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The Ubyssey Jan 28, 1969

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 Love Is
Vol. L, No. 38
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 28, 1969
228-2305
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HE KEEPS HIS BODY
IMTAPT   Wilt  YOUR HH.VKFI
SHED A TEAR for the Mardi Gras Society. They picked the most non-contro- Russ  Patrick said Monday the fraternity which  ran  the  above  poster  has
versial theme they could find to avoid last year's "Down the Mississippi" been  suspended  from  the  "King" contest  and  further action   is  expected
fiasco.  But bad taste,  it seems,  leaps all  obstacles. Mardi Gras organizer by the interfraternity council.
Justice costs
Straight $1
• III!
By NADER MIRHADY
The Georgia Straight has been fined $1000 for criminal
libel.
Editor Dan McCleod and writer Bob Cummings now
face fines of $250 each or two months in jail for an allegedly
libelous article printed last July.
The paper was found guilty of libelling magistrate
Lawrence Eckhardt by awarding him the Pontius Pilate
Certificate of Justice.
Today there will be another decision in magistrate's
court on an obscenity charge which the Straight people
feel may go even harder against them. The paper, Dan
McCleod, and cartoonist "Zip" Almasy are accused of
showing an obscene acidman cartoon strip.
McCleod said he doesn't mind paying the fine except
that it would leave him with a criminal record and give
the police more opportunity to harass him.
In any case it's much cheaper to be guilty and pay the
fine than to appeal the case and try to be found innocent.
The costs are $1500 if guilty, compared to $2,000 to $3,000
to appeal.
If the obscenity judgment goes against the paper the
added costs may force the paper to stop publication permanently.
A benefit for the paper at the Garden Auditorium Sunday has been postponed.
Be warned
Campus takers and pushers are hereby warned of a bust in
t,he next few days by Vancouver's finest narcotics squad.
Informed sources in the narcotic squad said this lot of
arrests would concentrate on university students. Beware.
Med dean denies pact
to limit hospital grant
The UBC and the Socred government are
haggling over money once again.
The latest blow came Sunday when the
dean of UBC's medical faculty denied that the
university agreed to limit its request for funds
to operate the psychiatric unit.
Dr. J. F. McCreary was refuting a claim
made last week by premier Cece Bennett that
UBC had agreed to stay within the B.C. Hospital Insurance Service grant, which pays for the
operating costs of B.C. hospitals.
Bennett used the agreement that he said
was made in 1965 when permission to build
the unit was granted, \o justify his flat refusal
of UBC's request for additional operating funds.
The university has asked for $88 per student
per day, claiming that the BCHIS grant of $55
is inadequate with the multiple roles of the
unit.
McCreary said the government was informed from the beginning that BCHIS rates would
not cover many of the services.
In his refusal, Bennett added that the rate
could not be raised for UBC without "undermining the financing of every hospital in B.C."
McCreary retorted that it was not just a
BCHIS matter, that the research and teaching
roles of the unit should concern other government agencies.
McCreary also backed up a UBC demand
for  $12.50  per  day for  the faculty  involved
saying that this would pay about half of their
salaries.
This was justified he said, because only half
of the faculty's time would be spent teaching,
and the rest of the time would be involved with
treatment.
Bennett had previously said that all faculty
salaries should come from the general university funds.
The university had reportedly earlier given
the government until March 6 to satisfy them.
Otherwise, the hospital was to sit idle indefinitely.
University officials could not be reached
Monday to comment on this in the light of
Bennett's refusal.
Blood clinic operafes
at only half potential
Only 248 people gave blood during the first
day of operation of the UBC blood donor clinic.
The head of the clinic has appealed for 4000
pints of blood. This means donations from one
out of five students.
He said there is presently an acute shortage
of blood.
The Canadian Red Cross operates the clinic
on the second floor of SUB at the south-east
corner.
The facilities can handle 500 people daily
from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. until Feb. 7. Page 2
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1969
— iohn frizell photo
A GROOVY TIME was had by all at the all-n ight dance Friday in SUB. It was part of the
gala SUB opening.
Red Guard member advises
abolishment of imperialism
"Unless we destroy the system of imperialism there can be no economic development in
the rural parts of the world."
African revolutionary Gora Ebrahim spread
this message to about 100 students Monday in
a talk on the problems of emerging Africa.
Ebrahim, who was speaking as a representative of the Pan-Africanist Congress (PAC),
traced the history of African resistance to imperialism, including the founding of the PAC
in 1945 by W. E. B. DuBois.
"It is naive to believe that colonialism and
imperialism will grant true independence out
of its own generosity," he said.
Imperialism in Africa is maintained by
armies that have been trained by colonists, he
said. "It is ridiculous to believe that an army
working for Britain before independence
would change allegiance when the new flag
goes up."
"Whenever the new government had tried
to challenge imperialist interests, the army is
used to further the cause of imperialists. This
is why there are so many coup d'etats in
Africa."
He said the armies couldn't be changed by
removing the leaders. "You cannot change an
institution by removing a leading individual
in it. The whole institution has to be destroyed
and a new one built."
Ebrahim summed up the history of Azania
(South Africa) as a 400-year struggle against
imperialism—from the time the first white man
landed in 1552.
In 1959, the Pan-Africanist Congress of
Azania was founded and "took upon itself to
lead the people to victory through people's
war." ^   X
He said the turning point in the congress's
history was in 1960, when 72 of its members
were killed and 365 wounded by forces of the
South African government.
"Prom then onward we decided to not only
die for freedom, but kill for it as well."
"South Africa is the only country in the
whole world which has racist ideology as the
official state ideology." Fifteen million of the
nation's 18 million inhabitants live on 13% of
its land, he said.
The PAC now has more than 10,000 members working in underground "cells" around
Africa.
Ebrahim has spent the last four years in
China. He speaks again tonight at 8 p.m. at
the Pender Auditorium.
Council survey will poll
student attitude to reform
Two thousand UBC students will get a
chance next week to tell the student council
where the student mind is at.
A comprehensive questionnaire is being
sent out to a stratified random sample of students by the Students' Assembly to determine
Pollution gab
If you want to know about pollution, you
have two chances to do something Wednesday.
A forum sponsored by the Voice of Women
will be held in the Vancouver Centennial Museum-Planetarium at 8 p.m. Wednesday.
Panel members are: Jan de Vries, of the
faculty of agriculture; John Fraser, solicitor;
Howard Paish, executive director of the B.C.
Wildlife Federation; and Dr. John H. Smith, of
the B.C. Health Department.
At the same time, a founding meeting will
be held at Simon Fraser University for an antipollution organization.
Speakers at the open meeting will be: Dr.
Ian Gay of the physics department at SFU; D.
Mallard, outdoorsman; Dr. R. Harper, head of
SFU's behavioral science foundation; John Hayward, pro tern president of the new society, and
a Canadian Labour Movement representative.
For further information on the SFU meeting, call Larry McConnell at 939-7110.
the students' attitude towards university reform.
The Assembly was set up at the end of last
summer when Alma Mater Society president
Dave Zirnhelt realized that his brief on university reform, Fair Weather or Foul, was
issued without enough reference to general
student opinion.
The results of the survey will hopefully help
the AMS to formulate policy before crises occur.
At present, policy is formed on the basis of
particular incidents. Once the survey is compiled, the AMS will be able to deal with student needs first instead of just dealing with
the issues of the moment.
The survey consists of a number of biographical questions as well as those asking for
student beliefs and opinions. .
This is in order to find out not only what
the students think, but why they think that
way.
The survey is stratified in such a way that
answers will show what upsets each specific
faculty as well as the campus as a whole.
To make the survey accurate at least 60 per
cent of the questionnaires must be returned.
The interim report, which will be presented
to the AMS and the administrative president,
will be ready by March while the final report
will be ready in April.
And that's when the location of the student
mind will be known, provided the forms are
returned.
European classroom
trip for architects
By  NATE  SMITH
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
An academic year at UBC consisting of an eight month tour
of Europe?
That unlikely prospect is planned next year for as many as
80 architecture students.
First year architecture representative Diederik Wolsak said
Monday the project has now been approved by the school of
architecture.
"We hope to get a perspective of how other people live and
how their cities function," Wolsak said.
The European tour, primarily for second-year architecture
students, will last from September to April.
Faculty members will shuttle between Vancouver and Europe in groups of three or four.
Wolsak estimates the unorthodox program will cost $2200
per student.
"We will try to arrange for financial assistance when we
get definite commitments and know how many students are
going," he said.
$50,000 LIFE INSURANCE
(Initial Amount)
(20-YEAR DECREASING   CONVERTIBLE  TERM   INSURANCE)
IT WOULD PAY YOU TO COMPARE
THIS WITH ANY OTHER TERM PLAN!
MONTHLY  PREMIUMS  (P.A.C.  PLAN)
AGE   21   -     $7.48 AGE   35   -   $13.56
AGE SS    -    $8.21 AGE 40   -   $19.85
AGE 30   -   $10.03 AGE 45   -   $28.69
Feme Jean
OCCIDENTAL LIFE
OF CALIFORNIA
PHONE 763-3417 (Collect)
WRITE BOX 341, WESTBANK, B.C.
con  fusion
A Series ot Informal Dialogues
for Faculty and Students
JANUARY 30:
"ENCOUNTER AT KWACHA HOUSE"-a 20-minute film
on a project in a Negro Ghetto in Halifax.
Peter Stein of the Company of Young Canadians who
worked  in the project.
FEBRUARY 6:
International  House and the White Man's Con Game.
Everybody is a special resource person!
FEBRUARY 13:
Black, White,  Red,  Yellow.  "The Woos  and Woes of
Interracial Dating and Marriage"
Any Experts?
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
UPPER LOUNGE
THURSDAYS 12:30 P.M.
FILMSOC PRESENTS
Audrey Hepburn
Jack Weston
Richard Crenna     Alan Arkin
&     Efrem Zimbalist Jr.
in
W\\\ UNTIL DARK'
with "PRISCILLA FARQUAR" in a
cameo role
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Jan. 30, 31, Feb. 1
Thurs.-12:30, 6:30, 9:00
Fri.-3:30, 6:30, 9:00
Sat.-7:00,9:15
SUB  THEATRE
ADM. 50c Tuesday, January 28, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Murmiirinjjs from
the masses
"What is your reaction to the university's
demands lor more money horn the provincial
government ?"
Elisabeth Pronkl
Commissary cook,
SUB Food Services
"Students shouldn't be so
dependent. They should make
more of the money themselves,
since they're the youngest and
most energetic workers. They
are adults and shouldn't need
to have so much money given
-to them."
Building service worker who
refused to be identified:
"I think more money is needed. The money is well spent,
"as it goes without saying education is necessary. Ninety per
cent of the students are interested in education. Also more
rooms should be put to" better
use. It is up to the students to
take the advantage and create
a favorable situation for expansion."
Cyril Lunka,
SUB janitor.
"It's a problem; it's public
money, more people are coming and the facilities must
grow. The students have to be
educated. I don't think they are
able to pay any more themselves. The more that is spent
to educate them, the more it
will benefit the country later."
M. Eaglestone
Cafeteria, SUB Food Services
"The university should have
more money if it is to progress.
People need education to get a
job, but I think the radicals
are wasting their time and
money. Those who loaf make
it tough on the others."
George McGee,
receiver and dispatcher,
SUB food services.
"Universities should receive
more money. It is big and getting bigger all the time and
needs money. They won't get
it any other way, so I think
the provincial government
should supply what is needed."
T. Foley.
SUB building service worker.
"There should definitely be
more money given. We're convinced that it's well used."
Prohibition of marijuana
wont work today - Depoe
By JACK EMBERLY
Prohibtion of alcohol and drugs such as
marijuana never worked and won't work today, CBC journalist Norman Depoe said Friday.
Depoe was taking part in a four-man debate
on the use of pot on campus.
He and Vancouver alderman, Harry Rankin,
supported the legalization of marijuana against
pitted opposition from Classic head, Malcom
McGregor and Dr. Robert Halliday, head of
the B.C. Narcotics Foundation.
Depoe said the problem was to set and enforce the use of marijuana and other drugs
people can obtain by perscription.
"The problem is not only pot but the whole
range of drugs, like speed, that are widely
used," he said.
"There are 583 drugs which can cause
hallucinations that can be bought over the
counter."
"You can't prohibit something a large number of people want to enjoy. Marijuana convictions have risen 200 per cent in the last two
years."
"You can now grow
it in your own flower
pots in your apartment.
We must have controls."
"We might as well
legalize it (marijuana)
get it under control and
ensure a stable profit."
Depoe said there are
many drugs now available by prescription
which could be "modified with a tinker-toy set
by anyone to make them
hallucinatory."
"We live in a depressive society where
people are always trying to escape this depression. Therefore we need research into this
attempt to escape depression."
Rankin agreed with Depoe about the need
for control and research and also felt legalization would at least insure profits from sales
would benefit the state and not the pusher.
"We lack a real scientific investigation into
the effects of marijuana. The only one that
took place linked it with heroin and caused a
credibility gap," he said.
"We need a first class investigation so we
can say here are the risks and this is what it
(marijuana) is."
"Every government owes the duty to give
to those people who think they know about
marijuana the accurate picture."
He added that laws governing marijuana's
use should be made only after scientific data
has been gathered.
He said most users of drugs have excluded
the hard drugs such as heroin, and opium and
MacORfGOt
RANKIN
narrowed in on marijuana because they think it
is harmless.
In adamant opposition to the views of Rankin and Depoe, McGregor said marijuana was
illegal and therefore should not be used.
"The taking of marijuana is against the law
and I implore you to
have nothing to do with
it whether you like the
law or not," he said.
"What you should do
is have respect for the
law."
He said the way to
change laws if they
were bad was not by
disobeying them.
"I'm in favor of
keeping the present law
and to enforce that law.
I don't believe the majority of people are
capable of deciding the
right or wrong and I'm
in favor of the law until
the medical men tell me
otherwise."
McGregor added that, law offenders,
whether students or not, are responsible for
their actions and the legal consequences.
"I suggest what we need is more physical,
mental  and  moral  discipline.
"In another word: guts."
Dr. Halliday, though basically opposed to
the use of marijuana because of what he called
its tendency to cause psychological dependence,
said there are questions as to why people seek
escape mechanisms which need answers.
"Is this a turning from alcohol to pot?" he
asked.
"Why is it necessary to have a weekend
junket, and what happens during the rest of
the week to make people need to get stoned
and do forbidden things?"
Halliday said there may be some forseeable
reasons for the trend toward drug use and
some social changes may be necessary.
Asked why marijuana was classed as a narcotic Halliday said he didn't know because it
wasn't narcotic by medical standards.
"Marijuana isn't a physically addicting drug
but it is a mind altering substance that can
become psychologically addicting, making
people dependent on it."
Halliday concluded by saying the problem
is not marijuana itself but the social situation
which causes the use of drugs.
If this is a symptom of this social situation
we should focus on the causes of the disease.
"We want to know how marijuana will affect people and we have to prohibit its use
until we know that effect."
Upcoming AMS elections
prompt radical slate to run
A radical group is organizing a slate of
candidates for the upcoming AMS elections.
At a preliminary meeting Monday, 20 students worked out a policy statement calling
for:
• oppostition to any enrolment cuts or
raising of admission standards;
• support of the 114 students arrested at
Simon Fraser University;
• student-faculty control of the election
of university administration president;
• student mobilization on national liberation struggles in Vietnam and Czechoslovakia
and other oppressed countries.
A spokesman for the group, Bob McKee,
said the aim of the slate was to demonstrate
to students that changes on campus depend on
initiating changes in society and students cannot isolate themselves from off-campus activities. The group will hold a further meeting in
SUB 115, Thursday noon, to elect candidates.
Earlier this month a group calling themselves the Reform Union began organizing to
present a slate for the AMIS elections.
Bains discourses
on social change
Hardial Bains, chairman and director, of the
Necessity for Change institute will speak
Thursday in Hebb Theatre on "the historical
basis of social change and the role of youth in
revolutionary struggles."
Bains, who first organized the Internationalists at UBC in 1963, will look at the problems of youth from the point of view of Marxist-Leninism and Mao Tse Tung's thought. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1969
THftlBYSSCY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it fs a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
JANUARY 28, 1969
LETTERS TO THE   EDITOR
SUB serenely socked
to breathless world
By LEO TOSCANELLI
The administration may only let four students sit
on the senate and no students sit in the faculty club, but
the student bureaucrats allowed 40 administrators to
pack of crowd of 60 at the formal opening of the so-called
Students' Union Building Saturday.
And who opened it? Dave Zirnhelt? Rod (This-is-
my-building) Ramage? Nope. None other than the administration president, Walter Gage.
This says nothing against Gage, but is he going to
let Zirnhelt cut the ribbon on the new administration
building? Not bloody likely.
So there we were. Standing: a few bewildered students who happened by, and cliques of SUB bureaucrats
who worked to make it possible. Sitting: chairs full of
honoured guests soaking up the salutations at the beginnings of all speeches.
The president of the campus religious council gave
an opening prayer, blessing it as a place where student
could get together and be human to one another. But
there's no place in the building where more than 800
students can get together. Why didn't a theology student
give that prayer, if there must be one?
Where were all the students the building was supposed to be built to serve7 They were at home recovering from the all night dance. It's almost as if the whole
opening was planned to keep those darn students out of
the way so everything could go smoothly. Monday noon
is when students are around the main floor of SUB, but
the opening was on Saturday afternoon, when all the
riff-raff is sure to be out of the way and the big brass
could steal the show with no trouble.
If we can't be masters in our own playpen, can we
ever hope to effectively participate in running the
university?
If we just want to use the building to bebop away
our frustrations at groovy dances and concerts every
weekend and not face uo to the causes of campus anxiety,
then we're doomed. Attendance at the opening week
seminars indicates we'd rather drunkenly rattle our playpen bars than the institutions that repress us.
While the mice are at play the cats make headway.
Jocks try grant jack
Hang tough. The jocks are after your cash.
Not content with $5 per student (only seven times
what you pay for your friendly, twice-weekly Ubyssey),
the phys ed people are conducting a survey designed to
show that this grant should be doubled.
Today and tomorrow the opinions of a random sample of students are being collected on a three-page survey.
They want to know why more people don't attend
games, whether there is enough publicity given to athletics, and whether athletics should be supported with
more funds.
At present the athletic department receives a $5
(non-discretionary) per capita grant of which $4.20 goes
to the men's athletic association and 80 cents to the
women's.
'#*■*'  **** .      *
EDITORS: Elaine   on   her   sweatshirt   pranced   up
Co-ordinating       Al   Birnie at>d down the hall. "My, she tarzwell,"
..                                                    ■«*._  tu.-... said  Jack  Emberly,   who   wore   a  hard
News   *-•    John  Twi" hat   and   drove   a   steamroller.   To   the
City   Alex Volkoff, Peter  Ladner left.  Candy Kane  was looked  at   ador-
Managing       Bruce   Curtis ably    by   Nick    Orchard.    "You're   the
A.,.,-.*.                                       d*.,i  ir.., apple of my eye," he said, in between
Associate   Paul Knox driving a rented  ice  cream truck  and
Wire       Irtne   Wasilewski pushing  a   grotesque   boiled   beet.   Tim
Page  Friday   Andrew  Horvat Wilson    and    Charly     Hulton    drifted
Soorts                                          Jim Maddin apart*   but   Ma«"ce   Bridged   the   gap.
Sp0rTS              iwaaain Tony   Hoage   m&   ^^   Mlrhady   sol(J
Photo       Fred   Cawsey feathers.   "Al   buy   that,"   said   Birnie,
Ass't News    John Gibbs who's    back,    as    Allison    Wunderland
walked up a path.
UBC   —Masthed   ...Page   4   ....   El   Cid Bob McKee and Eileen Onyu mouthed
Actually,   Mike  Graham   did  most   of revolution   at   Lin   Tse-Hsu   but   Irving
the   work,   but   don't   tell   PP.   There Fetish   lust  winked   as  he   carried  the
were  three Johns dressed in big seal- phyfatalphynx   under  his   arm.   Allison
skin    suits.    Their    real    names    were Brown existed  and  Rik  Nyland  watch-
Twlgg, Andersen and Gibbs. They look- ed    sportingly.    "Frizell    is    a    Dirk
ed very  nice.   Further on,  a  girl with Butto,"  said  Visser Dick  in  the John.
Indian injustice
In the past monuth, seven young Indians
have been arrested on various charges in
Northern Alberta, and have received sentences
of up to thirty months. All seven have been
active in trying to improve conditions of the
Northern Indian and Metis. The most recent
arrests arose following a beer parlour fight in
Canyon Creek, Alberta. Accounts of the incident indicate that it was a deliberate and provoked attack upon the Indians, yet no non-
Indians were arrested, and two Indians charged with obstructing a police officer were not
even at the scene when the police arrived.
The economics of being an Indian in Canada today means that an arrested man cannot
raise bail, hire a defense counsel, and very
often is intimidated with the threat of more
severe charges if he pleads "not guilty". An
Indian does not expect justice in the courts
and usually co-operates in whatever manner
will obtain his release in the shortest time
possible.
In Alberta, repeated requests for investigations or inquiries into police repression, withdrawal of welfare payments as a means of intimidation, lack of legal aid and violation of
Indians' civil liberties, have produced no effective solutions.
Gordon Wright, criminal lawyer of Edmonton, has now been engaged to defend and appeal the cases of all seven recently charged.
Funds are urgently needed to bring these cases
to court and to expose the injustices Indians
are subjected to.
Please send  a donation  (any  amount  will
contribute) to:
Indian Defense Fund
Vancouver 2, B.C.
Room  16, 448 Seymour Street
Understand that contributors are not asked
to make a judgment of guilt or innocence, but
only to make it possible to bring the cases to
court for a just trial.
Thank you for your assistance.
COLLEEN  TOPPINGS
R. S. RATNER — Department of
Anthropology and Sociology
Harger s teaching
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I would like to add what I hope will not be
the last postcript to Friday's interview with
Robin Harger. I reluctantly returned to university last fall because I had grown very bitter and cynical about the status of education in
the university. I registered for Harger's Zoology 400 and at the first meeting became aware
of the vast differences between the individual
students in the course. They ranged educationally from second year Arts undergraduates to
Ph.D. candidates in Chemistry, politically,
from ultra-right wing to ultra-left wing, in
appearance from greasy-haired 'straights' to
long-haired freaks. What has developed the
initially violent emotional confrontations are
many hours of (I hate to use the phrase)
meaningful dialogue. In the once a week three
hour seminar Harger lays his trip on everyone for the first hour, then, after coffee, individual confrontation takes place — student
against student, Harger learning along with
everyone else. There are no pedestals for professors and no barriers to communication.
Harger's approach has been that scientists
must become aware of who they are and why
they are doing what they are doing. He has
concentrated on science and scientists because it is a science course. Increased awareness can come from broadened horizons which
must be accompanied with greater honesty
and openess in our dealings with each other.
It appears that honestry and openess do not
pay when dealing with department heads and
senior faculty. To be successful one has to deal
on the basis of market place politics — bargaining, negotiation and all the rest of that
bullshit. I've heard more than one junior
faculty member say that if you want to exist
in the academic community you have to "mind-
fuck the bastards on top of the power structure". Beautiful. And when these junior faculty reach the top they will be playing the same
games that the bastards on top of the power
structure are playing now. Harger could have
laid he usual snow job on Hoar et. al., but
when he's laying an honestry-openess trip on
his students he hardly can turn about face in
his daily dealings. Robin may be naive politically but at least he has practiced what he
preaches. •**
It also appears that the zoology department
is intent on carrying on a campaign of psychological imperialism. Their policy seems to be
aimed at keeping faculty in small mental
boxes. Robin Harger's interests expand and
grow in relevance to both science and life. This
openmindedness is met by paranoiac reaction
and the casting adrift of this 'academically irresponsible' man who has dared look beyond
for what he was hired. I feel a sense of personal.
sorrow that UBC is losing Robin Harger. We
are losing someone who has made not only
science but also life more relevant to at least
one of his students. I can feel only pity and
some compassion for the paranoids that run
the zoology department. It must be terribly
lonely to be trapped in a mental box.
ROBERT WISHLAW.
Arts 4-
On Greek gods
Editor, The Ubyaaey, Sir:
With reference to last Friday's noon-hour
panel discussion in the SUB ballroom, "Has
The University Gone To Pot", a few general
thoughts came to mind with respect to statements made by Dr. McGregor of the Classics
Dep't.
Dr. Mc's Mother Hubbard Marijauna Temperance Union attitude symbolized classically
the cause of much of the alienation between
the student generation and many members of
the gray gene-ration.
With Pope-like prudence and the arrogance
of a Roman, Dr. Mc sanctimoniously requested
—no, demanded—student obedience to the law
because it is THE LAW.
Surely he is not so illusioned or naive to
expect mass resignation or submissiveness to
the many outdated laws presently on THE
Book. Surely he is aware that today youth desire freedom from the follies of their forefathers—that youth are not hypocritical enough
to prostitute their* minds to the laws and ideologies of bye-gone days.
Apparently being immersed in the antediluvian waters of classical history and anachronistic morality, Dr. Mc. is a captain looking
astern whilst registering the telegraph FULL
SPEED AHEAD!
How many social "Titanics" must civilization  suffer?
Some sagacious individual once said, "The
law is an ass" — could it have been Socrates?
With this posterior viewpoint in mind, hindsight emphasizes that the effluent from the
pages of the BOOK OF JUSTICE or from the
mouths of bewigged gentlemen saturated and
steeped with bar experience is enough to send
one rushing to the nearest privy.
Perhaps a thoughtful thistle or two shoved
up the asinine minds of those individuals with
mental constipation and verbal diarrhea would
induce sufficient prickly stimulation to result
in a psychic catharsis.
As one great Roman said to another,
"Tuum Est".
GORDON C. D. EEKMAN,
Graduate Studies 1.
Fratulence
■Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
So Mardi Gras is going underground. I
wonder how far? Last year it was niggers, and
this year hippies. Well, long hair or not, Tom
Campbell still thinks its good clean fun.
This social event is another great example
of the 'establishment', pardon the expression,
attempting to incorporate, superficially anyway,
new and original ideas or trends without letting
them affect the system.
I'm sure, though, that growing their hair
long may be a real learning experience for
some of those people if they don't cut it the day
after Mardi Gras is over, and they may even
begin to understand and appreciate the analysis
of the underground movement.
But after all, having long hair is just like
having black skin, and as such we might as
well make a joke of it, because Mardi Gras
time is fun time, and fraternities are for fun
people. _ *
STEPHEN BLOCK Have you
tried
MARDIEMSW
Juesday, January 28,  1969
MARDI    GRAS   '69
Page 1
CAROL FRASER AND TOM KEAST, are the sta rs of the Mardi Gras Ploorshow premlering
Thursday evening at the Showrnart Building.  They are part of the Phil Bernard production,
Mardi Gras Goes Underground.
Paraplegics the winners at
the Mardi Gras bazaar
The proceeds from Mardi Gras 1969 will
be-donated to the B.C. Division of the Canadian
Paraplegic Association.
**- The Canadian Paraplegic Association was
established in 1945 and now has 6,000 members
from the Atlantic to the Pacific oceans. The
National Office is in Toronto with eight divisions; Atlantic, New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and
British Columbia.
The purpose of the Association is the total
rehabilitation of paraplegics and quadriplegics
i.e. persons who have suffered disease or injury to the spinal cord, in order that they may
return to the community as healthy, productive,
independent citizens.
In British Columbia some 977 persons confined to wheelchairs are registered with the
B.C. Division and each year adds another 100
to 110 persons. The B.C. Division is dedicated
to the economic and social re-adjustment of
these people and are active in the following
areas: job placement, housing, transportation,
education,    vocational    training,    counselling,
legal aid, recreation, wheelchair athletics, supervision and general assistance. Our goal is to
restore paraplegics to both social and economic
independence and assist them to return to
society equipped mentally and physically to
take their rightful place in the community.
A great deal of the Association's efforts are
directed towards employment as it is only after
job placement that a disabled individual is able
to achieve the necessary confidence to again
become part of the community. In the past ten
years the B.C. Division has placed members in
189 permanent and 301 part time positions. If
just 100 of these permanent placements were
still confined to hospitals at the going rate of
$39.30 per day, the present bed rate at the
Vancouver General Hospital, the cost to the
citizens of British Columbia would be in excess
of $1,434,450.00 per year. Not only have these
persons gained their self-respect and moral dignity but they are now useful and productive
citizens in our community contributing through
their purchasing power and payment of income
tax.
Underground
floor shows
The floorshow for Mardi Gras 1969 explores the subterranean realms from the beginning of time through the caves and
caverns of the eons to the psychedelic present.
Choreographers Cathy Leighton and Colleen Gehrke have
prepared a spectacular show, each number revealing the work
and energy that have gone into its creation..
In the first scene, Hades Court, the hell-fire bursts forth,
setting the stage for our inhabitants. Nero's Rome represents the
decay and decadence of the ancient and pagan society. As the
punishment for the corruption spreading into western Europe,
The Black Plague follows. We move on to Paris, 1880, and are
swept off by the frivolity of the Can-Can. The gangsters of
Prohibition take over the stage, carrying us to our continent,
and the excitement and violence of that era. Once again the
Devil takes control with the Stock Market Crash and the Dirty
Thirties. Bringing us more up to date, the Rock and Roll boppers
of the last decade are now in the underworld, swooning over
the swivelling hips of the King, Elvis Presley. A revolution is
brought on by the Beatles and the "New Society" — the Devil
invites you to come on in.
As you move through the dark delves of underground, the
atmosphere is enhanced by music ranging from thirteenth century Spanish mass to the pulsating beat of Jimmy Hendrix to
the "The Cream".
Costumes in this year's show are a varied array of colours
and fashions, from the traditional to the bizarre.
Sets designed by Heather Scott provide a delightful setting
for the entire production. Lighting and special effects have been
specially co-ordinated with the dancers to heighten the aura of
fantasy.
WXC "-
You aie cordially invited
to participate in
a gala charity bazaar
presented by
The Greek Letter Societies
ol UBC
on the evening of
Thursday, the thirtieth oi January
at 6 p.m.
Showmart Building. PNE
ITS ALL IN AID
OF CHARITY
MARDI GRAS BALLS RUN THIS WEEKEND
The greek letter societies
present the 29th edition of the
Mlardi Gras Ball — the biggest
social and charity event on
campus.
The Mardi Gras originated in
1940 as a wartime effort to aid
the Red Cross. Since then it
has grown in the size and number of events.
In 1968 Mardi Gras raised
$20,000 for the Vancouver
Association for Retarded Children.
"'  This  year  the  Mardi  Gras
committee hopes ta raise the
same amount for the B.C. Paraplegic Association to aid them
in building a hostel for crip
pled children.
Activities in anticipation of
Mardi Gras began on January
15 with a "Kick Off Dance" in
the SUB ballroom. The sororities and fraternities introduced
their candidates who will vy
for the title of Mardi Gras
Queen and King. Everyone
danced to the sound of the
"Pennsylvania Railroad."
On Wednesday this week
students lunching in the SUB
cafeteria will be greeted by the
King and Queen candidates
who will be serving in costume
from 12:30 - 1:30.
A Pep Rally will be held on
Thursday at 12:30* in the SUB
ballroom. Each fraternity and
sorority will present their candidate in a costume relevant to
their campaign theme. There
will be dancing to the "Trials
of Jason Hoover".
Thursday evening the bazaar
will be held at the Showmart
Building at the PNE grounds
at 6:00 p.m.
The "Underground" theme
for this year has provided for
many different booth ideas including a boutique, a booth for
psychedelic body and poster
painting, various games of
chance and food of all types.
Other events during the evening include a King and Queen
candidate costume show, premiere of the most exciting and
colourful floorshow yet, and
the drawing of the raffle prize
winners.
On Friday and Saturday are
the two dances, which climax
the months of hard work. At
this time the King and Queen
are crowned, the fabulous floor-
show presented, and of course
there will be dancing to "The
Intentions" with Lynn Brooks.
The imagination is the only
limit for costumes for this
year's theme "Mardi Gras goes
Underground". Ideas range
from the literal underground
world of nature to the underground in its social sense
through, all the ages. Page 2
MARDI    GRAS    '69
Tuesday, January 28, 1969
WHO'S THE BEST? ITS UP TO YOU
Wendy Fysh
Alpha Delta Pi
Marion Esau
Kappa Alpha Theta
Tom Gove
Alpha Delta Phi
Friar Mountbatten III
Psi Phelta Thi
Jocelyn Murray
Alpha Gamma Delta
Wendy Grant
Alpha Omicron Pi
:>&xm
Brock Tully
Beta Theta Pi
Bert Clark
Phi Delta Theta
Doug Brawn
Phi Gamma Delta
Jim Barbee       ^~
Phi Kappa Pi
*'X >'.■>'■;•'■ ■'.■'-.'.:'■■
v.r.'r.f. *.•'.*.'<* ".*
■ * v.f
v if v t  K E E P
THIS
PROGRAMME
HEP.   Jan 29
All Day
THE VANCOUVER LIVING THEATRE meets you
In various buildings and open places
12:15 p.e.
■FUGUE" A piece for motor-vehicles,
transistor radios, transmitters and
performers.
Play Snakes & Ladders: Move to 61
12:30 p.m.
* FILM "The War Game"
(Sponsored by AMS Performing Arts Committee )
SUB Auditorium   Adnission 75*
3:30 p.m. K
"POSIDRON" by Oave Whetter
Dance Performers.  Lasserre Building, Basement
♦ FILM "The War Game" (As Above)
6:00 p.m.
» FILM "The War Game" (As Above)
8:30 p.m.
FILMS Animation Programme
"Dream of Wild Horses" by Denys Colombe
and*. "Little Monday", "What's Opera Doc?"
"Tall of Kail", "The Cruise", "The Hangman",
"Song of the Prairie", "The Great Train Robber"
SUB Auditorium'    Admission 50*
THURS. Jan 30
All Day
TIME PIECES
Play Snakes & Ladders: Move to 97 or 94
or to 31 (Clue: 'books') or move to 15
12:30 p.m.
SAff FRANCISCO COMMITTEE WORKSHOP
Improvisational Theatre
Old Auditorium   Admission 50*
MORTON FELDMAN, Illustrated lecture
"Between Categories"
Musje Building, Recital Hall
3.30 p.m.
FILMS Canadian Programme
"Palace of Pleasure" by John Hofsess
"Chansons Populates, Nos. 2,3 & 5" by Alexieff
"Solipse" by,Robert Fothergill
"Square Inch Field" by Oave Rlmmer
Old Auditorium Admission 50*
"GAMUT" A serial study for 4 performers
by Ross Barrett (no audience)
Music Building, Electronics Lab
8.30 p.n.
SAN FRANCISCO COMMITTEE WORKSHOP
Improvisational Theatre.
Old Auditorium Admission 50*
OT
E**-
>«
5
FRI.   Jan 31
All Day
CARNIVAL PROCESSIONS.     Everywhere
12.30 p.m.
Recital of Works by MORTON FELDMAN
Performed by Morton Feldman and
members of the UBC Music Faculty
"Projection I" 1950
"Tuo Pieces for Three Pianos" 1966
Music Building, Recital Hall
SAN FRANCISCO COMMITTEE WORKSHOP
Demonstration. - Freddy Wood Theatre
"PIEFACE", A carnival piece by
Dennis Vance
Lasserre Building, Foyer
"POSIDRON" by Dave Whetter, »ith THEco
Performers. Lasserre Building, Basement|
3.30 p.m.
FILMS  American Programme I
"Meshes in the Afternoon", "At Land"
& "Ritual" by Maya Oeren
"Green Desire" by Kuchar
"7362" by Pat 0 'Neal
"Wave Length" by Michael Snot-
Old Auditorium Admission 50*
4.30 p.m.
"SUNDOWN EVENT" by G. Brecht i
John Cage
Play Snakes I Ladders: Move to 52
FRIDAY 8.30 p.m. - 2.00 a.m.
FESTIVAL DANCE I CABARET
San Francisco Committee Workshop (9.00-10.00)
Oaryll Scott*.  Folk Blues
UBC School of Architecture Nonsense
Papa Bears' Medicine Show
Mother Tucker's Yello* Duck
GIANT SOUND by Deyong Sound Center
War Memorial Gym Admission 31.50 each
SHOES OFF
ART EXHIBITIONS
Fine Arts Gallery (Library Basement)
"Some Younger American Painters &
Sculptors'"
Mon. Jan 27 thru Sat. Feb 8
Hours: Mon thru Sat, 10.30 a.m. - 5.00 p.m.
Tues, 7.00 p.m. - 9.00 p.m.
Closed Sundays
X
<
O
o
to
w
w
«M
Programme Scores I Random Events ill) occur every day.of the Festival at.
various times and places. For some of these, see the Festival programme and
play the Snakes and Ladders Same; for others, just look out.
SUB Art Gallery
"Perlvalon"
Hours: 12.30 p.m. - 3.00 p.m.
The "Posidron* by Oave Whetter will be In operation every day of the Festival at 12:30 p.m.
and 3:30 p.m. in the basement of the Lasserre Building.  In addition, for
performances In the "Posidron", see the Festival programme.
Students, faculty and general public are cordially Invited to attend any or all of the
Festival events.
OTHER EVENTS TAKING PLACE OURING THE-FESTIVAL
"The Royal Pardon" by John Arden &
Margaretha D'Arcy. Directed by Jace
Vander Veen.
Dorothy Somerset Studio
Feb. 5,6,7 & 8, at 8.30 p.m.
Matinee, Feb. 6, at 12.30 p.m.
Reservations:   228-2678 I SON. Feb 3
All Day
PIECES AT RANOOM
Play Snakes & Ladders:
Move to 3,14 & 41
12:30 p.m.
SAN FRANCISCO COMMITTEE WORKSHOP
Improvisational Theatre
Old Auditorium Admission 50*
COMPOSITION RECITAL I
Performance of original works by
students in the UBC Music Dept.
Music Building, Recital Hall
FILMS Repeat of Canadian Programme
shown on Jan. 30, 3.30'p.m.
SUB Auditorium Admission 50*
3.30 p.m.
20th CENTURY RECITAL I
'Performed by students in the UBC
Music Dept..
Music Building, Recital Hall
"POSIDRON" by Oave'Whetter. Dance
Performers.  Lasserre Building, Basement
FlUfS American Programme II
"Vinyl* by Warhol
, "Danse Chromatique" by Emschwiller
"Craven Sluck" by Kuchar Bros.
"Lapis" by Whitney Bros.
SOB Auditorium Admission 50*
WED. Feb 5
11:22 a.m* - 2.00 p.m.
THEATRE PIECES by Jerry Gilbert, Gathie
Falk, Glen Lewis, Helen Goodwin J THEco
I  Tony Gnazzo
Play Snakes I Ladders: Move to 29,30,31
12:30 p.m.
SAN FRANCISCO COMMITTEE WORKSHOP
Improvisational Thea.tre
Old Auditorium Admission 50*
ELECTRONIC MUSIC FROM SFU
Works by Murray Schafer, Peter
Huse S Phil Werren
Music Building, Recital HaM
3:30 p.m.
"New York Art in the 60's".
Illustrated lecture by Alan Solomon
followed by open discussion
Buchanan 106
'DEAN FOGAL i IDA LANDAUER
"In an Effort to Communicate a Life-Time"
SUB Courtyard (2nd Floor)
TUES. Feb 4
12:30 p.m.
SAN FRANCISCO COMMITTEE WORKSHOP
Demonstration.  New Arts I Bldg.,Blue Rm.
'  "OPERATION FEEDBACK".  Ross Barrett &
Jim Land, with The Third of the Fu-Si Trio,
the Tiny Rival Foundation, I other
performers.
Music Building, Recital Hall
Play Snakes & Ladders: Move to 90
FILMS American Programme I
Repeat of American Programme I,
shown on Jan 31 at 3.30 p.m.
SUB Auditorium Admission 53*
•COLLECT CALL - Vancouver to Oakland"
Play Snakes I Ladders: Move to 80
(clue: 'Tele')
3.30 p.m.
JACKSON MAC LOW: Poetry Reading
SUB Auditorium
DEUS EX MACHINA, with Martin Bartleft
J Alden Jenks.  'A performance which
presents...the quiddity of events in
space I time...'
Music Building, Recital Hall
6.00 p.m.
FILMS American Programme II
Repeat of American Programme II shown
on Feb 3 at 3.30 p.m.
SUB.Auditorium Admission 50*
8.30 p.m.
SAN' FRANCISCO COMMITTEE WORKSHOP
Improvisational Theatre
SUB Ballroom Admission 50*
FRI. Feb 7
All Day
I ftiURS. Feb 6
|12:00 noon - 2:00 p.m.
CONFRONTATIONS
Play Snakes I Ladders: Repeat
moves 29, 30 J 31
12:30 p.m.
SUPER SAFE.  A purple comedy by Chris
Johnson.  01rected by John Linton.
Freddy Wood Theatre. Admission 25*
"THE UNORTHODOX PIANO", presented by
Kathryn Bailey. Works by Cage,
Cowell, Bartok, etc.
Music Building, Recital Hall
LUCY LIPPARD conducts a tour of ttie
exhibition "Some Younger American
Painters S Sculptors"
Fine Arts Gallery (Library basement)
3:30 p.m.
20th CENTURY RECITAL II
Performed by students in the UBC
Music Dept. .
Music Building, Recital Hall
"Contemporary Developments In Painting
J Sculpture: Vancouver & North America"
Open discussion with Lucy Lippard, lan
Wallace, Jeff Wall & others
Buchanan 106
"POSIDRON" by Dave Whetter. Oance performers.
Lasserre 8ullding, Basement
FILMS Animation Programme
Repeat of Animation Programme shown on
Jan 29 at 8.30 p.m.
SUB Auditorium Admission 50*
RECAPITULATION of Programme Scores.
I Random Events
12:30 p.m.
- SUPER SAFE.  A purple comedy by Chris
Johnson. Directed by John Linton.
Freddy Wood Theatre Admission 25* *
OEAN FOGAL & IDA LANDAUER
"In an Effort to Communicate a Life-time"
SUB Courtyard (2nd Floor)
COMPOSITION RECITAL II
Performance of works by John Swan &
Lloyd Burritt .
Music Building, Recital Hall
3:30 p.*.
JOHN LOGAN: Poetry Reading
SUB Auditorium
COMPOSITION RECITAL III
Performance of original works by
students in the UBC Music Dept.
Music Building, Recital Hall
8:00 p.m.
"THE UNORTHODOX PIANO", presented by
Kathryn Bailey. Works by Cage,
Covell, Bartok, etc.
Music Building, Recital Hall
8.30 p.m.
SUPER SAFE. A Purple comedy by Chris
Johnson.  Directed by John Linton.
Freddy Wood Theatre Admission 25*
SAT.   Feb 8
8:30 p.m.
SUPER SAFE. .   A purple comedy by Chris
Johnson.     Directed by John Linton.
Freddy Wood Theatre    Admission • 25*
PLEASE     PHONE     228-2757     FOR    ANY    FURTHER     INFORMATION There was an Old Person of Mold,
Who shrank from sensations of cold $
So he purchased some muffs, some furs and some fluffs,
And wrapped himself from the cold. Tuesday/ January 28,  1969
.*?vM ■*■■*. ?i;' Z0';4.'$yi   . -'^^ffi.-*%>%$ "
MAR DI    OR AS XA9
Page 3
0R MARDI GRAS KING AND QUEEN
a Phi Beta
Christine Currie
Alpha Phi
Shelly Bowell
Delta Gamma
Mark Coleclough
Delta Kappa Epsilon
M. Kennedy
Phi Kappa Sigma
Ken Baker
Psi Upsilon
Harvey That
Zeta Beta Tau
Peggy Allan
Delta Phi Epsilon
Lynn Pomfret
Kappa Kappa Gamma
Scott Swan
Delta Upsilon
Humphrey Killam
Zeta Psi
. -,-s. -» -.*•**• .' .'
»■ * * * * • i i v.i * t *■ •*■ * i
. i s '. vj.i > ■**.•* •' •* i *' v ,
,* ♦••**. t ¥ i* * " i i .* .* .* ■»** •( V ' Page 4
MARDI    GRAS   '69
Tuesday, January 28, 1969
BEV COUSINS, the one on the left, and Brian McDonld, the one on the right, have worked
for many months as co-ordinators of the Mardi Gras Committee. They take all the complaints,
but they will also get most of the credit for a job well done in the name of charity.
Week of fun at M.G.
Mardi Gras will be filled with various activities for
all tastes. Below, in easy chart form is a list of the action
for Mardi Gras Week '69:
Tuesday, 3:30 p.m. —
The  Mardi   Gras Committee will  be holding  its   annual
reception for the King and Queen candidates. This year it
is being held in the Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity house at
5785 Agronomy Road.
Wednesday, 12:30 p.m.—
The candidates for King and Queen of Mardi Gras will be
serving lunch to the student population in the SUB Cafe.
If you want to meet them, talk to them, or just see them
. . . this is the place.
Thursday, 12:30 p.m.—
In the SUB Ballroom and Extension there will be a pep
rally. At the rally there will be the presentation of candidates. In addition the Trails of Jason Hoover will be performing for you're entertainment. Darrell B, popular and
well-known local disc jockey will be Mc'ing the whole show.
Come out and dance your troubles away.
6 p.m. —
At six p.m. the Gala Charity Bazaar will open its doors
at the Showmart Building. There is a colour TV to be won
in the raffle.
7:30 p.m. —
At the Board Room at the PNE the Mardi Gras Committee
is holding its annual Cocktail Party. Admission by invitation only.
8:00 p.m.—
The Floor Show premiere at the Gala Charity Bazaar.
Friday, 9:00 p.m.—
The Intentions will be providing dance music at the Mardi
Gras Ball being held both Friday and Saturday nights at
the Showmart Building. The proceeds all go to the B.C.
Parapalegic Association.
Saturday, 9:00 p.m	
The second night of the Gala Charity Balls. It will be
exactly as on Friday night.
Frat House
Reception
The Mardi Gras Committee
will hold its annual reception
at the Phi Kappa Sigma Fraternity house, 5785 Agronomy,
today from 3:30 — 5:30 p.m.
There the King and Queen
candidates will foe judged on
personality, ease of conversation and general appearance.
TICKETS
ON SALE
Tickets to the Mardi Gras
Ball on Friday January 31 and
Saturday February 1 are now
on sale. The dances are scheduled from 9:00 - 1:00 p.m. in the
Showmart Building, P.N.E.
"The Intentions" with Lynn
Brooks will provide for an
evening of lively dancing and
entertainment.
Tickets are available at the
Mardi Gras office in Room 230
in S.U.B., the A.M.S. office and
at a booth on the main floor of
S.U.B.
Production day drew near and The
Ubyssey had failed to come up with
a candidate for Mardi Gras King. The
only one who wouldn't say no was
Friar Mountbatten. In fact he ' is an
undercover agent for the F.B.I. He
parades around campus in the guise
of ex-VP Linde's dog. Friar.
MARDI GRAS IS
CO-ORDINATED
The arrangements for the many Mardi Gras events this
year have been organized by co-ordinators Beverley Cousins and
Brian McDonald. They head a committee including: Ian Mitchell
(treasurer), Joan Trites (recording secretary), Jill Morris (corresponding secretary), Timothy Kerr (publicity), Dave Dale-Johnson,
Judy Rich, and Jerry Lindsay (bazaar), Rick Goepel and Helen
Simpson (raffle), Russ Patrick and. Kelly Gourlay (kings and
queens), Phil Bernard (producer), Judy Stringer (programs),
Donald Ralston (showmart), John Price (dance tickets), Stuart
Hensman (prizes), Heather Scott and Brian Lecky (sets and decorations), Marjorie Hall (costumes), Barb Laing (makeup), Colleen
Gehrke and Cathy Leighton {choreography).
//
tl
Trials of Jason Hoover
perform for Mardi Gras
The Mardi Gras Pep Rally will be held this Thursday
in the SUB Ballroom from 12:30-2:00 p.m.
The King and Queen candidates in costume will be
introduced by master of ceremonies, Darrell B.
Everyone is invited to groove to the sound of "The
Trials of Jason Hoover".
BRING  BUCKS
FOR BAZAAR
THE INTENSIONS will be performing at the Mardi Gras balls being held this weekend at
the PNE. All fraternity and sorority members are urged to attend.
The charity bazaar, this year,
is being held on- Thursday in
the Showmart Building beginning at 6 p.m.
When the doors open, the
public enters to vast domain of
all types of food and entertainment.
The theme of Mardi Gras has
provided an opportunity for
the fraternities and sororities
to create unique booth ideas.
These intriguing booths and
and their wares will be on display Thursday night.
The atmosphere will be that
of a village Bistro, and Three
Penny Lane combined with the
carnival aura of last year's
bazaar. One can browse
through the various businesses
which will foe selling colourful
paper flowers, psychedelic posters, mod fashions, and
numerous tempting refreshments. In keeping with the
theme some fraternities have
even excavated their own London and French undergrounds.
As well there will be many
games of chance, eggs to throw,
judo demonstration, a cartoonist doing caricatures, plus many
other delightful novelties.
Following the booth exhibit
will be a costume show and
presentation of King and Queen
candidates.
Next is the premiere of the
most colourful and exciting
Mardi Gras Floorsho-w yet.
The evening draws to a close
with the presentation of the
Mardi   Gras   Committee.
The final event of the evening is the raffle ticket draw
and the awarding of prizes, including a nineteen inch Zenith
handcrafted colour T.V. with
a full 180 square inches of
viewing area, a Harrison Hot
Springs weekend for two, a
wrist watch (donated by Henry
Birkls and Sons), and many
other prizes. Tuesday, January 28, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
The Responsibility of Science
By MIKE McPHEE
"In our society we give scientists credit for superhuman
wisdom. In fact . . . they are
slightly inhuman. On the one
hand, they show enthusiasm
for schemes which tend to turn
society into a vast field for scientific experiment. On the
other hand, they have done
little or nothing to protect society from the misuse of their
discoveries.
"... When there is mention of their being responsible
for destructive inventions,
they take refuge in their position as pure scientists. They
show extremely little sense of
what a contemporary society
owes to the cultural tradition
of the of the past ..." These
words of Stephen Spender
were in my mind as I went to
talk with a man who has devoted considerable time to the
professional responsibility in
science and actually teaches a
course in it — ecologist Dr.
Robin Harger.
The course is Zoology 400,
"dealing with the history and
philosophy of science" against
the background of contemporary thought. With no prerequisites and satisfying the
science requirement for Arts,
this remarkable course teaches
non-scientists what science is
and how it works and acquaints science students with
other modes of thought as well
as with the origins and inherent assumptions of their own
discipline.
Dr. Harger feels that every
Science student should take a
course of this nature "if only
to realize that scientific research is just one use of human thought." He adds, "It is
possible now to become a proficient scientist and not have
any idea what other people
are thinking about. One has to
realize that people, not scientists, are engaged in research."
They key to ethical practice
and to restoring the scientist
to the context of society is the
consideration  of  effects.
It is by making himself and
the public aware of the implications   and   possible  dangers
of his research that the scientist exercises professional responsibility. Therefore he must
be able to justify his research
by relating it to its foreseeable
effects, and to communicate
both of these non-specialists.
"Research for its own sake is
merely an ego-trip of personal
challenge  .  .  . Building a
bridge is not an end in itself
—people must use it."
Dr. Harger sees two classes
of research. There is pure research, "to find out what's
what," which cannot be condemned: the knowledge gained may have good and evil applications, but the responsibility passes on to those who do
apply it. Then there is research
which is for obvious and immediate destructive purposes
— the scientist must decide
whether he can morally engage in research of this kind.
The argument that he must on
the grounds that he cannot assume his colleagues on The
Other Side will do the same
Some continuing debate on the moral responsibility oi
scientists and the university, and the creeping publish-or-perish
uncovered by the firing of zoology assistant professor Robin
Harger.
The Ubyssey, as usual' presents one side of the argument—
university authorities show by their actions that they uphold
the other, but never talk about it.
^University machine eats people
By ROBIN HARGER
As I stand up to speak on a point which I think is directed
to the ideal of a university, a colleague of mine (a junior professor) says to me — "Better know what you are doing; the university is a machine, it eats little people."
This is the way that the institution that should stand for the
benefit of people is now viewed.
This is in part caused by the institutionalization of the science
departments into technical (perhaps far-out technical but still
technical) training schools. To this end the very idea of the
"education"to be passed from these departments concerns the
extending and moulding of the student to suit his vocation.
The process is sometimes justified in this way — "We have
nothing to say about a student's avocation" (Avocation is defined
by inference as 'that which is not vocation'). But, I say, should
we not expect to find the moral reasons which will enable a
person to wield his vocational abilities in this area?
I submit the faculty of a university does its students injustice if it does not educate beyond the reach of technical skills
and reasoning to the point at which questions of conscience con
cerning the use of those aquired skills are illuminated. Why
make it easy for people to work in, for instance, bio-warfare
laboratories?
If this point were taken, this would lead to the recognition
of 'science' in general as a 'technical' body of though presupposing thinkers.
I suggest we aim our education at people, I suggest the
science faculty is bound by conscience to support philosophy
courses, and by implication people who are interested in teaching
them, in its context.
HARGER
can be validly held only by
the scientist who would refuse were there no threat.
The scientist's responsibility to the public involves
breaking out of the ivory tower. Outsiders regard science
as some mysterious god, while
scientists feel unable to communicate with them, prevented
as they are by professional jargon. "A scientist is not a showman if he publishes in local
newspapers." The public after
all, does not read scientific
journals.
The scientist-professor has
responsibilities to teaching as
well as to research. Both are
ultimately responsibilities to
people, and they are conjugate:
he must research so as to have
knowledge to transfer, and he
must teach to justify his research. "I also teach experimental population ecology, but
I think there is a larger problem in philosophy so that more
of my research is reading for
my philosophy course."
Zoology 400 has seventy
students, two-thirds in science
(not all in life science), another
fifth in Arts, the remainder in
Education, Grad Studies and
others. The extensive reading
list includes Nietzche, Whitehead, Dewey, Khun, Descartes,
Berkeley and Aquinas. The
three-hour sessions (Thursdays at 2:30 in SUB Meeting
Room F, visitors "more than
welcome") include a summary
by Dr. Harger of the week's
book, free-ranging discussion,
and remarks by individual
students on popular articles in
the journal "Science."
Grades are obtained from
two term papers, the best of
which Dr. Harger expects to
publish, which are marked
jointly by the professor and
the student author. Attendance
and morale are high despite
the heavy reading load.
"I enjoy this class more than
any other I've taught. Especially rewarding is the respect
with which students of necessarily mechanistic viewpoints
have learned to treat the metaphysical problems under
study."
WHAT DO  THE   VICE-REGAL  MANDARINS  .  .  .
.  .  . HAVE TO SAY
Are good teachers going down the drain with Hare ?
By  CAREY  LINDE
One of the few policy positions taken by Dr. Hare
in his presidency was issued to the faculty at a
meeting held last fall. At that time he said in very
certain terms: "I want good, imaginative and original teachers." It was very clear that while he wasn't
lessening the importance of research, he felt teaching should come first.
The current difficulties in the zoology department
involving Dr. Robin Harger, reported in last Friday's
Ubyssey, are indicative of one of the contributing
factors in Dr. Hare's resignation. Robin Harger was
hired a year and a half ago to do certain research.
Since then he has discovered the "joy", as it were,
of original teaching. Senior members of the faculty
have decided to dismiss him. The fact is that Dr.
Hare was president of a university where all the
highly: professionalized departments gave only glori
ous lip service to teaching. The reality of the situation is that publish or perish is still the politic.
This whole problem points out what could be
considered the only really important function of a
university president. If the president is to have any
one quality above all others, it is the position he
takes on this problem. He has no real power, but as
a symbolic head, he determines the overall image,
mood, and posture of the campus. If he favors research over teaching, as did president MacDonald,
conservatism over radicalism in the faculty, then it
is easy for the departments to maintain the status
quo, to lessen teaching and to concentrate on research. If, however, a man like Dr. Hare is president, it would be possible for faculty members to
become more vocal on social issues, to innovate
teaching methods, and to generally feel more comfortable in a radical position.
Men  like Robin Harger are the pawns in  the
game being played between those faculty members
who are mainly status conscious, climbing the
scholastic ladder of publications and fame, and those
who feel that teaching and the priorities of the student come first.
One can only speculate at this point, but I can't
help feeling the mandarins in the zoology department, in English, and in almost every other department at UBC, are as much to blame for Dr. Hare's
resignation as is Bennett and the Senate. It would
seem incumbent upon acting president and probable president-to-be Walter Gage to make his position clear on this matter. Vice-president Armstrong,
should also make his position clear. Then there is
that mystery man, vice-president William White, the
bursar, who isn't even an academic. I guess you
couldn't ask a mere accountant what his thoughts
are on the matter, after all, he is only the vice-
president of the university. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1969
Thunderbirds 15
Dinosaurs 8
By RIK NYLAND
"UBC came out of that dressing room all fired up
and completely outskated and outplayed us in the
first period of both games."
And in those words Calgary coach George Kingston summed up the weekend hockey action as the
v UBC CAPTAIN MICKEY McDOWELL receiving the
Johnny Owen Memorial Trophy, for winning the
Fourth Annual Collegiate Hockey Classic. It is
between UBC and any other Canadian collegiate
hockey team.
Birds retained the Johnny Owen Memorial Trophy
for a fourth consecutive year by beating the University of Calgary "Dinosaurs" by scores of 6-4 and
9-4.
In both games the Birds played exceptionally
sound hockey in the first period and managed to
lead by four goals going into the second period.
From here on in both games it was a matter of not
letting the opposition overcome the large first period
deficit.
Before a near capacity crowd on Friday the Birds
jumped to a 5-1 first period lead on goals by Wayne
Schaab, Tom Williamson, Jim Fowler and two goals
by Mickey McDowell.
Mike Barnett replied for the Dinosaurs.
Both teams settled down to some close checking
in a much slower second period as the Birds attempted to hold down the Dinosaurs instead of playing
their usual aggressive offensive brand of hockey.
Calgary started a comeback as they scored two
quick goals off the sticks of John Kocher and Colin
Patterson midway through the period.
With a narrow 5-3 lead going into the final frame
the Birds came out ready to stomp on the first Dinosaur who happened to get in the way as they needed
that insurance goal. And it took them just two minutes and twenty five second as Jim Fowler took a
perfect relay from McDowell and Schaab and put it
away cleanly past Dave Margach.
At the 15-minute mark a defensive lapse sent two
of Calgary's men in on a lone UBC defender and
John Kocher made no mistake as he used his line
mate as a decoy and beat Don Cram from aboui 25
feet.
Final score 6-4. Birds outshot them 41-36 and
picked 11 penalties to Calgary's 10.
Individually Jim Fowler and Brian Jones played
their best games of the season. Fowler was in constant motion as he skated and bounced everyone in
sight and when Jimmy skates there is nothing that
slows him down. Brian Jones finally settled down
to the hockey he is capable of playing as he played
good positional hockey and never let up covering
his   man.
Goalie Don Cram played a good game but it was
mainly an overall effort by the team.
Within the first 15 seconds on Saturday ♦•he Birds
had three good shots on the net as they came out
with a definite winning attitude.
A penalty to Calgary's John Toner gave the Birds
the advantage at the 23 second mark but being overanxious gave Calgary a two on one break and Gord
Jones put it away at the 54 second mark.
This momentary lead was short lived as Barry
Wilcox tied it up at 1:26.
Laurie Vanzella, sMckhandled beautifully past
two defenders to make it 2-1 and a few minutes later
Laurie again scored as he let go a slapshot that split
goalie Don Vesburgh's pads cleanly from the point.
Score 3-1.
Barry Wilcox, on a perfect pass from Vanzella
slid the puck along the ice as the Birds went ahead
4-1 at* the 4:47 mark.
Dave Smith scored Calgary's second goal from
the point between the legs of sprawling defenceman
Jack Moores as Birds goalkeeper had been taken out
of his net. Rick Bardal ended up laying down on the
job as he was pushed out of his crease by several
players fighting for a position in front of the net.
Barry Wilcox scored his third goal of the game
and se*, up Stu Gibbs on a pass from behind the net
to make the score 6-2 after the first period.
In the second frame the Birds stayed in control
as Wayne Schaab took a little flip pass from Wilcox
and put it behind Vosburgh. Gord Jones, the spearhead of Calgary's offense, tapped in the puck on the
empty side while the Birds were shorthanded.
At the start of the third period Gord Jones attempted to put the Dinosaurs back in She game but
he drilled the puck of the goalpost. Two minutes
later Wayne Schaab scored to make it 8-3 and they
might have presented the trophy at this point.
For the final 15 minutes both teams went through
the motions as the game was already decided. The
ever-pressing Gord Jones scored his third goal of
the game but rookie Tom Williamson evened the
goal 55 seconds la-jer to make the final score 9-4.
Coach Bob Hindmarch was extremely pleased
with the attitude his team had and they will certainly
need this as they take on league-leading Edmonton
this weekend.
Dinosaur Coach George Kingston felt that UBC
would definitely have to be up for the games to
overcome Edmontons strong defensive hockey team
as well as their large partisan home crowds.
SFU - UBC
BASKETBALL
SAT., FEB. 8, 1969
PACIFIC COLISEUM
RESERVED SEATS - $2.00
NOW ON SALE AT MEMORIAL GYM
TO U.B.C. STUDENTS FOR $1.00
Blocks of tickets may be ordered by
Clubs, Fraternities, Undergraduate Societies
CAN-CAN
YOU
CAN!
Student Performances
Feb. 6,12-8:30 p.m.
Feb. 13-Noon
OLD AUDITORIUM
L«7W
ichool of Physical Education & Recreation
VOLUNTARY RECREATIONAL PROGRAMME
B.C. TRACK & FED
COACHES' AWARD
An eight week course for students to qualify for the
B.C. Provincial Track and Field Coaching Award will
commence on Tuesday, February 4, 1969 and will continue every Tuesday and Thursday for eight weeks until
the end of March. Only the following groups of events
will be offered on the instructional course this year—
Hurdling, Jumping and Throwing. A coach may qualify
in any one of these groups but may elect to take two
or three groups. Instruction will follow the pattern of
one hour per week for each group. Full details including time of instruction, application forms etc. may be
obtained from the Entrance Hall in the Memorial Gym
during the noon hour on
Wednesday, Jan. 29 and Friday, Jan. 31 Tuesday, January 28, 1969
THE   -UBYSSEY
Page 7
Available at
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY
5754 University Blvd.
In The Village - l'A blocks
from Memorial Gym
FOR
MARDI GRAS
Carnival Makeup
Costume Fabrics
Trim and Accessories
303 W Hastings St.
Vancouver 3, B.C.
684-9611
Vfeur Psychology
professor lives
with his mother?
Think it over, over coffee.
TheThink Drink. 4tS^k
For your own Think Drink Mug, send 75C and your name and address tc
Think Drink Mug, Dept. N, P.O. Box 1000, Willowdale, Ontario. The International Coffee Org J mzjtior
GRADUATING IN 1969?
ARTS   AND   COMMERCE   STUDENTS
INTERESTED IN CAREERS IN
• ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT
• ACTUARIAL SCIENCE
• SALES AND SALES MANAGEMENT
will be interviewed at the Placement Office
THURSDAY, JANUARY 30
o
Metr<
Ufe
0 f if
litan
T'Birds
lose to
Bears
The UBC's swimming Thunderbirds went down to defeat
at the hands of the University
of Alberta Golden Bears on
Saturday night, at Percy Norman Memorial Pool.
The meet was extremely exciting as the outcome of the
meet seemed to depend on
who won the final relay.
The Birds with Frank Dorchester, Frank Nordquist,
Te<rry Lyons and Bruce Melton, won by less than one
tenth of a second. It seemed
they had won the meet.
Later however, it was found
that a mistake had been made
in adding up the running score
and that in fact Alberta had
won by one point.
Leading the Birds was diver
Bob Menzies who won both of
his diving events. After blowing his first dive off the one
meter board, he came back to
win the event handily.
Leading scorers were varsity swimmers Jim Maddin and
Phil Dockerill.
The swimmers are preparing for the Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Association championships, which
are to be held over mid-term
break in Edmonton. By qualifying at this meet they earn a
trip to the University of New
Brunswick for the Canadian
finals.
— Jim Maddin Photo
UBC   DIVER   BOB   MENZIES
won both diving events at
the UBC-U of Alberta dual
meet. This was just before a
back dive off the one meter
diving board.
Grasshockey: The Birds first
and third teams have qualified
for the UBC Indoor tourney.
It will be held in the Armouries this week.
UBC Judokan wins all
at tournament in Haney
UBC judoka once again carried home more trophies than
any other club at, the Haney judo tournament.
Charles Maingon, 1966 Canadian university champion won
the grand championship for black belts in all weight divisions.
Before this he had to fight three matches to win the 154
lb. class trophy.
In the championship his final match was against Udo Werner, winner of the 205 lb. black belt class. It's unusual to see a
lightweight fighter outclass a larger opponent.
Maingon scored his victory in a holddown against, displaying
tremendous strength in his mat work.
Art Adams, a brown belt, fought in a class with black belts
and won UBC another cup for second place in the 205 lb. class.
The only person to defeat him was Werner, who went on
to win the reserve championship.
The UBC team had newer members fighting for the first
time and was very successful against experienced competitors.
Wrestling
The UBC wrestling team
had a traumatic weekend as
they lost every overall competition of the four way meet
they competed in on the weekend here in the Women's gym.
They lost by scores of 26-18
to the University of Puget
Sound, 31-11 to Western Washington State College and 36-
10 to Seattle Pacific College.
UBC was unable to fill three
weight classes thus giving
each of the other teams a 15
point advantage.
Of the twenty-one bouts UBC
wrestled; they won nine, with
Cann Christensen the leader
with 3 wins, followed by Leo
Burgener who pulled off two
victories.
Bob Grafton and Gunnar
Gansen had one Win apiece.
Intramurals
The administrative boards
of men's and women's Intramural programmes are providing for volleyball on a co-
recreational basis every Friday at noon, beginning on
Feb. 14.
Groups or individuals may
enter, no registration is necessary.
Just come and be ready to
play as teams will be organized on the floor.
For those who have no
knowledge of the game, fundamental instruction will be provided.
The only request is running
shoes as street shoes may not
be worn on the gym floor.
Squash
The UBC Squash team won
the Vancouver Inter-City C&D
squash league by amassing 25
points, 3 more than the next
team.
Members of the team captained by Bill Hamilton were
Chat Mitchell, Karl Kuum,
Ken Mackeniot, and Ken Fowler.
They won the Bob Wade
Squash Trophy.
Volleyball
The UBC volleyball team
finished third in the Calgary
Invitational Tournament.
They were beaten by the
Washington Athletic Club and
the University of Winnipeg
"Wesmen".
FILMSOC PRESENTS
Audrey Hepburn
Jack Weston
Richard Crenna     Alan Arkin
&     Efrem Zimbalist Jr.
in
with "PRISCILLA FARQUAR" in a
cameo role
Thurs., Fri., Sat., Jan. 30, 31, Feb. 1
Thurs.-12:30, 6:30, 9:00
Fri.-3:30, 6:30, 9:00
Sat.-7:00,9:15
SUB  THEATRE
ADM. 50c
SERVICE
OPPORTUNITIES
Overseas &  North America
See Classified Ads Back Page
For Details.
EAT IN 'TAKE OUT • DELIVERY-
INTERNATIONAL
BALL'
Dinner & Dance
Vancouver Hotel
$5 A Person
Tickets at I.H. Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 28, 1969
ARTS   U.S.
General meet of Arts undergrad soc.
Friday noon. Bu. 100.
PSYCH.    SYMPOSIUM
Symposium registration across from
SUB information booth noon to 1:30
p.m. this week. $2.50 includes dinner.
CHINESE   VARSITY
Skating party at Star Dust roller
rink Feb. 1, 9 to midnight. Tickets
begin sale noon today, SUB registration desk, $1.
PHOTO   SOC
General   meet   Thursday   noon,   SUB
249.
PSYCHOLOGY   CLUB
General meet Tuesday noon, Ang. 24.
LIBERAL   CLUB
Exec, meeting SUB 130-1 today noon.
PRE-SCHOOL WORK
Sign up Wednesday noon, Bu. 202,
for field trip to Oakalla Feb. 6 and
13. Speaker Grant McKeen of Youth
Resources.
CAMPUS   CAVALIERS
Dance     workshop     Thursday     noon,
Clubs  Lounge.
CHORSOC
Practice 6 p.m.  Wednesday,  Bu.   104;
Exec,   meeting   Tuesday   12:40   p.m..
Music   bldg.
"tween classes
the village BISTRO
Tomorrow's Eyes or* running their
dark horse all this week. Come on
down and lei us ring your chimes.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC.
Meet Wednesday noon SUB 113-B to
discuss "the expression of the new
consciousness".
ROD   AND   GUN
General meet Thursday noon, SUB A.
ARCHAEOLOGY   CLUB
Meeting today noon, Bu. 205.
PRE-LIBRAIRIANSHIP
Tour   of   CBC  record   library   Thursday   noon,   phone   Marg   879-3815   for
transport.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
3000  GARMENTS
TO CHOOSE  FROM
• Full Dress (Tails)
• Morning Coats
• Directors' Coat*
• White & Colored Coats
• Shirts & Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
623 Howe 688-2481
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Order of Elections
SLATE I — Nominations open Jan. 29; nominations
close at 12 noon Feb. 6; election is Wednesday, Feb. 12.
1. President — who shall have sucessfully completed
his second year or its equivalent, and who has attended
the University of British Columbia for at least two years.
2. Internal Affairs Officer — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
3. Secretary — who shall have successfully completed
his first year or its equivalent.
4. Co-ordinator of Activities — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
SLATE II — Nominations open Feb. 5; nominations
close at noon Feb. 13; election will be Wednesday, Feb.
19.
1. Vice President — who shall have successfully completed his second year or its equivalent and who has
attended the University of British Columbia for at least
two years.
2. Treasurer — who shall have successfully completed
his second year or its equivalent.
3. Internal Affairs Officer — who shall have successfully completed his first year or its equivalent.
4. Ombudsman—who shall have successfully completed
his first year or its equivalent.
Nomination and eligibility forms and election rules and
procedures can be obtained from the AMS offices in
SUB and are lo be returned to the Secretary's Office,
Room 248, SUB, before 12 noon on days of closing of
nominations.
YOU ARE
TO BE OUR GUEST AT
AN ORIENTATION OR PREVIEW MEETING OF THE
DALE CARNEGIE COURSE
Enjoy the fellowship of "Move Ahead, Get Ahead" people.
Have fun, but — fun with a purpose! Learn why the Dale
Carnegie Course has, for over fifty years, successfully trained people in all walks of life. Discover how easy it is to participate in Dale Carnegie Training!
BOTH MEN AND WOMEN INVITED
NO  COST  OR  OBLIGATION
* ORIENTATION MEETING
TUES., JAN. 28 - 7:30 P.M.
ELDORADO HOTEL —2330 KINGSWAY
* PREVIEW MEETING
WED., JAN. 29 — 7:30 P.M.
ELDORADO HOTEL
2330 KINGSWAY
Presented by "Thorne" Thorfinnson
LEADERSHIP TRAINING INSTITUTE
No. 212—515 W. Oeofflte St, Phone MS-IMS (24 hn.) DALE CARNEGIE
FOUNDER
TEACH-IN STUDY GROUPS
All sections meet together 8 p.m.
Thursday Arts 1 blue  room.
WUS
Duke Redbird speaks on "Indians in
the 21st C." 7:30 tonight, SUB clubs
lounge; and Wednesday noon, Bu.
104.
SIMS
Introductory lecture on* transcendental meditation Thursday noon,
Bu. 204; daily meditations SUB 213
7:30-9:30 a.m., 4-5:30 p.m.; weekly
group meditation Thursday 7:30 pm..
SUB 105-A. Sign up for Rosario retreat in SUB main lobby.
CUSO
Nigel the scholar performs noon today, SUB  113.
DENTAL. HYGIENE
Have you teeth cleaned, polished
and fluoridated by dental hygiene
students for $2. Phone 228-3023 or
see Miss J. Faulafer in room 122 of
Faculty  of  Dentistry  bldg.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
"Ethics in Education" with Dr.
Coombs,   Wednesday  noon,  Ed.   100.
MOTORCYCLE  CLUB
Meet  Wednesday  noon,  SUB  130.
IL   CAFFE
Wednesday noon I. H. 402, conversa**}
tion in Italian. *
ACADEMIC   ACTIVITIES
Meet to plan science symposium —
"Values in science" SUB 236 noon
today.
Non-Stop    Calypso
CARNIVAL DANCE
FRIDAY,    FEB.    21 ST
THREE BANDS
8:30    SUB    Ballroom
Tickets    I.H.   $2.00   per   person
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75£, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
BRING A VALENTINE TO THE IN-
ternational Ball Vancouver Hotel,
Feb. 14. Dinner & Dance $5 a person.
UNDERGROUND MARDI GRAS
tickets for Saturday, Jan. 31, on
sale  now in  AMS office.
Greetings
12
CUE CARDS
with NEW supplement
(1) Honoured    in   200    Retail   outlets;
10 - 40%   discounts.
(2) Special coupons; 2 for 1 at Whistler,   Baker,   Martinizing,   etc.
Available: Bookstore, SUB  Info. Desk,
Canteens  —  Only  $1.50
PEGGY, YOU DRESS LIKE A LADY
(Lady Godiva). Happy Nude Year
From The Alpha Taus.
Lost  &   Found
13
LOST ON WED., COIN CHARM
bracelet, sentimental value. Reward.
Phone   731-3785.
LOST ONE LEATHER GLOVE
while hitching last week. Please
contact Carol 224-7161.
WOULD WHOEVER ACCIDENTAL-
ly took my Leather Jacket (Black)
from the dance on Friday Phone
Allan RE 3-8280.
DID    I    LEAVE    MY    CAMERA    IN
your  car?   Phone  Ian Wallace  731
1023.
AUTOS  FOR  SALE  (Conld.) 21
1961   LANDROVER    MODEL   109.    IN
good   condition,   phone   732-7991.
1965 AUSTIN 850. GOOD CONDITION.
Private 922-6268,  6 p.m.
Autos Wanted
22
WOULD THE FELLOW WHO
drives his mama's Viva (Epic) and
owns a broken M.G.A. kindly phone
Howard   Smith   at   224-9049.
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
DUNBAR RENTAL COSTUMES
reserve for Mardi Gras Special Student rates. 3567 West 41st. Phone
263-9011.
Scandals
37
MARDI GRAS BAR ASSOCIATION:
The Trial of J. Hoover — Thurs.
in  the   Ballroom.
MRS. ROBINSON LIVES AT THE
Alpha Tau House. Her new phone
number   is   732-7827.
SEE THE DANCE THAT BURNED
up Paris. Can-Can. Feb. 6, 12 (8:30)
and 13th  (noon)  75c.
WANTED WENDY AOTT DEAD OR
Alive.   $10,000 Reward.	
BLIND WOMAN AND HOT STUFF
See Wait Until Dark Thursday,
Friday, Saturday, SUB Auditorium.
50c.
LUST AND GORE. SEE WAIT UN-
til Dark, Thursday, Friday, Saturday.  SUB Auditorium.  50c.
MISC. FOR SALE (Contd.)     71
BAND EQUIPMENT FOR SALE
Organ, drums, guitars, amps, etc.
University, shure, E.-V. mikes. All
the tea party's equipment goes
priced to sell. Phone anytime Ralph
922-2562,   Jim   922-2084.
LOVELIFE: TRENCHANT CRITI-
que of respectable criminalities and
affirmation of integral living.
Not recommended for minors. Cloth-
bound, 113 pp. $3 from R. MacLeod,
Box  1180,   Creston.  B.C.
SKIS AND POLES, $20. STOP AT 359
Buchanan or call  277-5072.
WOMEN'S AUSTRIAN DOUBLE
lace ski boot size 9-10, phone 922-
0949,   $35.00.
RENTALS  &  REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
1 SLEEPING ROOM, $30. 1 SELF-
cont. room, $70. Priv. bath. Point
Grey.  224-3833 after 5 p.m.	
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE ALPHA
Delta Phi fraternity house. Good
food and congenial surroundings.
Phone   224-9866  or  224-4221.	
FURNISHED BEDROOM WITH ADD-
ed facilities of a living room, bathroom and private entrance; light
cooking facilities, $50 month. Phone
228-8867.
COME AND SEE THE WAR GAME.
Sub Aud. Tues. 12:30, 3:30, 8:00
and Wed.   12:30,   3:30  and   6:00.
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM    SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable   Rates —  TR  4-9253
EXP. TYPING, REAS. RATES.
Quick service, from legible drafts.
Call  738-6829  after 10:00 a.m.
NICE CLEAN ROOM FOR MALE
student, light cooking, bath, private
entrance, near gates. Free Feb. 1*5.
Please call 224-6795.
NON-SMOKER ROOM AND RUN OF
house,   $50.00.   Call  224-5572.
Room & Board
82
Rides  &  Car Pools
14
RIDE NEEDED FOR 8:30's. ALSO
ride needed from U.B.C. at 9:30,
three or four nights per week.
Larry 253-0042. First and Commercial.
Special Notices 15
DEAR JOANNE, LANA, PAM, AND
Carol: The Pleasure was ours. Come
again and bring some of your fe-
male friends.   The  Alpha Taus.
COME AND GET BLOWN UP TUES.
12:30, 3:30 and 8:00. Wed. 12:30, 3:30
and  6:00. War Game—Sub Aud.
TRY   MARDI  GRAS!
NO      APPOINTMENT     NECESSARY
' at the  UBC Barber Shop &  Beauty
Salon.   "It pays  to look your best."
5736   University   Blvd.   228-8942.
UNION COLLEGE CAFETERIA —
Daily meals on regular basis now
available by prior arrangement with
matron.   Phone   224-3266.	
UBC LIBERALS 5 CULF CONVEN-
tion delegates to be elected, General Meeting. Bu. 106 noon Feb. 6.
Candidates submit notice of intention to run to box 117 SUB. (AMS
General   Office)   before   January   31.
MARDI GRAS PRESENTS THE
Trials of Jason Hoover Thurs., January 30 noon in the ballroom —
only 50c!   Don't  miss it!
MARDI GRAS UNDERGROUND
tickets on sale now in AMS office.
Greatest   floorshow   ever!
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premium? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted   Elliott.   299-9422.
Travel  Opportunities 16
MID TERM - UP, UP AND AWAY.
Fly half fare with your youth
fare card, $3. Valid until your 22nd
birthday. Call Deirdre for yours.
Swingair rep.   738-1678.	
TRY MARDI  GRASS!
SKI TRIP — SKI BIG WHITE JAN.
31 - Feb. 2 for $28.00 inclusive. Residence sponsored, 120 going. 224-
9944. RM. 536 for further information  &   tickets.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'58 CHEV 2-DR. WAGON REBUILT.
Powertrn, new upholstery. No rust.
New tires (snows) winterized, $425.
Firm call  224-9834,  Rm.  580 after 6.
ESSAYS    TYPED.    REASONABLE
rates:  .25c per page. Call June 261- i
4122.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
RESPONSIBLE PERSON FOR
babysitting (2-year-old boy) and
light houskeeping duties, weekdays.
Phone  224-5233.
Help Wanted—Male
52
DELIVER MEDICINE IN YOUR
own car after school, $2.00 per hr.
Call   Archie   Baker   683-9191.
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
UBYSSEY NEEDS A COPYRUNNER
to work Mondays and Thursday
from 4-7 p.m. Apply to Bruce Curtis  241-K   SUB.   Car   necessary.
SERVICE OPPORTUNITIES
Needed: —Registered Nurses
—Agriculturists
—Sec. &E1. Ed.  Teachers
—Community Development
Workers
—Social Workers  (MSW)
—Other Skills & Training
A Mennonite Central Committee
rep. will interview interested persons of any denomination on Wednesday, Feb. 5. Make appointments
now at Student Placement  Office.
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Music
62
Special Classes
63
LEARN   TO   CAN-CAN.   OLD   AUD.,
Feb.  6, 12  (8:30) and 13  (noon). 75<i
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS—■
$85 a month, Delta Upsilon Fraternity House; good food, short walk
classes, quiet hours. Phone 228-9389
or   224-9841.	
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE ALPHA
Delta Phi fraternity house. Good
food and congenial surroundings.
Phone   224-9866   or   224-4221.
ROOMS AVAILABLE AT TOTEM
Park Residences for both male and
female students (twenty years of
age and over). Call Office of Housing Administration, Hut 03, Campus
Phone 228-2811.
ON CAMPUS RESIDENCE ACCOM-
modation for male student in double
room in Carey Hall. Phone Mr. Wil-
burn at 224-6939 or 224-5086.
ROOM AND BOARD $85 A MONTH
at Fraternity House. Phone 224-9769.
Ask for Gary Goodman between 5-7.
Furn.  Houses   &   Apts.
83
SHARE FURN. HOUSE WITH 3
others. All facil. incl. Cable and
phone. 2 blocks from gates. 224-
0552  after   5.
WANTED. FEMALE STUDENT T9
share furnished home with two of
same. Own bedroom. Five minutes
from   U.B.C.   $65   month.   228-9105.
SELF-CONTAINED SUITE—1 SEN.
male to share with 2 others —
Great View — Great place. 3rd &
Tolmie.   224-1935.
RESPONSIBLE MALE OR IRRES-
ponsible female share 3-bdrm furn.
house near MacDonald-6th. $80.00.
Call Wayne 733-2242,  5 p.m.
WANTED ONE MALE STUDENT TO
share furnished house with 2 others,
near UBC.  Phone 738-7691.
MADE STUDENT TO SHARE HOUSPJ
with 3 others (2 grad, 1 undergrad),
complete sharing of responsibilities;
wash-dryer, pvte. bedroom, entrance,
bath, shower, full kitchen, etc. One
block from gates; 4615 W. 9th; good
study atmosphere. Ph. 228-9448 after
5:30.
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR  SALE
71
BIRDCALLS
75c
Publications
Office
241—SUB
Unfurn. House & Apts.
84
UBC   STUDENT   WITH   WIFE AND
baby   needs   modest   suite   or small
house    (unfurn.)—req'd.    Apr. 1    or
May 1. Ph.  738-0202 after 6
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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