UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 9, 2015

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128199.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128199.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128199-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128199-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128199-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128199-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128199-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128199-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128199-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128199.ris

Full Text

Array  // Page 2
\Jxaaraiw!M!mm
WEDNESDAY   ' 11
RITS REAL JAPAN EXHIBITION
10:00 A.M. -2:00 P.M. @ SUB207/209
Rits Real Japan Project UBC is hosting an exhibition about Japanese culture
and, specifically, about the 2011Tohoku earthquake. Expand your cultural
horizons, meet new people and enjoy some free food. Free
Tlwda^YUtM.
KAPPA ALPHA TH ETAS TRIVIA NIGHT
6:00-8:00 P.M. ©ABDUL LADHA
UBC women's fraternity Kappa Alpha Theta is hosting a trivia night to raise
money for CASA which supports abused children by through court advocacy. Win prizes and help a good cause! $50 for team of 4-5
SUNDAY ' 15
ERG-A-TH0N
Varsity Rowers participate in 12 hours of continuous
rowing to raise funds for the BC Cancer Foundation
UBC ROWINGS ERG-A-THON
7:00 A.M. - 7:00 P.M. @ STONG'S MARKET 4560 DUNBAR
T-Bird Rowing is bringing their erg-a-thon fundraiser back for another year.
Members of the team will row in shifts for 12 hours, raising money for the B.C.
Cancer Foundation. Free, but donations encouraged
ON
THE
COVER
Moisture is the essence of wetness,
and wetness is the essence of beauty.
- TimHoggan
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*w
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
MARCH 9,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXLIV
EDITORIAL
STAFF
BUSINESS
CONTACT
Coordinating Editor
Copy Editor
Business Manager
Editorial Office: SUB 24
Will McDonald
Ciaran Dougherty
Natalie Scadden, CJ Portland, Host;
FerniePereira
604.822.2301
coord i n ati n g @ u byss ey.cs
:opy@ubyssey.cs
Elsay. Olamide Olanyan. Lawrence
*Jeal Garcia, Olivia Law, Tariq Vira,
fpereira@ubyssey.cs
Business Office: SUB 23
Design Editor
Distribution Coordinator
-Idley Lin, Jenny Tang, Leo Soh,
Ad Sales
ADVERTISING 604.822.1654
NickAdams
Lily Cai
Vlateo Ospina, Koby Michaels,
Geoff Lister
NQUIRIES604.S22.66S1
pri nted i tor@ ubys sey.cs
cai@ubyssey.cs
Jasmine Cheng, Miguel Santa Maria,
g dve rti s i ng @ uby ssey .cs
Student Union Building
Web Developer
Illustrator
Sam Fruitman, Bra ed on Atkins or
Dauze,JacobGershkovich,Emm;
Accounts
613S SUB Boulevard
Peter Siemens
Julian Yu
Cartridge, Ben Cook, Ming Wong,
Oliver Colbourne
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
web@ubyssey.cs
julianyu@ubyssey.c=
TamrnyHsieh. Chlce Lai. Mischa
g ccou nts@ u byss ey.cs
Online: ubyssey.ca
News Editor
Twitter: ©ubyssey
Veronika Bondarenko
news@ubyssey.cs
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the officia
cannot be reproduced without
and clarity. All letters must be
Culture Editor
stident newspape" of theLIni ver
the expressed, written permis
•eceived by 12 neon the day be
Jenica Montgomery
sify of British Columbia. It is pub-
sion of The Ubyssey Publica
fore intended publication. Let
culture@ubyssey.cs
iEhecl every Morday and Thurs
tions Society
ters received after this point
day by The U by ssey Publications
The Ubyssey isa founding
will be published in the follow-
Sports* Rec Editor
Scciety. Weaiean autonomous
member of Canadian Universi
ng issueunlessthereisan ur
JackHauen
derrtciaticallyrun stident crga-
ty Press(CUP)andadherestc
gent time restriction or other
sports@ubyssey.es
■nization.andallstudentsaieen-
CUPsguiding principles
matter deemed relevant by
oou raged to participate
_etters to the editor must
the Ubyssey staff.
Video Producer
Editorials are chosen anc
oe under 300 words. Please
t isagreed byall persons
TimHoggan
iwitten by theUb/sse/ staff They
nclude your phone number
olacing display or dassif ied ad
vi d eo@ u byss ey.cs
are the expressed opinbn ofthe
student number and signa
vert isirg that if theUbyssey Publ
staff,and do not necessarily re
ture (not for publication) as
ications Scciety fails to publish
Photo Editor
flect the views of The Ubyssey
vvell as your year and faculty
anadvertisernentcrifanerrorin
Cherihan Hassun
Publications Scciety or the Uni
with all submissions. ID will be
the ad cccurs the liability ofthe
photo® ubyssey.c;
versity of British Columbia. AI
checked when submissions are
JPS wil not begreater than the
Editorial content appearing ir
drcpped offatt heed iter el effice
orice paid for the ad. The UPS
Opinions + Blog Editor
The Ubyssey is the property of
of The Ubyssey other wise ver-
shall rot be responsible for dight
The U b/ssey Pu bl cation sSccety
fication will be done by phone
changes or ty peg ra phica I er tors
Stories, opinions, photographs
The Ubyssey reservesthe right
that do not lessen the value or
aerhardt@ubyssey.cs
and artwork contained hereir
to edit submissions for length
the impact of the ad.
OUR CAMPUS //
ONEONONE^
_EANDBUILDINGSTHAT
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Vivian Dong began debating in grade eight and has now been accepted to Harvard Law School.
From UBC to Harvard Law, Vivian Dong leads an examined life
Elba Gomez Navas
Contributor
Both scholarly and personable,
Vivian Dong exemplifies the ideal
candidate for Harvard Law School
— a program to which she was
recently accepted — yet she's also a
typical college student, hinging on
Netflix TV shows, watching The
Wire and attempting to foster as
many kittens as possible.
As the president ofthe UBC
Debate Society, a club that has been
around for about 100 years, Dong
has travelled extensively, from attending the The World University
Debate Championship in Malaysia,
to debating at a prestigious event
at the University of Toronto with a
prize of a trip to Paris and a meeting with the Canadian ambassador
to France.
But debates are not only glamorous conferences in exotic places;
as Dong points out, they are also
very much about outreach. "We do
a lot of outreach in terms of teaching other campus organizations,
including public high schools,
efficient debate skills," Dong said.
Josh Sealy was one
ofthe best debaters
in the club, probably
the best.... He kind of
showed me what kind
of person I could be
here."
Vivian Dong
Fourth-year economics student
and UBC Debate Society
President
Dong knows first-hand the
substantial impact these outreach
events have on the lives of kids
in high school. In grade eight
she entered the debate club at Sir
Winston Churchill high school,
and was coached by UBC Debate
Society volunteer Josh Sealy.
"Josh Sealy was one ofthe best
debaters in the club, probably the
best," Dong said. "He won many
national championships, did really
well, and that inspired me to be
very involved in debate, especially
when I got to university... it was
actually one ofthe reasons I came
to UBC. He kind of showed me
what kind of person I could be
here."
Debate makes you a lot
less ideologically pure.
It really pushes you to
be a lot more rigorous
in why you believe
things."
Now in her fourth year and
about to graduate with her BA in
economics, Dong reflects on the
academic and personal benefits she
got from her involvement in debate.
"Debate makes you a lot less
ideologically pure. It really pushes
you to be a lot more rigorous in
why you believe things," she said.
Although debating does result
in one challenging both their own
and others' beliefs, Dong feels that
this results in increased confidence
in the views one holds.
"I think a lot of people come to
college with a certain set of political beliefs, easily categorized as
liberal or conservative. But debate
pushes you to think in utilitarian
terms and to think about each
singular belief you have and why
you believe it; because the entire
point ofthe activity is to break
down how other people think,"
Dong said.
"It's really challenging in that
way, but it is immensely rewarding.
It makes you a much smarter and
much more rigorous and intellectually honest person," said Dong.
Debate has also transformed her
academic experience, allowing her
to push back on some preconceived
notions present throughout her
economics education.
"In economics, we very rarely
consider matters of distribution, or
the differential impact on increasing something for someone who is
rich or poor. We think in terms of
efficiency, but in debate, we think
about things that are inherently
valuated."
For me and for all
the debaters I know,
debate is playtime —
it's a very ambitious
kind of playtime, but
that's how I have fun."
When asked about how she can
manage a stellar academic record
and so much debating, Dong says
the key is managing time wisely,
but also enjoying what you do.
"I really love economics so that's
never seemed like a chore to me...
and for me and for all the debaters
I know, debate is playtime — it's a
very ambitious kind of playtime,
but that's how I have fun," she said.
In terms of choosing law school
as her next big project, Dong said,
"The honest answer is that I do not
want to go to graduate school because it takes too long, and I'm not
sure academia is right for me."
"I like the idea of becoming
a lawyer because it's a service
profession where we have a substantive impact and [get to see]
immediate rewards and failures,"
she said.
Ultimately, Dong is excited
about law school as the new stage
of her life. "At heart, it is also about
caring intensely about the consequences ofthe law and the consequences of justice. [Law] seems to
have a lot ofthe same values that
I've acquired through practicing
debate." tJ
Know
somebody
interesting?
Do you have a brilliant prof or a fascinating friend at UBC? Send an email to
aerhardt@ubyssey.ca with some contact info and reasons why you think they
would be a good candidate to be profiled in The Ubyssey. // News
STARTUPS»
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
AMS»
UBC student manages Vancouver branch of
apartment subletting service
=HOTO COURTESY ANDRE AVDEENKO/FLICKR
Flatbook cleans, decorates and rents out empty apartments at hotel prices.
Olivia Law
Senior StaffWriter
With a large proportion of students
traveling home during the summer break, UBC Facebook groups
and Craigslist sites are filled with
students desperately trying to find
subletters for the summer months.
Flatbook, a subletting startup
from Montreal that was launched
globally in 2014, has just arrived in
Vancouver and is managed by UBC
student Daniel Kim. Promising
to offer a completely stress-free
subletting experience for students,
Flatbook will decorate, photograph
and clean apartments to rent at hotel
prices to businessmen or travellers
looking for an authentic, local experience in the city.
Not every apartment or house
will be accepted into Flatbook's
selection, however. Conditions such
as size, duration of availability and
furnishings factor into the eligibility
of each residence, which ensures
that not all applicants will be successful in using the startup for their
summer season.
Worries about paying rent for
a house you aren't living in are a
constant concern, yet Flatbook guarantees that, even if an apartment
isn't inhabited for periods of time,
the full rent will be paid through the
company's profits.
Kim, a fifth year biology major,
is one ofthe two regional managers
for Vancouver, and has focused on
gaining the attention and business
of major internationally-focused
clubs on campus such as the International Student's Association and
CVC, the majority of whose members will not be in Vancouver for the
summer months.
Flatbook gives tenants monthly
feedback and regularly cleans the
apartments, in an aim to make the
experience easier for students.
"We collaborate with professional photographers, interior designers,
professional cleaners, as well as
local artists to make the place look
like a hotel," said Kim. "Then we can
rent it out to more affluent people
who can come from anywhere in the
world, and pay hotel prices."
As former president ofthe UBC
Dollar Project and heavily involved
with other projects around campus
such as fundraiser UBC50K, Kim is
keen to use his connections around
campus to help renting students
enjoy the summer without stressing
about finding someone to sublet
their apartment.
"There are damage policies,
liability policies, there's free storage,
so it's essentially the easiest thing for
the students," said Kim.
Kim stressed that it is only on rare
occasion where the subletting has
been unsuccessful and attributes the
success ofthe program to the lack of
similar initiatives in the country.
According to the B.C. Landlord's
Association, the means by which
your property is subletted doesn't
matter, just as long as the sublettees
sign appropriate and agreed forms,
and comply to the terms of residency
set out in the rental contract. tJ
NEW SUB »
New SUB set to open before exams, opening
celebrations to focus on mental health
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKERfTHE UBYSSEY
The new SUB is scheduled to open without any more setbacks.
Danni Shanel
Contributor
After being delayed three times, the
new SUB is on track to open its doors
to students in early April.
"We are moving forward," said
VP Admin Ava Nasiri. "Progress is
going well and we are really working
towards the timeline we had set
initially, to be able to open the first
little while of April."
Still, the official date for the opening has not yet been set and hangs on
the balance ofthe final steps in the
construction process.
Accordingto Nasiri, teams of
electrical engineers and carpenters
are working rapidly to make the new
building ready for students to move
into come April.
"It's kind of like a big family fighting for space at the dinner table,"
said Nasiri.
Nasiri also said that the last critical step before opening is a fire safety
check. This Monday, specialists will
be touringthe building to check for
any hazards.
"If anything were to hold us back,
it would be those things," said Nasiri.
While the opening celebrations
that had been planned for the
January opening have been toned
down, the AMS still plans to have a
week of festivities. As the building
is set to open just as final exams
begin, the celebrations will focus on
students' mental health.
"It's about what we can provide
for them to make that time easier,
so it's really catered towards the
heath and wellbeing — really cheap
massages, maybe a room of puppies
and kittens, lots of free food and
different types of study spaces," said
Nasiri.
Over the last couple of days,
Nasiri has been discussing opening
plans with the clubs, so that they
are ready for the transition in the
upcoming weeks.
Nasiri also said that the building
will open for students as soon as the
AMS has final access to the building.
"What we would like to do is as
soon as we possibly can, open the
doors to students, so they can flood
in and interact with the building,
even if it's not in its fullest final
form," said Nasiri. Xi
Gastroenterologist
to join UBC as new
Dean of Medicine
ReemYousif
Contributor
UBC is gearing up to welcome a new
dean to the Faculty of Medicine.
As of September 2015, Dermot
Kelleher will replace Gavin Stuart as
the new Dean of Medicine.
Kelleher, who is currently the
vice-president health and Dean of
the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial
College London, began his journey
in Dental School at Trinity College
in Dublin, where he specialized in
gastroenterology.
In this field, Kelleher earned
numerous scholarships and awards,
including a Fogarty scholarship at
University of California — San Diego
and Wellcome Senior Fellowship
back at Trinity College Dublin.
On March 6, Kelleher hosted a
lecture and Q&A segment at the
Djavad Mowafaghian Center for
Brain Health.
At the lecture, Kelleher's resume
touched on the current state of
civilization and emphasized the implementation of personalized medicine, which, accordingto Kelleher,
"revolutionizes the challenges of
Precision Medicine and spans from
early discovery through to implementation in the community, which
UBC is actively and enthusiastically
taking on."
Kelleher also expressed his desire
to modernize healthcare research
and the curriculum at UBC and
stressed the importance of collaboration among faculty members and
students alike.
After the lecture, Kelleher held a
Q&A session, where an outpouring
of questions ranged from science
communication strategies to patents
and funding to the shift towards
translational versus general science
to greater recognition of females in
the industry. tJ
Tanner Bokor hopes to pass AMS
2030 vision on to new president
AMS 2030 is a 15-year plan on AMS strategy.
Sarah Pribadi
Contributor
The AMS is coming up with a
long-term strategic plan to improve
student life at UBC.
AMS 2030 is the 15-year long
plan designed by Council that aims
to improve student life at UBC by
restructuring how AMS operates.
The strategic plan was initiated by
last year's president Caroline Wong,
who created a vision task force
that correlates to the values ofthe
AMS. During Bokor's presidency,
AMS Council then redrafted the
vision task force into AMS 2030 in
April 2014.
The main goals of AMS 2030 are
to provide stability and continuity
for their annual action plan, create
a longterm vision for the society
and establish a guide for the society's operation.
Accordingto AMS President
Tanner Bokor, the strategic plan
took an entire year to develop with
the AMS 2030 committee. The plan
going forward right now is to build
the four sub-strategies that make
up the master 15-year plan. So far,
the strategies have been drafted
and prepared and AMS council is
going to see the presentation on
what AMS 2030 is by the end of
the term.
"It's really collaborative process," said Bokor. "It's also a way to
make sure that AMS is accountable
LLUSTRATIONJERRYYINfTHE UBYSSEY
for its members, keeping all of their
interest in mind as we go forward."
Bokor also said that as previous
plans by the AMS have been very
broad and lacked a clear direction,
Council hopes to delve deeper into
specific issues. AMS has created
four main strategies — Access, Engage, Invest, Divest. Each strategy
consists of issues that need to be
addressed, laid out in five goals and
three subgoals, so that it allows the
strategies to have sharper focus,
more detail towards implementation
and clear direction for AMS to take.
"We made lots of attempts to
build strategic framework and strategic parentheses but it's something
that had been lacking direction,"
said Bokor. "So I think by having
[the plan], this is goingto provide
stability and guidance to incoming
AMS execs and students. I'm sure
that AMS is moving forward on
clear trajectory year after year."
Bokor had been drafting the plan
with executives, staff and students
who provided consultation after it
was drafted.
Since he is about to leave his position, Bokor hopes to sit down with
his successor and go over all the files
and plans for AMS 2030 up to now.
"I'll say to them, this is your plan
now, and it will be up to the next
council and the executives on how
do you want to see it through," said
Bokor. Xi
...you fill in the blanks.
Learn how to design, write, edit, and create
print and web publications in one year.
Apply now. Start in September.
Info sessions: March 25 and April 29,6-8pm
www.langara.bc.ca/publishing
THE COLLEGE OF HIGHER LEARNING. NEWS    I    MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2015
AMS ELECTIONS »
Board of Govenors candidates
talk fee increases, divestment
=HOTOWILLMCDONALDfTHE UBYSSEY
tulie Van de Valk, Veronica Knott and Tanner Bokor (left to right) are running for two BoG spots.
Will McDonald
Coordinating Editor
Three candidates running for
two student representative
positions on the Board of Governors squared off at their first
debate today.
Julie Van de Valk, who said
her work on UBC's divestment
campaign is what spurred her to
run, said her main platform points
are advocating for more student
consultation, decreasing tuition
and divesting from fossil fuels.
"I've learned how to advocate
for students and people... I think
that would make me a really
strong voice for divestment, but
also for any issues that would
come up," said Van de Valk.
Candidate and current AMS
president Tanner Bokor argued
that his experience in student
government would allow him
to be a reformer on the Board,
particularly pushing for responsible, student-focused land use
on campus and for affordable,
accessible education.
"I understand UBC's problems.
I know what students care about,"
said Bokor.
Engineering Undergraduate
Society president Knott said
that her experience both as EUS
president and with more than
30 committees would allow her
to be an effective student rep on
the Board.
"I've learned to not be afraid
to speak my mind.... Once you're
a student member on the Board
of Governors, you are an equal
member on the Board of Governors," said Knott.
All ofthe candidates took
issue with the university's fee
increases this year and said
they would work to improve the
consultation process.
The candidates also supported
divestment from fossil fuels, as
long as it is done responsibly,
though Knott pointed out that
the Board would likely finish its
work on divestment before they
are in office.
Knott and Bokor clashed on
the role of a student Board rep in
relation to the AMS.
After Bokor said the relationship should be improved, Knott
brought up what she saw as lack
of connections to student BoG
reps under Bokor's leadership
as President.
"Our student BoG reps have
reached out to us and the AMS
exec walked away from the table
when they had an opportunity to
engage," said Knott.
The debate wrapped up with
all three candidates saying they
would push for more funding for
graduate students after being
asked about teaching assistant
strikes at the University of Toronto and York. Xi
The 2015 AMS Elections will be held Monday, March 9 through
Friday, March 13. Keep an eye out for our coverage ofthe races,
including candidate profiles, debate recaps and results.
Presidential candidates discuss student
life, tuition increases and Hunger Games
=HOTO WILL MCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
This year's candidates for AMS president are Aaron Bailey, V and Cheneil Antony-Hale (left to right).
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
The three presidential candidates
faced off at their first debate on
Thursday, March 5.
Student senator and former Science Undergraduate Society president Aaron Bailey pushed forth to
improve student life on campus.
"My opinion in terms of what
the AMS needs to do in the upcoming year is to return the 'student' back into 'student politics' by
focusing on creating a memorable,
positive and fun experience for its
constituents," said Bailey.
Bailey also said that while many
may criticize a campaign that is
focused on student life, he feels
that engaging students through
events and activities is imperative
to creating strong communities.
Feminist Club founder Cheneil
Antony-Hale had ambitious goals
of providing more legal support
to residents of student housing
and increasing the number of
student seats on the Board of
Governors, however, her power
to implement the latter would be
severely limited.
"I'm also going to push for
greater control for students over
their fees and university spending
by increasing the number of seats,
hopefully, on the Board of Governors," said Antony-Hale.
If elected, Antony-Hale also
hopes to bring mandatory sexual
assault training for residence advisors and create a resource centre
for students with disabilities.
Joke candidate V pressed for
his vision of a campus where all
the students leave university and
organize a Hunger Games-style
battle to decide who will have the
best spaces in the new SUB.
when asked about their
leadership styles, Antony-Hale
said that she prefers consultation and leadership while Bailey
replied that, although he enjoys
taking charge, he also hopes to
collaborate with his executive
team to bring different working
styles together.
V said that he prefers to step
back and let students fight
things out for themselves in a
deadly battle.
"As many of you might know,
my leadership style is to not
lead at all," said V. "Once I'm
the president, I will dissolve the
executive council, let them fend
for themselves and fight each
other."
Bailey brought up An-
tony-Hale's lack of experience
in student government by asking
how her previous involvement
would help her if she were to
become president.
Antony-Hale replied that
her experience founding UBC's
Feminist Club has taught her
how to listen and lead in a way
that allows people with different
ideas to be heard.
"I will adjust my leadership
style to make it a benefit to you
and thus a benefit to the team
as well because everyone knows
stuff," said Antony-Hale.
V continued to push forth the
idea of staging a Hunger Games-
style faceoff to allocate the best
areas ofthe new SUB to the
most deserving.
"When something belongs to
everyone, it means that it doesn't
belong to anyone at all," said V.
Antony-Hale questioned
whether Bailey's fun-centred
campaign would address issues
such as accessibility and diversity
on campus.
Bailey said that he would support, but not interfere with, the
efforts ofthe VP Academic, whose
portfolio specifically includes
working to ensure diversity and
accessibility for students.
Executives also received questions on how they would build a
relationship with UBC president
Arvind Gupta, with both Bailey
and Antony-Hale agreeing that
they needed to do more to communicate to him that tuition and
residence increases are a problem
for students.
Antony-Hale again stressed that
her top priority would be to implement mandatory sexual assault
training to residence advisors, as
students who have been assaulted
on campus often go to them for
help first.
Bailey said that, as Student
Housing and Hospitality Services
already provides sexual assault
training to its staff, it would be better to focus such lobbying efforts on
increased education about consent
and sexual assault.
Antony-Hale replied that the
training that SHHS provides on
sexual assault is short and often
taken lightly.
An audience member told Antony-Hale that, as someone who
had worked as a residence advisor
for two years, she had received
extensive training on how to advise
victims of sexual assault and was
offended by Antony-Hale saying
that the training they receive
is insufficient.
Accordingto Hale, her conversations with members of UBC's
Sexual Assault and Support Centre
(SASC) and other residence advisors led her to believe that more
training is needed.
Candidates also discussed balancing their own projects with those
of other executives, transitioning to
the new SUB and supporting First
Nations students on campus during
the debate. tJ
VP External candidates discuss views on tuition, transportation at debate
=HOTOWILLMCDONALD^HE UBYSSEY
Candidates tanzen Lee and tude Crasta are both in running for VP External.
Joshua Azizi
Senior StaffWriter
VP External candidates Janzen Lee and Jude Crasta met
at Thursday's debate to discuss issues including tuition
costs, public transportation,
student engagement and the
federal election.
Lee, a third-year political
science student, plans to increase
transparency between the AMS
and students by keeping a regularly updated blog which will get
students involved with the AMS
as well as keep them aware of
what the VP external is doing. To
address rising tuition costs, Lee
intends to give students greater
access to student loans and to
decrease off-campus housing.
"My campaign is based on
difference," said Lee. "There is
a big problem with involvement,
information and general fun for
the AMS. It needs to be more representative ofthe students."
Crasta, the current associate VP external, said that he is
campaigning to improve issues
related to rising tuition costs,
the federal election and public transportation. He plans
to get students involved with
the federal election as well as
improve legislation regarding
affordable housing.
"A 20 per cent increase with
winter contracts is not something
that we can just stand by and take
at this university," said Crasta.
The issue of rising tuition and
housing costs loomed large over
Thursday's debate. To address
it, the candidates discussed how
they would work with the federal government, the provincial
government and the university
to make UBC more affordable
for students.
Lee vowed to work to decrease
off-campus housing costs and
to increase the accessibility of
student loans in order to help
students pay off their debts.
"This is an issue that has
been brought up to me by many
students at UBC claiming that
they're having trouble getting access to an education because they
can't access funds," said Lee.
Meanwhile, Crasta said he
wants to give the federal government greater encouragement to
help fund education.
He criticized the provincial
government's minimal funding
for education and suggested
implementing a mandate where
"each province [would] have a
needs-based grant system so that
students could have the support
that they need without having to
pay back their interest."
Crasta also pointed out that
B.C. interest rates are some ofthe
highest in the country.
During rebuttals, Lee targeted
the current VP External office
(of which Crasta is a part) for not
making an effort to prevent the
provincial government's funding
cuts. Crasta responded that the
VP external office did play a role
in negotiations, but ultimately
ignored them.
Crasta then asked how Lee
would lower off-campus housing,
to which Lee responded that he
would work with figures from the
municipal government and city
council to increase affordability
at UBC.
The final question ofthe
debate focused on student engagement with lobbying efforts.
Crasta referred to his involvement with the transit referendum
and AMS events such as Coffee
For Commuters, while his future
plans involve engaging students
in the upcoming federal election.
Lee was once again critical
on this topic, calling the AMS'
involvement with student engagement "the greatest shortcoming
of this office in the past few
years."
His plan to create a blog that
informs students ofthe VP
external's activities will revolve
around student feedback, where
criticisms and compliments could
be directed at the AMS. Xi MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2015    |    NEWS
AMS ELECTIONS »
Debate brings up question of audits, relevancy for Student Legal Fund Society
-
.■%..
PHOTO WILL MCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
Students for Accountability hopes to rule out the incumbent slate this year.
COUNCIL »
Bill Situ
StaffWriter
Two student slates are running
against each other to control
the Student Legal Fund Society
next year.
On March 5, the Students for Accountability Slate and the Students
for Responsible Leadership Slate
debated which team would be more
effective at running the SLFS.
The SLFS, which collects a $1
fee from every student, is meant to
provide legal assistance to students
who require it. Still, most students
do not know that the society exists.
The central issue ofthe debate
revolved around improving the
recognition and accessibility ofthe
SLFS for UBC students. Since its
establishment in 1998, the SLFS has
largely had a reputation for being
ineffective in adequately fulfilling
intended services to UBC students
in need of legal assistance.
Janzen Lee from the Students
for Responsible Leaderships Slate
and the only incumbent SLFS member, was the most active speaker
among all candidates on his slate.
Having served during the past year
AMS disendorses BDS referendum, supports students voting any way but yes
CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
The AMS took a 'vote-no-or-abstain' stance on the BDS referendum.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
After a meeting that went on for
over five hours, AMS Council
voted to oppose the BDS referendum question that asks the AMS
to divest from companies that
support the Israeli military.
Earlier in the month, Solidarity
for Palestinian Human Rights
(SPHR) gathered the 1,000 signatures required to hold a referendum on whether the AMS should
divest from companies that support the Israeli military's actions
in Gaza and the West Bank.
On March 4, Council held
an emergency meeting to
discuss their action plan with
the referendum.
After presentations from both
SPHR and Hillel, the AMS talked
about whether they should take
a stance and advise students of
their position.
AMS Ombudsperson Camelia
Toghiani-Rizi gave a presentation
in which she recommended Council to oppose the referendum, as
she felt that the question put forth
by SPHR contained loaded words
and an answer within itself. She
also said that she heard reports
of vioations during the signature
collecting process, such as some
students pressuring others to sign.
AMS President Tanner Bokor
then clarified that, after consultation with their legal team,
they found that the question did
not presuppose an answer and
passed the required bylaws for the
language used.
Accordingto the follow-up
described in the motion, the
primary reasons for the opposing vote revolved around the
divisiveness of Palestine-Israel
relations, the need to promote
respectful dialogue on campus
and the topic of international
relations being outside the scope
ofthe society's objectives.
The exact wording ofthe motion reads:
"BIFRT the AMS endorses any
vote but a yes vote, as one ofthe
AMS' primary objectives, as outlined in the AMS Constitution,
is to promote unity and goodwill
amongst its members."
While most councillors agreed
that the AMS should encourage
dialogue between members of
the UBC community rather than
try to make a decision for them,
the main source of disagreement
came on whether the best way to
encourage debate and reflection
on the referendum question was
achieved by opposing a yes vote.
VP Admin Ava Nasiri spoke
against the motion on the
basis that it would divide the
campus community.
"I don't think that as the AMS
we should be endorsing either
side," said Nasiri. "I think that
our goal here is to do as best we
canto facilitate and mediate and
I think that by taking one side
or the other what we're doing is
alienating a portion ofthe campus population."
Bokor said that, as the question of divestment is at base a
moral and geopolitical debate
with differing opinions, it was
important for Council to also
share their thoughts on it openly.
"If we will have any debate,
it must be on the basis of each
other's idea not each other's
identities. We, as a community, must not marginalize each
other because of who we are, or
where we were born, or who our
parents are, or what religion you
follow," said Bokor.
"We believe in providing
equal opportunity and being
inclusive to all voices, opinions
and beliefs."
VP External Bahareh Jokar
pointed out that the AMS did not
take a stance on divestment from
fossil fuels a year ago since it felt
that it was not their place to take
a stance for students.
"It's a matter of process," said
Jokar. "Our role here as a Council is to effectively ensure that
we are providing safety for our
students, providing safe and respectable space for conversation
and dialogue and to ensure that
the processes are adhered to."
Still, councillor Christopher
Roach said that endorsing the
referendum would set a precedent of doing the same for any
referendum pushed forth by
students in the future.
"If we were to follow exactly
what students requested us to
do through a referendum, would
we not disenfranchise a group
of students? How are we going
to act when that time comes?"
said Roach.
Councillors then voted on
the motion by secret ballot after
Roach said that disclosing who
voted for or against might put
members' safety at risk.
While a secret ballot cannot
reveal the number of votes for or
against the motion, the motion
passed by a simple majority.
After that, Council also voted
not to proceed with a formal
campaign on their position, but
rather to send out one email informing students of their stance.
The referendum is currently
slated to take place from March
23 to 27. a
on the SLFS, he acknowledged
that the incumbent SLFS slate has
flaws, but maintained that the committee actually did tangible work.
"We have our website," said Lee.
"[You can access it] if you have a
case that you believe affects a wide
array of students."
Still, Lee also said that it is
students' job to seek the services
ofthe SLFS themselves. Last
year, they dealt with a total of
two cases.
"Because it was not up to us to
go and find real cases that we can
work with, it was up to students
to fill out an application, which
you can then take to the litigation
committee," said Lee.
Students for Accountability, the rival slate, did
not find his argument to be
overly compelling.
"The SLFS does not release
any regular audits, and nor do
they release any information
in order for the organization
to effectively spend its money,"
said Tanner Bokor, current AMS
president and candidate for the
Students for Accountability slate.
Bokor challenged Lee that it
must be mandatory for the SLFS
to provide audits for legal cases
back to the institution. If elected
for the SLFS, Bokor's slate promised to make the release of public
audits a regulation.
In addition to the history of
how the SLFS has been handling
its services to students, contention also emerged between the
slates in terms of how the background and experiences of their
respective candidates would be of
benefit to the SLFS.
The Students for Accountability slate consists of candidates
who have all been involved with
the AMS. According to Jude
Krasta, his fellow candidates have
the necessary experience given
that they are all familiar with the
operations ofthe society.
No candidate from the Students
for Responsible Leadership slate
has had any prior affiliation with
the AMS. Still, candidate Nathan
Ho maintained that the non-AMS
credentials of his slate's members actually place his slate at an
advantage. tJ
book by JAMES MAGRUDER
music by JEFFREY STOCK
lyrics by SUSAN BIRKENHEAD
BASED ON THE PLAY BY   MARIVAUX
directed by BARBARA TOMASIC II Culture
JENICA MONTGOMERY
MONDAY, MARC
CITR»
20 years of Discorder get digitized
Discorder is a music magazine off-shoot of CiTR.
Olivia Law
Senior StaffWriter
If you listen to music, go to gigs or
are at all interested in Vancouver's
thriving indie-music scene, you'll
have most likely picked up an
issue of Discorder, CiTR's monthly magazine which focuses on
Vancouver and B.C.-based bands
and concerts.
With the future of print media
continuously up for debate, more
and more mediums are transferring
to, or adapting themselves to the
online world — and Discorder is
keeping up to date with this trend.
Every issue since the magazine's
inception in 1983 was digitized over
the past eight months.
Cecilia Rose, a grad student in
the school of library, archival and
information studies was in charge of
the digitization process, as part of a
work-learn.
"We started from the very first
issue over 20 years ago," said Rose.
"You can see materials from the
comfort of your own home, you can
browse pages, you can even search
for information."
Now, rather than searching
through physical archives, music
fanatics can use the complete stored
archives online to access their favourite bands, concert reviews from
years past and even photographs
from gigs (the ones from the 80s are
pure gold.)
"It's documenting the history
ofthe independent music scene in
Vancouver," noted Rose.
For Rose, the process of digitization disclosed hints of nostalgia.
Currently in three-man band, The
Flinettes, Rose was featured on the
June 2014 cover of Discorder, which
can be accessed online due to her
role of digitizing.
Issues include articles, reviews,
photos, features, interviews and
advertisements, all of which can
be downloaded in PDF format and
=HOTOTIMOTHY HOGGANfTHE UBYSSEY
saved for future use. Although the
physical archives are still produced
and available, Rose specifies the
importance of these online editions,
particularly when looking further
into the future.
"It helps to protect the originals
so people don't have to access the
original material to actually handle
it, as they might be fragile."
Although the magazine is digitizing all of its future issues, print
readers will not be disappointed.
"I think that Discorder's print
existence will always be a top priority for the publication," said Alex de
Boer, editor-in-chief of Discorder.
The entire process of 20 years
worth of magazines took just eight
months, and are all available on the
digital collections website ofthe
UBC Library. Not only is Discorder
your one-stop-shop for all things
musical, cutting edge and current,
now it can be an insight into the past
music scene in Vancouver. Xi
AMS»
Block Party to be hosted
in a parking lot
FILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTER/THE UBYSSEY
Last year's Block Party was hosted in Maclnnes field.
chosen based on what was avail-
Jenica Montgomery
Culture Editor
The eighth annual AMS Block
Party was announced for April 10
this past Thursday, however the
capacity is 2000 people less than
last year.
Block Party, which was held
in Maclnnes field last year, will
be taking place in the parking lot
next to the Technology Enterprise
Facility 3 (TEF 3). The lot will hold
4800 attendees which, according
to AMS programming and events
manager Anna Hillar, is 2000 less
than the previous year.
"We can't have it in a big deep
hole, which is currently what
Macinnes field looks like, so we
have been searching for a new
home basically for a year and half
... so [the AMS] and the university
found the biggest lot possible that
was going to be safe enough to
hold as many people as we could,"
said Hillar.
Since construction began on
Macinnes field for the new aquatic
centre, Block Party and other large
scale events had to find a new home
on campus. This year's location was
able, cost efficient and close to the
centre of campus. Hillar noted that
the large football and soccer fields
were unavailable for use due to the
expensive nature of covering turf.
Though the event won't be able
to host as many attendees as previous years, Hillar reassures that the
event will still be fun for students.
"I think it will be just as fun....
It's going to feel intimate and awesome, so I don't think it will affect
the energy of it at all it will just be
a little bit harder to get a ticket,"
said Hillar.
Though they haven't announced
the artist lineup, the available food
stands or the planned activities,
students should be excited.
"Its really really fun, like even if
you don't like being around crazy
drunk people, its not all just crazy
drunk people. Some students are
there solely for the music and a
lot of students on campus don't
actually drink, so I just encourage
everybody to come."
Early bird tickets will be $15
and week-of tickets, if they're still
available, will be $30. Xi
CHAN CENTRE »
Celtic Connections combines Celtic and Indian music traditions
Rachel Levy-McLaughlin
Contributor
Art has had an interesting
history of both expressing the
conventions of culture through
folklore and rebelling against
those conventions to create
something revolutionary. It can
both reinforce the envelope and
push it.
Coming to the Chan Centre
on Saturday, March 21 at 8 p.m.
is just one demonstration of how
art both pushes and forms cultural conventions.
Celtic Connections combines
Celtic and Indian folk music. Za-
kir Hussain, a renowned Indian
tabla player, has teamed up with
Irish, English and Scottish musicians and percussionists to create
something innovative.
"We haven't created a new
type of music here," said John
Joe Kelly, award-winning
badhran player collaborating
March 25
with Hussain on this project.
"There are not new musical
rhythms or new musical forms
that we have composed together,
but we have found a commonality
between these sounds which are
rarely played together."
This project first began in 2011
with Hussain experimenting
with the combination of Indian
and Celtic musical styles. It was
such a success in the United
Kingdom that Hussain and his
group were asked to perform at
the London 2012 pre-Olympic
performances.
"[The performance] is a fusion
with all the different musical
languages, sounds and flavours
mixing with each other and
creating a really exciting whole,"
said Kelly.
The bodhran, played by Kelly,
is an Irish drum, played with a
short wooden stick. The tabla,
played by Hussain, is two small
■ttoptealia Film Screen/^
April 2
Students gather to present on Latin     This documentary
hand drums each with its own
timbre. Also featured in Celtic
Connections are fiddles, flutes,
Scottish pipers, a guitar and a
bansuri (an Indian bamboo flute).
"We all still remain true to our
traditions while obviously pushing boundaries in order to ... find
connection points and common
ground between our repertoires
through rhythm and melody,"
said Kelly. Celtic Connections
uses the tradition of folk music to
create a new sound of music.
"The beauty of collaboration
really is getting different musical
brains in one room and working
to find a common language,"
said Kelly.
At one point in time, Celtic
and Indian folk music might
have seemed worlds apart. Now,
however, they have been combined into something that is
simultaneously traditional and
innovative. Xi
=HOTO COURTE^T LAURAMURRAY PR
John Joe Kelly is an award winning badhran player.
from language to art. Musical performances in conjunction include
Gilberto Gil and Lila Downs.
ofthe 1960s. The film, of course,
includes interviews, images, archived materials and music.
Gilberto Gil
April 12 -
Key Tropicalia participant is
playing a sold out show at the Chan
Centre next month. This show
promises to show a glimpse of
brazilian history. MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2015    |    CULTURE
NETFLIX »
Bottom of the
Queue: The
Coed and The
Zombie Stoner
NETFLIX
Sam Fruitman
StaffWriter
Well, the title sure doesn't leave
anything to the imagination. To
be honest, we really just wanted
to see how a coed could ever be
grouped together with a zombie stoner. More importantly,
how can a zombie stoner even
exist? This film glides over these
important questions, providing
decidedly unsatisfying answers.
We're not sure a plot summary
is even necessary for this one. It's
so ridiculous you probably won't
believe it. But here it is anyways. The film centres around
a "nerdy" sorority girl (read: an
attractive girl with glasses) who
stumbles across a hunky zombie
who smokes inhuman amounts
of marijuana to turn his hunger
for flesh into hunger for snacks.
Stay with us. He mistakenly bites
a frat guy, and before you can
say "munchies," the campus is
filled with the undead (and a lot
of topless women). The nerdy
sorority girl, with the help of
her science professor and super
stoner brother, must "smoke out
the entire school before it's too
late," as the official plot synopsis
so eloquently states. We'll give
you three guesses as to who the
target audience for this flick is
(Hint: it isn't zombie fans).
This film is another example
of a bad movie that knows it's
bad. The problem with this one
is that it's a little too confident
in its "badness." It employs all of
the standard bad movie tropes:
predictable twists, nudity for the
sake of nudity and acting that
makes Arnold Schwarzenegger's
work Oscar worthy, but it doesn't
pave any new ground. However,
it does have a couple redeeming
qualities. There is a nice little
reference to zombie flick 28 Days
Later, as well as a cat named
"Romero," presumably after
the father of zombies himself,
George A. Romero. Other than
that, the film doesn't really hold
up as a zombie film. The zombies
themselves were little more than
actors with dark makeup under
their eyes.
The bottom line: If you need
a film to have on in the background, this is it. If you need
a film that requires very little
brainpower to watch, this is it. If
you're looking for a decent zombie comedy that delivers equal
scares and laughs, look somewhere else.1!!
DEBATE»
Debate club: Should the next James Bond be female?
Elba Gomez Navas
Contributor
You might have spent your weekend
either frantically studying for that
ever-elusive last midterm, or trying
to get an ephemeral reminder of
what it is to have fun before finals
come down full force. But for UBC
debaters, this weekend meant the
opportunity to take a shiny trophy
home, courtesy ofthe McGoun
Western Canadian Debate Championship.
For this weekend's debate, the
Canadian Parliamentary style was
the debate method of preference. In
this debate structure there's no flying solo, given that participants pair
up to compete and victory is only
secured if partners work in tandem.
"A lot of it comes down to the
relationship between you and your
partner. Between my partner and
me we had a very supportive relationship, like, it doesn't matter if we
win or loose, we're still good people
and we'll still have fun," said Allison
Morell.
This weekend, 14 teams representing four ofthe largest West
Coast Universities, including the
University of Victoria and UBC,
went through six debating rounds,
arguing for or against topics ranging
from whether we should eliminate
the Hogwarts house system to more
contentious issues such as whether internet anonymity has done
more harm than good. Although
the seriousness of topics varied,
LITERATURE »
the selection for this year's final
was an irreverent exercise in the
highly hypothetical: should MGM
studios make the next James Bond
a woman?
As University of Victoria debater
and finalist Nicolas Methot gleefully
announced the final debate topic,
gasps and laughs were heard across
the room.
"This house as MGM studios
will make the next James Bond a
woman. We changed, however, only
the biological sex and the fact that
she identifies bodily as a woman,
every other facet of James Bond's
character remains the same insofar
as being an alcoholic, womanizing
mysoginist... who is a super badass
spy. The story line remains the
same," he said, opening the debate.
After the announcement, the
opposition team had less than 10
minutes to prepare before one of
the partners got on-stage to argue
against MGM's head-turning decision.
The first opposition debater
was Connor Hunter, third-year
Arts student, Model UN and UBC
Debate aficionado. Hunter has also
won three debate tournaments
this past year. After that, Methot's
debate partner, second-year Emma
Kinakin passionately argued
for a new era in female leads.
Grant Bradshaw closed with the
argument that women deserve to
craft their own role models, rather
than borrowing from a figure that
has so much historical baggage
=HOTO ^EVEN DURFEEfTHE UBYSSEY
UBC hosted the McGoun Western Canadian Debate Championship this past weekend.
already. The winners for this
year were Hunter and Bradshaw,
allowing UBC to keep its title from
last year's victory.
Although this was announced
at the end of the night, when
interviewed after the end ofthe
closing arguments, they both said
debate — although competitive by
nature — was most attractive to
them because ofthe people they've
met and befriended.
"Debate allows you to challenge
your views and gives you the confidence and purpose to achieve real
progress. For me, it's where I have
made some of my best friends,"
said Shannon Hogan, previous
Western Canadian Debate Champion and current French Director
of UBC Debate.
For UBC Debate, the people are
the bedrock ofthe club. That's why
so many are drawn to it. tJ
Eat what you love and love what you eat
^RM.iJluiftlti
jliTiTiI
«W           1
=HOTOCOURTE^T FORBIDDEN FOOD
John Sloan is a doctor with UBC Medicine.
Jasmine Cheng
StaffWriter
Everybody knows the secret to
living a long and healthy life is to
eat right. We desperately strive to
make good food choices everywhere we go, from purchasing
all-organic meats and produce to
asking for low-fat skinny lattes at
our favourite coffee shop.
The association between eating
"good" food and boosting general
health seems hard-wired in the
general public. Evidence suggests,
however, that many of these connections are not scientifically supported at all. John Sloan, a doctor
with UBC Medicine has written a
new eBook called Forbidden Food
which examines our obsession
with healthy food and the plethora
of new fad diets that have emerged
in recent decades.
We are all familiar with ideas
and beliefs surrounding the negative consequences of consuming
trans-fats, sugar and salt, especially in relation to the development of
obesity and diabetes. But where do
these beliefs, which have become
so ingrained into our culture and
permeated society's collective
conscious, come from?
According to research presented
in Forbidden Food, the source of
many of these beliefs maybe a
surprise to many. For instance,
the idea that fats are bad was
started more than 60 years ago
with the observation that populations living in Europe during
World War II who were on the
brink of starvation on a daily basis
were also observed to have lower
rates of heart disease than their
wealthy American counterparts.
Americans at the time who freely
consumed what was considered
luxury foods such as meat, which
happens to contain high quantities
of saturated fat, had increased risk
of atherosclerosis and other types
of heart disease as a result of their
diet.
"[It's] only in the last 10 years or
so that it's become clear, although
it certainly has not penetrated the
general cultural consciousness
that there is absolutely no outcome
to be obtained by cutting back or
otherwise modifying types of fat,"
said Sloan.
The book Forbidden Food
mentions several other examples of food myths that have
little credible scientific backing
which we frequently accept as
common knowledge. Sloan uses
the term 'orthorexia' to describe
our society's unhealthy fixation
with what is considered healthy
eating.
Sloan examines scientific studies ofthe past 50 years in his new
book and said that many ofthe
so-called healthy choices that we
strive to make are merely superstitious. According to Forbidden
Food even in cases where it has
been proven that eating specific
foods can prolong life, the net
effect can be astonishingly insignificant. It turns out that even
choosing healthy options over
fast food over an entire lifespan
would only lengthen it by a few
minutes on average.
"People want to deny themselves the pleasure of eating what
they enjoy, but the science doesn't
back it up. So I'm hoping with my
new book to liberate people from
their superstitious eating habits,"
said Sloan. "It runs counter to
common wisdom, of course [but]
the only bad food is food that
tastes bad; you should eat what
you love and love what you eat." Xi
Are you looking for close convenient storage?
SsHkitsilano
liiM MINI STORAGE
We have two locations available minutes from the UBC campus and offer student discounts year-round.
■ 1850 York Avenue 604.731.0435 york@kitsministorage.com
604.736.2729 w11th@kitsministorage.com
■ 2034 West 11th Avenue
We also have limited space available for on campus storage, please contact w11th@kitsministorage.com
for details. // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
"Time for the BDS vote... no peeking!"
LAST WORDS//
AMS ACCOUNTABILITY
AND SECRET BALLOTS
CANT GO HAND IN HAND
At the last AMS Council meeting, the society, by secret ballot,
voted on whether to take a
formal stance opposing the BDS
referendum. If we put aside the
larger issues of what their stance
should have been (or if they
should have taken one at all), it's
pretty shocking to all of us that
they did not vote on it openly.
As Tanner Bokor rightly
pointed out at the meeting,
transparency is just as important when dealing with sensitive
subjects such as BDS as it is when
voting on what to, for example,
order from the pizza place. We'd
venture to say that it's even more
important for an issue such as
this.
Naturally, it is more comfortable for councillors to vote on
sensitive issues in private, but
the comfort should not trump the
accountability that those who
were elected owe to students.
While there are definitely times
when a vote by secret ballot is
necessary, it shouldn't be an
automatic shield away from
sensitive topics.
In this case, the safety concerns that some ofthe councillors had brought up were based
mainly on hypothetical scenarios
rather than actual risks. The fact
that councillors had the option
to abstain, too, means that if
they really didn't want to take
a stance on a major geopolitical
issue, they could have.
The truth is, people in politics
sometimes have to make difficult
choices and have the public judge
them because of it. But when
politicians start toying with the
scale of comfort versus accountability, accountability should win
in almost every case.
ELECTIONS DEBATE
LIVED UP TO ITS NAME
It was nice to see some actual
debating at the AMS elections
debates on Thursday. Too many
candidates in recent memory
have used the debates to just
agree with each other, rather than call out holes in their
opponents' platforms or take
controversial stances. Candidates actually challenged each
other on points that could have
easily been let slide, and it's for
the best.
One of Cheneil Antony-Hale's
platform points — mandatory
sexual assault-related training
for residence advisors — sparked
challenges from an audience
member, as well as spirited debate. Agree or disagree with her
point, it was nice to see candidates being challenged. Even the
SLFS debate — one that is often
ignored, or doesn't happen in
the first place — sparked some
legitimate discussions about why
SLFS matters to students. We
hope this spirit of actual debate
will carry on to the Great Debate
on Tuesday, and more importantly, we hope it will make students
look beyond the platform points
on candidates' websites and
make informed choices in this
year's elections.
THE AMS NEEDS TO PLAN
FOR THE LONG-RUN
Tanner Bokor is heading the
development of a long-term strategic plan for the AMS, and we're
impressed. Though how effective
the plan will be isn't yet certain,
and we aren't particularly hopeful
based on the efficacy of long-term
plans we've seen, it's critical for
the AMS and its student politicians to make goals and plan for
the long run. The university is
Teach in CHINA
We are currently looking for certified professionals to fill
teaching positions at all grade levels. Must have a B. Ed.
For more information or to APPLY ONLINE,
visit our website: WWW.AEI-INC.CA
Brunswick
AEI*f*
Atlantic
Education
ternational
QD
LLUSTRATIONPRESTYWULANSARIfTHE UBYSSEY
going to be around for a long time,
and we need to think beyond our
own four or five years here.
The nature ofthe AMS'
governance model means that
the executive can switch over
entirely from year to year. Bokor
seems eager to work with his
successor to ensure that this plan
is actually adhered to, which will
hopefully result in some sort of
continuity with the new government (and hopefully with many
more to come). Only time will tell
how much good the AMS 2030
plan will do, but at least they're
doing something.
NEW SUB CELEBRATIONS
ARE LONG OVERDUE
The New SUB is set to open in
early April and though we can't
say that we're optimistic, we are
getting pretty excited. We've
been in our basement office for
nearly 15 years, and we're all
looking forward to a few days of
natural light at work before the
school year (and our work year)
ends.
Students have been waiting for
the New SUB for a few years now,
and some have watched it go
from a hole in the ground to what
it is today over the course of their
university careers.
Unfortunately for them, many
of those who have been here
for the whole process are now
graduating and won't have a
whole lot of time to enjoy the
new facilities.
Though an opening date of
early April seems a little bizarre,
given that most of us will only
have a few weeks to enjoy the
building before escaping UBC for
the summer, it's nice that it gives
graduating students a chance
to experience the building for
which they suffered endless
detours and paid for with their
student fees.
As far as the opening itself
goes, it looks like the AMS plans
to make quite an event out of
the new building's first day. The
focus on mental health is timely,
given that it'll be smack-dab in
the middle ofthe most stressful period ofthe year for most
students.
Though we are a little bit terrified by the prospect of "cheap
massages" (mostly by the concern
that those giving them may be
newly out-of-work construction
workers), it's nice that the AMS is
going to be putting in some effort
to make up for the numerous
delays that students anxiously
anticipating the building's opening have suffered. tJ
DIVESTMENT »
Supporting BDS is a moral responsibility
SALMAN ZAFAR
Letter
SPHR's campaign to have the
AMS include a BDS campaign
against the state of Israel at the
upcoming student government
elections is in full swing. The
reaction to that has been strong,
which is expected at a university
that has students from across
the globe.
While there have been calls
to prevent this referendum from
passing, the arguments used to defend that line of action have been
weak on multiple levels.
Getting into the historical
question of Israel-Palestine is a
long debate and one which cannot
be covered in the given space. But
while the complication ofthe issue
is acknowledged, what also needs
to be accepted is that Palestine's
position on the negotiation table
is ridiculously weak. What also
needs to be accepted is that the
sheer magnitude of human loss
suffered by Palestinians over the
course of this conflict is significantly higher compared to what
has been suffered by Israel.
This does not imply, under any
circumstances, that violence by
Hamas or other outfits is acceptable. But while Israel, one ofthe
strongest military forces in the
world, is able to burn Palestinian
homes down to rubble and splatter
streets with blood, action needs
to be taken. This is precisely why
a campaign that promotes to
respond via economic measures
makes a lot of sense.
It would be naive to believe that
the BDS campaign, if successful,
will significantly harm Israel's
economy. But it will make a statement, which is what all of this is
about.
Concerns from Jewish and
Israeli students on campus are
valid, but we need to accept the
fact that every time Israel's brutal
foreign policy is criticized, it is not
a sign of anti-Semitism. Every time
Israel's brutal campaign in Gaza
is criticized, it is not a campaign
against the global Jewish population. Similarly, a campaign on campus that aims to speak out against
Israel's foreign policy and makes
an attempt towards pushing for
economic harm is not a campaign
against the Jewish and Israeli
students. Israel's foreign policy
is separate from the people who
reside in that country. That needs
to be understood. It is common
knowledge that there are sections
within Israel that are against the
country's brutal campaign in Gaza.
All this is easier said than done,
of course. The world, unfortunately,
has a dark history and the fears of
students on campus are perhaps
justified when one looks at it from
a historical perspective. But those
fears need to be addressed without
comprising on the principled stance
of supporting the BDS.
Violence is not an answer to
anything; neither from Israel, nor
from Palestine. But if economic
harm makes a statement in the
face of a brutal foreign policy, no
matter how small, then it must
be supported. It is our duty, not
just as people who are affiliated
to UBC in some capacity, but as
humans, to take a stand and speak
out for Palestinian voices. As
Dante said, "The darkest places
in hell are reserved for those who
maintain their neutrality in times
of moral crisis." Let us not be
those people.
Salman Zafar is a UBC staff member and also a member of Socialist
Alternative Canada. Xi
ADVICE »
On having a newly-Greek girlfriend
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"Dear Natalie,
My girlfriend joined a sorority
and I know it's not rational
but I hate that she's always out
with her "sisters" now and I
feel like I'm always second in
her life."
I'm not in the Greek system, but I
know a lot of people who are are,
including one of my best friends.
Sure, there's a certain stereotype that is thrown in with the
Greek system (you know the one:
preppy, high maintenance, heavy
drinking) but honestly there's a
stereotype for every club (and
really that's all sororities are at
their core. Really complicated
and somewhat secretive, but a
club nonetheless). The lacrosse
club is full of jocks, the poetry
club is full of "sensitive" English
majors and The Ubyssey is full of
amazingly beautiful and talented
people (although that last one is
true.)
Just because something has
the stereotype, doesn't make it
real. Sororities are for meeting
new people, making friends and
hanging out with them. One
of my friend's sorority events
is weekly dodgeball. Does that
seem like an activity you want to
keep your girlfriend from? No,
because dodgeball is amazing.
Get out of your pity party of
one, because I'm not joining you.
So your girlfriend joined a club
and is meeting new people who
she seems to like and is doing lots
of fun activities. What a shame.
However, you can talk to your
girlfriend about feeling left out of
her life. Ask for more time where
she doesn't talk about her sorority or sisters. Relationships are
about communication and being
able to use that communication
to work through problems.
Don't be an ass and good luck.
Need advice? Write to Natalie
anonymously at asknatalie@
ubyssey.ca and have your questions answered in an upcoming
issue ofThe Ubyssey. Xi MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2015    |    SPORTS
BASKETBALL»
Women's basketball takes Canada West Championship
Victories over Alberta, Saskatchewan punch T-Birds' ticket to Quebec City
Kris Young celebrates with her teammates after a hard-fought battle Friday night.
Natalie Scadden
Senior StaffWriter
For the UBC Thunderbirds
women's basketball team, their
16th straight win could not have
been any sweeter.
A night after securing a berth
at the CIS national championship
tournament, the T-Birds completed a thrilling comeback on
Saturday to win the 2015 Canada
West Championship by a final
score of 69-68.
With the Saskatchewan Huskies
up four points and the clock ticking down fast, Adrienne Parkin
drained a huge three-pointer with
18.7 seconds remaining.
Strategically, UBC quickly used
up their remaining fouls to give,
sending Saskatchewan's Kelsey
Trulsrud to the free throw line.
She missed both the freebies
and when Kris Young picked up
the rebound, she knew exactly
what to do with it. The two-time
conference MVP took the ball
from end-to-end, expertly used
=HOTO VICTOR HOGREFEfTHE UBYSSEY
her body to create space and
banked the ball off the glass into
the basket.
With no timeouts left and six
seconds remaining, the T-Birds defence was able to shut the Huskies
down, the final buzzer sounding
before they could get a shot off.
"Oh my god, honestly, this is
a storybook ending for me," said
Young. "My last game in War
[Memorial Gym], I got MVP, we
won and I hit the game winner. I
mean, it doesn't get much better
than this."
UBC was down early and often
in this game. Saskatchewan was up
by as many as 12 points in the first
quarter and took an 11-point lead
into the half.
The Huskies had been shooting 50 per cent from the field in
the first half, but went ice cold in
the third quarter, allowing the
T-Birds to pull themselves back to
a two-point deficit at the end of
the frame.
At that point, one could sense
that it was time for the Kris Young
show. Held to just eight points on
3-of-10 shooting through the first
three quarters, UBC's all-time
leading scorer was on an entirely
different level in the fourth. Playing
every minute of her final home
game, Young hit six-of-nine shots
en route to 13 points in that final
frame, electrifying the crowd into
loud "M-V-P" chants.
"Kris did some remarkable
things down the stretch," said UBC
head coach Deb Huband. "You
could see she wanted it so bad and
so did her teammates. It takes a lot
of courage to step up like that when
the game's on the line."
Credit to the Huskies though,
who were hitting seemingly every
three down the stretch. The
T-Birds only led the game for a total
of 43 seconds, but had the upper
hand when it mattered most.
"I think it was great for us to be
challenged like that and have to
answer the bell, come from behind.
[It helps] prepare us going into
nationals," said Huband.
While there was the obvious
standout performance from Young
— who led UBC with 21 points,
eight rebounds, six assists, three
blocks and three steals — as well
as the game-changing triple from
Parkin, the T-Birds dug in as a team
and stayed calm and composed
throughout the game. They've
got plenty of star power between
Young and Harleen Sidhu, who had
18 points, but their improved depth
is what's gotten them through their
current 16-game streak.
"Deb always talks about showing
yourself and having different
people on our team step up," said
Young. "I think that's what has
been amazing about our progression over this season. We've had
people step up when we need it. It's
not just me and it's not just Harleen
getting buckets, it's everybody. It's
a team game and it's way more fun
and that's why we're succeeding."
The T-Birds still have a long way
to go to reach their ultimate goal
this year. All season long they've
been wearing shirts with "3210"
written across the chest. That's
how many kilometres it is, as the
crow flies, from Vancouver to
Quebec City, where nationals are
being held.
"We wanted to have it in front
of us all the time to know that
was our end goal and know the
little steps that were going to get
us there," explained Young.
But since 3,210 kilometres is
actually quite a bit of an underestimate, the 'Birds will have
to go the extra distance if they
want to bring home the rather ironically named "Bronze
Baby Trophy" for the first time
since 2008.
Thankfully, they've got the
wind at their back.
"I think the real importance of
this game was momentum," said
Young. "We had a tough, tough
win and that's going to make us
better." tJ
Baseball
Final, March 8
Thunderbirds
^   Cavaliers
March 7
Thunderbirds
Cavaliers
2
1
March 7
Thunderbirds
Cavaliers
5
0
0
1
Softball
Final, March 7
Thunderbirds
^   Cavaliers
March 7
Thunderbirds 2
Cavaliers 4
0
9
Men's Rugby
Final, March 7
Thunderbirds
Vikes
March 7
Thunderbirds
Norsemen
24
21
March 7
Thunderbirds
Warriors
12
17
52
0
Women's Rugby
Final, March 7
Thunderbirds
Vikes
7
12
March 7
Thunderbirds
Pronghorns
40
12
March 6
Thunderbirds
Vikes
51
0 v lmwM.                                I
fe,. MONDAY, MARCH 9,2015    |    SPORTS    I   11 12    |    GAMES    |    MONDAY, MARCH 9,2015
Photo of the Day
Get to Kits beach before summer to beat the crowds and enjoy some city solace.
PHOTO STEVEN DURFEE/THE UBYSSEY
1
2
3
4
5
'
1
'
S
9
"
1
*'
12
13
14
15
"
17
"
13
20
21
■ 22
23
■ 24
■ 25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
■ 38
39
40     1
41
42
43
44
■ 45
46
47
48
43
50
51
52
53
54
55
5G
57
58
59
GO
■ Gl
62
G3
G4
G5
1
GG
G7
1
GS
"
70
"
"
5
6
4
9
8
1
3
2
7
3
2
9
7
5
4
6
1
8
7
1
8
6
3
2
5
4
g
1
9
2
4
6
7
8
5
3
8
7
5
1
2
3
9
6
4
6
4
3
5
9
8
1
7
2
9
3
6
2
4
5
7
8
1
2
5
7
8
1
9
4
3
6
4
8
1
3
7
6
2
9
5
MAR5ANSWERS
E
2
R
3
1
*c
|
's
6
H
A
s
N
3
A
10
B
ii
o
12
L
13
0
L
O
B
o
c
0
W
E
R
1
T
E
R
E
L
A
L
A
L
E
V
E
S
0
N
E
A
L
R
E
A
D
Y
A
N pA
H
E
1
M
H'
R
5 1
|  F | G
0 1
B
E
L
L
1   H
E
*B If
p |!L
E
A
A
L
1
A H 'S
A
L
A
M 1   1   HI A
R
N
N
0
T
w n i t
H
S
T
a | n |d
1
N
G
A
P
R In 1 A
T
1
o
n Hi
R
1
E
L
E
E |"z
A HT'i
E
R Ii
L
D
E
R
B"°l
w| 0 |
Ha
M
1   |
P
1
C
G
E | R
Y
s
L
1
C
K
E
R
A
T
0
Z
B
U
T
T
E
l
A
L
A
E
S
E
c
A
1
M
E
A
N
"T
E
R
P
S
M
0
G
T
A
S
T
B
"e
E
L
S
8
5
3
7
2
2
8
6
3
6
2
8
6
5
9
2
5
3
8
1
9
1
5
3
7
6
COURTESYBESTCROSSWORDS.COM
29- "You are
MAR5ANSWERS
63-Endanger
5-Concerning
COURTESYKRAZYDAD.COM
39- Hawaiian native dance
ACROSS
31- Ferrara family
32-Fashions
66-Gnawing animal
67-Wreath of flowers
6-Ushered
7-Cong, meeting
40-Absolutely!
41-Follower of Christ
1- Mischievous person
35- American space agency
68-       a soul
8-Office no.
42-Guitarist J.D.
7-Actress Ward
37- Georgia, once: Abbr.
69-Wide street
9-Meadow
43- Country in North Africa
11-Spring mo.
38- Surgical removal of stones
70-Period
10-"Lou Grant" star
46-Hindmost part
14- Broadway opening
from an organ
71-Gas burner or Sicilian volcano
11-Puzzled
47-Body of retainers
15-Former partners
41-Simile center
72-Cared for
12-Mother and father
48-Put up
16- kwon do
44- First king of Israel
13-Cervuselaphus
50- Decoy
17-Supported
45- Capital on South Dakota
19-Sandy tract
52- Plague
18-Norm
20-Books on plant life
49-Voting-pattern predictor
51-Applaud
21- Biblical verb ending
25-German sausage
55- Mindlessly stupid
57-Thai breed of cat
22-Caught congers
53-Visionary
DOWN
26-Greek fabulist
58-Range
23- May excused?
54- Monetary unit of Mauritania
28-The whole shebang
61-"Only Time" singer
24-Explosive stuff
56-Authorizes
1- Burrowing rodents
30-       Gay
62-Steinbeck: East of
25-Without exception
59-Munched on
2- Performer of gymnastic feats
33- Frozen Wasser
64-Make lace
27- Currency unit in Western
60-Severe
3-Majestic
34-Actor Keach
65- Eastender?
Samoa
61-External
4-Caesar's partner
36-Parisian pal

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128199/manifest

Comment

Related Items