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The Ubyssey Feb 13, 1973

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Array Dorms get BoG rent pledge
Bv RYON GUEDES
The board of governors
meeting decided Monday
student tenant representatives
should be present informed
and participating in any board
decision to accept the proposed
9.75 per cent residence rent
hike.
The board reached the
decision after a twenty-minute
discussion with delegates from
Place Vanier, Totem Park,
Acadia Park and Gage Towers,
while more than a hundred
students waited in the hallway
adjacent to the board room, in
the ■ old administration
building.
The demonstration,
originally planned by the
Acadia tenants but organized
into an all-residence effort by
the     newly-elected      AMS
executive, was held to protest
the withholding of information
and the lack of student control
over financial issues directly
concerning them.
Half an hour before the
meeting • was to begin, the
demonstrators began to file
into the hallway in order to
greet arriving board members
with copies of both their formal
letters to the board and their
outline of requests.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. UV, No. 35 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1973      *g§&°i8     228-2301
"We have serious concerns,"
said the letter, "as to the
causes of this rent increase and
these concerns are not going to
be allayed by the inadequate
and evasive assertions
received from the housing
administration.
"Mr. Rohringer has
indicated his hands are tied in
discussing the relevant facts
and figures, and that is why we
are here."
The board agreed to admit
representatives from each of
the student residences.
The delegates, Svend
Robinson, Derrick Booth and
James Authos of Acadia, Wally
Earner and Rosemary Cairns
of Gage, Bruce Gillespie of
Vanier, and Claude Pierce of
UNWASHED AWAIT board of governors decision on whether or not
to hear their brief against the housing department's ten per cent rent
hike.    The board finally  decided  to  admit student reps thus giving
—kini mcdonald photo
unbelievers a first look at the BoG's secret rites and strange initiation
practices. Members also promised to invite students to their next get
together.
Totem, spoke with the board
tor twenty minutes.
Booth told those waiting no
decision would be made until
the board recommended the
increase be adopted. Up to
now, the board has rejected the
proposals made by the
administration, said Booth.
When the recommendation
is accepted, "a meeting of the
board will be held, to which we
will be invited, and in which we
shall take part," said Booth.
"We are also to be supplied
with the pertinent information,
including a copy of Rohringer's
brief supporting the rent
increase."
AMS secretary-elect Stan
Persky said the demonstration
is a student victory.
"Friday afternoon bursar
William White was reluctant
even to mention the matter to
the board and today the board
is listening to our delegates."
Persky attributed the
success to the numbers of
people who did attend the
demonstration. "It's our
appearing in force that
probably impressed them. It's
one of the few things they
understand."
Tenants
mobilize
for fight
ByRYONGUEDES
Tenants of UBC's three
single-student residences have
formed action committees to
protest the proposed 9.75 per
cent hike in residence rent.
Meanwhile, protest
organizers, members of the
newly elected Alma Mater
Society executive, have met
with frustration in attempts to
get bursar William White and
housing director Leslie
Rohringer to explain the
reasons for the increase.
The action committees were
formed at a meeting organized
by the new executive and
attended by representatives of
all residences Sunday night in
Gage Towers residences
common block.
The executive, led by
president-elect Brian Loomes,
See page 12: DORM
NDU faculty seeks union certification
NELSON (CUP) — The faculty association of
Notre Dame University has reapplied for
certification following initial rejection by the B.C.
labor relations board.
The association's original application was made
in early December, 1972 and the faculty was
informed Jan. 29, the application had been refused.
Although no reason was given, it is thought one main
reason was that part-time personnel were not
included in the proposed union.
The new application, submitted Jan. 30, proposed
including part-time personnel in the union.
The faculty association is seeking certification
because it wants to be the only recognized agency
representing faculty members as a whole in
negotiations with the governing body of the
university.
The faculty association's immediate goals are
salary increases, increased fringe benefits and
improved working conditions. The association hopes
to reach a salary level that is, according to its
president, A.H. Child, "comparable with the most
poorly-paid public universities in Canada." Full
professors here earn less than $10,000 per year. The
association wants an increase of about 30 per cent.
The board  of  governors  is  currently  simply
presenting the faculty with an unnegotiated offer on
a take-it-or-leave-it basis.
Administration president C.L. Kaller says he
thinks certification is an ideal administrative
situation, but he does not believe academic work can
be done on a time-clock basis. Neither he nor the
board of governors have taken an official stand on
the matter. There is concern in the university about
the effect certification would have on the university.
The institution's financial situation is somewhat
shaky since the university is paying off an $800,000
mortgage to the Catholic Diocese here.
To prevent NDU's closure, the university
administration was forced to seek an increase in its
provincial government grant. Although there seems
to be little argument that the professors are
underpaid, the university may not be able to pay
them more.
NDU's status is now somewhat unclear. It has
applied to the government to become a public
institution but the provincial government has made
no decision.
If certified, the faculty association would bargain
with the board of governors. However, since the
faculty has two members on the board, this may be
contrary to the B.C. labor laws which differentiate
between labor and management.
Child has said the faculty association is aware ot
the university's financial situation and futility of
professors trying to attain large raises at this time.
Other opposition has come from student leaders
who fear the effect unionization could have on the
hiring and firing within the university as well as the
possibility of a strike option.
The students fear certification could give
everyone automatic tenure. At present, an NDU
faculty member is eligible for tenure only after
reviews over a seven-year period. The present
structure supposedly guarantees standards before
allowing academic freedom and security.
If used properly, certification would not be a threat
to the university community, Child says.
Certification would lessen the possibility of strike
action by faculty through the availability of
arbitration and mediation.
Child criticized those who are quick to condemn
all unions on the basis of a few mismanaged unions.
He claimed those who criticize labor unions don't
criticize either labor legislation or collective
bargaining but the misuse of them. Child said it is
insulting to assume the NDU professors would be one
of the groups who would mismanage the power
unionization could give them. Page  2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 13, 1973
By women's group
Stalls expected on report
By LINDA HOSSIE
The Women's Action Group
expects little help in
combatting sexism from either
the administration committee
on discrimination or the new
provincial government,
according to spokeswoman
Shelagh Day.
"This means the committee
will stall certain things until it
comes up with its conclusions
about the report," Day said.
"The faculty association
requested money to deal with
inequities in salary but this will
probably be put off by the
board of governors until the
report has been checked out."
Day said she doesn't expect
much help from the New
Democratic Party government
in implementing the report
despite their party platform of
equality for women.
"Like all parties they're as
male chauvinist as the rest,"
she said. "In terms of this
particular issue I don't think
we can count on them being
any different from anyone else.
There really isn't much
understanding of or dedication
toward changing the status of
women in the province."
Speaking to about 50 people
at a women's week meeting
Monday, Day said she expects
the committee to "stall"
certain actions in dealing with
the report
"The university senate can
help students but I wouldn't be
surprised if things going
through the senate are also
tabled until the committee
comes up with its conclusions.
"We have to work through a
very elaborate bureaucratic
system," she said.
"The only way we can work
is by putting pressure on
Elileen Dailly, the faculty
association and the senate.
We're in a very powerless
position.
"There is no procedure at
UBC to deal with specific
incidents of discrimination or
problems affecting individual
women," Day said. "We will
have to go through existing
channels to set up a new more
direct channel where all issues
of women's status are dealt
with in a co-ordinated way."
Day said this status is shown
by the fact that women are
paid an average of $1,470 less
than men per year for the same
type of jobs.
She said when salary
increments are considered the
difference between the money
made by women and that made
by men at UBC may be as high
as $3,000 a year.
In the various faculties
women with the same
qualifications as men are
placed in lower ranking
positions, Day said.
As well as affecting salary
levels, this grouping of women
at lower ranks affects their
decision making power, tenure
status, pension, access to
research money and other
benefits, she said.
"Women comprise only 18
per cent of the total faculty at
UBC, and they are distributed
through the academic ranks in
a different way than men.
Women are bunched at the
assistant professor level, with
fewer women as you go higher
in the ranks."
Day stressed money is not
the aim of the women's group.
The "statistical game —
playing with salaries" the
report goes through is simply a
way of making their position
apparent.
"Women are bunched in
particular jobs and their work
is paid less than the work men
do," Day said.
In the UBC library only men
can shelve books. They are
paid $130 a month more than
the women who type cards,
catalogue them and check out
books, she said.
"It seems the idea that they
have to lift heavy books
means they should be paid
more. Muscle should be paid
more."
At UBC women earn under
$45 a month, Day said. This
compares with 49 men earning
under $450 a month. There are
149 women earnings under $300
a month.
"This is slim pickings even
for a single woman with no
dependents," Day said.
Day also discussed the status
of women students at UBC.
"There are almost no women
in economics, and few in
philosophy and political
sciences," she said. "Women
seem to be in psychology,
languages and English."
The report discovered
"nothing of the financial status
of students".
"As far as we could tell
there's no central place where
student financial information
is kept."
The situation on finances are
kept on the basis of the
financial year rather than on
the academic year so "it's
hard to figure out the
relationships between the
number of students getting
scholarships and the number of
students," Day said.
Loans go through the federal
government and many
scholarship monies come from
outside the university so the
university doesn't keep very
good track of the, she said.
The Royal Commission on
the Status of Women noted
fewer women than men take
out loans.
The Royal Commission also
reported although the same
number of women as men
receive scholarships, the
amount of money given to men
is usually higher.
These facts apply on a
Canada wide basis. "Women
really disappear from
graduate studies," Day said.
"The age — years set aside for
graduate work are the same
age — years as women have
children. We don't have a
system that makes it possible
for women to do both at once.
"If we had a system that
gave respect to part time work
we'd find the proportion of
women in grad studies turned
around substantially."
Right now part time students
can't have financial aid, access
to housing or access to
scholarships and bursaries,
Day said.
One of the graduation
requirements is you have spent
one or two years as a full time
student, she said.
"The proportion of women
getting final degrees was
higher in the twenties and
thirties than it is now."
A women present at the
meeting said in elementary
and high school education in
B.C. administrative positions
are not given to women.
"The principal is paid $6,000
a year over and above his
ordinary salary, and he is often
less qualified than women
teachers who get more and
more education in an effort to
get higher salaries," the
woman said.
B.C. Teachers Federation
has approved an ombudswoman at $25,000 a year, to
deal with all issues affecting
women in education, Day
replied.
"We're simply at the point of
knowing what all the questions
are we'd like to ask," she said.
"Now we have to start asking
them."
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WARNING: The Department of National Health and Welfare advises that danger to health
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INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
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TRAVEL TANK,
FRI.  16
An Informal Information
Exchange on How to Travel
Cheaply in North America and
Abroad.
8 p.m. - 12 Refreshments
OVERSEAS STUDENTS
Sign Up for MidTerm Break Trip to Powell River by Friday, Feb.
16, 1973. Bus leaves I.H. Thursday, Feb. 22 at 1 p.m. Coming
during  Open   House   -   I.H.   INTERNATIONAL   FAIR  AND.
DANCE.
A
PROBATION
OFFICER
has a tough challenging but rewarding career. He works
with the courts, with the offender, and with the
community to help solve one of society's major sociai
problems - crime.
B.C. CORRECTIONS SERVICE
see your Student Placement Office
on campus for more details
SUB FILMSOC PRESENTS
"Canadian
cinema has
come of
age"
—Village
Voice
film by CLAUDE JUTRA
with
JACQUES GAGNON • JEAN DUCEPPE
OLIVETTE THIBAULT
"Eloquent! One of the finest films
released in the world in 1971!"
—Toronto Star
Note
one show
only on
Fri. 9:30
Feb. 15-18
Thurs. 7:00
Fri. 9:30
Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
Sun. 7:00
SUB
AUD
50c Tuesday, February 13,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Group protests Gabriola ferry site
By VAUGHN PALMER
A UBC group is being
organized to protest the
provincial government's plan
to transfer the Nanaimo ferry
terminal to Stevenson Point on
Gabriola Island and the bridge-
freeway complex the move
would necessitate.
The group is being organized
by political science professor
Paul Smoker and students of
his peace research course, poli
sci 311. Smoker is also
organizing a peace research
commune on Saltspring Island
this summer.
"We feel the bridge and
freeway would destroy the
sanctity   and   uniqueness   of
Gabriola and threaten the rest
of the Gulf Islands as well,"
third-year arts student Dick
Bell, one of the organizers, said
Monday.
"It's really a question of
what type of progress you
want," Bell said. "This is just a
plan to ensure more cars will
be able to move from A to B
quicker."
Bell said the protest group
will propose alternate solutions
such as night ferries,
reservations and reduction in
fares in off-hours, as well as
organizing Gabriola Island
residents to protest the plan.
During       September's
BORED OF GOVERNORS? "We are," mumble tiny tots waiting in
the old administration building foyer while student reps present their
—kini mcdonald photo
case against the proposed residence rent raise and board secrecy.
provincial election campaign
Nanaimo New Democratic
Party MLA David Stupich
promised the bridge would not
be built without the consent of
Gabriola residents.
In January provincial
highways minister Robert
Strachan announced the
Gabriola ferry terminal would
be built and the Horseshoe Bay
terminal would be moved to
Richmond's Iona Island, thus
cutting the crossing time to an
hour and a half as well as
reducing the traffic load on the
upper levels highway.
Bell said the plan is linked to
the proposed Howe Sound coal
port.
"They seem to be saying, the
ferry terminal must be moved
from Horseshoe Bay to make
room for the coal ships when
actually they should be saying
the coal port can't be built in
Howe Sound because of the
ferry terminal."
Bell noted the Gabriola and
Iona terminal sites are being
planned by Swan-Wooster Co.,
the same firm which planned
the abortive third crossing
tunnel of Burrard Inlet.
Bell said there is little
evidence NDP thinking on the
Gabriola site is any different
from Socred thinking on the
third crossing.
"In the case of the third
crossing some of the public
was made to see progress at all
costs is not the answer, and I
guess that's what we're trying
to do again."
Bell said residents of
Gabriola are already incensed
by the plan and there is
evidence the local Nanaimo
NDP council is opposed as
well. He said there is a good
chance residents of other Gulf
Islands could become involved
in the protest.
UBC students interested in
the protest should attend an
organizational meeting, noon
Wednesday, in the Wesbrook
building, room 5.
Student politicos prepare for round two
The Democratic Students'
Caucus, the Students' Coalition
and an independent slate will
contest the four positions in the
second slate Alma Mater
Society election Feb. 21.
Positions open are vice-
president, external affairs,
treasurer and ombudsperson.
DSC candidates are: Dawn
Hasset, arts 2, vice-president;
science senator Svend
Robinson, treasurer; Gerald
de Montigny, arts 2, external
affairs and Charlene Moriarty,
science 2, ombudsperson.
SC candidates are: Gordon
Blankstein, agriculture 5, vice-
president; John Wilson,
commerce 3, treasurer and
Bonnie Long, hottie economics
3, external affairs. The SC has
no candidate for ombudsperson.
The Young Socialists have
not yet decided which positions
to contest but Coreen Douglas,
arts 2; Stuart Russell, arts 1,
and Marilyn Smith, arts 1 will
be their candidates. They
cannot be treasurer candidates
because    an    AMS    bylaw
Exposure
By ART SMOLENSKY
In keeping with its tradition Simon
Fraser University is about to announce
the appointment of yet another
American to an administrative position.
In this case it is New York State
University professor Lawrence Resnick
to head SFU's philosophy department.
One of the unfortunate circumstances
surrounding the whole affair is that Ian
Hacking, a competent Canadian
presently at Cambridge, was never told
of the vacancy, even though he had
applied and was being seriously
considered for an associate
professorship position also open in the
department.
The hiring committee of eight
contained only one Canadian (and
possibly another naturalized Canadian).
This is an exceptional ratio even at SFU
where the faculty, according to vice-
president Brian Wilson, is approximately 37 per cent American, 33 per cent
Canadian   and    30    per    cent    other
citizenship — or two non-Canadians for
every Canadian.
Still, this sort of thing is to be expected
in an administration extraordinarily top-
heavy with Americans; SFU being
distinguished as the only Canadian
university with an American president.
As it stands now, Ian Hacking won't be
at SFU in any position. On Friday, after
learning of Reshick's appointment, he
telephoned the department withdrawing
his application for the associate
professorship.
Chalk up one for the eagles.
Also of concern to a number of SFU
students is the possibility an American
will be appointed dean of arts.
John Maffett, president of the SFU
student society and a member of the
dean of arts selection committee said
Sunday only about 25 per cent of the
applications received so far have been
from Canadians.
* * *
Melvin Lee has resigned as head of the
UBC school of home economics but will
stay on as full professor in the
department.
Lee was criticized in a previous
Exposure column for failing to follow
senate regulations governing the
advertising of positions in Canada before
looking elsewhere. Lee was known to be
interviewing candidates in Portland
without advertising the availability of
vacancies within the department.
Apparently this indiscretion
contributed significantly to his
resignation and has been a sore point for
two months among both home
economics faculty and students.
The dean's selection committee for a
new head will include one person from
the nutrition section and one from the
family life section.
*      *      *
Keeping in line with the spate of
appointments of young department
heads at UBC, Ron Shearer is soon to be
appointed head of the economics
department after a half-year term as
acting head.
establishes the treasurer shall
be a third year or higher
student.
Independent Amarjeet
Rattan, arts 3, is candidate for
ombudsperson.
The DSC and SC retain their
•platform splits of politics
versus services as in the first
slate elections, although
Blankstein said the SC is not a
completely service-oriented
slate.
He said the SC will provide
services and a different type of
politicking than the DSC.
Blankstein said the SC slate in
the second election could work
with the four DSC executives
elected Feb. 7.
The DSC will run on the
platform of student voting
representation at all levels of
the university, equal rights for
women at UBC and opposition
to the proposed residence fee
increases.
The independent candidates
from the Young Socialists want
parity at all university levels, a
general democratization of the
university and immediate
implementation of
recommendations in the
women's action group report
on the status of women at UBC.
Candidates' statements will
appear in Thursday's edition of
The Ubyssey. Page  4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 13, 1973
& ** *«*
Chalk
Chalk up another small victory for student activism.
You'll recall a proposed 9.75 per cent rent increase to
begin Sept. 1 was announced last week for the campus
barracks. The proposed increase would effectively screw
residence students living on marginal or non-existent
incomes.
Well, the screwees decided to do something about it.
And they did it very nicely.
There was none of the usual "please sir may I kiss
your ass we really have a problem if you'd present this
brief for us at your meeting next month we'd really be
grateful you want me to kiss your ass again yes sir" type of
jive.
The students, about 100 of them, decided to march
over to a meeting of the usually secretive board of
governors and demand their delegates be heard.
They did. And they were. Just like that.
This does nothing to lessen our suspicion that there is
a direct correlation between the amount of attention paid
to student demands and the number of students directly
involved in fighting for those demands. But this is beside
the immediate point.
After hearing the delegates, the board decided to send
the proposed rent increase back to the housing administration for further study.
So what happens now?
For the housing administration there are three basic
alternatives.
They can decide not to increase the rent. Not likely
but nice if it happens.
Or they can decide to let the proposed increase
remain at the present level. Also not very likely because of
the present uproar.
What will probably happen is that the rent will be
increased by a hefty amount but by less than the present
proposal of 9.75 per cent.
For students there are two simple alternatives if the
rent is increased. They can decide to pay the rent increase.
Or they can decide not to.
Either way they have a tough choice.
Any announcement of a rent increase will now likely
be made either when students are busy with exams or are
away for the summer.
Those students that can afford to will arrive back on
campus disorganized and unable to fight the increase.
Unless students begin to organize now.
The Alma Mater Society should make sure students
are organized this spring, stay organized this summer and
are brought back in September organized and ready to put
up a fight.
When organized, students can begin to fight back
with rent strikes or whatever else is necessary. The same
type of collective action that forced the board of
governors to listen to the delegates can be used against the
housing administration.
But the immediate task is to get organized.
As someone once said: "What we need here is a
union."
Letters
Gears
This is an open letter to the
two "disgusted gears."
I feel really sorry for the two
of you for what you are suffering
because of the lack of
consideration of other gears.
However, you two do not deserve
any sympathy. How can we
sympathize with two gutless
"disgusted gears" who dare not
even sign their names; who dare
not even stand up for what they
believe? How can we trust you
two in future, when you will be
making decisions that will affect
masses of people when you do not
even have the backbone to back
up what you believe?
If you believe there are a lot of
"nice" engineering students on
campus why don't you get off
your butt and organize these
people together and run for some
executive positions in the
engineering undergraduate
society. This is the least a
"democratic system" can offer
you. It offers you a chance to
change the system within the
system. I believe the executive
positions in the EUS are open to
every   engineering   student   who
wants to have a try at it.
Lastly, in case you may not
know, the election for EUS
executive positions is coming up
soon. If you two decide to run for
some positions, you may have my
support.
Bin-Siew Lim
applied science 3
Canlit
Fiji
The student committee for
Fiji hurricane relief wishes to
commend the student body of
UBC for its generous support in
our money raising and clothing
drive. We are also grateful for the
large turnout of students at our
benefit drive at International
House. With the closing of our
drive we are happy to announce
that a sum of approximately $600
and a large quantity of clothing
will be sent to Fiji.
We are also grateful for the
close co-operation which we received from the Alma Mater Society and The Ubyssey.
Kamal Prasad,
Bill McMichael,
Amarjeet Rattan
THS V8YSSSY
FEBRUARY 13, 1973
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Jan O'Brien, John Andersen
Today's man in the street question is: Why doesn't the AMS executive
have its own backgammon team? "To get to the other side," said Lesley
Krueger. "Wow," said Kent Spencer. "No, but if you'd seen my date you
would have," replied Gary Coull. "Puce," said Ryon Guedes. "Zeowette
Stumpwallow," suggested Vaughn Palmer. The rest of those responding
failed to answer so, Jan O'Brien, John Andersen, Sondra Marshall Smith,
Kini McDonald, Art Smolensky, Mark Hamilton, and Mike Sasges, you'd
better show up at the big party on the office door, Saturday. The rest of you
are invited too.
The sardonic Richard Cavell
has aired his beefs about "Canlit"
(Page Friday, Feb. 9) and, having
purged himself of so much venom,
must feel immensely better. He
should be thanked for the service
he has done. Readers of his article
cannot but come away positively
convinced of the need for a broad
"perspective" when discussing
Canadian literature. It is precisely
Mr. Cavell's lack of perspective
which makes his article such a
sham. It would seem that the very
labels, which he sees as
obstructive to "understanding",
have caused him to survey the
Canadian literature scene with
blinkers more narrowly focused
than any McLuhan or Frye (so
condescendingly referred to as
"Northy") have worn. Surely the
recognition of labels as such is
step one in understanding any
literary tradition: English,
American literature, romantic,
existential, etc. Labels once
recognized and temporarily
discarded hardly interfere with
the understanding of art. In fact,
the reverse is true. The poet's
labels (i.e. metaphors) pack far
more weight than any ten lines of
expository prose on the same
subject, and labels of traditions or
genres can do as much in the
context of criticism.
To suggest that criticism stunts
understanding "by trying to
explain literature" is simply
illogical. Surely attempts at
understanding and attempts at
explanation are processes aimed at
the same goal, from opposite
standpoints. There is no more
positive motivator than
understanding and to condemn
those who attempt it is to ask for
return to a level of ignorance
Canadian students and critics have
hopefully left behind.
But the "best" of Mr. Cavell's
article is his remarks about
particular Canadian works. Such
critical   acumen!   Such   objective Tuesday, February 13,  1973
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
evaluation! Such claptrap! So
David is an "epic (an epic!) about
how a pimple-faced queer pushes
his partner off a mountain and
then makes it with a slug." This
cute remark is about as close to
the truth and as close to wishful
thinking as the Chicago Tribune
headline of a Dewey victory. As
for 'Roughing It in the Bush
sounding like a Prince George
version of Last Tango in Paris, one
can only admire the liveliness of
Mr. Cavell's imagination. So the
publishers invented the novel, did
they? Such irony. So Canadian
literature is a product of
unemployment, PMLA, and the
financial difficulties of Canadian
publishers, is it? I wonder if
anyone mentioned this to Thomas
Haliburton or Ned Pratt?
"Canadian literature" achieved a
"virgin birth" at the beginning of
the 1960's, did it? Sounds like
saying the incarnation of English
literature occurred with Samuel
Johnson.
No, Mr. Cavell, whatever is
valuable in "Canlit" will come to
the fore despite your
disparagement. Reportorial
half-truth and insidious humour
will convince no one otherwise.
Rodney Fussell
grad studies
English
Vietnam 1
I am writing to call to the
attention of Ubyssey readers the
tag day for medical aid to Vietnam which will be held in Vancouver on Friday, Feb. 23, from
11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
The tag day has been organized
by Canadian Aid to Vietnam Civilians, which since 1966 has sent
over $250,000 worth of medical
supplies and cash for civilian relief
in all parts of Vietnam. It has the
official authorization of Vancouver city council and honorary
sponsors include the entire caucus
of the New Democratic Party in
the legislative assembly and Liberal MLA Dave Brousson.* Proceeds from the tag day will be
forwarded to the international
committee of the Red Cross in
Geneva, to be distributed for medical aid throughout Vietnam.
A similar tag day in 1967
raised over $8,000. Today, the
need for medical relief is even
more urgent. The recent
Christmas bombing of North Vietnam's population centres destroyed many important civilian
facilities, including the leading
teaching hospital, Bach Mai. Anyone who remains unconvinced of
the extent and savagery of this
destruction might do well to consult the editorial, "A Hospital the
Letters
Enemy Calls Bach Mai", in the
New England Journal of Medicine
of January 25, 1973 (NEJM 288
(4): 213, 1973). In South Vietnam, as in the north, literally
millions of people have been killed, wounded, or made refugees
by the war. The extent of ecological damage in the south is documented, amongst other places, in
a May 1972 article in the Scientific American (Sci. Amer. 226
(5): 20, 1972).
Despite its protests against the
worst excesses of the Americans
in Vietnam, Canada shares some
responsibility for the slaughter.
Under the Defence Production
Sharing Agreement of 1959, Canada has supplied the United States
with upwards of $300 million
worth of military equipment
annually. This has included everything from electronic weapon
system components to high explosives for bombs and shells. Once
these supplies cross the border,
Canada has no control over their
use, and there is no question that
significant amounts of Canadian
material have been used in the
Indochina war. Canadians surely
have some responsibility to help
repair the damage to which they
have contributed.
The 1973 tag day needs a
large number of volunteers to
meet its goal. To volunteer your
help, or for further information,
please call one of the following
numbers: 876-0041, 224-3842,
738-3036,224-0203.
If you will be out of town
during the midterm break, or
otherwise unable to participate in
the Feb. 23 tag day, please send
your contribution for medical relief in Vietnam directly to: Canadian Aid to Vietnam Civilians,
P.O. Box 2543, Vancouver 3, B.C.
Thomas L. Perry Jr.
science 4
Vietnam. 2
The Canadian government has
sent members of the Canadian
armed forces to Vietnam. Their
role, we are told, is that of "neutral supervisors" — to assist in
ending this long and bloody conflict. They are part of an international force charged with overseeing the implementation of the
ceasefire agreement that was signed
in Paris.
Russian
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What role are they really playing? Are Canadian troops in any
way advancing the struggle of the
Vietnamese for self-determination?
No! Canada's record in Vietnam speaks convincingly against
that.
Throughout the war Canada
has acted as an apologist, a partner in crime with the United
States in Vietnam. That is the role
Canada plays in the International
Control Commission.
Canadian representatives on
the ICC have consistently blocked
any action that could benefit the
Vietnamese or expose US agression. They have justified US acts of
genocide. They have acted as spies
and messengers of the US military. They have never opposed US
interests.
The people of Vietnam have
not fought with unparalleled courage against the Japanese, then the
French and now the Americans so
that their country is finally supervised by American representatives
in Canadian uniforms. The demand of the Vietnamese people
has always been for independence,
for self-determination - for an
end, once and for all to foreign
intervention.
Nixon is once again telling us
to trust in him, that peace is here.
He has and is still supplying the
corrupt Thieu regime with arms,
so that it now has the third largest
air force in the world, replacing US
technicians and military experts in
army uniforms to ones in civilian
uniforms. Following the October
breakdown in negotiations he
launched the most massive air
assault in history against the civilian centres of North Vietnam.
Peace in Vietnam will be guaranteed only when the US has
renounced any right to intervene
in the affairs of Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos; when all US
troops and war material has been
removed from south-east Asia,
when all foreign interference is
ended, when the people of Indochina have finally won the right to
self-determination.
All of us who oppose the war
and recognize the right of the
Indochinese people to govern
their own affairs must demand
that the Canadian government end
its continuing complicity in the
war, that Canadian troops be
withdrawn from Vietnam, that all
American forces and war materials
be withdrawn, that they are not
replaced by other foreign troops
so that the Vietnamese and the
other people of Indochina finally
will be able to decide their own
fate without outside interference.
Stuart Russell,
UBC student mobilization
committee
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ATTENTION
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STUDENTS
NOMINATIONS
for the
Executive
open:
following    AMS
positions are  now
Treasurer
External Affairs
Vice-President
Ombudsperson
Deadline for the Nominations is 12:30 Thursday,
February 15, 1973.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 13, 1973
Why are you at UBC? A
"Liberal education seems to me to be
indispensably necessary; and the completion
of it by the establishment of a university in
the Capital of the country . . . would be most
useful to inculcate just principles, habits and
manners among the rising generation."
Upper Canada Governor
John Simcoe Graves
By WYNTON SEMPLE
From The Varsity
Liberal education has always  been  viewed
within the context of how it could best serve the
prevailing economy. Three distinct ruling class
attitudes towards education have existed; each
corresponding with and varying with structural
changes in the economy.
Simcoe's quote expresses the traditional elitist
view of education which corresponded with an
agrarian/mercantile economy. This economy
supported a ruling class made up of two strata,
each of which made its money in similar ways. In
agriculture, they made the peasants give them a
share of their produce in return for the privilege of
tilling the land. In trade, they made it by buying
things in one part of the world at a low price and
then selling them at a high price in other parts of
the world. In Canada, this was the age of the fish
and fur-trades, and extended into the wheat and
timber eras around the middle of the 19th century.
The traditional ruling class view of education
focused almost exclusively on its moral value. The
line between education and religion was
imperceptible. In this context, education
performed minor cultural services for the ruling
class by drumming the virtues of hard work and
thrift into the children of working people, and
developing in the sons and daughters of the
bourgeoisie the appropriate mannerisms and
affectations of "culture" to distinguish them from
their inferiors and to enable them to occupy their
leisure time.
The second distinct set of ruling class attitudes
towards education was associated with the onset of
industrialism. Industrialism ushered in capitalism
(or perhaps vice versa). In this situation, the
ruling class made its money in a very different
way.
Instead of simply appropriating the wealth
other people had created, the capitalists set about
to produce their own. They assembled all the
elements of production and set them in motion.
They then took the commodity to market to
exchange it for what it was worth. There was just
one catch — they had to buy the various factors of
production (labor, raw materials, equipment, et
cetera) on the market. If they paid what each of
these factors of production was worth, there would
be little left over after having sold the total
combination of factors for what it was worth. In
fact, if this happened, the capitalist would secure
for himself only the value of the labor he himself
actually expended in producing the commodity.
However, as it turned out, the capitalists did not
have to pay the full value for all the factors of
production. They were able to pay labor much less
than the value of what it produced. This
circumstance arises partly from the motivations
with which each party — capital and labor —
approaches the market. Their motivations are
fundamentally different.
The capitalist wishes to buy labor power to put it
to use in combination with physical capital with
the ultimate aim of making a profit. The worker,
on the other hand, wishes to sell his labor power in
order that he may live. He is compelled to sell his
labor power to the capitalist, whereas the
capitalist is not compelled to buy it. It is a
perpetual buyer's market. Consequently, the
capitalist will not pay a worker the full value of his
labor.
With capitalism, the composition of the ruling
class changed from the landowners and
shipowners of before to the owners of
manufacturing enterprises and finance capital.
This ascendancy of the industrial bourgeoisie was
not achieved without some difficulty. In 1837 Upper
Canada, a war almost broke out when the conflict
between the landed "family compact" and the
SKELETONS ... Canada's intellectuals
rising industrial bourgeoisie took the form of a
dispute over "responsible" government. Over
the next few years, the question as to which section
of the ruling class the government would be
responsible was settled in favor of the industrial
bourgeoisie.
Their interests were soon asserted in the field of
education. Ontario's first chief superintendent of
schools, Egerton Ryerson, spoke on behalf of the
new elements of the ruling class and their interest
in education, writing in a report that became the
basis     for     the      Schools      Act      of      1846:
"The knowledge required for the scientific
pursuit of mechanics,  agriculture  and
commerce must needs be provided to an
extent corresponding with the demand and
exigencies of the country; while to a mere
limited   extent   are   needed   facilities   for
acquiring the higher education of the learned
professions."
It was apparent to Ryerson that the newly
"responsible" state had definite responsibilities in
the realm of education:
"The very end of our being is practical. . .
The age in which we live is likewise
eminently practical; and the conditions and
interests, the pursuits and duties of our new
country, under our new government, are
invested with an almost exclusively practical
character. Scarcely an individual among us
is exempt from the necessity of 'living by the
sweat of his face'. Every man should,
therefore, be educated to practice."
In recognition of Egerton's forsight they later
named a school after him. It is fitting that this
school, Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, was one of
the first schools in Canada to unabashedly produce
graduates on a demand schedule set by industry.
Around the turn of the century, industrial
capitalism underwent a major shift from its
competitive to its monopoly phase. The ruling
class became more compact as ownership of the
means of production became concentrated in
fewer and fewer hands. The mode of production
changed with the increased importance of
technology and the unit of production become
larger and more vertically integrated. It is
important to examine the reasons for this shift in
some detail since the Canadian economy is
currently under the tutelage of American
monopoly capitalism. There were two major
factors which led to the monopolization of
capitalism:
The tendency for the rate of profit to fall was
occasioned by:
(Da decrease in prices due to manufacturers'
competition for markets;
(2) an increase in the cost of the capital
equipment required to incorporate technological
change into the productive process;
(3) increasing cost of labor due to a shortage of
skilled manpower;
(4) the increasing costs of the anarchy of
production, the typical business cycle in which
each manufacturer produced as much as possible
leading to piles of unsold goods and factories and
workers sitting idle in a non-profit-making state;
and
(5) the relative saturation of domestic markets,
and other factors.
This was becoming increasingly common
around the turn of the century. The problems
associated with maintaining the rate of profit led
to wages being cut and people thrown out of work,
increasing numbers of workers engaged in
militant strikes which had an explicit anti-
capitalist orientation.
If capitalism was to remain intact, the ruling
class would have to develop a more acute class
consciousness — it would have to actively
maintain and expand capitalism — which is
exactly what happened.
All in all, it amounted to the ruling class
becoming much more sophisticated, learning to
put a velvet glove over its mailed fist, and
developing allies outside of the ruling class itself.
The first group to be co-opted and put to work on
behalf of the ruling class, helping them solve their
problem with People Getting Ticked Off with
Capitalism, were the liberals — the people who,
although they had a sincere interest in changing
society for the better, could not bring themselves
to break openly with the ruling class inasmuch as
they had some interests in common with the ruling
class. Since they were motivated by a social
conscience pricked by other people's misery, not
their own, the liberals did not feel the necessity of
challenging the system, but rather were content to
try and reform bits and pieces of it.
American historian Christopher Lasch
describes the various ways in which the liberals'
energies were harnessed to help save capitalism;
"Everyone who has studied the history of
American reform  agrees  that the reform
tradition underwent a fundamental change
ATTENTION
ARTS STUDENTS
ARTS UNDERGRAD NOMINATIONS for the
following Executive & Council positions are open as of
February 14, 1973.
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
SECRETARY-TREASURER
AND 4 ARTS REPRESENTATIVES
Deadline for nominations is Wednesday, February 21 at
12:30 p.m. For nomination loans please go the the AUS
office, Buchanan 107.
Chairman
MBA Program
School of Business
QUEEN'S UNIVERSITY
Kingston, Ontario
(613) 547 2923
Please send me further information
on Queen's MBA Program.
Befbrq... During
(bfT i
City:
i    ' I
How many undergrad
disciplines feed
into the program?
How can I finance
my studies?
What exactly does
the course entail?
How much individual
attention will I get?
What are the career
paths and potentials?
How does Queen's help?
University:
Faculty:
Graduating Year:. Tuesday, February  13,  1973
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 7
Marxist gives his analysis.
around 1900. Some people identify the change
with a changing attitude towards
government, a new readiness to use
government (particularly the federal
government) as an instrument of popular
control. Others associate it with an
abandonment of the old populistic distrust of
large scale institutions, like corporations,
and an acceptance of the concentration of
wealth and power. Still others define the
change as a movement away from the dogma
of natural rights towards a relativistic,
environmentalist, and pragmatic view of the
world."
This was then the ruling class began to hire
;ople to "rationalize" consumption. The need to
imulate and direct people's needs into profitable
lannels gave birth to the advertising industry.
The ruling class also discovered that its ever
ithful handmaiden, the state, could help it out
ith its new problems. In the past, the role of the
ate had been restricted to fighting wars on behalf
their foreign interests and doing small domestic
vors as donating land an money with which to
lild railroads. (In Canada, the government
mtributed around $50,000 per mile of track laid.)
was now even more helpful to have the state as
i agent since it meant that the ruling class had at
3 disposal the state's troops and law courts to
•eak strikes, its legislatures to pass anti-labor
ws and, perhaps most importantly of all, its
:hools.
Education became even more important than it
id been before since it now shouldered the major
irden of producing a surplus of skilled workers,
tie public school systems were expanded and
/eryone was expected to go to school. The liberals
liled the government's recognition of everyone's
alienable right to develop to the utmost his
iculiar ability to be of service to capital.
The schools were called upon not only  to
produce more human capital in nearly finished
form, but also to develop more effective ways of
exploiting it. Ceciley Watson, one of Ontario's chief
manpower  planning  experts   and  head  of  the
"educational planning" division of the Ontario
Institute for Studies in Education, points out in the
introduction to her manpower planning study that:
"A great contribution to labor efficiency was
made in the U.S. around the turn of the
century by F.W. Taylor, who realized, by
means of his "time and motion" studies, that
a 'functional organization' of work would
greatly improve the output of a worker by
making   him   highly   'skilled'   in   just   a
fractional part of the entire work performed.
This led to the use of the production line. He
also introduced the 'Principles of Scientific
Managment'   enlisting   science   for   the
progress of the economy. This study acted as
a mighty spur to labor efficiency, increasing
productivity considerably through enhanced
output at an unchanged level of labor input."
Through  his  theories  and  practice,   famous
educator John Dewey provided the foundations of
North American education for the next 40 years.
He also provided the ruling class with a good deal
of the material for its velvet golve. His book,
Democracy and Education, notes:
"Men have long had some intimation of the
extent to which education may be consciously
used to eliminate obvious evils through
starting the young on paths which shall not
produce these ills, and some idea of the
extent to which education may be made an
instrument of realizing the better hope of
men. But we are doubtless far from realizing
the potential efficacy of education as a
constructive agency of improving society."
Dewey's  sincere  but  naive  liberalism  was
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY ... questioning university's right to serve the ruling class.
easily turned to the service of monopoly
capitalism. Dewey was part of a general current in
the academic stream responding to the new needs
of monopoly capitalism.
Lasch gives some idea of the pervasiveness of
the phenomenon:
"The new psychology, the child study
movement, the new education, the idea of
scientific management, the philosophy of
pragmatism, the science of evolution, all
confirmed the experience of a century of
inimpeded material and social progress, that
the turmoil and conflict which had so long
troubled the course of history could at last be
eliminated by means of a scientific system of
control. The old techniques of social
discipline, the old agencies of
institutionalized violence, would soon be
obsolete. The mark of progressive societies
was precisely their ability to govern
themselves without resort to force . . . For
the new radicals, conflict itself, rather than
injustice or inequality, was the evil to be
eradicated."
During the first half of this century, monopoly
capitalism developed a steadily increasing
dependence on education. For the U.S., the total
annual outlay for human capital (in terms of
primary, secondary and tertiary education
education expenditures) rose from nine per cent of
the annual investment in physical capital in 1900 to
34 per cent in 1956. However, in the late 50s,
education rather abruptly became more important
to the ruling class. The exact reasons for the
upsurge in interest are not clear; however, at least
the following seem to have been involved:
(1) imperialism became less lucrative, making
it necessary to increase the rate of exploitation at
home by increasing the value-producing capacity
of labor via training;
(2) in connection with this situation, capital
was about to enter new technologically-oriented
fields and a pool of surplus labor would be needed
in order to keep labor costs down;
(3) the ruling class ideologues realized that
higher education offered a unique if temporary
solution to the problem of what to do with all the
post-war babies who, if unemployed and left to
their own devices, might develop into that old
nightmare— People Getting Ticked Off with
Capitalism.
Higher education would not only take up their
time, it would also give them the illusion of upward
mobility along with all the conservativizing
tendencies this induces.
Since the late 50s, there has emerged among
economists, educators, students and others a
widespread conscious adoption of the human
capital approach to education, euphemistically
known as "manpower planning." Much of the
impetus for manpower planning came with the
1958 passage of the U.S. National Defense
Education Act. The act greatly increased the
funding for certain subject areas which were vital
to the national "defence" effort — sciences,
mathematics, education and foreign languages.
This was a step towards manpower planning in the
sense that a conscious attempt was made to plan
the supply of skilled personnel for the defence
industry which is a major sector of the American
economy.
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All students who expect to graduate this Spring are
requested to submit "Application for Graduation" cards
(two) to the Registrar's Office (Mrs. Kent) immediately.
This includes students who are registered in a year not
normally considered to be a graduating year (e.g.
Combined B.Sc./M.D. or B.Com./LL.B.) but who are
expecting to complete a degree programme this Spring.
PLEASE NOTE: It is the responsibility of the student to
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graduation to be presented to the Faculty and to the Senate
for approval is compiled from these application cards.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 13,  1973
Programs 'intensify' growth
From page 7
Concurrently, at the international level, the:
committee for scientific and technical
personnel was established as a branch of the
Organization for European Economic Cooperation. Its task was to "develop policies,
aimed at increasing investment in education so
as to supply the qualified manpower necessary
for the implementation of a policy of economic
growth". One of the committee's first acts was
to set up "the study group on the economics of
education" which, in the words of its chairman,
Dr. Henning Friis, was "to promote and
exchange research and statistical data on the
broad subject of the economics of education,
that is the relationship between education and
economic growth, the educational needs of the
1960s and the fomulation of policies for
increasing the supply of scientific, technical,
and other qualified manpower." In Washington, D.C. in October, 1961, 13 months
after the "study group" was established,
manpower planning took a giant stride forward
with the holding of the policy conference on
economic growth and investment in education.
This conference was of international scope and
importance. Friis described it in the following
words: "This conference was a major step in
the development of policies for relating
education to economic requirements. It
discussed targets for educational investment
during the decade 1961-1970 and reached
general agreement on the necessity for long
term planning of educational investment in the
OECD member countries."
Interest and activity in the field of manpower
planning increased generally at the
international level in the early 60s.
Organizations such as the International Labor
Office, the International Association for
Educational and Vocational Information, and
UNESCO, held conferences, circulated
literature, and collected information.
In Canada, the Technical and Vocational
Training Assistance Act was passed in 1960. By
196(5-67, there were 185,000 students in Ontario
alone vwho were in schools and courses
approved under the federal-provincial
agreements concluded under the TVTA. The
increases in federal government expenditures
lor technical and vocational training were
dramatic — 35 million the first year.
In 1964, schedule 10 of the TVTA came into
effect, providing for research on a cost-shared
basis with the provinces. Manpower's research
program gave birth to its first offspring in 1968
when Canada's manpower requirements in 1970
was published.
The educational planning of the Ontario >
Institute for Studies in Education completed
Part 1 of the two-part study which projects
the future manpower needs and resources of
Ontario to 1986. The Economic Council of
Canada carried out a number of research
projects for its seventh annual Review. One of
the key studies attempts to measure the
relationship of operating expenditure, capital
expenditures, and total cost per student, to
student output.
Education's manpower   planning aspects
have many ramifications for the interests of the
ruling class. In the introduction toHigher
Education and The Demand for Scientific
Manpower in the United States, a 1963 OECD
study, the authors explain the study was done
because "there is much worry in high places
that shortages will be present in 1970 unless
immediate and drastic measures are taken to
increase the supply — shortages which will
impair the economic and scientific efficiency of
the United States and endanger her political
and military role in the world."
There are overtly political problems too.
Wilkinson,   in  his   study   for   the  Canadian
department of labor, partially financed by the
Imperial Oil Co. Ltd., points out:
"Another difficulty is that — even if the
projections are roughly correct insofar as
the desire of students or of parents for their
children are concerned, there is still no
assurance that the type of students trained
will be what the economy actually requires
for   production   purposes.   Considerable
misdirection  of   effort,   not   to   mention
thwarted  aspirations,   may   arise.   In
backward countries, as Van Den Haag and
others    have   pointed   out,    a    pool    of
unemployed intellectuals may provide the
spark for  revolution.
However, most of the explicit concern is
with producing a surplus of people with the
requisite  skills   for   participation   in   "our"
economy. The people who do these studies are
not monsters, they are not witting servants of
the ruling class — they seek only to understand
things the way they are.
The study done by Meltz and Penz on
Canada's manpower needs from '61 to 70
illustrates the class bias referred to above. Two
of the assumptions they use in doing their study
are:
(1) "the industry and occupational
structures of employment in the past have been
determined primarily by the structure of
output and by the prevailing technology, rather
than by labor supply conditions interacting
with demand conditions"
(2) "the structure of output and technology
of labor force is based on the assumption that
the education structure too is labor-demand
determined and independent of labor supply
conditions."
They describe these assumptions as "gross
oversimplifications of reality." The reality
they are simplifying, as may be seen from their
assumptions, is one in which the needs of the
ruling class for trained manpower are the basic
determinants of the structure of the labor force
and the structure of the educational system.
Their assumptions state quite clearly that in
both of these areas the needs, desires and rights
of the people who make up the structures —
students and workers — are inconsequential.
To question the degree of universality to
post-secondary education deemed appropriate
by the state or to assert that the main purpose
of post-secondary education should be the
cultural enrichment of the entire society is to
challenge priorities and fundamentals of the
economic and political orders in which we live.
LOSE 20 POUNDS
IN TWO WEEKS!
Famous  U.S.  Women Ski Team Diet
During the non-snow off season
the U.S. Women's Alpine Ski Team
members go on the "Ski Team" diet
to lose 20 pounds in two weeks.
That's right — 20 pounds in 14 days!
The basis of the diet is chemical food
action and was devised by a famous
Colorado physician especially for the
U.S. Ski Team. Normal energy is
maintained (very important!) while
reducing. You keep "full" — no
starvation — because the diet is designed that way! It's a diet that is
easy to follow whether you work,
travel or stay at home.
This is, honestly, a fantastically
successful diet. If it weren't, the U.S.
Women's Ski Team wouldn't be permitted to use it! Right? So, give
yourself the same break the U.S. Ski
Team gets. Lose weight the scientific,
proven way. Even if you've tried all
the other diets, you owe it to yourself to try the U.S. Women's Ski
Team Diet. That is, if you really do
want to lose 20 pounds in two weeks.
Order today. Tear this out as a
reminder.
Send only $2.00 ($2.25 for Rush
Service) — cash is O.K. — to Information Sources Co., P.O. Box 982,
Dept. ST, Carpinteria, Calif. 93013.
Don't order unless you expect to lose
20 pounds in two weeks! Because
that's what the Ski Team Diet will do!
ALTHOUSE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
The University of Western Ontario
London, Ontario
University graduates are invited to apply for admission to
the 1973-74 academic program leading to the
Diploma in Education
and Ontario teacher certification for elementary or secondary schools. Applicants must have an undergraduate degree
or be eligible for graduation by September, 1973.
The College facilities provide special instructional areas in
keeping with all new developments in secondary and
elementary education.
Althouse Students' Council in co-operation with the
Althouse Faculty have successfully assisted in placing over
85% of Althouse graduates through the operation of a
Placement Service.
Communications regarding admission to Althouse College
of Education should be addressed to:
The Acting Registrar,
Althouse College of Education
1137 Western Road
London, Ontario.   N6G  1G9
Telephone (519) 679-2367
ORPHIC
EGG
(A New Concept)
London Records introduces a new label with the
release of eight exceptional new LPs. Orphic Egg.
It's heavy music . . . it's light music . . . it's big
music . . . it's little music . . . it's spiritual . . . it's
funky and it's for everyone. Orphic Egg will crack
your head! Find out about it!
ROCK • BLUES
JAZZ AND FOLK
All New Good'uns
AVAILABLE NOW AT YOUR RECORD STORE Tuesday, February  13,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
f LAMJN GROOV1SS
WARNER, ELEKTRA,
ATLANTIC
EKS 7S04*—NO SECRETS -
Cwty Simon   '
SO 5W7-FOft THE SOSES -
.   Jo«t Mitchell
so ra44*-ctosi to the
EOGE-Yes
so vm~mu>&t ~ tmt-
too, tofcelr Palmer
eS 2W0-WE MAN DOO ~
feme* Taylor
BS 2655-HOMECOMIN6 ~
v' . America
«S 2&33-ST. DOMINJCS PRE-
VIEW-Von Morrkot,
SD72tt-LEO^mUN4
MS 20» ~ HARVEST - Neit
iS am-SCHOOL? OUT -
Atie* Cooper
»S25fe~AM!!ftlCA -
RS #W~aOCKWORK Oft.
ANSI Soundtrack
RS 64*6~ELECTRIC WAA.
RIOR-T.fex
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Palmar
BS   2S67-KHACR   -   Alice
EKS 74079-DOORS 13
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MANUFACTURERS SUGG.
■      UST$6.»  •
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GROUP "A":
tub; 7-StVfHTK SOJOURN - Moody
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hk s-crr your ya ta-sowi -
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Group A
SW «90*~NATU*AttY -i.i.tdt
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SMAS »0«-HASl*      „
S/MAJ. 2835-MACtCAL MYSTtRY
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Sugg. USt $4,29
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Safe Price
.99
MCA
Group A
«M H9*4-^OLD - fMI Hrnufld
9MW-1ST EI.TOM JOHN
»MM-TAP ROOT MANUSCRIPT -
milOMmtM
M0»*-TlAtttewa!& CONNECTION -
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MVI5-HONKY CHATEAU ~Ht»n John
«> J4-MOOOS - tWt Diamond
DL 79184—MtATY »EATY, »1G &
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Sugg.UstW.49
Sate Price
$3«
Group 9
Manufacturers
Su9S,tist(.29
soun611c%^.   sound-
Sal* Price
.39
RCA
ISP 4916-THE MAN WHO
SOtB THE WORLD - David
Bowie    -
LSP 4813-SPACE ODDITY -
David Bowie
LSP 4423-HUNKY DORY -
David Bowie
LSP 473t~ROCKY MOUN-
TAIN HIGH-John Denver
PCS 1305-AMAItNG GRACE
— The Bond of the Royol
Scots Grey
LSP 4515-NJLSSOH
SCHMIISSON
ABCS 756-YOO DON'T MISS
AROUND WITH flht^^im
Crate
ABCS 7$9~GVE& WHO -t.
AfiCS7H~MMESGAN<5
RIDES AGAIN
A8CS 760-PAS5IN' TH«U -
fawetGan^
tSP47(K!-ZIGGY STARDUST
* THE SPIDERS PROM,
MASS— David Bowie,,'
,W»4g30>-*ffiVlr6UESSWrK}f -
CASX 35*5^yRNJNG LOVE
CASX;^ia#tt'l-SIPARAT£
WAtC^Hw Presley -
tist^»-XS|»«fciH.p^,„
MoiHifactarers '
S«gg.U«$o.29
COLUMBIA
KC 31930-GYPSY COWBOY^
—New Riders of Ae Purple
KC 3T917-RISWG - Mark-
Almond
KC 31780—NEW BLOOD ~-
Biood, Sweat & Tears
KC 31770-BABY, OONT GET I
HOOKED ON ME - Mac j
Davis
KC 31760-BARBRA STREISAND "LIVE" CONCERT
KS 31480—WALTER CARLOS I
CLOCKWORK ORANGE
KC 313B4-MY TIME - Bo, ;
Seoggs
KC 3133»~IT'S A BEAUTif UL j
DAY AT CARNEGIE HALL
KC 31308-CARLOS SANTANA A BUDDY MILES LIVE
K\C 3«7Sfr-PAUl SIMON |
ALBUM
KC 30322-PEARL - ianis io- j
pfin
KC 30130-ABRAXAS - Son-]
tana
Kl 31584-THEY ONLY COME I
OUT AT NIGHT - Edgar
Winter
KE 31555-LaCROIX - Jerry]
LoCroix [
Kf 31331—JEFF BECK GROUP
KC 31067-INNNER MOUNT-
ING FUME - John McLaughlin
KCS 9914-BRIDGE OVER
TROtttLEDWAT**jSt>„
Shnea «> ggHanfcel :  j j'   . -
kc 3i76a*tOA mm %u
-LiiaMiMettt
KC 31750-All THE
DUDES-Matt thie^
Manufaefuiett:
Sum. L}«t $m»
sounol of>   sound
Sale Price
Sole Prke
I
■-:©
Complete Your Stereo System with the
ROBERTS 450A
TAPE DECK
• 3-head tape deck with 1 Micron Play Head
Handsome wood grained cabinets ready for custom
mounts
• 4-track stereo 3% or Th IPS operations
• Automatic stop. Instant pause control. Sound with sound
MANUFACTURER'S
SUGG. UST PRICE $278.95
a & b sound price
Please note: Limited Quantities at this Outstanding Price!
sound
556 Seymour St.    682-6144
OPEN THURS. and FRI. UNTIL 9 P.M. Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Pebruary  13,  1973
Hot flashes
Open house
needs help
UBC Open House '73 need
guides and first-aid help for the
March 2 and 3 open house.
Volunteers should drop by
SUB 230A and speak to Pemme
Muir.
Tribe problems
Morton Fried, Columbia university anthropology professor
speaks on "Noch Einmal! The
Problem of Tribe", 4 p.m.,
Thursday in Angus 110.
This another in the Cecil and
Ida Green visiting professor series.
De€isions
Anatol Rapaport, University of
Toronto psychology professor,
speaks on "What is a rational
decision?", 8 p.m., Wednesday, in
Buch. 106.
The talk is another in the
computer science department's
distinguished lecture series.
Mvsic moods
This week's free music department concert will feature the
music of Corelli, Mozart, Dukas
and Bozza, noon Wednesday in
the music building recital hall.
Musicians will be Ivor James on
the French horn and pianist Gillian Weir.
Other free recitals in the hall
this week include Barbara Legge
and   David Pickell  on  piano and
Vicki Ellis on oboe noon today;
the University Symphony Orchestra performing the music of.
Debussy, Ives and Tchaikovsky,
noon Thursday and 8 p.m., Friday; and Thereas Starchuck on
piano, noon Friday.
Poetry
Vancouver poets Pat Lowther,
Alan Safarik, Patrick Lane, Judith
Copithorne and Richard Snyder
will read selections from their
works, 8 p.m., today in Buch.
104. •
well  awards are no longer conditional upon a student's returning
to school the following year.
Applications are due March 15.
Abortion
The abortion action committee
is holding a tribunal on abortion
and forced sterilization, 7:30
p.m., Thursday in the SUB ballroom.
The tribunal is part of the
activities of women's week.
Vietnam future percv'S fjncf
Bill    Willmott.    anthroDoloav    r^m *#   *   ■■■■«■
Bill Willmott, anthropology
and sociology professor, and Sheldon Simon, visiting political
science professor, will discuss the
future of Vietnam Thursday noon
in International House upper
lounge.
The international study group
at IH is sponsoring the two, both
experts on the culture and politics
of southeast Asia. '
S€holarships
Application forms for B.C.
government scholarships are now
available in administration president Walter Gage's office, Buch.
207.
Scholarships are awarded to
students who rank in the top 17
per cent on final marks. This year
all awards will be $200, unlike
previous years when scholarships
of one-third, one-half and three-
quarters of tuition were given. As
Richard Percy, of Simon Fraser
University's museum of archaeology, will report on archaeological finds at Crescent Beach, 7:30
p.m. today, Kitsilano public library, Macdonald and Broadway.
Artifacts dating back 2,500 to
3,000 years were found in the
area last spring during sewer excavation work.
Woman cosfs
Agricultural economics professor Roslyn Kunin will speak on
"the economic cost of being a
woman" 8 p.m., Thursday, in
room 307 of the Vancouver public library, Burrard at Robson.
Kunin's lecture, the first in a
series of five, deals with occupational segregation, wage differentials and union discrimination.
Tween classes
TODAY
NEWMAN CLUB
Communication    workshop,    noon,
SUB 105B.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist,   noon,   Lutheran   centre.
ECKANKAR
Free  lecture:   Karma  and   reincarnation, 7:30 p.m., SUB 211.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Kay   Stockholder   on   the   ages   of
women   7:30  p.m.,   SUB   ballroom.
POTTERY
Membership     meeting,     bring     $2,
noon, AMS office.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. MacFadeyn, noon, IRC 1.
SLM-NORML
Bi-lateral      caucus      with      SFU,
11:30-2:30 p.m.
SAILING CLUB
Film:     Tall     ships,    noon,    club's
lounge.
WEDNESDAY
RIGHT TO LIFE
Meeting, noon, SUB 215.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Multi-culturalism,  noon,  SUB   207.
ONTOLOGY
Dale  Miranda  on breaking through
to fulfilment, noon, Buch. 216.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS
Eucharist,   noon,   Lutheran   centre.
Facing   our   sexuality,    7:30   p.m.,
Lutheran centre.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 105B.
PHYS ED UNDERGRADS
Workshop   in   bioenergetics,   noon,
SUB 207-209.
THURSDAY
FREE MUSIC
Japanese   flutists,   two   jazz   musicians, noon, SUB ballroom.
AUCM
John Conway on Tibetian refugees
again,  4:30 p.m., Lutheran centre.
GAY PEOPLE
Meeting, noon, SUB 213.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Crusading,  7:30 p.m.,  1962 Acadia
road.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square   dancing,    noon-2:30   p.m.,
SUB club's lounge.
ABORTION ACTION
Tribunal on abortion and sterilization, 7:30-9:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
VCF
Come and support the athletes in
action vs. the Birds, noon, War
Memorial Gym.
CCF
The underground church, noon,
SUB 211.
SIMS
Transcendental meditation, noon,
Angus 204.
GERMAN
Opera film: Zar und Zimmermann,
noon, Buch. 102.
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
Greg Cooper, B.Sc, 1971, UBC,
B.S.C.I., 1972, Maharishi International University, discusses scientifically validated results of this
practice.
12.30 p.m.—Thurs. Feb. 15
Henry Angus 204
information:
277-0623
"A Jew for Jesus"
ARTHUR KATZ M.A., (U.C. Berkeley)
Author of "Ben Israel — Odessey of a Modern Jew"
SUB AUDITORIUM
TODAY 12:30
SPONSORED BY V.C.F.
(I
FILM AT HILLEL
Saturday, Feb. 17 at 8:30 p.m.
Tales and Legends
of the Jews
Told by ELI WIESEL
—author of "Night"; "Beggar in Jerusalem"
—survivor of the Holocaust
CAMPUS COMMUNITY INVITED
A CAREER IN SECONDARY SCHOOLS?
Teaching in the B.C. Secondary Schools
Is there a career for you as a high school teacher? Are
you interested in the present and future possibilities?
You are invited to find Out more about Secondary
Teaching on Wednesday, February 14, 1973 in the
Education Building, Room 100, at 12:30 - 3:00 p.m.
Directors and other faculty will be present to help you'.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
rnmmarpial        Q   linoc      1    rlau  <fc1   Krt*   a#irlitiftncil   linar
WWI ■■■■■«#■ 1*l«l            V     IIIIVMf        ■      %Hf»J     v   ■ ■•#*#,    «%■«■■ IIWIKII     ■■■*<«•
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified adi are nut auvptcd by telephone and art payable in
advance Deadline is 11-JtOa.m., thedav before publication.
PublwattunsOffice, Rwm 24J S.U.B., UBC. Van. H, S.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
KING & QUEEN OP HEARTS BALL
Valentine's Day at the Commodore
Teen  Angel & the Rockin' Rebels.
Lost & Found
13
LOST: TWO SOFT COVER Ecology texts in a brown envelope,
Friday near Ponderosa, call 732-
9541.
Rides & Car Pools
14
NEED RIDE FROM NO. 1 RD. AND
Francis, Richmond to UBC. Must
be on campus before 9, leave after
4. One or both ways. Call Pam 277-
6764.
Special Notices
15
BOOK AND THESIS MANUSCRIPTS
edited by retired publisher for
grammar, syntax, puncuation, redundancy,   clarity.   263-6565.	
DISCOUNT STEREO, EXAMPLE:
AM-FM stereo receiver, turntable,
base cover, cartridge, two speakers,
2-year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125.00. Carry AKAI, A.G.S.,
Zenith color TVs at savings. Call
732-6769.	
RENT WHISTLER CONDOMINIUM
near gondola. Day/Wk. Ph. 732-
0174 eves, or before 8 A.M.	
WHEN WILL ENOUGH BE
enough? Dr. Bundolo and his Pandemonium Medicine Show returns
this Wednesday (so soon?) Feb.
14, 12:30 in the SUB Theatre. It's
FREE!!!
Special Events
15A
ANOTHER FREE CONCERT
Thursday Noon at the SUB Ballroom'12:30 p.m. This week: Takeo,
a Japanese master flutist plus two
fine jazz musicians all free. Bring
your  friends.   FREE  FREE FREE
$75 FOR 75*
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS   TODAY1
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
SEE MEXICO AND CENTRAL
America. 3-month "bus 'trip to
Panama, $465 return, leaving May
6 and Sept. 15. Contact Club Pan-
aventure,   980-1091   or   731-5672.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1966 CORTINA GT 2-DOOR SEDAN.
Very good condition. Phone John
Bell,   224-9706   after 7:00   p.m.
1972 PEUGEOT 304. PERFECT
condition. Still on warranty. Front
wheel, delight to drive. 9,000 milesr
$2,495.   684-0749.	
Motorcycles
25
Babysitting & Day Care
32
BABYSITTER WANTED FOR 2
children (2 and 4 years) on campus; afternoons, Mon.-Fri. if possible.  224-0878.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography 35
tityt Hens! ano gutter.
a      Camera*
USED
CAMERAS
Nikon FTn. Body & Head.... 219.00
Nikon FTn.  Black with 50mm
F1.4  Lens     369.95
Minolta SRT.  101
F1.7 with  case  189.95
Miranda  Sensorex  50mm
F1.8        155.00
Mamiya Sekor 528TL 48mm
F2.8 with flash     79.95
3010 W.  Broadway
Note our New Phone No.
736-8375
Scandals
37
BUNDOLO RIDES AGAIN!!! DR.
Bundolo's Pandemonium Medicine
Show this Wednesday, Feb. 14,
12:30 in SUB Movie Theatre. It's
FREE!!!
Typing
40
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED —
Experienced typist. Mrs. Freeman,
731-8096.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING.
My home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing service. IBMi Selectric —
Open days, evenings, weekends.
Call Shari at 224-5886.	
ESSAYS TYPED — NEAT ACCTJR-
ate work. 35c per typed page. 325-
9976, if I'm out leave your phone
number.	
EXPERT IBM SELECTRIC TYPIST.
Experienced Thesis Typist. Specialize in Formula and Math. Reason-
able Rates. Mrs.  Ellis. 321-3838.
FAST ACCURATE TYPING OF Essays and thesis. Reasonable terms.
Call Mrs. Akau, days 688-5235
weekends  and  evenings   263-4023.
51
 EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted	
PART TIME DISTRIBUTORS
wanted. Any hours of work. Phone
228-8836.	
ESTABLISHED DIAMOND IMPOR-
ting firm requires 12 senior student
sales representatives for the UBC
Campus. Clean, Neat Dresser.
Good Sales Ability. 3rd or 4th Year
students with pleasant personality
and some sales experience. Fluent
in English. Excellent commission
structure. Include in your application a recent photograph of yourself. Mr. Mel Battensby, General
Delivery, Vancouver Postal Station
A, Hastings & Granville, Vancou-
ver,  B.C.	
WOMEN: PLEASE HELP US SHOW
some Western hospitality to 150 engineering student delegates from
across Canada. We require 10 hostesses (preferably bilingual) for the
conference which will be held in the
Hotel Georgia from March 1 to 4.
Applicants should expect to spend
4 full days at the hotel—expenses
paid. Please apply to conference
co-ordinator at 228-3818 or Engineering Undergraduate Society office before Feb.  20, 1973.
Special Classes
62
Tutoring Service
63
Speakeasy SUB Anytime!
228-6792 - 12:30-2:30
TUTORIAL
CENTRE
For Students and Tutors
Register Now! 12:30-2:30
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring
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MISCELLANEOUS
FOB SALE
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Rooms
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Furnished Apts.
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Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, February 13, 1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
In rugby
New season dawning
In soccer
THE VANCOUVER  volleyball
finals to win the tournament.
club beat Calgary
—sucha singh photo
15-2, 16-4 in the
Fitness demonstration set
A former Simon Fraser
University physical education
instructor will host a fitness
demonstration 12:30 to 2:30
p.m. Thursday in SUB 207.
Lynn Sereda said Monday
the topics will include yoga
(autogenic relaxation), arica
gym, breathing, grounding,
chanting, meditation, bio-
energetics and improvisational
free form movement.
Final day
The last day of entry into the
UBC squash tournament is
today.
Anyone interested should
phone Bob Shultz at 228-4479
before 6 p.m.
The tournament runs Feb. 16
to 18 at the courts in the Winter
Sports Centre. Spectators are
welcome.
"The exercises are designed
to establish a sense of being
within the body as nervous
medium for the here and now
conscious experience," Sereda
said.
Birds do it
the easy way
The UBC Thunderbird
soccer team recorded their
fourth win Sunday at Empire
Stadium when they defeated
the high spirited Inter Italia
team by a narrow 1-0 result.
Daryl Samson, 15 minutes
into the first half of play
recorded the lone goal which
was all the student team
needed for the two points
awarded for a win.
In the second half of play the
Italian side made do with 10
men after a brief scuffle which
resulted in the referee sending
an Italian player off. The
'Birds were unable to
capitalize on the opportunity
with the weakened Italian side
due to the outstanding effort of
their netminder Hank
Poole vourde.
The win for the 'Birds move
them into a 4th place tie with
North Shore United, but the
'Birds have a game in hand
and a better goals for average
than North Shore. 'Bird
netminder Greg Weber
recorded his 3rd shutout of the
season.
Next week the UBC team
take part in an interlocking
game with Cliff Avenue United
of the Intercity League at
Empire Stadium, 1 p.m.
Sunday.
The game following at 3 p.m.
will have Simon Fraser
University playing Khalsa of
the ICL and it's a sure bet that
UBC players will watch their
crosstown opponents and
mentally record their ability.
UBC is due to play SFU in
March.
NEW
LOW
PRICES
on
QUALITY PHOTO FINISHING
by MORTIFEE MUNSHAW
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
LTD.
5754 University Blvd. 224-3202
EVERYONE INVITED
frustrated fanatics, anxious activists, rampant revolutionaries,
even apologetic apathizers
Hear The Candidates For:
VICE-PRESIDENT
TREASURER
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
OMBUDSPERSON
debate and discourse in didactic drivel I
SUB BALLROOM
Friday, February 16, 12:30 p.m
By PETER MacQUEEN
The rugby Thunderbirds
concluded their exhibition
games on the weekend with a
convincing 26-3 victory over
Kats.
The 'Birds seem to be back
on the winning track after a
dismal showing last term. Two
weekends ago, they trounced
the Castaways, one of the top
teams from Victoria, 34-6.
The 'Birds are 100 per cent
healthy now, helped by the
return of past regulars Eric
Lillie and Peter Dewitt, neither
of whom played last term.
The UBC Braves, who will
enter division I play next
weekend, will no doubt be glad
to be in a division where clean
rugby will be played.
On Saturday they went on to
the field against the thugs of
the Kats II team.
The game had to be stopped
five times because UBC
players were injured after late
tackles.
One player went to the
hospital with a separated
shoulder.
The 'Birds enter the
collegiate league 2:30 p.m.
Saturday against the
University of Washington at
Thunderbird Stadium.
Specialized Service
Original
Levis
cBlueJeans
$750
Rugged, wear-anywhere   I postage paid
pants of 100% cotton. Famous
"Shrink-to-fit" styling. 2" shrinkage
in waist and 3" in length must be
allowed when ordering.
Waist Sizes: 28-36, 38
Lengths: 29-34, 36
Note: Waist sizes 35, 36 and 38 are
not available in 29" length.
M RECREA
^B}o  (The Oi
RECREATIONAL EQUIPMENT, INC.
(The Outdoor Co-op)
P.O. Box 22088, Dept. UBC
Seattle, WA 98122 U.S.A.
Q Enclosed is my check or money
order for pair(s) of Levi's.
Waist Size Length
O Please send me your free full-color
catalog only.
Address _
City	
SEND FOR FREE COLOR CATALOG
11
JOIN THE FUN — BE A U.B.C.
BIRDWATCHER
Campus Highlights This Week
NOON HOUR - THURSDAY, FEB. 15
- 1:00 p.m.
BASKETBALL - Memorial Gym.
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Athletes in Action
(Touring United States Collegiate All-Stars)
FRI.— SAT.— FEB. 16-17
8:00 p.m.
ICE HOCKEY - Winter Sports Centre.
UBC Thunderbirds vs Univ. of Alberta
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17
RUGBY - Thunderbird Stadium - 2:00 p.m.
UBC Thunderbirds vs Univ. of Washington
FREE —JOIN THE FUN!
rr Page   12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February  13,  1973
Ministry 'mandatory' for equality
By SONDRA
MARSHALL SMITH
A provincial ministry of
women's rights is mandatory
to promote and ensure the
priority of full equality for
women.
This was the conclusion
reached at the Lower Mainland
regional conference on
women held on Saturday,
participants to discuss the
proposed ministry of women's
rights endorsed by the
provincial New Democratic
Party last November.
Addressing the conference,
Rosemary Brown, NDP MLA
Vancouver Burrard, stressed
the need for one central person
to be responsible for change in
legislation and enforcement of
existing laws.
"After an examination of the
political structure I have
rejected the idea of
committees,    commissions,
councils and other
alternatives. A minister is the
only one with real power.
There must be someone
ultimately responsible for the
changes for which we're
asking," she said.
She believes only a small
minority of the NDP MLA's
support the creation of a
separate ministry. However,
she indicated the opposition
was due to a lack of
understanding  of  the  issues.
Brown considers the
establishment of the ministry a
positive step to eliminating
existing discrimination against
women.
A human rights department
would not alleviate the
subordination of women. It
could become the catch-all for
every social problem, she said.
Answering the charge that
the ministry would become a
bureaucracy and suffer from
the faults of departments like
Indian affairs, Brown said,
such departments are
unsatisfactory because "they
are staffed by white civil
servants. The people they
serve have no control over
their own affairs."
Sharon Yandle, a member of
the NDP Women's Committee
and a speaker at the
conference, also supported the
ministry, "People believe what
they're taught. If our
instititutions teach us x is right
and y is wrong, we accept it. If
we want to teach different
values we must change our
institutions.
"Our factions are
oganizating to change their
lives, we must organize to
redirect ours. But in doing so
we must help each other," said
Yandle.
Women supporting the
ministry believe existing
methods are insufficient to
pressure the government for
such changes. The
government, civil service and
major institutions are staffed
primarily by males. Their
priorities reflect their needs.
Referring to other areas
where change can take place,
Sheilah Thompson, director of
the counselling at Douglas
College, discussed the
reluctance of  the   medical
profession to provide female
patients with enough
information upon which to base
personal health decisions.
Thompson discussed a new
treatment of breast cancer
developed by Dr. Ray Lawson
of Montreal which utilized
radiation instead of removal of
the breast.
"If you have a malignant
tumour, the odds of cure for his
treatment and for breast
removal are exactly the
same," she said. In fact, Dr.
Lawson has stated that radical
operations for breast cancer
are completely unjustified.
Thompson encouraged the
audience to demand clinics for
such treatment. There are
no centres equipped to perform
Dr. Lawson's methods west of
Edmonton.
In addition she felt a
community approach is
necessary. "Experts should be
treated as consultants to help
us help each other."
The trade union movement is
another area where women
can work for change.
"Seventy-nine per cent of the
working women are
unorganized," said Phyllis
Young, NDP MLA, Little
Mountain.
She urged wome to join their
unions. Brown supported this
recommendation no matter
how male dominated they are,
"They won't change while you
are on the outside."
Women are discriminated
against by their unions and
employers in their wage rated,
benefits and conditions of
employment, she said.
Young cited the recent
change in the Mines Act
allowing women to work
underground.
She said the section of the
Factories Act prohibiting
women from lifting more than
35 pounds is another
discriminatory piece of
legislation.
"No one minds if we pick up
a 35 pound kid."
Young considers the
women's ministry an
important agent to help
working women.
It will demonstrate to the
white collar worker, office
personnel, store clerks and
waitresses, areas in which they
are being exploited. It will
organize working women.
It is important not to fight
against one another warned
Young. Other groups may use
different approaches and have
different philosophies but the
goals are the same.
"We must act as a pressure
group, a voting block."
Medicine not 'magical'
Medical expertise is not a magical potion, it
does not lose its potency when more people
understand it, said Melanie Conn, a member of
the women's health clinic Monday.
"Nothing is under the sheets," said Conn,
referring to a health group series which led to
the establishment of the women's health clinic
and A Vancouver Women's Health Booklet.
The health group series, organized last year,
talked about specific subjects of interest to
women such as hormones, birth control,
abortions and child birth, Conn told 50 women
at a women's week seminar about women and
their doctors.
"Someone who knew about a subject would
talk about it to the group and tell everyone all
they knew.
"We also had very practical sessions
learning about our bodies. There was no
humiliation or shame. We got to be very close
and learned a lot about ourselves and what a
healthy woman is," said Conn.
The women obtained plastic spectrums used
in internal examinations and learned to
examine themselves and each other.
"It's very exciting to see your cervix for the
first time. It's an interesting thing to see.
Everyone has a different cervical opening. You
also learn about secretions and what is healthy
and unhealthy.
"We found out things like 80 per cent of all
women who have gonorrhea discover it when
they have severe pelvic pain rather than
through symptoms developed early in the
disease," said Conn.
"The standard test is to take a swab of
vaginal mucous and look at it under a
microscope. A better test for women is to take a
culture and grow it in an incubator and check 48
hours later."
Women need good information like this to
enable them to communicate with their doctors
and tell them what they need, she said.
Morgan Fox of the health clinic said the
clinic was developed by women who were not
satisfied with the kind of medical care women
received.
"Some women were hired as paramedics
during the summer, then we went to Seattle
where there are several women's clinics and
got the impression we could do it ourselves, she
said.
"We're not trying to be doctors but want a
clinic to inform women about their health
care," said Fox.
As well as seeing the paramedic teams
everyone sees a doctor at the clinic held
Fridays from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. at 1952 West
Fourth.
The clinic does tests for pregnancy, yeast
infection, gonorrhea; gives out information
about nutrition exercises and breast cancer
self-testing; and will draw blood for syphillis
tests. All tests are duplicated and checked out
by the provincial lab.
A woman's referral bureau for information
about birth control, abortions, venereal
diseases and other problems is also operating.
Call 736-8471.
Dorm reps may meet with gov't ministers
From page 1
secretary-elect Stan Persky
and treasurer candidate Svend
Robinson, met with Rohringer-
and White on Friday and asked
them to open the books and
show the reasons for the
increase. Both refused.
Robinson, who is also a
member of the Acadia Park
graduate student residence
action committee, told the
Sunday tenants meeting White
refused to open the books
because "it is against
administration policy to do
so."
Robinson said White agreed
to bring up the question at the
Monday board meeting.
"He also told us Dave
Barrett's budget speech,
announcing a budget of $100
million dollars to be divided
between three universities in
the province, may have some
serious drawbacks to housing
at UBC.
"He told us we may have to
tighten our belts a little
because the increase in
funding this year is less than
last year," Robinson said.
Robinson said: "The
provincial government has the
authority to force the board of
governors to open the books.'
"I have made tentative
appointments with premier
Dave Barrett, education
minister Eileen Dailly, and
rehabilitation minister
Norman Levi in Victoria for
Feb. 23, which will be attended
by a number of delegates from
the residences," Robinson
said.
Robinson said Friday's
meeting with Rohringer was as
unproductive as the one with
White.
"He covered much of the
same ground as before. Mainly
concerning costs, required to
maintain the buildings and
staff," Robinson said.
Said Persky: "Rohringer
talked with us for two hours
and we come to the conclusion
that his contradictory positions
in this matter have affected his
mind.
"He has deluded himself into
believing the housing
department is a separate
entity, not a part of the
administration. Thus, armed
with his ten years of figures
and graphs, he is able to
convey his arguments
convincingly,"   said   Persky.
Walter Earner, a member of
the Gage apartments liaison
committee, told the meeting
he had talked to Rohringer
about  releasing   the  figures.
"He said he wouldn't show all
the accounts," said Earner,
"but would ask housing
business manager Keith Davis
to prepare a simpler dollars
and cents report."
Earner said Rohringer
claimed his department had
nothing to hide but students
would not be able to make
heads or tails out of his
accounts.
Robinson said there are a
number of accounting students
at UBC more than equal to the
task.

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