our readers what Page Friday was all
about. Many of you know, of course, that PF is
The Ubyssey's arts and opinion supplement, now
embarking recklessly on its ninth year of
publication. But we figure there's about 5,000
new readers this year so we thought we'd say it
anyway.
Someone who'd taken offence at one of our
reviews came in this week and asked if she could
write a rebuttal. We were only slightly less than,
overjoyed. Believing that consciousness of
cultural and political issues at UBC seems to be
at its usual state of morbidity this year, we'd love
to print all the arguments we can fit in. So if you
thought Woody Allen's movie (page 3) was
awful, or Karl Shapiro's book (page 6) was great,
tell us why.
And if you want to do reviews, please come
and see us in room 241-K on the second floor of
SUB. We particularly need people to write about
art and music, as you may have noticed. We're
always around Wednesday at noon, and if you
know of something going on that you think we
might be interested in (which includes just about
everything) we'd like to hear about that too.
This coming Tuesday at noon, there's a PF
staff meeting in the Ubyssey office, to talk about
things generally and next week's issue in
particular. Come if you're interested.
This week's cover photo was by Dirk Visser.
Page Friday, Z
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1972 The titles come on over
a background of hundreds of
white rabbits with wiggly
noses and pink eyes and
already you know that the
delightfully warped mind of
Woody Allen has its stamp
on every frame of this movie
from start to finish.
"Jeezus," you say to
yourself, "What a nut!" And
thereby you introduce a
phrase you will  be using
Everything you always
wanted to know about
sex*, *but were afraid to
ask, Starring Woody
Allen, Anthony Quayle,
John Carradine, Gene
Wilder, Tony Randall,
Lynn Redgrave, Burt
Reynolds. Screenplay
and Direction by Woody
Allen. "Based" on the
book by Dr. David
Reuben. At the   Coronet.
about every other minute
throughout this outrageous,
insane, screwball movie.
When you're not laughing
your brains out, you'll be
groaning "Oh, No!" and
wondering how far Allen
will go next.
Our bashful friend Woody
is still pretty deeply into his
usual broad, slapstick
comedy, but this film has
Films
Woody not afraid
more substance than usual
because of its double-edged
satire.
It's about time somebody
went after Dr. David
Reuben for his overcomplicated, myth-building,
sensational sex-manual and
Mr. Allen gaily minces
Reuben's theories ("Do
aphrodisiacs work?, What is
sodomy?, Why do some
women have trouble
reaching orgasm?") in an
attitude much more appropriate to the subject of
sex. He asks: how the hell
can it be that much hassle
and, anyway, who does this
guy Reuben think he is,
giving us all these hangups?
But even that shallow an
analysis is too straight for
dealing with this movie.
There's only one even
vaguely serious line in the
script and it's one of the
weakest moments. At the
end of the sequence in which
Woody vanquishes a
gigantic tit that has been
terrorizing the countryside,
he lets slip a serious line,
summing up his message:
that regarding sex and its
doings, there are certain
things that are better just
left unknown. Woody should
have left it unsaid. His
clown suit fits him better
and we would have got the
point anyway.
But enough, enough: that
approach is far too boring
for this movie and if you are
expecting significant and
socially uplifting satire, you
won't get it. What you will
get is a lot of moments that
are wildly funny and
deliciously obscene (the
weak bits are soon forgotten).
Allen takes a series of
Reuben's     incredible
questions ("What are sex
perverts?, What happens
during ejaculation?") and
produces seven separate
skits. Out of this structure
comes one of the most
impressive sides to Allen's
talent as a director.He
handles each tale in a kind
of second-line spoof that
gives us, with each new
story, a take-off on one of
the stale old film genres of
the last 20 years. These are
great. They hammer
Shakespeare and Antonioni
with a slickness one doesn't
expect.
One of them is a full-bore
monster flick (a la
Frankenstein) complete
with the mad doctor's experiments that go wild and
produce a fiendish, 30-foot-
high boob ("4,000 with an X-
cup" quips Woody). It
glurps around zapping
people to death with milk
■«*
shot from a nipple the size of
a $10 pizza.  "Jeezus," we
say.	
The script is as batty and
Unpredictable as the mind
that conceived it. The
throwaway asides are some
of the best lines and should
be listened for. Trying to get
into the horny queen's
chastity belt, Allen murmurs:
With    most    grievous
dispatch,
I will open the latch,
And get to her snatch.
,    Anyway, it's a real laugh.
Don't expect any high-flown
redeeming artistry. It's not
meant to be there.
The whole movie, being
about sex, fits the definition
some wag once gave about
the subject: "When it's
good, it's great; and when
it's bad, it's still pretty
good."
— Clive Bird
FTA brings you into the world
It's Donald Sutherland
and Michael Alaimo before
an  audience  of American
Fuck The Army, with
Jane Fonda, Donald
Sutherland, Len Chandler, directed by Fran-
cine Parker, at the Fine
Arts.	
soldiers doing a satirical
play-by-play sports
broadcast of the Vietnam
War.
It's a Yankee GI in the
Philippines saying, "I was
the silent majority until five
minutes ago."
It's Fonda, Rita Martinson, Holly Near and
Pamela Donegan in a
hilarious chorus line telling
sexist males that they've
had it with the man who
"howls like a dog, snorts
like a hog."
It's a U.S. military man
reading a list of demands to
the roaring approval of a
mass of U.S. military
women and men, one of
which is, "We demand the
immediate withdrawal of all
U.S. troops from Vietnam,
Laos, Thailand, Cambodia,
Japan, the Philippines,
Okinawa, Germany,
France, Italy .
Fuck The Army is a full-
length documentary of the
Fonda-Sutherland group's
tour to U.S. GI bases around
the Pacific Rim.
The FTA group, in making
its tour, had three main
political functions. First, its
appearance at various
bases helped strengthen the
organizing of GIs against
the war. Secondly, the group
helped develop links between the GI movement and
various political groups in
places semi-occupied by
U.S. troops (the FTA, for
example, joined with
national liberation
movements and union
demonstrators in the
Philippines and on
Okinawa).   Finally,    the
group continues to aid the
wider U.S. anti-war
movement in the struggle
against the war that U.S.
rulers refuse to end.
In addition, what Fuck
The Army reveals is that it
isn't simply the genocidal
war in Vietnam, that
American military personnel are aware of. In this
film, we discover that there
is a growing perception
among "ordinary"
Americans (who just
happen  to  temporarily  be
military personnel) of the
deeper evils of their society:
how women are oppressed,
how blacks are
discriminated against, how
the war is part of an
economic system that
creates wars.
One of the things that the
U.S. system successfully
accomplishes is to convince
people that those who
struggle against it never
achieve anything. Often it
even convinces people who
have    themselves    been
engaged in the struggle
against U.S. policies that
they've had no effect.
We thus find a widespread
belief that the hundreds of
thousands of Americans
who have conducted the
anti-war movement in the
U.S. since 1963 have not
changed American policy.
Instead, we are given the
impression that it is the U.S.
rulers themselves who have
"decided" to end the war. It
is they who have changed,
who have become "wiser",
The bard on the screen
Of interest to English, theatre students,
and professors, should be this series of
Shakespeare films. The Varsity is presenting them every Sunday at 2 p.m. starting
this weekend. No reserved seats and the
prices are regular.
It's a good mixture, some are the classic
versions and some are adaptations that you
wouldn't see anywhere else except a movie-
house. There's not a bad one in the lot.
Williamson's Hamlet and Brook's Lear both
have excellent reputations.
Dates and titles:
Oct. 1: Roman Polanski's Macbeth
Oct. 8: Nicole Williamson's Hamlet
Oct. 15: Russian version of Twlefth Night
Oct. 22: Peter Brooks' King Lear
Oct. 29: Olivier in Othello
Nov. 5: The Burtons in Taming of the
Shrew
Nov. 12: Marlon Brando in Julius Caesar
Nov. 19: Olivier in Henry V
and the anti-war movement
has had nothing to do with
that.
It's important to see that
this impression is a myth
generated by the system
itself and the function of the
myth is to make people
believe that there is nothing
they can do. This is where
Fuck The Army comes in.
The most important thing it
does is to show you people
engaged in building a
movement to change
society.
As cinematic experience,
Director Francine Parker
has done an excellent job
with a difficult genre (the
tour documentary). Parker
makes move and she brings
the viewer into the situation.
The protest skits and songs
are mixed with experiences
and confrontations that
occurred during the Pacific
Rim journey.
—Stan Persky
Friday, September 29, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
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14
Medical schools and the medical profession —
B.C.'s being no exception — have always been
bastions of male supremacy. These articles on the
medical profession's role in sex socialization are
reprinted from A Vancouver Women's Health
Booklet, published last month at A Woman's
Place, 1766 West Broadway. They are based on
UBC medical student Kirsten Emmott's paper,
Women and the Health System. Copies of the
paper and the booklet are available at A Woman's
Place, or you can pick up the booklet in the
women's studies office on the second floor of SUB.
'e c
"ifyw fallow ny advice wc nwy haft
it M time. T&iJ\ her to CootCaxd&
The medica
of Canadian
1/ Gynecology texts
One would think that gynecology textbooks, not
to mention the lectures of individual professors,
would provide a calm, unprejudiced view of
women patients. This is unfortunately not the
case: authors of medical textbooks are as likely as
anyone else to include their personal biases as if
they were scientific truths. A random sampling of
available textbooks from the Biomedical Branch
Library at Vancouver General Hospital revealed
the following shortcomings;
1) It is assumed that all gynecologists are men.
2) There is little or no mention of how to put a
patient at her ease.
3) Women are attacked for being uncontrollably emotional and most complaints are
assumed to have strongly psychogenic overtones.
4) Women are attacked for being foolish, un-
dependable and untrustworthy.
5) Women are attacked for being dirty and
immoral.
6) Dysmenorrhea is simultaneously described
as a widespread, troublesome problem and as a
neurosis which deserves no treatment.
7) Menopause is similarly treated.
8) Discussions about sex reveal ignorance,
discredited anatomical and psychological ideas,
and weird moralisms.
9) Women are attacked for being masochists.
10) Women are attacked for wanting abortions.
A large component of the above attitudes is the
women's guilt. Women are made to feel guilty, not
"If every husband were a gynecologist
in the widest sense we should see fewer
clinical problems, and if every
gynecologist were a husband and a
father of girls he might be better fitted
for his work."
— from a gynecology textbook, 1967
"Perhaps it is not too ridiculous a
quibble to suggest that if every woman
were a gynecologist in the widest sense,
and if every gynecologist were a woman
and a mother, the situation might be
even better."
— Kirsten Emmott
only for having cramps or pregnancies bu
for wanting regular checkups!
"a patient, either out of curiosity or bee,
she   is   a   nymphomaniac,   comes   in
gynecological examination."
— from a gynecology textbook
While the occasional gynecology tex
phasizes kindness to patients, few mentioi
courtesies as warming instruments, and
ignore such topics entirely. Any woman wl
felt embarrassed and humiliated lying c
examination table knows what help a little
ness and gentleness can be sometimes.
Women are assumed in these textbook;
neurotic individuals, always complaining
pain or tension for no reason. Dysmen
(painful periods) is especially bothersome
gynecologist as is premenstrual or meno
tension. One text even suggests that
gynecologists consider that there is a
emotional component in the gene?
trichomoniasis (crotch-rot), but his has r
been clarified". If it ever is clarified, it is <
to revolutionize the thinking of those who i
think spontaneous generation was impos
One text, however, warns against a dia
of psychogenic illness until all organic t
have been ruled out. It relates the stop
woman who had unusual pain and tachyc
which the G.P. attributed to neurosis
relatives insisted on a second opinion ai
consulting doctor recognized the sympto
ectopic pregnancy. By the time they reach
patient's home, the tube containing the pre§
had ruptured.
Women are portrayed as ignorant and ft
One   text   says,    "Many   are   extraordi
careless about the dates of menstruation an
no  records.   If  reliable  information  on
matters is wanted, ask the husband."! A
who had ever actually had a menstrual
would know the pointlessness of keeping
accurate records'. The only reason to do so
be to avoid the scorn of a gynecologist,
simply isn't worth the trouble. And ariyon
actually had a husband would know how n
his information on 'these matters' is.
When it comes to a discussion of sex,
textbook  writers  reveal   ignorance  of  f
genitalia and their functions, pass on ou
information   on   female   sexuality,   and
moralistic judgments about women.
Page Friday, 4
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1972 2/ Medical journals
Doctors are constantly receiving publications,
samples, even free gifts from companies engaged
in selling medicines and medical equipment. A
tremendous amount of space in medical journals
is devoted to such advertising, mainlv from the
large pharmaceutical firms. if one looks through
recent issues of medical journals with special
attention to how women are portrayed in drug
company advertising, one will come away with
the following general impressions:
1) Women are portrayed as patients more often
than men are.
2) Women are often portrayed with hostility or
contempt.
3) Advertisements for psychotropic durgs
usually portray women, not men.
Women's problems, especially as portrayed in
psychotropic drug advertisements, are shown as
neuroses rather than as problems amenable to
social solutions.
5) Women's bodies, nude or partially clothed,
are used to decorate advertisements.
6) All doctors portrayed in advertisements are
men.
7) Advertisements are aimed at men,
especially those inviting the reader to respond to
sexual innuendo.
For a quick impression of the sexism behind
drug company advertisements, here are the
partial results of a survey of the advertisements in
ization
women
Doctors are not unaware that a poor doctor-
patient relationship may contribute to poor
success in treatment. Yet they seem to be even
more concerned about annoyances for doctors
caused by unhappy patients. One book written "to
guide physicians in their management of the
doctor-patient relationship" refers in the foreword
to patients as behaving "stupidly, childishly,
mean — always ready to put the doctor in a bad
spot." It explains that with better patient
management (sic) "patients will behave more
maturely and will be more appreciative and
cooperative" and there will be a reduction in "the
unearned incidence of dissatisfied patients
quitting the doctor, failing to pay his fees,
bringing malpractice suits, and generally
gossiping and causing trouble."
the Canadian Medical Association Journal over a
period of six months (July 18— December 5,
1971):
Ads showing
Females   Males
Only Only
42
2
1
0
of the
72
19
5
Total
—anxious or depressed
—bitchy, dullwitted
—nude    or   in    underwear 13
A survey of eight consecutive issues
American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
(Sept. — Dec, 1971) showed that about a quarter
of the women were portrayed in a distinctly unfavorable light. The large number of women
shown smiling were nearly all in advanced
pregnancy, and were advertising such things as
vitamin supplements. Most were wearing very
short skirts or were otherwise seductively posed.
The consumption of mood-changing drugs by
North Americans is extremely high, and they are
taken by twice as many women as men. In a river tisements-in medical journals, doctors are told
that the answer to the "tired housewife" syndrome is to drug the patient — her problems may
not lessen, but at least she won't come back so
often.
Dr. Robert Sidenberg, clinical professor of
psychiatry, at New York State University at
Syracuse, states in Mental Hygiene (Jan. 1971)
that such ads are not psyehiatrically sound nor
medically ethical. The drug industry openly
acknowledges the enslavement of women, he
says, when it shows a women behind bars made
of mops and brooms. Another advertisement
pictures a woman who, we are told, has MA
degree but who must now be content with the PTA
and housework. This, we are advised contributes
to her gynecological complaints, and she should
be given mood-altering drugs.
Surely the doctor could "set her free" by, say,
getting her a day care centre and a job. He could
get the father of these troublesome children to
look after them, or to do some of the housework.
He could stop thinking that all single women are
psychoneurotic failures, and that marriage is the
only goal in life for women. He could agitate for
better career opportunities for women and better
pay for the jobs they do, so that they could find
satisfaction there. He could stop drugging women
into adjusting to a bad deal.
Even worse are the advertisements in which
doctors are invited to drug women simply because
they are bothersome. A distraught, angry man
exclaims: "Women are impossible!" The copy
explains that his wife is suffering from premenstrual tension and needs meprobamate. An insomniac in curlers keeps her husband awake.
"How can this shrew be tamed?" Why, with
sleeping pills. Another must be tranquilized
because she demands too much of the doctor's
time.
Worst of all are ads for estrogen replacement.
Copywriters really go to town on the supposed
"witches' curse" (an actual phrase used) of the
menopause. An ad for Premarin shows a
longsuffering bus driver with the caption "he is
suffering from estrogen deficiency". We turn the
page to see "she is the reason why" under a
picture of harassing menopausal bus passenger
who "makes life miserable for everyone she
comes in contact with."
Another Premarin ad shows a kindly gentleman interrupted at his morning paper. This
time "the reason why" is his wife, whom we see on
the next page, in curlers and robe, teeth gritted,
finger pointed, and glaring at her husband.
In contrast, a quite unusual advertisement,
from an eight-page supplement about men and
their chances of getting coronary heart disease,
shows a man being obnoxious and troublesome in
a restaurant. The copy says, "Pattern Type A is
an aggressive individual who must assert himself
as one who deserves recognition and good service,
whether from fellow-workers or a waiter. Pattern
Type A has been associated with a significantly
higher incidence of CHD as compared to other
patients with the same coronary risk factors". His
behavior is not offered as sufficient cause for
treatment with hormones or psychotropic drugs,
as is so often the case where women are portrayed
in this way.
Needless to say, drug companies do not much
care how women feel about their advertisements
so long as doctors keep prescribing what is offered. The situation will change only when women
force doctors to supply safe, effective treatment
based on verifiable evidence and not advertising
innuendo.
3/ Women as doctors
Only 7% of Canada's doctors are women. In the
United States the percentage is 9%; in India, 12%;
Phillipines, 25%; Western Europe, 13 to 20%; -
Eastern Europe, 30%; Soviet Union, 65%. Medical"
schools have historically discriminated against
women. An article by Harold Kaplan, MD, in the
New Physician described a study of attitudes in
North American medical schools to women. Over
95% of the schools in the U.S. and Canada
responded to this survey. As his first conclusion,
Kaplan states that a significant number of schools
were very negative about single or married
women (what other kinds are there?) in
medicine: "... while no school in the United
States overtly or officially refuses to accept
women, prejudice does seem to manifest itself by
refusing medical school admission to married
women with or without children, schools being
very unimpressed with single women as medical
students, or simply by the administration of a
school being uninterested in adapting to the
unique problems women have."
Kaplan found that some schools are ambivalent in their attitudes toward women,
pregnancy and medicine; while they deny any
problem exists, or avoid facing it, they make
special provisions for this "non-existent" problem
when it occurs. He describes the University of
B.C. as a classical example of avoiding facing the
conflict the school itself describes.
"... we would not admit students where there
is likely to be a conflict between two jobs; that is,
the academic pursuit and the responsibility of
looking    after    a    family . . .    there    is    no
discrimination against women students, there are
certainly no special privileges for them. We have
several   women   medical   students   who   have
children but they carry on exactly the same as any
other medical student."
"Let me say here that I consider this absolutely wrong. Where marriage and childbirth are concerned, women (especially young
women)  are special and deserve not rigid
equality but special privileges. We demand
this in the same spirit that black people have
demanded special financial terms to build up
their businesses, improve their ghettos, and
desegregate their schools:   to equalize opportunity."
— K.E.
Some medical schools allow schedules to be
juggled somewhat to suit the students. While this
makes it slightly easier for a woman medical
student to have children while in school, in many
schools such women return to the full academic
schedule in from three days to two weeks — too
short a recovery period, and potentially
dangerous to the woman's health. The reason they
return so soon is that "there has been no provision
made for their absence and they fear that they will
lose their academic year's credit if they stay out
longer".
In fact, female medical students do quite well.
In 1970, 19.7% of women students were in the top
10% of their classes. While 15% of women in U.S.
schools in recent years dropped out, as compared
to about 8% of men, only 19% of those leaving for
non-academic reasons had children.
Often women interested in a career in medicine
are shuffled into "light" (read: low-pay, low-
prestige) work to become paramedics, such as
dental assistants and contraceptive technologists.
Women doctors are heavily concentrated in
pediatrics, obstetrics, radiology, and general
practice. Rarely do women enter such high-
prestige fields as neurosurgery. It is open to
question whether these jobs are considered "more
suitable for women" because they are lower in
prestige, or vice-versa.
In spite of the lack of arrangements for
childbirth or childcare, women medical school
graduates manage to do quite well in their
practice. In a survey of the graduates of seven
medical schools between 1945 and 1951, 91% of the
respondents (all women) were practising. Ninety
percent of the married women were practising.
All the single women practised full time.
A 1967 survey reported that 38% of the 17,000
women doctors in the U.S. took off an average of
four years from practice because of pregnancy
and motherhood. They calculated that the nation
therefore lost 25,440 years of practice. (!) By this
logic, since women live an average of 7 years
longer than men, the U.S. would gain 119,000 extra
years of practice just from these women
physicians — at that rate, why not have all doctors women?
Medical school prof:   "So how do you like
medical school?"
Female med student: "I love it."
Prof: Are you going to practise?"
Friday, September 29, 1972
THE  UBYSSEY'
Page Friday, 5 Book every bit as bad as car
In observance of National Let's Beat The Shit
Out Of An American Novel Week, we notice Karl
Shapiro's Edsel.
This is one of those books where the wild poet
Edsel
$1.25.
Karl Shapiro (Signet, N.Y., 1971),
resists taming by the big, bad university. Or, as
the cover blurb so winningly describes our hero:
"Meet Edsel Lazerow . . . Poet on the loose in an
up-tight university. Savant on the sly to the
freaked-out student body. Male on the make
among the restless campus wives, rebellious coeds, and lovely lewd ladies of the town."
It turns out that he's a lecherous 50-year-old
poet, has a job in the English department at a
college in a small Midwestern town called Milo,
and has just returned from a reading tour sponsored by the U.S. State Department (!). It's also
the case that author Shapiro himself is a poet (he
won a Pulitzer Prize way back when), is pushing
fifty, has a job in an English department, and is
Establishment enough to have done some globetrotting kulcha tours.
My momentum carried me to page 54. Actually
I stopped reading on page 35. The book is
autobiographical enough that we have to assume
that Shapiro can be held somewhat responsible for
his hero's view of the world.
And on page 35, we find that view:
I toured the two blocks of the Negro
ghetto but it was a disappointing slum.
Milo was too lily-white and WASP, too
unimaginative for an honest-to-God slum.
The   Negroes   were   wraiths,   ghost-like
creatures with the usual quota' of befinned
Cadillacs ... It all made me sad. It was
such a dismal attempt at a slum.
Shapiro doesn't even bother to make his racism
subtle. The slum doesn't exist because of an
economic system; instead it's the people who live
there who are 'attempting' to create a slum. The
black people ("Negroes") are presented as non-
persons   ("wraiths,   ghost-like   creatures")
described in viciously stereotyped terms ("with
the usual quota of befinned Cadillacs"). Shapiro's
line   is   purely   reactionary:    the   oppressed,
somehow, are responsible for their oppression.
So there's sexism, racism, and if I could get
past page 54 I'd probably find the third member of
the Big Three, imperialism. But I don't think I'll
bother. — Stan Persky
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Page Friday, S
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1972 Books
Insight
into
Outsider
By ROBERT PERRY
My first encounter with modern literature
was with the novels of Albert Camus in
grade 12. "Adventures" in Literature ended
then, and still ends, with James Barrie, W.
A Happy Death, Albert Camus.Translated
from the French by Richard Howard.
(Alfred A. Knopf, 1972, $6.95).
H. Auden and Stephen Spender. Reading
Camus, especially his marvellous novel, The
Outsider, was like suddenly becoming
conscious of a cool, fragrant summer breeze
flowing through the unreal, sweaty, running-
shoes, wasteland atmosphere of a British
Columbia secondary school.
It was therefore with high expectations
that I started to read his first, until very
recently unpublished, novel A Happy Death,
written between 1936 and 1938. I am not
disappointed. For an unpublished novel it is
remarkably good in parts. But Camus knew
that he could do better and he did just that.
In a short space of years he completely
transformed and reworked A Happy Death,
incorporating some of the finer passages,
but not the plot, of the earlier novel into The
Outsider, published in 1942.
A Happy Death will interest more than
literary scholars for three main reasons.
This first novel reveals, when juxtaposed to
The Outsider, the stunning contrast between
a mediocre novel and a good novel. Camus
described his method of writing in these
words, which really describe the overwhelming fault in A Happy Death, that is
incoherency:
Notes,   scraps   of   paper,   vague
musing, and this for years on end.
One day, the idea, the conception
that    causes    these    scattered
fragments to coagulate,  comes
along. Then the long and painful task
of setting  everything  to  order
begins. And this task is all the longer
because of the immensity of my
profound anarchy.
(Young Canadian novelists might do well
to compare soon-to-be published first novels
with this one Camus thought unworthy of
publication.  The  Great   Canadian  Novel,
CAMUS
Unpublished first novel
when and if it finally arrives, will then be
easier to spot.)
Also, the novel goes some way in helping
to interpret the central character of The
Outsider, Meursault. And it retains much
interest, because much of the young Camus
himself is embodied, in the central character
of A Happy Death, Mersault. For instance,
Camus' awareness of his possible early
death from tuberculosis floods his first novel
with an often morbid atmosphere, not nearly
so apparent in The Outsider.
The hero, or anti-hero, of A Happy Death is
in many ways unlike the young man he
becomes in The Outsider. Nevertheless, he
can be viewed, as does the critic Roger
Quillit, as bearing a distinct family
resemblance: "Mersault is . . . the younger
brother of Meursault."
The plot of A Happy Death might be briefly
described in this way: A poor, bored, young
man named Patrice Mersault, who feels
"alienated from himself and his interests,
from his heart, his truth" meets the wealthy
but hopelessly crippled former lover of
his mistress Marthe. This cripple,
Zagreus, retains a basic love of life in spite of
the fact that both of his legs have been
amputated. He persuades Mersault that "the
will to happiness" constitutes the purpose of
life. But to cultivate happiness, lots of time is
important, and money buys time. Zagreus,
See page 8
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Education costs a bundle.
At the Commerce, we know.
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You and the Commence. Ibgether we're both stronger.
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BILL
CLARKE
Don't you think we need a Member of Parliament from
Quadra who cares about the issues that really affect
Vancouver's future? Readers know that I care about the
treatment (or lack of it) given to Vancouver by the Trudeau
government, and the silence displayed by the Trudeau
representatives on many local problems. One of the most
obvious examples of indifference is to be found in our harbour
area. Read this story:
All summer long, thousands upon thousands of truckloads of
fill were dumped into the Vancouver harbour in the Gastown
area. Alderman Phillips, this candidate and other concerned
citizens visited the area and questioned Federal officials about
the Project.
We were met with evasive answers and a general cloak of
secrecy. Bill Rathie, Trudeau's western spokesman for the
N.H.B. said ". .. there is no need to discuss this further." In
other words, go away and don't bother us, we know what's
best for you. More arrogance came from Urban Affairs
Minister, Ron Basford, who also refused to say what was
planned. Trudeau himself, questioned while in Vancouver in
August, said, "The landfill is being put there as a temporary
measure ... it doesn't mean that it is all going to be used
there."
Last week, Basford "announced" that a huge container
terminal (called Vanterm) will be built EAST of Main Street.
This seems a strange mid-campaign announcement for him to
make, because it had already been reported in the B.C.
Business Journal last May.
Basford also announced that the landfill stockpiled under
water in the harbour would be moved to the Vanterm
location, a mile along the waterfront. The truckers will be
happy, no doubt, but you and I are footing the bill! Obviously
Rathie and Basford knew about the Vanterm location last
May, and one might wonder why the landfill was not put there
in the first place. Could it be that our protests brought about a
change of their plans?
Still unanswered is the question of the future plans for the
Harbour west of Main St. Along with other Progressive
Conservative candidates, since June I have been proposing
that our Harbour area between Main St. and Stanley Park be
saved for people-oriented amenities such as walkways,
ocean-liner docks, restaurants, and other attractions,
compatible with our future as a Global City where residents
can enjoy the quality of life.
We recognize that the primary function of a seaport is the
movement of cargo; but CPR pier A-3 is the only cargo facility
on the waterfront west of Main St. The rest of the area is a
clutter of unused cargo docks, antiquated passenger-liner
docks, and a railway yard where loading ceased years ago. We
think the citizens of Vancouver deserve better than this.
There is still time, with careful planning, to make Vancouver's
Harbour the most beautiful in the world.
Bill Clarke is the Progressive Conservative Candidate in
Vancouver Quadra. His Headquarters is at 21 OS W. 38th.
Phone 261-2292.
Friday, September 29, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 7 Violence and pleasure
From page 7
rather conveniently, has written an undated
suicide note, and a revolver is ready for use
anytime.
Mersault, in predictable Dostoyevskian
fashion, bumps off Zagreus. With loads of
money but deteriorating health, he launches
out on his pursuit of happiness. From the
congenial climate-of Algeria and his tedious
office job he heads for Europe, and particularly Prague where the smell of
"cucumbers soaked in vinegar" epitomizes
his disgust for Northern climes. He finds no
happiness there, much as Meursault in The
Outsider loathes Paris, and retreats to
golden, sun-drenched Algiers.
He forgets about his killing of Zagreus:
"Innocent, overwhelmed by joy, he understood at last that he was made for happiness." A brief sojourn in a communal villa,
appropriately called the "House above the
World", with three mindless girls (women,
are often depicted as vacuous playgirls in
Camus' novels), does not satisfy his craving
for happiness. He marries Lucienne after
telling her with Mersaultian sincerity and
coolness: "If you want, I can marry you. But
I don't see the point."
The hedonistic Mediterranean setting
gives him great happiness. He finally
decides that, for him, happiness is to be
found in solitude. He matches his heart to
"the rhythm of the days instead of submitting their rhythm to the curve of human
hopes" and dies, a happy man who "had
created his life with consciousness; with
courage. That was his whole happiness in
living and dying." The novel is summarized
in Camus' Notebooks:
Novel: the man who has realized
that in order to live he must be rich,
who gives himself up to the conquest
of money, succeeds lives and dies a
happy man.
The Mersault of A Happy Death is more
vain,   self-pitying,   energetic,   egocentric,
thoroughly trapped in his own subjectivity,
and above all talkative than the taciturn,
unassuming, and likeable Meursault of The
Outsider.
A Happy Death is full of delicious sensuous
images and descriptions of color which'
recall Manet's painting, A Bar at the
Folies-Bergere. For example, "Orange
boats were drying in the sun like fruit cut in
quarters." There are also precisely recorded
evocations of pain, disease and sordidness.
Perhaps the treatment of the relationship
between   violence   and  the  pursuit  of  a
pleasurable life is the key to this novel and
The Outsider. Just before he dies, Mersault
reflects   that   "he  had   played   his   part,
fashioned his role, perfected man's one duty,
which is only to be happy." But, although
he was aware of no other reality in
himself than that of a passion for
adventure, a desire for power, a
warm and an intelligent instinct for
a relationship with the world  —
without  anger,   without  hatred,
without regret
he refuses to try to come to grips with his
own violent nature. In a key passage toward
the end, Camus writes:
In the innocence of his heart,
Mersault accepted this green sky
and this love-soaked earth with the
same thrill of passion and desire as
when he had killed Zagreus in the
innocence of his heart.
This message gives us an insight into the
Meursault of The Outsider and his equally
dangerous acceptance, or at least, indifference to violence. Only in his later
novel, The Plague, does Camus recognize
the shortcomings of the hedonistic, impersonal and "cool" approach to life and
acknowledges that sometimes the "duty" of
happiness must be subordinated to other
demands such as human solidarity and self-
sacrifice for the communal good.
The literary and ethical development of
Camus from .The Outsider to The Plague is
probably worthy of more critical attention
than that between his two earliest novels.
But the intimations of youthful genius so
awkwardly expressed in A Happy Death
should not be ignored. No writer since
Camus — Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath,
Charles Reich, Theodore Roszak, not even
Jean-Paul Sartre has so authentically
conveyed the sensibility of modern youth, or
depicted so convincingly the consciousness
of post-adolescent generations wandering on
the verge of uncertain adulthood.
If this is true, then the past tense used in
Francois Mauriac's tribute to Camus on his
death in i960 should be changed to the
present tense: "A whole generation became
aware of itself and of its problems through
Camus."
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Page Friday, 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, T 972 Friday, September 29, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
Liberal hopeful sees
no end to unemployment
Bj ERIC HANSON
The unemployment situation
isn't likely to ease over the
next few years, the Vancouver
Quadra Liberal candidate
admitted Wednesday.
But Grant Deachman, who
held the seat in the last
parliament, added: "Unemployment will abate when we
get past the crises of the large
number coming into the labor
market following the post-war
baby boom."
Speaking at an all-
candidates meeting in the SUB
ballroom, Deachman,
Progressive Conservative Bill
Clarke and Nigel Nixon of the
New Democratic Party
discussed everything from
inflation to student loans.
In his opening remarks,
Deachman said he had
"directly lobbied on behalf of
UBC every day of my career.
"The MP in Vancouver
Quadra has a duty to see that
students and professors
receive assistance and prompt
service when they deal with the
federal government," he said.
Deachman also cited the
health science centre and the
Triumf project as examples of
federal involvement on this
campus.
Clarke then reiterated
Conservative policies that if
elected they would cut personal income taxes by seven
per cent, cut general spending,
and possibly introduce temporary wage and price controls
to curb inflation and reduce
unemployment.
Clarke said students
shouldn't "blame business
because they make large
profits while the consumers
are confronted with a high
consumer index.
"As it stands right now the
corporation merely follows the
rules set by the government."
He added that the corporation only exists as a piece
of paper and if a higher corporation tax was imposed, the
people of the country would
pay for it as consumers, employees, and shareholders.
Referring to himself as "the
other Nixon," the NDP candidate stated that federal
grants given to corporations to
increase employment
benefited big business rather
than workers.
"The actual employment
level has declined instead of
increased since these grants
frave been implemented,"
Nixon said.
He referred to the pouring of
money into big business when
there is unemployment as "a
reflex response of the old
parties because they are
beholden to supporters. And
the major part of their support
comes from the recipients of
government policies."
Nixon said the deficit in the
unemployment insurance fund
is one place where the public
must pay for the government's
failure to curb unemployment.
He said he doubted if
voluntary wage and price
controls would ever be implemented because "asking
big business to voluntarily
restrain themselves is like
asking Frank Gnup to restrain
the UBC Thunderbirds from
winning."
The NDP candidate said the
problem of unemployment
could be dealt with by introducing   a   major   housing
development program across
the country.
"A dollar thrown-into such a
program,generates $9 in the
economy whieh in addition to providing housing will
ease unemployment and
stimulate the economy."
Deachman said he opposed
extensive tax reforms, leading
to heavier taxation of the rich.
He said there was "no more
fruit to pluck from that tree."
"Besides, it would lead to
migration of the rich from this
country."
Clarke made no comment on
the subject, but Nixon said in
1961 38 per cent of government
revenues came from personal
taxes and 12 per cent from
corporation taxes.
"Furthermore, in 1971, 46
per cent of the corporations in
Canada didn't pay any corporation taxes at all," he said.
Deachman answered this
statement by saying the corporations' income had expanded three per cent annually
over the past 10 years while,
personal incomes had expanded five per cent annually.
"Stay here with the
capitalists, you're safer," he
told the audience.
Deachman later defended
the government's withdrawn
bill that would have set up a
screening system for foreign
takeover. "A journey of a 1,000
miles begins with a simple
step," he said.
Clarke commented the
Liberals had a majority in the
house of commons and that
minority parties couldn't have
blocked the bill. "The
Progressive Conservatives will
give incentives to Canadians to
invest in their own
businesses," he added.
Nixon said the NDP had
opposed the legislation
because "it was a token action
on the part of the government
to try and satisfy people that
the government is doing
something."
When grilled by students on
the new Canada Student Loan
system, Deachman said he had
discussions with the administrator of guaranteed
loans as well as bankers
concerning the reasons for the
new procedures.
He said the applications
were being falsified by up to 75
per cent across the country and
the rate of failure had increased at an alarming pace.
Deachman suggested the
university, which now assesses
loans, is not a proper judge of
loans and it should only certify
a student's registration.
Assessment should be left to
the banks with the student
making an application on a
banking basis.
The federal government
would still guarantee the loans
but the more cautious bankers
would be better able to detect
false requests.
YOUR EXHIBITOR
BRINGS TO OUR
CIIMEMAGOERS THE
RECORD BREAKING
(HINDI) MOVIE
iM EASTMAN COLOR WITH    ENGLISH SUBTITLING AND
A MOVIE WHICH IS SELECTED FOR
GLOBE FESTIVAL IN AMERICA
Presented by Hindustan-Canadian Educational
and Cultural Society. For information: Avtar S.
Bains 325-7369
QUEEN ELIZABETH PLAYHOUSE
SATURDAY, SEPT. 30-8 p.m.
SUNDAY, OCT. 1-12 NOON & 3:30 p.m.
ATTENTION
ALL STUDENTS
OPEN HOUSE '72
*eg^
Applications are now being received for
Open House '73 executive positions
VICE CHAIRMAN
TREASURER
RECORDING SECRETARY
FACULTY CO-ORDINATOR
CLUBS CO-ORDINATOR
SERVICES
TOURS AND GUIDES
TRAFFIC AND SECURITY
HIGH SCHOOL TOUR
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Those interested please write to:
Chairman, OPEN HOUSE, Box 61, SUB, U.B.C.
or see John Keatings in SUB Room 230A, 9:30-11:00 a.m.
IMPORTANT NOTICE
TO ALL STUDENTS
ENTERING LAW
All students who intend to apply for entrance into the U.B.C:
Faculty of Law must submit with their application a score from
the Law School Admission Test. The only dates for this test are
October 21st and December 16th (at U.B.C. only) February 10th
and April 14th (at U.B.C. and U. Vic). You must register for the
Test at least three weeks prior to the date you wish to write. For
further information write or phone the Law Faculty, U.B.C.
NATURAL FOOD
RESTAURANT
HORN OF
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RESxTUmaKT
Mon.-Wed. 8:30- 4 p.m.
Thurs. & Fri.      8:30-10 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-10p.m.
INVITES YOU TO BUY 1/2 A MEAL AND GET THE
OTHER HALF FREE (WITH THIS AD).
OR JUST DROP IN FOR A CUP OF ROSEHIP TEA.
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Offer ends Oct. 6, 1972 687-5225
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"Shoes for Hip Chicks" Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1972
JERICHO BEACH ... peaceful now,
Land developers decide
Jericho beach fate
By SANDY KASS
An idea contest, in which only corporations
are allowed to compete, will decide the fate of
peaceful Jericho Beach.
The Vancouver park board has asked
companies involved in land planning to come
up with their own ideas for development of 72
acres of federal land adjacent to Jericho
Beach.
The board will select the best three or four
ideas from which either one plan or a combination of proposals will be chosen as the
recreational facility for the former army base
site.
No dates have formally been set for the
contest, approved unanimously by the board,
but it is expected to get underway sometime in
October.
Under an agreement with the federal
defense department, Vancouver gets control of
the West Fourth Avenue property when the
army moves to a new base at Chilliwack next
April.
A federal freeze on planning for the
relatively undeveloped land, put into effect
after the public complained about the city's
plans for a four-lane highway and "Coney
Island" type of development in the area, expired last April.
Reacting to the protest, the board has asked
for professional planners' ideas in an attempt
to avoid another controversy.
It is unknown which firms will be competing
in the contest, or what types of ideas will be
submitted.
The only specification the board has made is
that plans be for "parkland and recreational
facilities."
Park board chairman George Puil insists he
does not want a "Coney Island" development
for the area even though the board released
plans* in 1970 calling for such facilities as an
offshore island, aquatic rides, a miniature
railroad and a marina.
Companies' submissions will be judged by a
panel to be selected by Puil and board commissioners Art Cowie and Sandy Robertson.
Final judging is expected by next April, when
construction can begin on the site.
With an eye to the December civic election,
the board maintains the public will have ample
opportunity to comment on submissions before
final decisions are made.
The board also maintains it is working hard
to acquire an additional 38 acres of federal
land, on the north side of West Fourth, adjoining the 72-acre parcel.
The 38 acres were slated for sale to private
housing developers to finance the army's move
to Chilliwack but the board, along with city
council and the provincial government, claims
to be attempting to acquire it from Ottawa for a
city park.
Meetings between city and federal officials
have been held at which urban affairs minister
Ron Basford set the price on the 38 acres at
between $900,000 and $2 million.
Civic officials say they want to buy the land
for the same price as the 72 acres was purchased for in 1968 — $1. Negotiations, stalled
during election campaigning, are expecting to
formally resume early next year.
Denis Gray-Grant, chairman of the Jericho
park committee which represents many Point
Grey citizens groups, said Wednesday the
board's idea contest is "premature" if the city
is sincere in its attempts to acquire the additional 38 acres.
"The board can't just add on an additional 38
acres if it gets the land — it has to plan for it.
"If a contest is going to be held it should be
held after the board knows whether its planning
for 72 or 110 acres. It's impossible to develop 110
acres in the same way as 72 are developed,"
Gray-Grant said.
The committee chairman also called for
greater participation by the public in the initial
planning for the land.
"The park board says it will ask for public
opinion on the ideas it considers best — but
what it the public doesn't like any of them?
"Then we're back in the position of having a
development thrust upon the citizens of Vancouver.
"The fate of the Jericho property should rest
with the people — not with professional planning groups out to make profit on the
development."
Women's studies, liberation from tradition
By LORRIRUDLAND
The women's studies program at UBC will
explore the traditional roles of women and try
to show that their are alternatives to them
beginning with the first lecture Tuesday
evening.
Women's liberation is directed towards
sexual liberation and that applies to everyone",
said Fran Isaacs, the program co-ordinator.
"Men are as socialized into sex roles as
women are and they need liberation from these
roles as much as women do.
"We need liberation from the traditional
ways of thinking about women, which were
mostly thought up by men," she said.
The women's studies program began in the
summer of 1971 when several female students
and faculty members received an Opportunities For Youth grant to plan and
organize this program. Last year about 600
people were registered for the course.
Half of the enrolment were from off campus
and one quarter of the total were men. This
year only 150 people have registered, Isaacs
said, but more people are anticipated to join the
course on the first night of lectures, to be held
7:30 p.m. in the SUB ballroom.
The lectures are conducted by women while
the seminars are led by members of the
faculty, students and women from off campus.
Most of the women who are lecturing have a
university background and have been active in
the women's movement for several years.
This Year
BIRD CALLS
the UBC Student Telephone Directory
Will Include
40 Money Saving
COUPONS
The Handiest
Book
on Campus
Will Be Available Soon
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
GET OUT AND VOTE!
There will be elections for the following positions on
Wednesday, October 4 & Thursday, October 5, 1972.
Ombudsperson
Arts Senator
Grad Studies Senator
At the same time, students will be asked to vote on two
referendums:
Indoor Pool Referendum
Constitutional Amendments Referendum
Poffs will be open as follows:
Thursday, October 5 — 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
BUCHANAN MacMILLAN SUB SOUTH
ANGUS MAIN LIBRARY SUB NORTH
CIVIL SEDGEWICK WOODWARD
LIBRARY LIBRARY
Advance Polls will be open as follows:
Wednesday, October 4-11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
SUB
EDUCATION
LAW
MEDICINE
WAR MEMORIAL
GYM
.. . and from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
PLACE VANIER
TOTEM PARK
GAGE
BRING YOUR AMS CARD
TAKE AN INTEREST
YOUR VOTE COULD BE VITAL Friday, September 29, 1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  17
Get of #,
skydive
TODAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAIS
General     meetin g,
International House.
VARSITY GRILL
4381 W. 10th
(Beside Varsity Theatre)
CHINESE & WESTERN
FOOD
FREE QUICK DELIVER Y
Serving Students
for 16 years.
224-1822 224-3944
Hot flashes
If you want to get your feet
off the ground, join the skydiving
club.,
The package deal costs $40,
which includes a $10 membership
fee, $10 charge for the eight hour
'tween
classes
noon,
SATURDAY
TAEKWONDO CLUB
Registration and first practice, 1:30
p.m., 2422 Main.
SUNDAY
HAIDA COFFEE HOUSE
Acoustic music every Sunday, from
8    p.m.    to    midnight,    at    2270
Wesbrook Crescent.
TAEKWONDO CLUB
Practice,   7   p.m.,   gym   A,   winter
sports centre.
VST
Singalong, 8 p.m., fireside room at
6050 Chancellor.
MONDAY
SHITORYU KARATE
Orientation and practice, 7:30 p.m.,
war memorial gym annex basement.
EDSA
General meeting, noon, ed 100.
PENTECOSTAL CHAPLAIN
Free     dinner,     reservations    at
263-8219, 6 p.m., Lutheran campus
centre.
KUNG FU CLUB
Practice,  4:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
EL CIRCULO
A lecture by Tomas Bartroli, noon,
I H 404.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVES
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
AUCM
Alan    Buchanan,    Archibishop    of
Dublin, speaks on the Irish conflict,
noon, SUB 207.
TUESDAY
CUE
Speaker   in Mildred Brock room at
noon.
THURSDAY
ECS
Soul travel, noon, SUB 211.
FRIDAY
CUE
Lunch at the grad student centre at
noon.
•instruction session, $15 to cover
insurance plus $5 for the first two
flights.
All necessary equipment will
be supplied by the club. The eight
hour instruction session plus two
test flights, will all L aken on
thejpne day.
They wFTTbe holding a meeting
Friday noon in SUB 212.
Motorcycle
The B.C. safety council is
conducting a motorcycle safety
course on consecutive Sundays
beginning Oct. 1.
Registrants must be at least 16
and have a learner's permit and a
motorcycle. The 25-hour course
costs $30.
Boot race
Forestry week will wind up
with a series of boat races outside
SUB today.
For those who think it
impossible to race boats on grass,
it should be noted no real boats
are involved.
Contestants will simply guzzle
as many beers in a row as they
can. Stretchers with attendants
will be on hand for the
over-zealous.
Foresters expect to make up
expenses for the week at Saturday
night's Undercut dance.
Spokesmen said tickets were
still available for the dance, to be
held 8 p.m. Saturday in the SUB
cafeteria.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus - 3 liites, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commerdai - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications&Jfice, Room241 S.U.B.. UBC. Van.8.&C
WHITE TOWER PIZZA
& SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
iSteaks-Pizza-Spaghetti-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatoni-Chicken Cacciatoref)
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11 a.m. - 3 a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11 a.m. -4 a.m.
Sun.
11 a.m. -1 a.m.
DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618W. Broadway'
__mm_mmmm__ (at Dunbar)
HOME DELIVERY  738-9520    738-1113
2S
,»*"&»*1*Sb .
EVERYBODY WELCOME
.. . political activists, political atheists, political agnostics and even the totally apolitical
. . . the idly curious and the curiously idle . . .
ALL ARE INVITED
ALL-CANDIDATES
MEETING
Monday, October 2
12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM
This is for you
Come, hear the candiates for the upcoming
A.M.S. elections. Know who you're voting
for.
jcine fonclci * cloncild /utherland
"PROVOCATIVE" -playboy
"HILARIOUS" -NY.TIMES
(F.T.A. Doesn't Mean
NOW Showing ®
MATURE ENTERTAINMENT
"For the Army")
"Warning-Frequent coarse language"
r. w. Mcdonald, b.c. Dir.
FINE   ARTS EVENINGS: 7:20, 9:15
CINEMA SAT.: 12:00, 1:35, 3:30,
1117 W. GEORGIA  685-7821    Sunday r™ £35
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DANCES
11
MEET TOUR FRIENDS AT UN-
dercut 72. Sat., Sept. 30, 8:30-1:00
SUB Cafeteria. Hardtimes, full
facilities. ___^	
DANCE TO SUNSET CAVALIERS
Steel Band, Sat., Sept. 30th, 9
p.m.-l a.m., $1.00 per person. Grad
Student Centre. Everyone welcome.
Greetings
12
SATURDAY SALE 100 FUR COATS.
jackets,  many  vintage  items,   $29
or less — all day Saturday, 10 a.m.
6   p.m.    Pappas   Bros.    Furs,   459
....Hamilton Street at Victory Square.
Phone 681-6840 weekdays 12-6 p.m.
Lost & Found
13
WELCOME    HOME    RIDDELL! ! !
How  'bout a cup of tea at  1449?!
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
IRELAND CONFLICT. HOPE AND
the church. Alan A. Buchanan,
Archbishop of Dublin. Monday,
October 2, 12:30 p.m. SUB 207.
(Anglican United Campus Min-
istry).	
BARGAINS IN THE BASEMENT
at University Hill United Church
on Thurs., Oct. 5, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Fill your needs — clothing, house-
hold   articles,   books,   toys,   etc.
THURSDAY, OCT. 5th, CHRISTIAN
Science Lecture, "Are You Living
In The Present?" — Josephine
H. Carver, 12:30, Club's Lounge,
S.U.B., sponsored by Christian
Science Organization, U.B.C.	
INVITATION TO YOU—TO COME
to lunch after the 11 o'clock services at St. Anselm's Anglican and
University Hill United churches
on Univ. Blvd., on Oct. 1 — a
chance to get acquainted and talk
about possible future activities.
Lunch will be at University Hill
United  Church.
GIRLS! PHRATERES IS A CLUB
designed for social service, meeting people, and fun. Come to signup meeting, Fri., Sept. 29, 12:30.
S.U.B., 205.	
DINNER — FOR CHARISMATIC
& Pentacostal Students. You are
invited to the Annual get acquainted gathering for food and
fellowship. U.B.C. Lutheran Campus Centre, 5585 Univerpitv Blvd.
Monday, Oct. 2nd, 6:00 p.m. No
Charge. Phone 263-8219 for reservations    immediately.
 Chaplain   Bernice Gerard
$75 FOR 75c. WATCH FOR B.C.
Bonus Coupons coming early
October  .	
DISCOUNT STEREO. EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akai. A.G.S.,
Zenith   TVs.   Call   732-6769.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Information
17
HELP! HIT & RUN. On Fri.. Sept.
22    at    University Boulevard    at
10th   at   11:50   p.m. A   yellow   '69
Toyota   Carolla   was   hit   in   the
rear     by     another car.     Anyone
seeing   this   please phone   Craig,
224-7235.
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale  21
•66 PONT. GRAND PARIS. EXCEL,
cond., good tires, power brakes,
power steereing, V8, 4 door h.t.,
best offer over  $1275.   732-0481.
1965 PLYMOUTH FURY II 4 DOOR
sedan, clean interior, 70,000 miles.
Runs  well,   $200.   261-9274.
Autos Wanted
22
I'M LOOKING FOR A RELIABLE
car under $150. Prefer small one.
733-3468  after  5.   Fri.   &   Sat.
Automobiles—Parts
23
Automobiles—Repairs 24
Motorcycles 25
SELLING MY 1971 HONDA 7oT
Top shape, best offer over $200
takes.  Call Diane, 731-8609.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
Babysitting & Day Care 32
Dance Bands 33
Duplicating & Copying
34
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified
Photography
35
tfjeJUrtai anfc gutter
^       Camtnra* ,
IT'S A TIME
FOR READING
Time-Life Photo Books
M &  M  Lab   Book  	
$8.95
$29.95
FULL  SELECTION  OF
KODAK   BOOKLETS
This Week Only
Kodak  Darkroom  Guide  ...-$14,50
3010 W. BROADWAY
 736-7833	
Scandals
37
DR. BUNDOLO'S PANDEMONIUM
Medicine Show ! ! ! B.C. Censor's
Warning: "No coarse language,
no nudity or brutality. In fact
one of the boringest shows I've
ever   heard."	
FIGHT BACK AGAINST CORPOR-
ate welfare bums. Support Ron
Johnson. Meet the candidate.
Wednesday, Oct. 4, 1972, 1956
West Broadway, Vancouver Cen-
tre Federal N.D.P.	
RETURNED VOLUNTEERS —
Crossroads   Africa   or   Canadian
Crossroads   who   are   interested—
call Nora Mann, 733-3276.	
WILL JACK FELL JANE AT UN-
dereut    72?    Cum    and    see!    Sat.
Sept.   30   SUB   Cafe.
Typing
40
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat accurate work. Reasonable
Rates.   263-5317.	
EXP'D TYPIST, THESES, ESSAYS,
etc.   Phone   Mrs.   Brown,   732-0047.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PART - TIME BABYSITTING
sought for two small children.
Pleasant home 37th & Dunbar.
Tina Scull,   266-9765.	
CAREERS   FOR   ECONOMISTS
AND    STATISTIANS
This  Competition  is  open  to both
men and women.
Interested in a professional career
in the Public Service of Canada?
Come  to a briefing session:
ON: October   10
AT: 12:30 p.m.
IN: Room 207 Angus
We  are  particularly  interested  in
graduates in one of the following
disciplines:
Economics, Agricultural Economics, Statistics, Labour Economics, Mathematics, Resource
Economics,   Economic   Geography,
Transportation   Economics.	
PUBLIC   SERVICE  CANADA
These  positions are  open  to both
men   and   women.
The    Foreign    Service    offers    a
challenging   career   in   one   of   the
following   departments:
External Affairs
Industry, Trade and Commerce
Manpower and Immigratalon
Representatives    from    these    departments   will   hold   an   information  seminar.
Location: Angus 110
Date: October 4. 1972
Time:   12:30  p.m.	
BABYSITTER, one afternoon, pref.
Wed. or Thurs., 4 hrs. for $3.00
2 boys aged 3 and 1. W. 62nd
Ave.   Ph.   263-6494.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
81
CLASSICAL GUITAR AND LUTE
with former S.F. Conservatory
instructor,   733-6888.
Special Classes
62
WEST POINT GREY BAPTIST
Church Pre-School has vacancies
for children 3 and 4 yrs. of age.
Register before Oct. 1. Phone:
Mrs. R. Duff, 263-6459. Mrs. G.
Manning,   738-9735.	
LEARN CHINESE DANCING AND
Mime.   Phone   261-5918.
Tutoring Service
63
Tutors—Wanted
84
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
1 PR. VR 17 SKIIS. UNUSED 207
cm. $160. Also Panasonic 8-track
tape am-fm tuner, excel, cond.,
$150.   Peter,   263-6167.	
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CO-ED BOOMS-KITCHEN — CAM-
pus, $60 mo. 5745 Agronomy, 224-
9549.	
LARGE ROOM FOR 2 STUDENTS,
quiet home near UBC. Day 687-
8478,   evening.   736-9590.	
2 PLEASANT SPACIOUS ROOMS,
fully furnished, close to campus,
share facilities, 2 students, $70
each,   224-1981. 	
Room 8c Board
82
ROOM AND BREAKFAST FOR
responsible female student In exchange for evening babysitting -.
services. Experience with children *
necessary. Private room and bathroom. Laundry facilities available.
Close  to campus.  Phone  263-4764. -
Furnished Apts.
83 Page  18
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1972
*^my *c
Intramural talk
By SIMON TRUELOVE
Great excitement was felt at
Tuesday's unit manager's
meeting on the subject of the
new indoor pool.
Intramurals are looking
forward to a share in the
facility which would allow
year-round aquatic activity.
Such items as waterpolo,
tubeball, water-volleyball,
diving (or even synchronized
swimming for you graceful
types), would add great spice
to the program.
The board of governors is
putting up some money (great
astonishment) so we'd better
show them that we want it.
Football got off to a fine start
Wednesday since, amazingly,
there was no rain. In Division
One play, Dentistry thumped
Arts 13-0. A tight game between Recreation and St. Andy's ended at 8-6 for St. Andy's.
Commerce squeezed by
Alpha Delts for a 1-0 win.
The Arts 20 race, usually
held in the spring, has been
moved to Oct. 19 to correspond
with Trek week.
The Arts 20 race was
originally started by the Arts
class of 1920 who challenged
anyone to beat them in an
eight-man relay for the old
campus at VGH to UBC. Arts
won it.
This year Forestry (last
year's champs) are in training,
already sweating to beat the
record for the race set in 1936.
Sunday's softball action will
determine who goes into the
quarter finals. The favorites
are commerce, dentistry, and
forestry.
Entries must be in today for
the Arts 20 race, the Turkey
Trot, and the cycle race. Information is on the notice
board in SUB. Team schedules
for tennis and badminton are
posted outside Mem. Gym 308.
Anyone interested in playing
intramural basketball should
start getting a team organized.
For any questions please phone
228-4648 or come to Mem. Gym
308.
DAOUST...
THE
BREAKTHROUGH
SKATE BROKEN
This is Daoust's National
300 — without the kangaroo
leather casing. Constructed
of top quality materials —
tested for strength and
durability — this boot gives
you the comfortable fit
Daoust is famous for. When
you ask for the National
300, you're asking for the
best — a skate you can
depend on ... year after
year.
Daoust distinction
With over 75 years of
experience, Daoust has
created an impressive line
of skates — including the
superb National 100 and
the rugged Junior Pro . . .
the skate for the future
superstar.
^The Daoust line also
includes ladies'
skates. Of solid
construction
and elegant
^look, this
model — the Ice Ballet —
is a Daoust top seller.
1. Genuine kangaroo
leather.
Snug heel fit pattern.
3. Full ballistic nylon mesh
interlining for maximum
foot protection.
4. Fully lined with English
kip leather.
5. Leather outsole reinforced at shank with
special pegs for extra
strength.
6. Pro style leather sole
with heel lift.
7. Rigid box toe —
guaranteed.
8. Long moisture-resistant
counters.
9. Tough resistant tendon
guard.
13. Tempered steel cups,
tube and blade.
14. Unbreakable tempered
steel safety guard.
15. Steel and two anti-rust
copper rivets at'heel
secure boot to blade.
16. Rockwell Test blade
reading of 58-60.
17. Shoe treated with
Sanitized® process.
The official skate of the
National Hockey League
Players Association.
SOCCER TEAM ... heads south
Soccer
The UBC Thunderbird
soccer team heads south next
week for six intercollegiate
games against what has to be
described as very tough opposition.
The series has the 'Birds
playing against: San Francisco U. Oct. 4, San Jose State
Oct. 6, the Naval Post-Grad
School Oct. 9, Colorado College
Oct. 11, the Colorado Springs
All-Stars Oct. 13, and
Metropolitan State College
Oct. 15.
Coach Joe Johnson has
named Greg Weber to start in
the nets for UBC for the first
two games of the series. For
the remaining games, the UBC
Tomahawks goalkeeper of last
season, David McLeod, will
take over.
Other than the goalkeeper
switch, UBC's line-up will be
basically the same as in
Saturday's exhibition game
against the New Westminster
Blues. (In that game the 'Birds
lost 4-2 to the Blues, who are
the Western Representatives
in the Canadian championship
Dominion Challenge Cup
final.)
The forwards will include Ed
Soltysik, Chris Suzuki, Jim
Quinn, Joe Blell and Joe
Iacobellis.
Listed as defenders are Rod
Bailey, Ned Mulock, Bert
Smulders, Barry Redl, and
Alan Collings. The Linkmen
are Maurice White, Wayne
Larson and Daryl Samson.
The team travels by bus and
stays for the most part in the
homes of their opposition. This
keeps the costs low and allows
the players the opportunity to
really mix with their fellows.
It's an excellent chance for
the team to jell, for many of
them still don't know one
another.
Last year's series resulted in
seven wins and one tie in nine
starts for Johnson and company. They're hoping for
similar results this year.
HOT LUNCHES- HILLEL
MONDAY - 12.30 - WEDNESDAY
Middle Eastern — Delicatessen
Reduced Prices for Members Friday, September 29, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 19
THE THUNDERBIRD FOOTBALL TEAM returns to UBC Saturday
at 2:00 p.m. at Thunderbird Stadium. Coach Frank Gnup and the
boys will be looking for their second straight win of the season
against the Whitby Islanders, a semi-pro team from Washington
State.
Football... ?
By KENTSPENCER
Hopefully the UBC Thunderbird football team will be all
primed, set, and ready to win their second game of the season
come Saturday against the visiting Whitby Islanders from
Washington State.
A win against Whitby would be yet another surprise for
UBC fans in what has been a season of surprises.
Following last year's season-ending three game streak, and
with the development of sophomore quarterback Jim Tarves,
the 'Birds seemed set for a reasonably good season this year.
They played their first league game against the Manitoba
Bisons on Sept. 9, losing 22-0. And Manitoba was supposed to be
only a second or third rate team.
After this game fans and coaches alike agreed that the loss
of tight end Dave Pearce and fullback/linebacker. Ron Fowler
were considerably big holes to fill. Last year Pearce had been
Tarves' prime target and Fowler the team's leading rusher.
In the next game against Edmonton UBC not only lost the
game but their number one quarterback, Jim Tarves. It seemed
their 1972 "comeback" season was finished.
In view of this, it came as quite a shock when last Saturday
the 'Birds eked out a 13-11 game against the U of Saskatchewan in the dying seconds. The passing game was nonexistent, but two of the 'Bird backs, Gord Perm, and Nick
Zuccaro had excellent days running the ball.
Looking at the 'Bird practice Thursday, two things became
apparent:
1. Saturday's win was no fluke — the 'Birds do have a good
running game.
2. Saturday's poor passing record was no fluke. In the
several passing plays that were tried during the dummy
scrimmage, none were completed; one or two were intercepted,
several were dropped.
It also became apparent in watching the scrimmage that,
%AsTarves said: "The backs have got enough speed to get the
job done."
The 'Birds have no burners as far as times go, but they are
quick enough to run a pass pattern and get in the open, or hit the
hole and make a reasonable gain.
Throughout the practice the 'Birds worked on a play that
they plan to use against the islanders Saturday.
In view of the blocking that went with it, here's hoping that
they don't try it in the game — if they do they could surprise
themselves.
Game time is 2 p.m. at Thunderbird Stadium. It should be
interesting.
Team notices
Rowing
There will be a rowing
organizational meeting Friday
in SUB 207 at noon for all those
interested in rowing for UBC
this year.
Tennis
Fencing
The Fencing Club is
beginning operations again
this year.
A "general meeting for
beginners is slated for Wednesday at 6:30 p.m. in Gym E
of the new PE Complex.
Everyone is welcome.
Tryouts will begin for the
women's tennis team starting
Tuesday in the armories. All
are welcome.
Basketball
Junior varsity basketball
tryouts begin Monday.
The managing job for this
team is also open for applications.
Any potential rower is encouraged to try out, no matter
We?ght3esnordiffer1ncTfor CubSCribeJlS^The   HOCKEY   JOURNAL
an oarsman, and men under --
110 pounds are used as cox- Take Advantage of this Special Introductory Offer to
swains,  who are responsible       Canada's Newest and Most Exciting Hockey Publication
for steering the shell. _. . ■
8 ISSUES FOR ONLY $1 50
A person s year makes no ■ »ww
difference and you don't have MISS COMPLETE & MAIL TODAY
to be good right off. Oarsmen MRS
will be brought along at their MR.
own    particular    rate    of ADDRESS
development. C/TY
Practice is 11/2 hours per PR0 v-	
day.  The time is  still   to  be SEND YOUR CHEQUE OR MONEY ORDER TO
decided. There are workouts at THE HOCKEY JOURNAL
Coal Harbour on the weekend. p 0 BOx 33785 Station "D"
The rowing is at both the VANCOUVER, B.C., CANADA
collegiate and international W!m^mWjmtW^Kkm^^k4Kki^ik^mmm^^k4Km^f^-~^^^^ik4LW^^mW^
levels.
• CAMPUS LEAGUES •
TENNIS
Mon., Oct. 2nd
in the armouries
4:30-7:00
Balls and rackets provided.
General knowledge of rules.
For further information phone
Sue Nicol Is
266-8082
VOLLEYBALL
For men and women.
Tues., Oct. 3
at 8:30- 11:30
in Gym A or B
Contact
SHARON WORTON
732-7153
STUDENTS
FACULTY & STAFF
10°/c
o
off on all
BOOKS
Just show your i.D. card
SEE OUR WIDE SELECTION
Mfr's.
Suggested List
• All the latest fiction
• Serendipity section
• Children's friezes
• Canadiana
• Dover colouring books
DRIVE IN & SAVE
CHARGEX • EASY TERMS
• Handyman's corner
• Children's books
• Gen. book dept.
• Art supplies
• Gift books
MILLERS
1123 DAVIE ST. 683-1326
Hours 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Sat. 9 a.m.-6 p.n
P
THUNDERBIRD
FOOTBALL
U.B.C. Thunderbirds
vs
Whidbey Islanders
SAT., SEPTEMBER 30,1972
2 p.m.
THUNDERBIRD STADIUM
General Admission »1.H - U.B.C. Students Free Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, September 29, 1972
Our very own West End
Everything
a student
needs.
If only the rest
of us could see
the mountains.
By LINDA HOSSIE
In case you haven't noticed, a giant
chunk of the West End has cra\vled
across the inlet and is squatting behind
SUB.
Yes indeed Florence, that is why you
haven't been able to see the mountains.
It has nothing to do with that stack of
books you're carrying.
The question everyone is asking is,
who are those great grey monoliths,
REALLY??
The facts according to the Walter
Gage Residence handbook:
The Walter Gage Residence consists
of three highrise towers, one lowrise
development and a central common
block.
Each highrise accommodates 392
students, 24 to a floor. There are four
quadrants of six students on each floor.
The quadrants seem to be comfortably arranged. Each one contains
six bedrooms, a common bathroom,
and a kitchen-living room. There is also
a small balcony off each quadrant, big
enough for one barbecue and one
person, or two or three people at a
time. Not to mention the incredible
view.
The bedrooms are large in comparison to the single rooms in other
UBC residences. They are less sterile
looking. The desk and chest of drawers
are separate pieces of furniture, not the
white enamelled looking built-ins that
Totem Park and Place Vanier are
sporting.
There is plenty of storage space in
each bedroom as well. It's a good thing,
too. The cupboards in the kitchen are
too narrow for the doors to close with
dinner plates on the shelves, and many
of the quadrant dwellers find it im-
WALLY GAGE TOWERS . . . man-mountains
possible to store food for six people in
the narrow cupboards.
One group in the north tower stores
their food, which they buy in bulk, in
their bedroom cupboards v Another
group in the south tower has'their food
in the shelves under the bathroom sink.
It stands to reason that six people
living in one quadrant will save money
by buying their food in large quantities
from co-ops and wholesale food outlets.
It seems a bit short-sighted of the tower
designers not to have taken this into
consideration. The shelves really don't
have enough space even for food for six
people who don't buy in bulk.
In spite of this and other hassles, like
shortage of parking space, inconvenient telephone arrangements,
and crowded elevators, people seem to
like living in the towers. The few
regulations that exist would apply in
any apartment living situation. Most
students find it cheaper than living in
other residences because they buy and
cook themselves The towers are close
to classrooms, the library and SUB.
The residence contains food service
areas, a cafeteria, a groceteria, a
coffee shop, seminar rooms, lounges
and vending machines for everything
from stamps and change to coffee and
sandwiches. The basement contains
laundry rooms, and recreation rooms.
ON THE 17th FLOOR ... a dinner party
-Daryel Erickson
Tutoring and counselling services are
available. With a good organization a
student could probably live in the
towers for years without ever going
outside.
Tower residents seem to accept the
shortages and organizational problems
stoically. Things like the east tower
quadrants having no furniture for a
week, and students having to make last
minute arrangements for parking are
taken in the strike of things. One
student called the problems "a fact of.
residence living at UBC".
The east tower fire alarm has been
cut off because someone pulled it as a
joke. So far there hasn't been any need
to use it, but as one east tower resident
put it, "If there does happen to be a
fire, and your phone isn't in yet, you
have to run out and stand in line at the
elevator, make your way down to the
public phones, stand in line there and
when you finally get a phone, phone
Housing and tell them you have a fire."
Some floors are missing bedding.
Other quadrants have stoves that were
broken for more than a week before
they were fixed.
"One thing they are good about is
fixing the elevators" a student from the
north tower said. "The servicemen
come at any hour if an elevator is
broken."
However, the elevators are overcrowded, especially just before 8:30.
The maximum capacity of the
elevators is 12 persons. One girl from
the 17th floor reports that by the time
the elevator reaches the ground floor in
the morning there may be as many as
20 persons in it.
As far as parking goes, housing
administrator Les Rohringer said
Tuesday that within a few more weeks
the number of surface parking spots
will have doubled.
No visitor parking spots are
available now because residents are
taking up all the available space. When
the parking is enlarged though, there
will be 12 visitor parking spots in front
of the main entrance to the building, he
said.
Let's see. If there are 392 residents to
a tower and there are three towers,
then that leaves enough parking for 12
of the 1,176 Walter Gage residence
dwellers to have one visitor in an
evening. Working on a rotating basis,
each student could have one visitor
with a car every 96 days.
"The parking system discriminates
-Daryel Erickson
against out of town students" one
student charged. Parking was given
out on a first come first servedbasis,he
said. This meant that students who
lived out of town and couldn't make it
to apply for parking during the first
couple of days ot registration went
without parking spots. Rohringer was
not aware of this complaint and had
nothing to say about it.
Rohringer also said the housing
service is trying to arrange for
telephones in the quadrant common
rooms. Right now. the only way that
B.C. Tel will install phones in the
quadrants is in the individual
bedrooms. B.C. Tel claims "student
risk" or the possibility of people
walking into the quadrants and running
up long distance calls on phones in the
common areas is the reason for this
policy.
As it stands now, one person from
each quadrant would have to be willing
to install a phone in his or her bedroom,
and give everyone else a key so they
could use the phone. This obviously
won't work in quadrants where all six
students are strangers.
Rohringer said housing staff are
doing their best to see that B.C. Tel
changes its mind, but so far no change
is imminent.
Rent in the towers is $75 a month for
each student. That works out to a total
of $543 for the two terms. In Totem
Park the cost of room and board is $926
for two terms. In Place Vanier it is
$854. In Acadia dorms it is $774.
Most of the students I talked to in the
towers said they could live for approximately $100-$110 a month, so they
do save money by choosing the towers
over other UBC residences.
If you consider that the six people are
paying $450 a month for the quadrant,
though, it starts to sound a little more
expensive.
The crucial think is availability. Six
people could easily rent a house for $450
a month if they could find one. There is
a housing shortage in Vancouver.
The Walter Gage residence is right
on the campus, and for the most part
has everything the students' need.
As an alternative to residences like
Totem Park and Place Vanier it has a
lot going for it.
As an alternative to living in a
sleeping room on East Forty-first it has
a lot going for it.
Now if the rest of us could only see
the mountains.

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