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The Ubyssey Feb 1, 1985

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 3* >
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, February 1,1985
, OV j,;
228-2301
Tories plan $61 million job cut
OTTAWA (CUP)—The federal
government is drawing up a
business oriented summer job program that will create 20,000 fewer
jobs and cost $61 million less than a
similar program did last year, a
government document reveals.
The document's details, released
by NDP MP Howard McCurdy, in
the House of Commons Jan. 28, indicate the Tories plan to provide
65,000 summer jobs through a $120
million program. McCurdy obtained the document from the employment and immigration union.
The Liberal government created
Grant helps
native program
By DAVID RANSON
The Donner Canadian Foundation has given UBC $55,000 for the
development and evaluation of a
new masters of education program
for native students.
Verna Kirkness, Native Indian
Teacher Education Program director said Thursday the money will be
used to fund a program in educational administration. The program
will allow native students to study
administration practicum in both
native and non-native settings.
The program is open to qualified
natives in B.C., Kirkness said, adding, "We'd like to attract others
from other provinces." The program is the only one of its kind in
Canada, she said.
There is a definite need for this
kind of program based on the direction that native education is taking,
said Kirkness. Native Indians are
taking control of their education,
she said, so there is a need for people qualified in administration.
The Donner grant is quite significant because of the recent lack of
funding caused by the recession.
Kirkness said, "Native education
can always use more money." She
added that without money, there
can be no developments.
The grant will also be a major
help to native education at UBC
because it will allow the education
faculty to expand this department.
And Kirkness said other faculties
are interested in promoting native
people through developing similar
courses.
The Donner grant follows last
October's announcement by UBC
president George Pedersen that
UBC cannot improve its few native
education programs in the near
future due to lack of funds.
Pedersen said recommendations of
an earlier presidential committee
could not be implemented.
Kirkness said little has been done
since the October announcement.
Any funding for native education
changes will probably have to come
from private donors, she said.
nearly 86,000 summer jobs for
students last year through its $201
million Summer Canada Works,
the country's largest student job
creation program. Summer Canada
Works was virtually eliminated
when the Tories announced their
Nov. 8, 1984 economic statement.
Flora MacDonald, employment
and immigration minister, denied in
the House Jan. 28 that she has approved the document, which contained a memo saying she had done
so. She also refused to admit the
government is slashing the amount
of money and number of jobs
allocated to students, and left the
House without stopping to answer
reporters' questions.
But one day later she said she had
approved the document for "further consideration" along with
other proposals and would be announcing a replacement for Summer Canada works soon.
Said McCurdy, the NDP post
secondary education and youth
critic: "Yesterday in the House the
minister denied that she had seen
and agreed to a program called
(Summer Experience and Learning
Fund). . .High level officials in the
ministers own department have now
confirmed the legitmacy of the
document which I said yesterday
she had seen.
MacDonald said: "When I finally had a chance to see the document. . .1 recognised it as a
preliminary document to which  I
had agreed there should be given
further consideration. . .(That) is
on-going and out of it will come
decisions which govern the Canada
Summer Employment Program". "
The Summer Experience and
Learning Fund, as described in the
document,  is a radical departure
from Summer Canada Works. Of
the program's $140 million, $125
million is new money and $15
million will be available if needed.
The government expects the
federal department and agencies to
find money from their constrained
See page 2: TORIES
Athletic fees may
increase $30
— eric eggertson photo
UBC DIVING TEAM member Stephen Church practices in Aquatic centre.
By PATTI FLATHER
Student athletic fees may jump
from $7 per student to more than
$30.
The board of governors votes this
March on a proposal to impose
higher fees, and an ex-student
board member says the idea is "garbage".
There will be a notice of motion
at the Feb. 7 board meeting and the
board will vote on the higher fees at
its March meeting, Neil
Risebrough, associate vice president
student services, said Thursday.
Risebrough, a member of an ad hoc
Aid needed
The UBC awards director and the
associate vice president student affairs have advised the vice president
finance not to cut UBC's awards
fund to save UBC money.
Bruce Gellatly asked the financial
awards office earlier this year
whether cutting UBC's current $4
million student aid budget could be
achieved in any constructive manner.
Gellatly added he thought
because first year enrolment declined by 800 this academic year there
might not be as much demand for
financial assistance.
But awards officer Byron
Henders said he told Gellatly enrolment levels do not determine the
need for financial assistance. Demand for financial assistance is
determined by such external factors
as tuition fee increases and the
general state of the economy, he added.
Henders said due to rising tuition
and living expenses students may
have to accumulate large debts in
order to attend university. "Debt
doesn't thrill a lot of people, and it
certainly doesn't thrill us."
Neil Risebrough, associate vice
president student affairs, said the
university may even have to be
more liberal with its bursary funds
as the size of student debt loads increase.
Work study, scholarships and
graduate fellowships are also important programs covered by the
awards budget, Risebrough said.
The provincial government cut student grants and UBC tuition fees increased 33 per cent last year.
committee reccomending the fee
hike, said he could not tell the exact
increase requested.
The committee studied athletics
fees at more than 10 Canadian
universities, said Risebrough. "The
fees range from a high of $70 at
McGill, $55 at Toronto, $48 at
Western, and $39 at Alberta," said
Risebrough, adding these are last
year's figures.
"We'll be bringing in a fee which
is not in the higher end of the fee
range," he said. The proposal to
the board asks for a fair proportion
of the new fee to support building
new sports facilities.
Risebrough said the increase
would allow artificial turf to be put
on the field next to SUB and in-
tramurals to be expanded.
Asked how he justifies imposing
another, student fee increase when
tuition is rising, student grants are
cut, and unemployment is high,
Risebrough said: "That's always a
difficult question." But he said
once a student makes it to UBC the
money is worth it to improve UBC's
atmosphere.
Risebrough said he wants the fees
imposed rather than voted in by student referendum as done in the past
because the latter route is too difficult.
But former student board
member Dave Frank said "imposing a specific $30 fee is absolute garbage. That's crap. I don't know
why the hell they're going to do
that."
Frank said there are two ways to
fund athletics; through a student
fee voted on by students, or
through UBC's overall revenues,
which the board controls. Frank
said it's unfair for the board to cut
its own commitment to athletics as
it did last year and then impose one
on students. "I don't think the
board can logically defend it at
all."
Frank said he thinks UBC's ad-,
ministration will request a $30 fee,
adding the proposal is still being
worked out. The discussion should
be out in the open and not secretive
as has been the case, he said.
The board is afraid prominent
alumni active in athletics will be
upset if athletics is slashed, said
Frank. UBC cut funds to athletics
by 10 per cent this year.
Students hold sit-in beneath murals from radical past
By IAN TIMBERLAKE
In a mural larger-than-life, the
faces of Jimi Hendrix and Jim Morrison stare forever through the glass
entrance-way of University Hill
secondary school. On another corridor wall, the Beatles peer from inside their Yellow Submarine.
The radicalism of the era which
those performers represented
returned to University Hill Wednes
day. Nearly one-third of the
school's students stayed after
classes as part of a city-wide protest
against provincial cuts in education
funding.
Sitting in small groups on the
gymnasium floor and in the
bleachers, some students studied,
while others wrote letters of protest
to education minister Jack
Heinrich. A petition ciruclated, and
was signed by 125 of the school's
370 students.
The students say if the Socred's
planned February budger is passed,
janitors, or staff-assistants — who
help with labs, audio-visual equipment, and in the library — will be
cut. Some teachers may have to
work part-time, they added.
With only one art teacher and
one drama teacher, the school's arts
program is seriously threatened,
they said. "We used to have one of
the best programs around, "said
former student Christa Ovenell.
Last year, the school's Learning
Assistance Skills teacher, who gave
one-to-one tutoring, was laid off.
"Without that, I'm going to have
a hard time graduating," said student Alice Gerbrecht, who lives in
West Vancouver.
She is one of many students who
travel from outlying areas to attend
U-Hill. Student Mindy Parfitt explained this is because the school
"is small, special—at least it used to
be. . .You call teachers by their first
names."
Christa   Ovenell   pointed   to   a
photograph   of  last   year's   small
graduating class. The students were
See page 9: SIT-IN Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1, 1985
Tories hope private
sector has jobs
From page 1
budgets to fund another 5,000 jobs
and will challenge the private sector
to create additional openings. It
hopes these two measures will add
to the 65,000 jobs slated for
students.
About $108 million will take the
form of wage subsidies under the
banner of Incentives for Career
Employment. The government
plans to give priority to those
private, municipal and non-profit
groups which provide jobs linked to
students education and career
plans.
The government will subsidize
private sector groups for up to 50
per cent of students' wages with a
maximum of $3 an hour and nonprofit groups for up to 100 per cent.
This part of the program resembles
a similar segment of Summer
Canada Works called Summer
Career Access, to which the
Liberals allocated $31.9 million last
year.
The document says $16 million
will be allocated for Canada
Employment Centres for Students,
comparable to the Liberals' $15.9
million, and $14.2 million for jobs
and training in federal departments
and agencies. These include training
in cadet and reserve programs as
well as the peace keeping and law
enforcement programs.
Wash and wipe hits
HALIFAX (CUP)—The time has
come for disposable graffiti.
Artists at Dalhousie University
and the University of Alberta can
now sit in washroom stalls and
scrawl cryptic messages for hours.
It's the new age of wash and wipe.
Student councils at the two
universities installed chalkboards in
student union building washrooms
to eliminate the kind of graffiti that
doesn't go away. And graffiti artists
have never been happier.
Alberta's student council came
up with the idea first in 1976, and
while attending a recent Canadian
Federation of Students general
meeting there, Alex Gigeroff,
Dalhousie's student council president, thought he should try the
chalkboards out.
Gigeroff now calls the functional
boards one of his "major
discoveries", and hopes they will
raise the quality of graffiti at
Dalhousie.
"There was no vandalism and
people were indefinitely more witty,
creative and less offensive at the U
of A," he says.
"Most graffiti is of the ha-ha,
boo-boo kind but the walls still
have to be scraped down and repainted each year. With
chalkboards the graffiti can be erased."
Both schools have already noted
a marked improvement in the quality of the graffiti. "Dick loves Jane"
has been replaced by "End
heterosexual hegemony now."
TAKE ACTION
OVER
DRINKING
/ like the taste of a cold beer on a hot day,
but I certainly don't think you have to get the gang
together with a couple of cases of beer just to celebrate
the fact you've had
a bit of exercise"
Canada
I*
JOHN WOOD
Health Santept
and Welfare     Ripn-ew sot ial
Canada C.indda
.^.
j.j
WAR. MEM. GYM
ROOM 203
OUTDOOR
X-COUNTRY - Sat , Feb  9
Manning Park
REGISTER BY FEB. 6-3 p.m.
SAILING - Sat   March 2
Jericho Beach Sailing Center
REGISTER BY FEB. 27 - 3 p.m.
NOON RUNS
All   runs   are   free*   and   begir
12:36   at   Race
Center/S.U.B. Plaza.
Triumph Road Run
Fri., Feb. 1
3.8-5.2 km
Boulevard Road Run
Fri., Feb. 8
3.0-6.8 km
Peripheral Road Run
Fri., Feb. 15
3.0-5.5 km
Tower Beach Suicide Run
Thurs., Feb. 28
10 km
•There is a $5 registration fee for
those
entering the
Tower Beach Suicide Run. Payment made before race
begins. All participants receive a T-shirt.
RACQUET SPORTS
Badminton Grand
Prix
Buchanan
- Round III
Feb. 9-10. Register by Feb. 1, 3 p.m.
U.S. Open Tennis Grand Prix
February 1, 2 & 3.
Australian Open Tennis Grand Prix
March 8, 9 & 10. Register Feb. 25-March 1.
Alpine Squash Grand Prix
Invitational Tournament of Champions. March 2, 3.
Register Feb. 18-22.
WOMEN'S TEAM TOURNAMENT
BOOKSTORE TEAM TUG-O-WAR
Thursday, Feb. 14 - 12:30 p.m. Register Feb. 4-8.
McNULTY TEAM RELAYS
March 7, 12 & 14. Register Feb. 25-March 1.
RED ROUGHENSORE RUGBY TOURNAMENT
March 9-10. Register Feb. 25-March 1.
MEN'S TEAM TOURNAMENTS
SUB 6' BASKETBALL
Feb. 9. Register Feb. 4-8.
BOOKSTORE TEAM TUG-O-WAR
Thursday, Feb. 14 - 12:30 p.m. Register Feb. 4-8.
McNULTY TEAM RELAYS
March 7, 12 & 14. Register Feb. 25-March 1.
RED ROUGHENSORE RUGBY TOURNAMENT
March 9-10. Register Feb. 25-March 1.	
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
- FANTASTIC FEBRUARY -
"let's see you do it"
FEBRUARY
SUN i MON    TUE | WED    THU      FRI   > SAT
CO-REC PROGRAM
Recreational,
fun
and
FREE.
DROP-IN BADMINTON
Tuesdays:
6:30-8:30 p.m.
Sundays:
6:00-8:00 p.m.
Osborne Gyms
DROP-IN VOLLEYBALL
Thursdays:
7:30- 9:30 p.m.
Sundays:
8:00-10:00 p.m.
-I--
3   U.S. Open
Tennis GP
Drop-In
Volleyball
8:00-10:00 p.m.
Osborne
Drop-In
Badminton
6:30-8:30 p.m.
Osborne
10
11
12
Badminton GP
Round III
SUB 6'
Basketball
Tournament
Regn. Ends
X-Country
Skiing
3 p.m.
13
7      Triathlon
Regn.
Ends
Tomorrow
3 p.m.
Centipede
Championships
14
Drop-In
Badminton
6:X-8:30 p.r
Osborne
Bookstore
Team
Tug-O-War
ITruimph
Road Run
12:30 p.m
Regn. Ends
Badminton GP
Round III 3 p.m.
U.S. Open
Tennis GP
8Blvrd. Road
Run  12:30
Regn. Ends
Bookstore Team
Tug-O-War
3 p.m. Regn,
Ends. SUB 6'
Basketball 3 p.m.
U.S. Open
Tennis GP
9X-Country
Skiing
Badminton GP
Round III
SUB 6'
Basketball
Tournament
	
15
Peripheral
Road Run
12:30 p.m.
Intramural
Sportswear
Sale
Ends I
16
17
24
18
25
19
Drop-In
Badminton
6:30-8:30 p.m.
Osborne
26
Drop-In
Badminton
6:30-8:30 p.m.
Osborne
20
27
Regn. Ends
Sailing
3 p.m.
21
22
28
Tower
Beach Suicide
Run
12:30 p.m.
Regn.
Ends
Alpine Squash
GP 3 p.m.
Regn. Ends
Australian
Tennis GP
3 p.m. Regn.
Ends McNulty
Team Relays
3 p.m. Regn.
Ends. Rugby
Tourn^ j p.m.
23
SPECIAL EVENTS
TRIATHLON III
THURSDAY, MARCH 7 - 10:00 a.m.
REGISTER BY FEBRUARY 8 - 3:00 p.m.
1 Mile Swim — 20 Mile Cycle — 6 Mile Run
CENTIPEDE CHAMPIONSHIPS
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7 - 12:30 p.m.
REGISTER BY FEBRUARY 1 - 3:00 p.m.
PHONE
228-6688
SKI VACATIONS
WHISTLER MOUNTAIN
And day — $29/person. Includes:
Lift & transportation. Registration
deadline: 3 p.m. Wednesdays.
BLACKCOMB MOUNTAIN
Any day — $28/person. Includes:
Lift & transportation. Registration
deadline: 3 p.m. Wednesdays.
THE HILLS HEALTH & FITNESS
RANCH
"Ski & Fitness Midterm
Vacation", Feb. 21-24. Register
by Fri., Feb. 15-3 p.m. $95/per-
son. Includes:
• accommodation
• transportation
• sleigh rides
• aerobic classes
• aquatics
• massages
• sun beds
• weight room
• whirl pool
INTRAMURAL
SPORTSWEAR
Now is the time to save 30% off all
stock.
-Rugby Shirts -Surfer Shirts
-Aerobic Wear       -Workout Wear
-Shorts -Track Suits
See our wide selection of sizes, styles
& colors at      ^
riKi BOOKSTORE
SALE ENDS FEB. 15
Intramural
Sports Friday, February 1, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Department restricts class size
By DAVE MAGOWAN
UBC's political science department is planning to limit entry into
senior level courses to deal with the
effects of ballooning enrolment and
funding costs on the quality of
education.
A committee of department professors has recommended that 300
and 400 level lecture courses be
limited to a maximum of 75
students and seminar courses
limited to 20 students.
In a written statement the committee also recommends prerequisites to limit enrolment. Under
the system, all 300 level courses
would be lectures, and would be used as prerequisites for corresponding 400 level courses designed as
seminars. Political science and international relations majors
students would be given first oppor
tunity to enroll in the classes on a
first come, first served basis.
Department head Kal Holsti said
enrolment restrictions are necessary
to ensure students receive an adequate education. He said there is a
total of 3,752 students in all
political science classes this year,
compared to only 2,387 students
four years ago. He added because
of administration-imposed hiring
freezes his department cannot
replace two professors lost to retirement.
"We are trying to re-establish the
quality of classes we had a couple of
years ago," said Holsti. "We feel
that our majors are not receiving
the quality of education they did
four years ago. There has been a
quite serious erosion due to increased enrolment."
Holsti said enrolment restrictions
could  take  effect  next  year  but
Trek action starts
By ROBERT BEYNON
A Great Trek organizational
meeting in the Faculty
Association's executive offices
Wednesday was extremely successful, an organizer said Thursday.
Saskatchewan
hospital ends
late abortions
SASKATOON (CUP) — Saskatchewan women more than 12 weeks
pregnant must now scrape up hundreds of dollars to go to the U.S.
for an abortion, after one of the
province's university hospitals shut
down an abortion service.
The University of Saskatchewan
hospital, the only facility in the province to perform second trimester
abortions, discarded the service
Dec. 21. Community and women's
groups in Saskatoon are protesting
the decision.
Dr. David Popkin, head of the
hospital's obstetrics and gynecology
department, said the lack of
counselling, risks of infection and
injury and unsafe methods used to
induce abortions prompted the
move. The hospital continues to
perform abortions on women up to
14 weeks pregnant using the dilation and evacuation method.
Popkin said some doctors and
nurses dislike performing late abortions. "It becomes an ethical and
moral question because these
fetuses are very close to viability
and some are born alive."
But another doctor from the
city's community clinic discounted
the hospital's reasons. John Bury
said the university could perform
abortions on women up to the 16th
week of pregnancy, using the safer
dilation and evacuation method. In
addition, he said, fewer counsellors
would be needed.
Hospital executive director Tony
Dagone said the hospital did not
bow down to pressure from pro-life
groups when it made the decision,
though the hospital has received a
greater number of letters and calls
supporting the move rather than
criticizing it.
Dagone's executive assistant
Julia Colvin said 90 per cent of
women who received second
trimester abortions at the hospital
applied for the operation while in
the first trimester of pregnancy.
The hospital performed about 70
second trimester abortions in 1984.
Audrey Hall of the Saskatchewan
Abortion Rights Association, who
predicted many pregnant women
would need $500 to $1,000 to travel
to American abortion clinics, said
women seek abortions in the second
trimester because they often cannot
make a decision immediately.
Political science professor Phil
Resnick said 25 union, student,
faculty and graduate student
representatives attended the one
hour meeting where they decided
the Great Trek scheme will definitely go ahead.
Faculty earlier voted to organize
a march to the government
buildings downtown in a special
meeting. Faculty then organized
this initial meeting with other
groups.
Resnick said the different campus
groups will now meet this Monday
— hopefully with representatives
from Simon Fraser University and
colleges — and discuss an exact date
for the upcoming event.
"My feeling is that we should
organize this event quickly,"
Resnick said. "One strikes when the
iron's hot or doesn't strike at all,"
said Resnick, referring to current
faculty anxiety over the upcoming
provincial budget.
The Socreds will probably introduce the budget into the
legislature in mid-February.
He said if students, faculty, and
staff protest, the public and the
government may realize what dire
straits the university faces if it
receives an expected five per cent
budget cut this year.
Public sympathy for public
schools shows the government may
be very receptive to protests of this
type, Resnick added.
University of Victoria faculty are
organizing a similar rally on Feb. 4,
Resnick said, and therefore want
the faculty to hold a mid-week rally
close to this.
Resnick added there are still
details to be worked out.
An Alma Mater Society representative to the Wednesday meeting
said the AMS executive will be contacting the undergraduate societies
for response to the proposal in the
near future. Nancy Bradshaw said
people interested can phone Glenna
Chestnutt at 228-3961 or herself at
228-2050.
Resnick said both he and
Chestnutt could be reached for
discussion. His office phone
number is 228-4354.
prerequisite rules would probably
not pass senate until 1986.
Committee chair Paul Marantz
told 30 people Thursday some
students could be turned away. But
he said the systerm is designed to
benefit better students.
Marantz said because the
registrar's office awards registration times on the basis of grade-
point average students with the best
marks will get first crack at preferred courses.
He said currently students are
getting less instruction and individual attention due to overcrowded classes. And a one-third
reduction in teaching assistants
means students are not being asked
to write as much because professors
don't have time to mark hundreds
of essays, he said.
"The most important thing is to
learn to write effectively," said
Marantz.
Students at the meeting expressed
concern for students unable to gain
entrance into classes.
"I think you're going to get people banging on doors and clamouring to get in," said Simon Read,
arts 4.
Tim Pearson, student representative on the political science committee, said students may not be
able to gain entrance into 300 level
lecture courses needed for prerequisites if enrolment is limited to
75.
— eric eggertson photo
LAST MINUTE STUDYING helps this man prepare for rigorous course in Entomology.
7967 war increases Israeli
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
If the 1967 Middle Eastern war
had not occurred the Palestinians
would have been integrated within
the country of Jordan, a visiting
political science professor said
Thursday.
"Since 1967 there are institutions
within Israel which represent the
Palestinian identity," said Schmuel
Sandler to 40 people at Hillel
House.
To understand the reemergence
of the Palestinian issue one must
concentrate on the side played by
Jordan as one of the Arab countries
to which the Palestinians turned, he
said, adding the Palestinians never
left Palestine in 1948. Instead the
country of Jordan was created
within the traditional Palestinian
homeland, said Sandler.
The Israeli declaration of independence May 1948 coincided
with the British withdrawal from
Israel and was followed shortly by
the Arab invasion. Five Arab armies entered Israel, a conflict which
was to be repeated several times until 1967, said Sandler.
In 1948 when Jordan controlled
the West Bank, King Abdulla ruled
over a large Palestinian population,
said Sandler. Jordan was a new
state without a history like Egypt or
Ethnic groups suspicious of media
Ethnic groups are suspicious of the press because
they have been covered poorly in the past, The Sun's
ethnic affairs reporter said Wednesday.
"That suspicious attitude is justified," Nancy
Knickerbocker told 75 people in Buch A102. "They
haven't had sympathetic coverage."
The Sun gave ethnic groups token coverage before
the ethnic affairs beat was created, she said. Only annual celebrations were covered while political perspectives were left out, she added.
Knickerbocker said she convinced Sun editors to
create the beat to remedy the poor coverage, adding
she argued an ethnic affairs beat could bring more
foreign coverage into the paper.
Knickerbocker said she had to "wrestle with her
Waspiness" when she began reporting ethnic affairs.
"Surprisingly, the editors thought I was perfect for the
job because I was perceived as being completely
unethnic," she said.
While she has encountered some stereotypical attitudes from her colleagues at the Sun, Knickerbocker
said editors are generally supportive of her story ideas.
"I'm pretty well left free to do what I want," she
said. "As far as I know, there's only one other
reporter in Canada who's paper has given him a similar
opportunity," she added.
The speech was the second in a lecture series
presented by the UBC ethnic studies committee examining ethnicity in the media.
Syria and King Abdulla was faced
with the problem of integrating this
Palestinian population into his new
state, Sandler said.
By 1967 the Palestinians on the
West Bank had become a dependent satelite of the East Bank and
the capitol of Aman, said Sandler.
Israel conquered the West Bank
in 1967, an area less developed than
it had been in 1948, said Sandler.
The economy was based on
agriculture and tourism. Since then,
the situation has changed drastically, said Sandler. "There has been
economic improvement on an individual level, and Arab labor
restrictions were removed, and the
West Bank has become integrated
with Israel. There was also political
development and modernization, he
added.
"There was a growth from 1967
until the mid-seventies in institutions which translated into a
Palestinian identity," said Sandler.
He explained that although the
Palestinians lived in Jordan they
were still within an Arab culture.
He added the Palestinians turned
towards a Palestinian identity instead of a Pan-Arabic identity.
Jordan and the Re-emergence of
the Palestinian Issue is the second
of three mini-seminars with Sandler
sponsored by the Hillel Foundation. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1, 1985
Ive T\ever s«er\ n fbwe£"C
7*S£uore£   awr  uuruW* demise
©ifafen '35
Letters
Define homosexuality
On reading Alan Findlay's letter
(Letter on gays 'harmful', Dec. 7,
1984), I reread David Kulak's letter
(Speaker's views on homosexuality
simplistic, Nov. 19, 1984) to sort
out the issue for myself (and
possibly other people interested in
it).
Findlay makes the point that
David Kulak used such terms as
'painfully simplistic', 'paranoid',
'trivializing' and 'slanted' in
presenting his obiections to Frank
Shears' lecture, while leaving out an
important piece of information, the
fact that Shears was once a practicing homosexual. (I shall cover this
fact later.)
Kulak's use of 'painfully
simplistic' is a valid criticism.
Anyone that claims homosexuality
"is not inborn. . .that most
homosexuals were sexually abused
children or were cast out of society
because of small 'differences' such
as effeminacy in males" and "most
lesbians are motivated by hatred of
men" is either ignoring or unaware
of the great amount of information
to the contrary on these blanket explanations.
Recent information and correlational studies indicate that there is a
biological (not genetic) basis for the
development of sexual prefence due
to the influence of sex hormones on
the developing brain and neural
passage ways of the fetus.
Studies with gay men and lesbians have shown that most have
not been sexually abused as
children. If sexual abuse was the
cause of homosexuality, then one in
four females and one in seven males
should be homosexual, these being
the estimates for the number of sexually abused children, which is
significantly higher than Kinsey's
estimates for homosexuality.
Small 'differences' such as effeminacy don't really hold much
water either. While some homosexuals act in an effeminate manner
and are labelled homosexuals
because of their effeminacy, other
men act effeminate, are labelled
homosexuals, yet turn out to be
heterosexuals.
They are not cast out and turned
into homosexuals because of the
small difference of effeminacy.
They are heterosexual.
As for the "fact" that most lesbians are motivated by hatred of
men, studies show gay women are
only motivated by a preference for
women, not a hatred of men.
However, I would suppose that
there are women who are not les
bians who hate men, as there probably are lesbians that hate men.
But to say that "most" lesbians
hate men is a sweeping generalization, and, let's face it, rather
simplistic.
Alan Findlay is correct in pointing out Kulak's broad use of the
word paranoid. Kulak is overstating
the case. Shears is not paranoid in
his view. Many people hold similar
views to Shears. This being the
norm, Shears' view cannot be
described as paranoid since
paranoid suggests a deviation from
the norm, which his view does not.
See page 5: SHEARS
Unusual
Something unusual is happening on Meares Island. People appear ready to defy the courts and risk jail terms to support their
convictions that Meares Island must not be logged.
It is rare in this day and age to see people who believe in
something, anything, strongly enough to take that kind of stand.
There is something more to Meares Island than some numbers
game, with logs, jobs, and royalties on the one side and tourists,
fisheries, and archeological sites on the other. Local residents see
their lifestyles threatened by logging and are unwilling to stand by
and watch.
We live in a province long dominated by the forest industry. We
are used to logging our forest land as a matter of course. It is time
for some political imagination to recognize that land use decisions
for the future should do more than just reaffirm the past.
Where is the political leadership at this, the eleventh hour? A
secret poll conducted by Macmillan Bloedell reveals that Tofino
residents are not alone in their opposition to the logging plans. The
Goldfarb poll showed 78 per cent of those asked in favor of
postponing logging activity until outstanding native land claims are
settled.
Still the showdown approaches. The government is content to
let the courts and now the jails solve a political problem that will not
go away.
Patronage,
anyone?
Hey you!
Yes you. Are you a member of the young tories at UBC? No?
Have you ever been a member of the Progressive Conservative
Youth Club? No?
Do you have any friends or relatives, or know anybody ever affiliated with the PC Youths? Still no?
Well I hope you can make friends quickly with one of these
young Tories lucky enough to be a member of the governing party,
and therefore the first in line to obtain benefits from the party that
they have been so loyal to.
You see, the new Tory government will likely soon formally announce that $201 million allocated for the biggest student summer
make work program last year will be drastically cut. The Tories
slashed $61 million, which provided about 20,000 jobs, from the
former Liberal Summer Works program when creating the new
Summer Experience and Learning Fund.
This is supposed to be the same type of program as the former
summer works program which many students rely on for summer
jobs.
How can the Tories, the party which was supposed to provide
new hope for Canada's youths, one of their big campaign slogans
in the last federal election, now ruin the only chance that many
financially strapped students have to try and pay for their own
education?
The Tories reason that the cut is not drastic, as the private sector
should bear more of the burden of providing youths with summer
employment.
1985. A year dedicated to be the international year of the youth.
It is ironic that the federal government has granted students a
much bleaker prospect of obtaining a summer job, in a year that is
supposed to concentrate on encouraging the success of our nations future generations.
Referendum reflects on us
r
Yorke fighting for education
UBC students have a stake in the outcome of tomorrow's civic
election for alderman. One candidate, Bruce Yorke, is clearly opposed to cutbacks in education and has fought to preserve our educational system.
The other candidate, Philip Owen, ran under the Socred banner
and is a staunch defender of the provincial government's "restraint"
program which is decimating our province.
Our city council has been the last line of defence against Victoria's
service-slashing mania precisely because of its progressive majority.
If Bruce Yorke is defeated by Owen, the NPA-Socred bloc will
control city council, and Bill Bennett will find it that much easier to
cut our education system, including UBC, to pieces.
Many students feel that their one vote can effect nothing. In
tomorrow's election, one vote for Yorke is of great importance, since
the 200 vote margin of the last election was a slim one.
Every student who believes in saving our education system from
further cutbacks must get out and vote for Bruce Yorke.
Kevin Annett
 Graduate Studies_/
Have you voted in the refugee
referendum? Today is your last
day. According to a front page article in the Vancouver Sun, people
are giving to charities more than
ever before — to the Vancouver
food bank and to third world countries (Hunger is a cause that people
understand, Jan. 28, 1985).
Alma Mater Society has already
set up an increasingly large bursery
fund for UBC students, but we too,
should think of others. Universities
are the place to discuss national and
international problems and to
search for solutions.
UBC-WUSC has a solution —
educate two refugees so they can actively participate in helping others
in the Third World. The people of
Vancouver have overwhelmingly
shown their support for the starving, and it would be embarrassing if
at their university the students did
not also show their willingness to
help out.
Here is our chance to show the
community that we care. We can
also give our approval and support
to a very dedicated group of UBC
students (who have been very active
raising money for refugees . . . and
it only costs fifty cents.
You have 'til 5:00 today. We
need over 2800 affirmative votes to
pass the referendum,  and in  last
years executive election only 2500
people voted in total. If you believe
in this, it is crucial that you show
your support.
Nancy Bradshaw
outgoing external
affairs coordinator
THE UBYSSEY
February 1, 1985
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978-
The blorg's velocity Diminished to light speed. First of all Rick Klein blinked into real space inside the
atheneum. Defalcator! the mob screamed. Ian Timberlake, Laura Mercer, Dave Magowan and
especially Peter Lankester attempted to border on the verisimilitudinous but Chris Wong, the censor,
prevented them from near perjury. Frank Pollilo, Charlie Fidelman, and Eric Eggertson worshipped the
unwilling New Mameluke. Mandamus' proliferated in the magic mushroom garden of Parti Flather,
Robert Beynon and Steven Wisenthal. Debbie Lo and Nicole Jean pondered in puzzlement the mystery
of YAKU'S cryptic phobic phrases about the potential origin of the strange life forms in Sarah Millen's
home. David Ranson and Bruce Cookson descended into quivering masses of jelly in shock from
O.D.'ing on the following profundity: We're off to see the funny farml Ho Ho Hee Heel Friday, February 1, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Vancouver will not ignore racist warnings
By BETSY GOLDBERG
Last Friday, Jan. 25, at about
2:30 in the morning, someone threw
a Molotov Cocktail into a window
of Temple Shalom. It was the second such incident in six weeks.
Where the first attempt failed, the
second succeeded in turning the
building into an inferno.
The extra precaution taken after
the first attempt did not prevent the
inferno from gutting the
synagogue, home of worship to
about 900 of Vancouver's Jewish
community.
Similarly, last Tuesday, Jan. 19,
an unsuccessful attempt to destroy
the Schara Tzedek funeral chapel
was made. The first attack on its
own may have been viewed as an
isolated outburst of vandalism. The
second cannot be.
The two arsons are only the most
recent outlash of anti-Semitism in
the 3200-year history of the Jewish
people. The best-known is the
World War II destruction of six
million Jews — Hitler's Holocaust
— "Holocaust" literally meaning
destruction by fire.
The evidence that this extermination of nearly 40 per cent of world
Jewry occurred is overwhelming.
The testimony of concentration
camp survivors is more than sufficient evidence. Yet the myth of the
"Holocaust  hoax"   —  the  belief
that the Holocaust either never happened or has been greatly exaggerated — is apparently flourishing.
It is a known fact that people
seek out scapegoats in times of
economic recession, and in our own
country, the true North strong and
free, we have seen two examples of
the attempted perpetuation of this
"hoax".
The trial of Jim Keegstra, the
former Eckville, Alberta, mayor
and high school teacher, is scheduled to begin April 9.  Preliminary
(freestyle)
hearings determined that a trial was
warranted.
His lectures to his students were
blatantly anti-Semitic, referring to
the Holocaust "hoax" and also to a
fictional Jewish conspiracy to take
over the world through its monetary
system.
Keegtra's trial may seem less
significant than of a murderer or of
a rapist; however, the influence of
an authority figure's views on impressionable and ill-informed people is very significant.
In Toronto, Ernst Zundel is currently on trial for writing and
publishing pamphlets that state that
the claims of Jewish deaths in the
Nazi concentration camps are greatly exaggerated. In order to be found
guilty of libel, it must be proved
that Zundel knew that the
statements he published were false.
The crux of the entire issue is that
even if Zundel is telling the truth,
the lies borne out of his ignorance
can be a dangerous weapon in a
multicultural society.
Doug Christie is the defense
counsel for both Keegstra and
Zundel. There is no evidence that
the man is an Anti-Semite, but in
his own words, he is a defender of
free speech.
Freedom of speech is an ideal
easily twisted to suit the purposes of
those who would deny democratic
freedoms to others. An outright lie
cannot be defended on the basis of
this ideal, especially when that lie
can be most damaging to the
freedoms of others.
There is sometimes a fine line between freedom of speech and the
deprivation of civil rights of the
peoples maligned by "freedom of
speech".
To prevent the crossing of that
line, the facts regarding violent outbreaks of racism such as the
Holocaust must be known by all.
Their significance and the dangers
of their recurrence must be
understood by all.
Mayor Harcourt has been to the
Shears trivializes homosexuals
From page 4
Is Frank Shears "trivializing the
homosexual community by ignoring
its diversity"? Yes, on two accounts. First, when he narrows
down the existence of homosexuality to a few blanket, common, and
generally incorrect reasons, he is ignoring the numerous other reasons
and evidence for the existence of
homosexuality, such as biological
factors and social isolation, as in
prisons.
Second, when he implies the
homosexual community is made up
of mostly effeminate men, he is ignoring or is unaware of the fact that
most people in the gay community
are not "fairies" or "drag queens".
There is also the blanket, and
equally incorrect, stereotype of
clone and/or macho homosexuals
(as there is ultra-femme lesbians,
lesbians not all being butch or
dyke.)
And aside from the stereotypes,
Shears is also ignoring or is unaware
that the majority of homosexuals
are like you and 1, indistinguishable
by sexual preference.
As Alan Findlay points out in his
rebuttal: "His (Shear's) views on
homosexuality are based not only
on his own experiences, but also on
those gays that he has counselled."
He takes his view from his
special, religious and personal information without regarding the
contrary views, evidence and information of a majority of other
researchers and counsellors.
Further,    counsellors    and
psychotherapists often view the
world from their particular
paradigm (behaviourists viewing
behaviour from a learning-
reinforcement perspective;
psychoanalysts viewing behaviour
as determined by intrapsychic interaction between id, ego, and
superego; et cetera).
One might say that Shears has
counselled other homosexuals, and
since Shears discovered that their
homosexuality has resulted from
similar experiences as his, Shears
has proven his point and his view is
valid.
However, evidence collected in
this manner is not good evidence.
Since Shears views these people
from his paradigm he would tend to
find support for his view while ignoring other evidence.
Further, those gays that sought
counselling from Shears, through
interaction with him, would come
to see and define their situation in
much the same way as Shears.
This is much like a phobic person
seeing a behaviourist coming to
define his phobia in behavioural
terms, and another person with the
same phobia seeing a psychoanalyst
coming to define his phobia in
psychoanalytic terms.
Same situation, just different interpretations on how it arose. And
those gays who were "cured" of
their homosexuality by Shears
would be cured of their homosexuality in the same way as Shears,
through spiritual growth, thus supporting Shears' view. However
other homosexuals are "cured"
through aversion therapy or
aesthetic realism, these two cures
implying much different etiologies
for homosexuality than Shears, and
the "cured" coming to define and
view their homosexuality in terms
of the cure, like Shears counselled
gays.
Is David Kulak wrong in his
criticisms of Shears? No, he is not.
Is Alan Findlay wrong in his
criticisms of David Kulak? No, he is
not. Like Shears, he is unaware of
other ways of viewing homosexuality (albeit, he also could be ignoring
the other facts, like Shears). Shears
and Findlay's view of homosexuality comes from their being unaware
of other information concerning
homosexuality and their innocent
viewing of the world through their
particular experiences and information. And hopefully, Shears and
Findlay, and also Kulak, will
change their view of homosexuality,
as I do, as more information regarding homosexuality comes available
and we have further experiences
with the issues of homosexuality.
Richard Krammer
arts 4
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APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION
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who expect to graduate this May or November are requested to complete and return both cards to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Donna
Anderson) as soon as possible, but no later than February 15, 1985
for graduation in May and September 15, 1985 for graduation in
November. Any student in the graduating year of these programs
who has not received cards in the mail should confirm with the
Registrar's Office (by phone at 228-4455) that his/her local mailing
address is correct.
Students in the graduating year of all remaining degree programs, except Applied Science and Graduate Studies, should obtain their
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PLEASE NOTE: EVERY STUDENT WHO EXPECTS TO
GRADUATE MUST MAKE APPLICATION FOR GRADUATION. ANY STUDENT WHO DOES NOT APPLY IS INELIGIBLE TO GRADUATE.
ruin cf Temple Shalom. He has attended its services. He has pledged
to aid the temple in rebuilding. He
knows that cases of arson against
one minority group can spread into
attacks on other groups. He has
called the arson an attack on
freedom.
In a society as liberal as ours, we
need to be reminded that racism is a
real threat to our liberty. If one
group in a society is not safe, then
no groups in that society are safe.
If we do not speak out against
racist acts today, it may be too late
tomorrow. Already statements are
coming from the community that
acts of violence against any segment
of the population will not be
tolerated.
European Jews, along with the
rest of the world, ignored the warning signs until it was six million too
late. The people of Vancouver must
not — and will not — do the same.
Betsy Goldberg is an infrequent
staffer who writes good frees tyles.
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' 'Licenced Premises''
George Orwell's terrifying vision
comes to the screen.
"THE FILM
OF THE YEAR!"
—Alexander Walker, The London Standard
'HURT GIVES AN EXTRAORDINARY
PERFORMANCE!"
—Edward Behr, Newsweek
"INSPIREDL.Conveyedonthe
screen with chilling conviction.
Richard Burton's final performance is one of his very best. Hurt
is perfectly cast as Winston Smith'.'
—Kevin Thomas, Los Angeles Times
"Richard Burton acts with stunning
resourcefulness. A posthumous
Oscar seems deserved'.'
—Peter Travers, People Magazine
m %
JOHN HURT    tICHAff D lUftTON
in Michael Ractfords film ot George Orwell s   NINETEEN FiGhty FOUR
With SUZANNA HAMILTON    CYRIL CUSACK
A Virgin Films/Umbrella Rosenblum Films Production Director ot Pnoiograony ROGER DEAKINS
Editor TOM PRIESTLEY   Production Designer ALLAN CAMERON   Music bv EURYTHMICS & DOMINIC MULD0WNE y
Executive Producer MARVIN J ROSENBLUM    Co-Produce'sAL CLARK & ROBERT DEVEREUX    Produced by SIMON PERRY
Written and Directed bv MICHAEL RADFORD    FROM #,» ATLANTIC RELEASING CORP 01984
j  Title Theme  Se-c
Soundtrack available on Virgin Records. Read the Penguin Book.
I* Subject to classitication.
\t STARTS FRIDAY FEBRUARY 1
,. .mTas.n. ,,< AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1, 1985
ust  how  boring  can  a
J film be before its audience departs? A Stranger Than Paradise is an extremely
boring film, a deliberately boring
film, and it is absolutely wonderful
in its dullness.
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
It was made on a shoe-string
budget that did not waste money on
sets, costumes, hair-do's, or makeup. Indeed, these so called props
were non-existent.
This lacklustre roughness extends
to the actors who aside from lacking a good script, do their best to
make the awful dialogue worse. But
perhaps the actors are not as bad as
they seem. What can one do with
inherently dull characters who exist
in a dull world?
Stranger Than Paradise, is composed of three distinct parts — the
New World section is first. Willie
(John Lurie) of Hungarian descent
is forced to accommodate his
cousin Eva (Eszter Balint) for a few
days    before    she   departs    for
Cleveland where their aunt Lotte
resides, he treats her inhospitably
but changes his preconceptions
when Eva lifts a few goods from the
store. Willie realizes they are
similar.
Stranger Than Paradise
directed by Jim Jarmusch
at Cine Plex
One year later, the title of the second part, has Willie and his best
friend Eddie (Richard Edson) driving to Cleveland in a borrowed car
and with money gleaned from a
wired poker game. They find Eva
working in a seedy hot-dog joint
while living with the dumpy and
stubborn aunt Lotte. The two dolts
spend their time watching television
or playing cards with the Auntie —
she always wins.
Eddie states profoundly that
although he is in a new city,
everything looks the same. And
despite being shot on location in
Cleveland, New York, and Florida,
Cleveland does look remarkably
like Eddie's and Willie's part of
New York.
The third portion of the film,
Paradise, begins with Willie and
Eddie   departing   for   home,   they
celluloid. It is full of long shots
stretching the pacing. People walk
out of camera's range and the constant use of the wide angle lens includes unnecessary objects like
lighting fixtures and clutter. The
ca'mera's eye rarely moves along
with the actors, instead, the camera
is in one place just like theatre audiences are stuck in one place, and
only the change of sets provide a
different perspective. This technique sets filmmaking back a few
decades.
The most consideration in
'Paradise' was paid to the
photography. And this is the real
merit of 'Paradise': director of
photography,   Tom   Dicillo,   shot
Flic bores reviewer
decide to travel to Miami, paradise
city, and return for Eva. The
journey stops short of paradise in a
run-down motel by the sea. There,
the threesome fall apart and the
characters separate.
This film calls for a bit of patience and work on the part of the
viewer. The characters do normal
and mundane activities such as
eating, drinking, sleeping, and watching television. What can be more
boring than that? The acting is
notorious, the dialogue sparse and
dull . . . This is a film dedicated to
the informed movie goer, the film
buff, and to the art student.
The filmmakers have detoured
from the norm to make an excruciatingly    boring   piece    of
this film like a series of black and
white stills. Imagine looking
through an album of black and
white photos and suddenly, their
people come alive and begin to
move about.
The quick fade-out between
scene changes occurs as often as the
different camera views are
necessary to the narration, and this
is often. Remarkably, this consistent fade-out technique serves to
give "paradise" a lyrical quality.
Stranger Than Paradise is, well,
once again, boring. I would not
recommend the film as entertainment to the average film goer who is
accustomed to seeing modern film
techniques which were developed to
maintain the viewer's interest.
Play shows meaning of family
w
dresses.
hat docs your family
mean to you? This is the
question Tsymbaly ad-
By PRANK POULLO
This musical is about the rich
history of a Ukrainian-Canadian
fetfttly Bnteg on the Canadian
prairie. And 'tsymbaly* is a string
instrument resembling a harpsichord. Its soft music opens and
closes the play.
As the violinist in the Fiddler on
the Roof the tsymbaly comes to
represent the family tradition.
Katherina (Sharon Baker) tells of
her father who, locking himself in
their shanty, would play it.
Although he was shy about his playing, the music would ring through
the fields as they worked, Such are
the precious memories defining the
character of Katherina.
The traditions of the Stefanyk
family are not so fondly kept by
Katherina's son Nickie (Dwight
Koss). The story focuses on the life
of Nickie and his personal realization of the value in his ethnic roots.
The family is a small extended one
of four members, who run a general
store in a tiny Manitoba fanning
community.
The matriarch Baba (Joy
Coghil), radiates a special love binding the family members not only
to her but to the? traditions of the
homecountry. She has the kindness
and wisdom that only a grandmother can have.
Nickie from his youngest days is
consumed by the need to expand his
knowledge and education. With his
nose buried in a book, he is tijore
concerned with the values of others
rather than those stemming from
his traditions. His academic career
is much more important than the
laborious and empty costume of his
people. Why, he asks, do people
practice traditions when they no
longer know the reasons for their
existence?
The reasons become clear as he
parts from his family to pursue his
education and career. He finds that
among the professionals of Vancouver it is not proper etiquette to
put ones family before business.
Wekie chooses to marry an Anglo-
Saxon  also,   further   fragmenting
Tsymbaly    '"■ ~        ~~
by Ted Galay
directed by Jane Heyman
at the Waterfront Theatre
himself from his parents. Nickie
seems to take his family for
granted.
The play takes a sad twist when
the warm hearted Baba dies while
Nickie is thousands of miles away in
Brazil. He flies back to attend her
funeral, but he no longer feels the
closeness he once shared with his
grandmother. He has even forgotten a gift given to him years ago by
his grandmother on his thirteenth
birthday: a jar of earth from her
country. She had asked him to
sprinkle a handful of dirt she had
brought back with her from the
Ukraine on her grave upon her
death.
This is seemingly simple act to
Nickie but one of great importance
to his Baba. He realizes that the
love and being of Baba is contained
in this modest symbol. He and his
family rejoice in his discovery by
building a clay oven — a modest
but appropriate shrine, dedicated to
Baba's traditions.
The musical is special because it
captures the feeling, and bonds between the characters. The simple
way they care for each other is a
refreshing change from the usual
North American family, where hate
and resentment are the most
prevalent feelings. The characters
may have their differences and
arguments, but they never learn to
hate   one   another.   Their   loving
family life is an aspect of their own
culture.
Although customs can seem empty, their repetition encourages those
who care to learn of the meanings
implicity in the actions. By
understanding the customs and
history of their people, the
Stefanyk" s family history will never
die.
The musical also shows another
aspect of the Canadian experience.
It is sometimes forgotten there are
many people in Canada who do not
belong to the two dominant
cultures. The Canadian multicultural aspects exists more in
theory than in popular culture. As a
member of an ethnic minority
myself, I thank Ted Galay for sharing his life. It was a pleasure to see a
Canadian history where the queen
or France was not mentioned.
Falcon and S
he Falcon and the Snowman is a thriller which
fails to thrill. Although
based on the factual novel by
Robert Lindsey, the translation to
celluloid is not as spectacular as it
might have been.
By PETER LANKESTER
Christopher Lee Boyce (Timothy
Hutton) is a young man who
manages to get a job in a super-
secret clearing house, dealing with
highly classified American Intelligence documents; he is the
Falcon. Dalton lee (Sean Penn) is
another young man who enjoys the
'finer things' in life, and accomplishes this by selling drugs; he
is the Snowman.
The story centers around Boyce,
who becomes disillusioned with his
government when he learns the CIA
is meddling in the affairs of Allied
governments,    manipulating   and Friday, February 1, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
s
eeing Red is probably the
best film Ronald Reagan
has ever appeared in.
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
The film, which traces the course
of the American communist party
from the 1930s to the 1950s,
begins with an old clip of Old Ron
Himself describing the horrors of
rampant communism.
the witch hunt of the McCarthy era.
People such  as Richard Nixon
and    Hubert    Humphrey    speak
Seeing Red
directed by James Klein and
Julia Reichert
at Van East Cinema
until Saturday, Feb. 2
violently   against   the   communist
country, their living example of a
working socialist state, turns out to
be all wrong. Eighty per cent of the
members of the party, including
many of the people interviewed,
quit within two years.
The film turns to the present
where some people tell why they are
no longer party members and others
convey their continued adherence
to the party ideals.
Ronnie's finest hour
Through interviews with people
involved in the movement, some of
whom remain involved to this day,
the film portrays the hope and enthusiasm behind the movement.
Julia Reichert, who conducts the
interviews and is a co-director of
the film, elicits candid, truthful and
above all lively and interesting
statements out of very interesting
people. She manages to be sympathetic yet critical while encouraging people to talk about their past.
Seeing Red is a documentary
which remains exciting because the
real life characters and their stories
are bright and witty. And*with the
extra historical clips their interviews
make a smoothly crafted narrative.
Everyday workers tell of their initial enthusiasm for the communist
party, the party which had a million
members in the U.S. at its height
and could fill Madison Square
Garden with 20,000 people. They
describe the course of the communist hope.
In one scene, a dockworker and
seafarer says he was asked in the
late 1930's by an old man when the
revolution would be and he
answered he was certain it would
happen within five years.
Three women talking together
with Reichert say how much fun
they had being with a group of
young idealistic people fighting to
save the world.
The people depict their personal
work for the unionization of
fctories and the liberation of oppressed groups.
One reporter, a bit edgy about his
former membership, tells of covering a sharecroppers strike for The
Daily Worker. He looks at letters he
wrote about the plight and determination of the sharecroppers
which he hasn't seen for many years
and almost breaks down at the
memories evoked.
The film carries on with anecdotes and original film clips of an-
ticommunist actions in the thirties,
the Spanish Civil War, and other
events leading to the forties.
Events then become troubled
with constant FBI surveillance and
movement. More mad rhetoric of a
cold war America terrified of
"reds" follows.
But the movement survives this
abortive rise of the new right only
to have the rug pulled out from
under it in 1956 when Khruschev
reveals what Stalin, a hero of the
movement, has done in Russia.
The people describe their bitter
disappointment   when    the   great
The film compares the peace
movement of today with the communist movement of the middle of
the century.
Seeing Red, while done from a
sympathetic point of view, is open
to the faults of the movement such
as its occasional sexism, hierarchical top-down structure and unquestioning acceptance of the
Soviet Union.
It closes with the peace movement but doesn't mention today's
question of the new right, and
whether it will restart activities like
McCarthy's purges.
The film, features music by Pete
Seeger, who is also interviewed, and
Bernice Reagan. It is an exciting
and well executed story told by ordinary people in their own words.
It may be called a documentary
but don't let that scare you away —
compared to a film like Daniel
which covered some similar themes
and even had a plot, Seeing Red
stands out as a vibrant, enjoyable,
interesting work.
Too much raw icing
often with an unsatisfying superficiality and breathless speed.
The play is set in northern Italy.
Katherine, the shrew, must be married off before her very popular
younger sister, Bianca, may marry.
Though men avoid Kate because of
By LARRY McCALLUM
ven   if   you   like   your
E Shakespeare fast and
lively, the production of
the Shrew at the Dorothy Somerset
Studio may prove more than you
bargained for. It has plenty of action and charges along at a rapid
pace. It's almost a whirlwind of
high spirits that clocks in at under
90 minutes. But the lines come too
Another Panych tod Mac-
donald creation hits the
Vancouver stage with
much aplomb. It is clever, funny,
and musical too. It is a political
satire done in the Cabaret style of
the 20's and 30's under the direction
of German director Wolfgang
Kolneder.
And Kolneder, say the program
notes, used improvisational techniques at the early rehearsals to allow
for the Tamahnous collective to influence the script. This wonderful
way of working can produce genius
performances . . . and some genuine moments of brilliance surface
in Contagious.
rowman fails to thrill/
coercing them for the sole benefit of
the United States. Boyce's increasing cynicism leads him to form a
partnership with his long-time
friend Lee, to sell classified infor-
The Falcon & The Snowman
Directed by John Schlessinger
at Cinaplex, Dunbar
mation to the 'competition' — the
Russian KGB.
The story is taken from actual
events (occurring in California in
1975), and is billed as 'the most successful and daring act of espionage
to occur within the last decade!'
The original story may well have
been exciting, but unfortunately
there were too many inherent problems with this movie to make k an
enjoyable one. It appears both the
scriptwriter and the director found
the material so secret that they even
failed to inform the audience. Also,
their use of peripheral characters is
amateurish; the audience is never
given an introduction to some of
the characters, which continuously
fade in and out of the movie.
There are some redeeming
features which do make this film
better than average. Sean Penn (of
Bad Boys) gives a superb performance as an addict who is incapable
of doing right, and who destroys
everything around him. Timothy
Hutton (of Taps) gives a better than
credible performance portraying
Boyce, and David Suchet is very
believable as the Russian agent.
It is a shame these performances
cannot make up for the weak script
and the somewhat poor direction of
John Schlessinger (of Midnight
Cowboy). The result is a film which
does not sustain itself, and which
with a little more effort could have
been a good comedy.
The play begins somewhere in the
foggy future. Vancouver is hit with
a deadly epidemic. It is uncurable
and the city is under quarantine. In
a seedy bar in the Downtown
Eastside a self-serving bartender
(Keith Thomas) and his wimp of a
piano player (Ken MacDonald)
eagerly await the onslaught of
customers. The bar is covered in
white paint — even the piano keys
are painted white. In the left hand
corner of the bar is the usual bar
television set which constantly
transmits static.
Contagious
by Tamahnous Theatre
at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre
Every so often, the t.v. alights
with the perfect t.v. lady (Wendy
Gorling) whose purpose is to inform the public of the daily lottery
numbers which just happen to be
the daily dead count. She urges the
people to help the Provisional
Government since they have a connection with God.
She also encourages the healthy
to remain healthy and to have faith.
Those who are sick, she says, are
those who let in the disease because
they didn't have enough faith in
God and the Provisional Government.
But there comes a time when even
the t.v. lady is infected, and until
the final stages of the disease
emerge she continues to broadcast
her faith. But when she realizes the
Provisional will not save her and is
actually responsible for the sickness
she becomes a true convert who is
dedicated to spreading truth. ''
Of all the characters who wander
into the bar, GorKng's t.v. ladey is
the best in concept and performance. The rest of the people are a
prostitute (Babs Chula), a bag
woman (Barbara E. Russell) and
the sailor (Morris Panych). The bag
woman takes every statement
literally while the prostitute utilized
her body the familiar style. The
sailor has a non-English speaking
role which does very little for the
play or his reputation as an actor.
However, Panych as the lyricist
of the musical is very slick and
clever. He has a song for every occasion and lends fresh nuances to
each situation.
her bad temper and searing tongue,
she meets her match in Petruchio,
who marries her for her dowry.
While the stage seems set for the
battle of the century, Petruchio
does not merely stand up to his
bride. -Instead, he seeks her submission by denying her all food and
sleep. He wears her down by
reverently insisting that she's a gentle creature. At the same time he
The Taming of the Shrew
At the Dorothy Somerset Studio
relentlessly brow-beats everyone,
Kate included, who falls short of his
absurdly exacting demands.
In the face of a man more
headstrong than herself, Kate
becomes obedient, if only to soothe
Petruchio's passions.
To treat this outcome as simply a
triumph of marital virtue may be
sexist, but it's also a probable in-
jsutice to the play Shakespeare
wrote. Yet in this production there
is no ambiguity, only a happy ending. Thus the Petruchio is a stock
protagonist: all benign, cunning,
and likeable.
Moreover, Ernest Warnielius
plays Petruchio with a selfconsciously virile swagger and a certain lack of conviction. He cuffs his
servants and takes his falls with
skill, yet delivers his lines with an
almost mechanical self-importance.
Yet Carol Nesbitt does an interesting Kate, more snide than
haughty, she cagily snipes at the
other characters rather than hotly
disdaining them. But when she must
vent her frustrations, her actions
are insipid. At least one slap whe
delivered was inaudible.
The lines are too often rushed in
this production. Tranio (Patrick
Blaney) seems ill-at-ease and speaks
with a sing-song rapidity.
The more minor characters such
as Michael Robinson fare better.
He brings a leisurely, whimsical eloquence to his portrayal of Gremio,
a foolish old suitor of Bianca. His
delivery is charming when he
laments, "Our cake is dough. . .on
both sides."
Here he almost seems to suggest
the problem with this production:
too many icing flourishes and too
little baking in an underdone recipe.
The production is too crowded and
busy. The actors seem too intent on
the fast pace and their own actions
to do justice to the words. And the
lines seem more memorized than
well studied.
A carnival pipe organ playing
back stage at intervals lends an
amusing air of self-mockery, but
this production may be too geared
to farce and entertainment for its
own good. And while treating The
Taming of the Shrew as a lightweight crowd pleaser is one thing, a
casual or rushed production is
another. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1, 1985
Testimonial
I used to write in full sentences, with no grammatical errors, and I never rnisquoted anyone.
I used to complete assignments early, considered joining a sorority ^j^^^M'^Mix^^M high school;
/Then I joined the Ubyssey.     v"     -:
I went to Pango Pango, on assignment, met Target .^p^i^^^Byi^lxi-.Weaal^-^alls, Dick Slime and
a cast of thousands of hairy puce blorgs.
I entered the maelstrom. Life can never be the same. /.,:.
- Snarlie* Diddeldum
'■:J:;fe.-- Ubyssey livestock editor   ;
P.S. be aware that the Ubyssey hereby officially invites those forthwith registered
in this official institute of highest education to an open house — guzzle at the hour of
12:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 8 in this our Lord's year of 1985 providing no act of God
destroys our presence in the intervening period. Beverages to be provided by the
munificent and beautiful Ubyssey staff on this Joyous occasion. Repondez s'ils vous
plait.
"Food, Service & Prices are all excellent"
—The Budyet Gourmet
a^ scrvnee a*o of&fr V»me CDt*i*> -
Try it out!
pcuul n irnlion Im \lin (r inn hi
««M«MS«®M!rti£Sfc'8t31*§i'j
I I.K. M A( MI 1.1 .A.N I'l .A.N1. TAR UM i'R/-:si-:.\ is
Canada ki Space
< ;irui<lun imilnbulioiisln Sp ttt Ktsi inli *^^V^   jfi»*      A
WIN DIWKR WITH MARC GARNKAl  KKB. 13th
Kill on I an enln form when \oti see Canada in Space.
a times phone 24 h<
rmalion 736-3656
Mappin;
Wbur
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1555 West 8th Avenue
Vancouver, B.C. VoJ 1T5
Telephone: (6041 732-1211
Certified General
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Incorporated in 19S1, the Certified General
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largest association of professional accountants, with more than 6,000 members and
students. Certified General Accountants
are employed in a wide variety ol positions
in industry, commerce, government and
public practice. Friday, February 1,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Meares Island confrontation looms
By RICK KLEIN
Across the bay from the fishing
village of Tofino a small settlement
has sprung up on Meares Island. A
group of brightly colored tents and
a two storey cabin block access to
the island's forests from the proposed log booms at Heelboom Bay.
Next week the last hand in a four
year poker match will be played
here.
For both lumber giant
MacMillan-Bloedel and the Tofino
residents the stakes are high — the
preservation of one of the last
unlogged rainforests on western
Vancouver Island.
Last week a B.C. Supreme Court
decision gave the company the
green light to begin logging operations on the island and issued an injunction against anyone interfering.
However, a showdown looms as
members of the Nuu Chah Nulth in-
dian nations and concerned citizens
appear ready to defy the court
order.
Emotions are running high
among many residents who are convinced the government decision to
allow logging on Meares was arbitrary and undemocratic.
Organizer Mike Mullin says many
people spent a lot of time and
energy on a three year planning
team whose report was ultimately
ignored. Instead a private meeting
between government officials and
Mac-Bio representatives resulted in
the so-called "fourth" option
which permits logging on 90 per
cent of the island.
Central to the Meares issue are
Clayaquot Band chief Moses
Martin says there is no room for
compromise on Meares. "We are
not a special interest group, we are
defending the place where we live.
For us it is a question of survival."
native land claims to the island.
Native resident Peter Webster says,
"We never surrendered our land.
We still think it belongs to us. We
see it as stolen land."
The native homeland on Meares
is more than a museum piece. It is
an integral part of a way of life.
There is a home economy in which
value is not necessarily measured in
monetary terms. Fish and clams are
taken for food, not profit.
Says Martin: "Meares Island is
the economic base of our people.
We can survive out here with what
we already have."
Without this economic base survival is often linked to government
handouts and welfare lines. The
dispute over Meares Island is more
than a battle between loggers and
conservationists. At issue is the
right of local residents, Indian
bands, and business people to control resource decisions in their own
backyard. Ninety per cent of
Tofino residents oppose the logging
plans due to the impact such activity would have upon tourism,
mariculture and local lifestyles.
Meares Island is part of
Mac-Bio's tree farm license number
44. The company gained cutting
rights to the island in 1908 when the
lumber industry was in its infancy.
There is little doubt that the social
and economic landscape of the province and the needs of its citizens
has changed since that day.
The timber on Meares is destined
for Mac-Bio's pulp and lumber
complex at Port Alberni. Company
spokesperson Nancy Scott says
Meares Island represents 100 direct
and indirect winter jobs for Mac-
Blo personnel, plus taxes and
royalties  to   both   provincial  and
Residents charge eviction unfair
Three UBC students claim their
eviction from Place Vanier
residence is unfair because they are
being singled out as scapegoats.
Tim O'Hearn, Craig Dorcan and
Dan McRory are being evicted from
Robson House partly for noise and
abuse of staff violations that they
and several others committed out
side of Kootenay House Jan. 21.
All but one were given infraction
points, but O'Hearn, Dorcan and
McRory are being evicted because
they have accumulated enough
demerit points from other infractions.
The   three   students   say  senior
house advisors Tony Ryan and Carl
Planning students win
Two UBC planning students won
national awards at their recent annual conference.
Doug   Aberley   and    Heather
Sit-in succeeds
From page 1
shown, some standing, others sitting, in the school's grassed courtyard. That's the way they see their
school, said Ovenell, "like a
family."
Despite this close-knit environment, Ovenell, Parfitt, and others
contend that the quality of education at the school began to decline
about four years ago.
Now, too, the normal class size is
30 to 35, a figure which could rise
to 35 or 40 if the cuts go ahead, the
students say. They singled out
humanities classes as being particularly overcrowded.
Christa Ovenell said
Wednesday's sit-in "was a good
method of protest. It was radical
because it was masses of students
getting together on their own time.
It's something that's going to be
taken seriously."
By 7:15 p.m. the University Hill
gym was suddenly empty. The last
of the protesters had left to attend
a school play.
Koulas, both community and
regional planning graduate
students, won top awards for their
oral presentations about historic
preservation at the Canadian
Association of Planning Students
conference, said Doug Ross, last
year's award recipient.
Ross said UBC students had to
pay most of their own way to the
Manitoba location this year because
of provincial government funding
cuts. The students received partial
funding from several UBC sources,
he added.
The four students who
represented UBC this year were
Aberly, Koulas, Kin Read and Yugi
Jinnouchi.
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Cooper have been lax and unfair in
applying residence rules. As an example, they claim they were allowed
to leave Robson House on the night
of the 21 while carrying open bottles of beer. They also charge that
one of the students involved wasn't
given points because he was a
member of the house council.
McRory said the advisors are
now under pressure by student
housing to toughen up because
things were out of control in Robson House during the first term.
McRory said pressure is on because
Robson House had been "assessed
more damage than all the other
houses put together."
The students are also upset at
what they feei is the arbitrary way in
which rules are applied and infraction points awarded. O'Hearn said
one of his infraction points came as
a result of playing his stereo loudly
for 15 seconds.
As the students are appealing
their eviction, Ryan, Cooper and
senior Robson resident advisor
Kirstie Grant would not comment
on the allegations.
federal governments.
The forest industry is still the
'backbone of the provincial
economy, but the industry remains
stuck in the midst of a prolonged
downturn. In 1984 record volumes
of lumber were produced in B.C.,
yet most companies continued to
record losses. With lumber prices at
rock bottom levels companies ae
forced to operate at full capacity
just to cover fixed costs.
The industry is undergoing a fundamental readjustment. The permanent closure of Mac-Bio's Vancouver plywood division and the
Chemainus lumber mill are part of
this readjustment. In the name of
greater efficiency over 1,000 jobs
were lost. The point is not that
Mac-Bio is some corporate villain.
They are at the whim of market
forces beyond their control; locked
on a treadmill of rock bottom
prices, fierce international competition, and high fixed costs.
The question is, might there be a
better way? The key to community
stability lies in not putting all the
eggs in one basket. It lies in promoting development in areas like
tourism, agriculture and recreation, so towns like Tofino can be insulated from the cyclical booms and
busts of the lumber market.
Meares Island represents an opportunity for economic diversification. Close to the Lower Mainland
and next to Pacific Rim National
Park the Tofino area has much
potential. To the residents of the
Tofino area, Meares Island
represents the opportunity to try
something different than the
logged-off hillsides that ring the rest
of Clayaquot Sound.
The decision to allow logging on
Meares was made in Victoria over
the wishes of local residents. Unlike
the people of Tofino it seems the
government lacks the imagination
to recognize that what has worked
in the past may not work in the
future.
Master of Public
Administration
Queen's University
at Kingston
A one year (3-term) multi-disciplinary program,
with an emphasis on public policy studies, at
the federal, provincial and municipal levels of
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Information/Applications available from
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Telephone (613)-547-3031.
TUDIO
cfb
Free Graduation Photo Session
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete
selection of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer
is valid to all 1985 UBC graduating students Phone now for an ap
pointment, 736-7281 or 731-1412.
2111 West 16th Ave., Van., B.C.
I
TUDIO |
I
I
I
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cfb
Anniversary
40
FEB.6^
edtjer
Pro
ducts
Rainchecks will be issued if paid in full on Staedtler Day
ONE DAY ONLY! Don't miss it! Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1, 1985
fo/A
('itf#ti
TODAY
UBC-JAP AN EXCHANGE CLUB
Information   meeting  for  Japan  summer  ex-
change, noon, SUB 237 B.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Pizza, music, bzzr, tzquila, 3:30-9 p.m.. International House.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT
Dr. Rita Steblin lecture: "Death as Fiddler in the
19th Century: An Interdisciplinary Study," 3:30
p.m.. Music 113.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Women and men vs University of Lethbridge,
women 6 p.m., men 8 p.m., War Memorial gym.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Speaker Vicky Martin:   "The Militarization of
Space, " noon, SUB 206.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation   meeting,    noon,    International
House.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
DANCE HORIZONS
Advance tickets on sale for Equinox, noon, SUB
216E.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Sign up for Feb. 8 Whistler ski weekend, all day,
Kenny 2007.
AMS ART GALLERY
Atkinson — Eklund — Hodgson, prints, paint
show, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., AMS art gallery in SUB.
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Free movies and bzzr garden, 4:30, SUB 206.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT
IN SCRIPTURE
Film: Francis Schaeffer's "How We Should Live
Then," Part I, noon, Buch A 102.
UBC LIBERAL CLUB
Speaker senator Ray Perreault: "Come See A
Great Canadian," noon, SUB 211.
STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC
UNIVERSITY
Movie pub night: "Ragtime," bar opens 6 p.m.,
movie at 8 p.m.. Graduate Student centre
garden room.
SATURDAY
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Potluck tournament, all day, University of Victoria.
THUNDERBIRD VOLLEYBALL
Women   and   men   vs   University   of   Calgary,
women 6 p.m., men 8 p.m., War Memorial gym.
SUNDAY
THE UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF SOCCER
Staff  and  friends  soccer  game:   "The   Libel
Bowl," 11 a.m., 25th and Crown.
MONDAY
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Film: "Free Namibia," noon, Buch B 214.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Sign up for Feb. 8 Whistler ski trip, noon, Kenny
2007.
ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Redeye Pancake Breakfast, proceeds to Variety
Club Telethon, 7:45 to 11 a.m., Cheez Factory
cafe near B-Lot.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
AMS ART GALLERY
Chang — Redgewell — Schenk exhibit, till Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., AMS art gallery in SUB.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT IN
SCRIPTURE
Film: Francis Schaeffer's "How Should We Live
Then," Part II, noon, SUB auditorium.
TUESDAY
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Seminar, Dr. J. Howes speaks on "Japanese
Canadian Relations: Past and Prospects," noon,
Buch B 221.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Sign up for Feb. 8 Whistler ski weekend, noon,
Kenny, 2007.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration,   new  members  welcome,   noon,
SUB 216E.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Administration meeting, noon, Buch A 202.
t finally fixed my prof. IBM aak) that there was oust in Ms logic circuits. I am felieved,) was beginning to think that a Moral Minority/Ami technologists
saboteur had wriggled Into my educational program. My prof wonH be wsretoing wtiem t» slwuWn't anymore. It s too bad, k
Tney even got rtd'rfttiat annoying prospsraityfw
younger sister to say them to visitors, you should have seen my mother's face when she suggested to out priest that he do a physically impossible thing to
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ENTER NOW UNTIL FEB. 14, 1985
EVERY TIME YOU COME IN FOR DINNER
THE DRAW WILL BE HELD ON FEB. 14, 1985 AT 10 P.M.
Fully Licenced. Open for Sunday Brunch iO A.M.—4 P.M.
Hours: 10 A.M.—11:30 P.M. DAILY. Dinner 5 P.M.—11:30 P.M.
For Reservations:
2611W. 4th Ave. (at Trafalgar) 734-7460
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines. .60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.50; additional lines. .70c. Additional days. $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
vfV
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00  Call228-3977
COMING EVENTS
CUECKEDJ
;> time s*
wwww
Monday Thru Saturday
Complimentary
hot & spicy munchies
4 P.M. - 7 RM.
682-1831
A.M.S.
Art Galley
Chang—Redgewell—Schenk
February 4-15
Steinke—Taylor
February 18-22
Monday to Friday
10-4 p.m.
WOMAN'S WATCH in SUB near east
entrance (near cafeteria! on Tues., Jan. 29.
To claim: 228-4846.
70 - SERVICES
20 - HOUSING
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
TIMOTHY FINDLEY
author
MATTER OVER MIND:
THE IMAGINATION
IN JEOPARDY
Saturday, Feb. 2
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Building
8:15 p.m. .
TAKES TWO — one of Canada's most professional, selective roommate matching
agencies. Call 9 to 9 for details. 685-5681.
Small fee.
2 B.R. SUITE to share with female grad. stu.
$235 mo. includes util. Phone 738-7398.
ST. ANDREW'S HALL men's residence,
6040 lona Drive, near Gage Towers, accommodation in double room. Room & board
$343 per month.
25 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT. GMAT. MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
SATURDAY EVENING
WORSHIP SERVICE
6 p.m. Weekly
Contemporary Communion
Guest Preachers
S. Philips Anglican Church
3741 W. 27th (off Dunbar)
Coffee and Fellowship
Following Service
ALL WELCOME
86 - TYPING
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
OCTOBER 5. 1986 LSAT
on September 13, 14, 15/1985
For information call free.
LSAT/GMAT PREPARATION COURSES.
112-800-387-3772.
36 - LOST
11 - FOR SALE - Private
NAKAMICHI TRI TRACER 700 3 head,
professional cassette tape deck. Tested
20-20, khz ± 2 db. Pristine condition. New
$1200. Now $500 O.B.O. 874-9581 eves.
75 CHEV. IMPALA. superb cond., no
rust, low mile. AM radio, winter & summer
tires. No work needed. $1200 OBO.
2630272
FREE LAB & SHEPHERD pups, born Dec.
25. Would enjoy outdoors & exercise over
SPCA. Till next Sat., Feb. 9. 261-4789.
HAND KNIT BROWN SCARF in or around
Buchanan Fri. a.m. Jan. 25. Phone
228-4256 or 224-1172.
BURGUNDY WALLET lost on Monday.
Somewhere between the Aquatic Centre
and SUB. If found call Barb, 222-2147.
40 - MESSAGES
15 - FOUND
THE CHOIR at West Point Grey Presbyterian
Church, West 12th Ave. & Trimble, is seeking new members in all voice parts. Come &
join us. 733-1797.
DAM, what a bizarre way to meet a girl,
I really like you but I don't want to seem
pushy. Call me. Lawrence.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reasonable rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U ft del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (MICOM). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail. Fast
professional service. Jeeva, 876-5333.
WORDPOWER — Editing & word processing professionals. Thesis, term paper,
resume ft form letter specialists. Student
rates. 3737 W. 10th (at Alma). 222-2661.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write, we type, theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evgs/wkends. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, mscpts., resumes, theses.
IBM Seiec. II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9857.
TYPING AND/OR EDITING: Reports, essays, letters, manuscripts, etc. IBM Selectric II. Phone 261-3345.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Math, sciences,
languages, fine arts, literature. Will correct
grammar & spelling. 872-7934.
YOUR WORDS professionally typed - to
go Judith Filtness, 3206 W. 38th Ave.,
263-0351 (24 hrs.) Fast and reliable.
MINIMUM   NOTICE:
224-1342 (24 hours).
Essays  &  resumes.
ON SEPTEMBER 18. 1984 a valuable ring
was found in The Thunderbird Shop in
SUB. To claim contact RCMP office on
Campus with proper description.
65 - SCANDALS
JODE—hang in there kid, you OAP check's in
the maill Happy 2wonl Love, The Brat.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. 25 yrs. experience. Reasonable, accurate, fast. Phone
Richmond, 271-6755.
TYPING —Fast, accurate, reasonable rates.
734-8451
WORD WEAVERS - Word processing,
stud, rates, fast turnaround, 3 terminals.
Bilingual. 5670 Yew ft 41st. 266-6814. Friday, February 1, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
£yUhih
David Hall, Shani Moo too and Mark
Linklater: Three B.C. painters who share a
common interest in working with the mundane to express the non-mundane, Surrey Art
Gallery, until Feb. 3, 13750-88 Ave., Surrey.
Alan Storey: Two site specific pieces built to
extend from the existing structure of the
gallery with movement created by the action
of the viewer, until Feb. 2, Contemporary Art
Gallery, 555 Hamilton St.
No Rest For The Restless: prepared by Kent
Tate, Jan. 21-Feb. 9, Pitt International
Galleries, 36 Powell St.
Rap On The Sublime: The female artist in a
male-defined field of art production is addressed through a series of large portraits, at
the Pitt, Jan. 21-Feb. 9.
Exhibition of Photographs: Jacques Rene
Andre, Nomi Kaplan, Jean-Jacques Baillaut,
Tom Knott, Stuart Dee, James Labonte,
Doane Gregory, George Plawski, Patrick Hat-
tenberger, Ted Scott, Werner Hintermeister,
Ingrid Yuille, at Centre Culturel Colombien,
from Jan. 24-Feb. 28.
Susan Keane and John Simeon: both
North Shore artists share a show, Jan. 9-Feb.
12, North Vancouver City Hall, 141 W. 14th
Ave. 988-6844.
The Longstaffe Collection 1969-1984: leading Canadian art collectors' treasures, Jan.
12-Feb. 24, Vancouver Art Gallery, 750 Hornby St. 682-5621.
Veronica Plowman: UBC grad shows pencil
drawings and oil paintings, Jan. 7-Feb. 3,
Vancouver East Cultural Centre, 1895 Ven-
ables St. 254-9578.
Kartner Block Series: an examination of
landscape and architecture by Katherine Sur-
ridge, Jan. 10-Feb. 10, Burnaby Art Gallery,
6344 Gilpin St. 291-9441.
Ain't Misbehavin' This popular musical revue celebrates its 300th performance on Jan.
30, held over to Feb. 16, regular showing
times and special price matinees on Wed. at
5:30 p.m. Arts Club, Granville Island.
Brew: an irreverent comedy that is known to
set house records soaring, opens Jan. 12, 8
p.m., The Vancouver Playhouse.
The Vancouver Show: come join the audience of the Vancouver Show . . . one of
many ways of to be aware of what's what,
CKVU 180 W. 2nd Ave., reserve seating only,
call 876-1344.
Twelfth Night or What You Will:
Shakespeare at the Arts Club directed by
Larry Lillo, starts Jan. 18 until March 2,
687-1644.
Contagious: A new musical by Morris
Panych and Ken MacDonald, directed by
Kolneder, Tamahnous askes the musical
question: "Is humanity a dead issue:" Jan.
19-Feb. 16 at the Van. East Cultural Centre,
previews for students at cheap prices: Fri.
Jan. 18.
Lark Rise: a promenade production, the audience is not formally seated for the story of
life in an English village 100 years ago. Opening Feb. 5, 8:00 p.m., previews Feb. 2 and
Sun., Feb. 3 at 2:30 p.m. Studio 58 at
Langara 100 West 49 Ave.
Sex Tips: for modern girls. Developed from
improve workshops from a woman's point of
view. Touchstone Theatre at the Firehall, 280
East Cordova.
I'll Be Back Before Midnight: a Peter Colley
thriller at the Waterfront Theatre, Granville
Isle, Tues.-Thurs. 8:00 p.m. Fri.-Sat. 5:30 &
9:00.
e
HcUi£6
Pinter Places: the Canadian premier of three
one-act plays by Harold Pinter, Tues., Thurs.,
Fri., 8:30 Wed. 5:30, Sat. 2:30 and 6:30, Sun.
3:30 p.m., in Repertory with:
Miss Margarida's Way: a one-woman exploration of the corruption and seduction of
power, Mon. and Wed. 8:30, Tues. and
Thurs. 5:30, Sat. 9:30, Sun. 7:30 p.m. Limited
run to Feb. 9, Arts Club Theatre, Seymour St.
The Taming of the Shrew: Shakespeare
thrives at the Dorothy Somerset Studio, Jan.
29 to Feb. 2, 8 p.m. UBC.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th Ave. & Commercial Dr. 253-5455) Country 7:30, Grapes of
Wrath 9:35, Feb. 1-3.
Ridge Theatre (3131 Arbutus St., 738-6311)
Talking Heads Stop Making Sense 7:30 &
9:30.
Cinemawest (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697)
Major Barbara 7:30 Feb. 6.
Subfilms (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697) Red
Dawn 7:00 & Diva 9:30 Jan. 31-Feb. 3.
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium, same as above)
Days and Nights in the Forest 6:30 & 8:30.
Pacific Cinemateque (1155 West Geogia) Une
Femme Douce 7:30 & L'argent 9:15 Feb. 1,
Little Nellie Kelly 7:30 & Ziegfeld Girl 9:30
Feb. 2, Tragedy of a Ridiculous Man 7:30
Feb. 6, Stalker & 'Unsere Afrikareise' 7:30
Feb. 7.
TIRED OF HOMEWORK? BREATHING?
TAKE A BREAK! SEE A SHOW!
SUBFILMS PRESENTS: JAN. 31 FEB. 3
Now Showing at SUB Auditorium
228-3697
Applications for a Position on the
AMS SUB
SECURITY TEAM
Are Now Being Accepted
The Security Team works both Friday and Saturday nights in the Student Union Building. Briefly,
the Team is responsible for assisting the Proctor in
protecting SUB from vandalism, aiding security
teams hired for any function in SUB, and implementing SAC policy in the Games Room.
Application forms are now available in the AMS
Executive Secretary's office, SUB Room 238.
This position is open to both males and females.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE RETURNED BY
7 p.m., Friday, February 1, 1985
;: . Gwy>
-twe»rt,«SHed,'t»*ture;:..■.'..,. j'f,'                                  ■'•••*&'<"'...,<, ikSis               ,:\:\i:M/o        ''m.^:, .'■:■                                        -   ->:.
Gray - soft, fuzzy, flirty
■/■■-,'. Srey—coWt:*lat8, »6«i,::.                 ,.   .:v;
:.'''"•(■'■                               ■  .-■T'^if-'i..^i®%S^->lii'^3ft»!l>^:^»!^"^^-"'j"' '^'■l-'f-.*                     ■   ■
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'..;.§;|:v":'v''"-ft:Kh.:vs;i.::'*';<'5     ~::vc/>;-,--   ^ V&eV: -"rWu<*> kjk; ysoiV	
-;~'r;j;                                                                         <5rey ~ Hey, hay« a swyt day . . .
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DAL GRAUER
MEMORIAL LECTURES
MR. TIMOTHY FINDLEY
Author
Toronto, Ontario
Timothy Findley has won acclaim in his career as a talented actor, playwright for
the theatre, radio and television; a novelist and short story writer. He is also an excellent lecturer and lucid commentator in all these fields. He has written many
short stories both for broadcast and for publication. His novel THE WARS won
him the major recognition of the Governor General's Award for Fiction in 1977.
Mr. Findley has served as Chairman of the Writer's Union of Canada and as
Writer-in-Residence at The University of Toronto. His latest novel NOT
WANTED ON THE VOYAGE was published in 1984 by Viking.
Saturday, February 2, 1985—8:15 p.m.
"Matter Over Mind: The Imagination in Jeopardy"
In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre
(Vancouver Institute Lecture)
Wednesday, February 6, 1985—12:30 p.m.
"Theatre Pieces: Putting It Together" Canadian Theatre in a State of Flux
In Frederic Wood Theatre
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Enquiries: R. Rumley 228-5675
Room 210, 6328 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C.    V6TIW5
AN OPPORTUNITY TO EARN EXTRA MONEY
RECEIVE A TERRIFIC
40% COMMISSION
AS A COLLEGE AGENT FOR NEWSWEEK
You can get monthly commission checks
by working just a few hours a week. Profits
are quick when you attract students to subscribe to Newsweek.
It's interesting work, and you'll feel proud
as you promote this exciting newsweekly.
Its award-winning editorial covers world and
national events, people, business, technology, sports, entertainment. Students
welcome the great ideas and insight that
Newsweek brings.
You'll welcome all the extra dollars you can
bring in, so contact us today:
Newsweek
Campus Network
444 Madison Avenue
New York, New York 10022
Attn: Delores Pressley
Newswetfc Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, February 1, 1985'
WANTSYOU
lake part in GM's M-Car clinic!
Win an M-Car for the summer!
GM wants your input in an important
research study on our brand new
M-Cars - better known as the Chevy
Sprint and Pontiac Firefly.
The reason why?
We're committed to excellence.
We want to provide young Canadians
with the best possible products. And
your feedback will help.
In this case study, it'll tell us, for
example, if our M-Cars are as much fun
to drive as we believe they are. How
their performance measures up. How
their features rate. Whether you agree
that priced at $6,099 (M.S.R.R), they're
an incredible value. Plus how to make
them even better.
Now what's in this project for you?
Apart from the fun of a test drive,
we'll give you a gift: an English-style
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some terrific prizes. You can win a Sony
TAKE A TEST DRIVE.
GET A "GATSBY" CAR
SONY WALKMAN
WINNER A WEEK
Walkman.  You can win an M-Car to drive
for a week.  You can win the grand prize:
an M-Car for the whole summer, June to
September 1985. Tax-free. With no-cost-
to-your insurance.
The Big "M" research study is
scheduled to run for 5 weeks, from
January 28 to March 2, Monday through
Saturday, 10:00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.
To participate, simply go to the Big "M"
Test Drive tent on the UBC campus
and register for your half-hour
M-Car test drive.
Afterwards, fill in the research
questionnaire and you'll automatically
get your cap. Plus be eligible to win
the draws for the other prizes.
Be sure to bring your driver's
licence along with
your UBC I.D. card
when you register.
And please remember: since space is
limited in this project,
first come must be
first served.
So sign up today.
Approximate total
value of prizes; $3,300.00
Winners must answer
a skill testing question.

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