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The Ubyssey Feb 26, 2015

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Array FEBRUARY26.2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXLII
UNACCOMPANIED MINORS SINCE 1918 // Page 2
EVENTS THIS WEEK, CHECK 01
FRIDAY ' 27
UBCS LARGEST YOGA CLASS
12:00-1:00 P.M. @SRC GYMS
Take a study break, get some exercise and relax after a stressful period of midterms with this group yoga session. Extra mats available, but bring your own if
you have one. Free
FRIDAY ' 27
UBC IMPROV
7:00 P.M. @ NEVILLE SCARFE ROOM 100
UBC Improv is hosting its 'Crunch Time' show! Enjoy some on-the-spot,
creative antics from talented and enthusiastic actors. $3
FRIDAY ' 27
HOT FUZZ BEVERAGE GARDEN
DOORS OPEN 7:00 P.M. @ NORM THEATRE IN THESUB
Come enjoy the best thing to come out of Britain since Queen at this FilmSoc
beverage garden. A night of British buddy cop film and cheap ($7 for two)
beer is hard to beat. $8 in advance, $10 at the door.
ON
THE
COVER
Thanks to Toronto Sketch Fest for
the imagery.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
:EBRUARY26,2015 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXLII
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OUR CAMPUS//
I'MWAWililSUWil'iAraEWB
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Ryo Sugiyama has curated the Nitobe Memorial Garden and maintained its intricate balance since 2011.
Ryo Sugiyama curates the Nitobe Garden: UBC's cultural bridge
Kari Lindberg
Contributor
Beauty is subjective in its own
right, but anyone would be hard-
pressed to deny that the Nitobe
Memorial Garden is one ofthe
most beautiful places on the UBC
campus.
The garden is named after
Nitobe Inazo, a famous diplomat,
writer, bureaucrat and educator in a time of great change for
Japan. It was within Nitobe's
lifetime that Japan moved away
from its period of international
isolationism to form stronger
international relations. Nitobe,
appointed under-secretary general to the League of Nations after
World War One, was dedicated
to the promotion and fostering of
greater peaceful understanding
between the western world and
Japan. It is from this vision of
Nitobe's that the Nitobe Memorial
Garden's design emerged.
Ryo Sugiyama, Nitobe Memorial Garden curator, has a master's
degree in Environmental Science
and Landscape design from Chiba
University's School of Science and
Technology. While completing his
master's degree, Sugiyama studied under Kannosuke Mori, the
designer ofthe Nitobe Memorial
Garden.
Sugiyama's job starts daily
at 6:30 a.m. with significant
amounts of of pruning, landscaping and clean up to do before the
gate opens at 10 a.m.
Sugiyama explained some of
the vision and context behind the
design ofthe garden.
"The pond in the middle of
the garden is symbolic ofthe
Pacific ocean. The far side of lake
[the furthest end from when you
enter the gardens] is symbolic
of Japan and the side closest to
the entrance is Canada or North
America."
Further biological steps were
taken to emphasize the symbolism of various parts ofthe garden
throughout the design process.
"On the side representative of
Japan, Japanese maple trees are
planted and on the Canadian side,
Canadian maple trees are planted," said Sugiyama.
Sugiyama says that the bridge
represents a key part of Nitobe's
vision, as it was his wish "that the
bridge would close [the cultural
gap created by the] ocean."
It is the Nitobe
Memorial Garden's
art of maintaining
curiosity that makes
it one of the most
authentic Japanese
gardens in North
America."
Ryo Sugiyama
Nitobe Memorial Garden curator
Sugiyama attributed his
method of pruning to the Nitobe
Memorial Garden's retention of
the authentically Japanese garden
feel.
"[The] Japanese style of
pruning is not to cut in a round,
square or hedge straight manner. We always try to think out,
take out branches as a means of
providing more depth, creating
a see-through style," Sugiyama
said. "We [Japanese landscapists]
are from a small country; we
are always trying to create more
space."
Within a small, confined space,
the beauty of a garden is used as
a tool to maintain the curiosity of
all those who come to look at the
garden, ensuring that they are
spurred on to go further.
"Authentic Japanese gardens
are characterized by the art of
maintaining curiosity. It is the
Nitobe Memorial Garden's art
of maintaining curiosity that
makes it one ofthe most authentic
Japanese gardens in North America," said Sugiyama.
A distinct feature ofthe garden's Japanese style is the efforts
by the designer, past curators and
current to represent an idealized
and symbolic understanding of
nature. Each stone, tree, shrub
and flower has been placed deliberately: a way of creating harmony
and balance between the waterfall, land and sea. The uniqueness
of the garden lays in its ability to,
accordingto Sugiyama, "respect
the local [vegetation]." Dispersed
among the irises, cherry trees and
azaleas brought over from Japan
are the native Canadian trees and
shrubbery, pruned in a Japanese
manner — a unique blend of
Japanese-Canadian cross-cultural botany styles.
Ultimately, Sugiyama says
that the garden was designed for
"strolling around" and to allow
people to "enjoy the view with
the tea garden." It's in the garden
that "you can communicate with
yourself, calm down and think
of yourself within the relaxing
environment." Xi
—°«—Cg
am
nviig // News
RESEARCH»
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
Cheaper, more efficient solar cells in the works at UBC
Researchers are developing a new generation of solar cells, inspired by photosynthesis
UBC researchers are drawing inspiration from photosynthesis to develop a new generation of solar cells.
Emma Partridge
StaffWriter
The Energizer Bunny may
have competition.
UBC microbiologist Thomas Beatty is collaborating with
UBC bio- and electrical engineer John Madden and chemist
Curtis Berlinguette to develop
a new generation of solar cells.
Their inspiration comes from
the behavior of microorganisms
during photosynthesis.
"We have solar powered calculators and things like that, that as
soon you turn off the light they
die," said Beatty. "It will be really
cool [if] we'd turn off the light
and it kept going."
Beatty breaks down the science behind the cells by explaining that their ongoing aim is to
"trick" a protein so that electrons
are directed to an electrode onto
which a protein has been bound.
Under normal conditions, proteins keep the electrons inside.
"What we're really trying to do
is modify the protein in such a way
=HOTO COURTESF UBC PUBLIC AFFAIRS
that it sort of short-circuits itself
and instead of moving the electrons
to the right place, or what the protein thinks is the right place, is to
bleed them off into an electrical circuit," said Beatty. "From there, the
electrons can move as electricity
into a circuit to do something like
power your charger, your computer
or your phone."
Beatty hopes that these cells
will be more efficient than those
that are currently available.
"The biological material that
we're working with basically
[has] an efficiency of one for each
photon that's absorbed, one electron is ejected and so it's very,
very efficient," said Beatty.
In contrast, materials like
silicon need more than one
photon to move an electron into
a current.
Of course, this work takes
time. Beatty estimates that it
will take roughly 18 to 24 months
before they have something that
is commercially attractive.
Though these cells are still in
their early stages and work continues on multiple fronts, Beatty
considers studying whether these
cells can function like a battery
in terms of storage the most encouraging work right now.
When asked what he hopes
to see this eco-friendly solution be used for, Beatty spoke
to the need for hooking up
people in off-the-grid regions in
Canada and beyond with safe,
sustainable energy.
"There's lots of places that get
sunlight that don't have electrical cables connecting them to
the grid and so if you can give
them a simple way to charge a
cell phone, or turn on a light in
the evening so that they can read
a book or get enough light to eat
their dinner by or something like
that then it will be a wonderful,
wonderful thing," said Beatty. 31
TRANSIT »
First round of students receive long-awaited Compass Card
Kelley Lin
Senior StaffWriter
UBC and TransLink have started rolling out Compass Cards
to students in their first phase
of implementation.
After several delays,
TransLink announced that it
would start distributing Compass Cards to groups of student
across the Lower Mainland at the
beginning of 2015.
In early January, the first
batch of Compass Cards was
distributed to 900 students in the
Affiliated Theological Colleges
on campus for February travel.
AMS President Tanner Bokor
is assured that the new program
is working as planned.
"We are right where we expected to be," said Bokor. "We
haven't had any reported issues
and the system's been working
just fine so we're actually very
happy with what we've been
hearing both from UBC and from
TransLink. We'll be continuing
to grasp with rolling out Compass to the rest of campus over
the next couple of months."
Accordingto Bokor, feedback
from the first round of students
regarding the convenience ofthe
new Compass Card has thus far
been very positive. TransLink
is scheduled to have two more
additional waves of distribution
as part of its trial period.
"I certainly have heard comments around it's much easier
just to have the one card that you
can reload month after month
rather than going to the bookstore," said Bokor.
Bokor also confirmed that
the new program will be fully
implemented within the year, but
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
TransLink has rolled out its Compass Card program for the first batch of UBC students.
the specific date for when the
Compass Card will be available to all students has not yet
been confirmed.
"We suspect that all students
will be able to be on the program
come next [academic] year," said
Bokor. "We just don't know what
date that will be. It all depends on
TransLink's analysis ofthe data
after this first wave finishes the
trial. Definitely within 2015." Xi
CRIME »
Woman assaulted on south campus
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Mundell Park is located just outside of Wesbrook Village, on south campus.
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
An 18-year-old woman was the
victim of an assault on campus
this Sunday.
The woman, who was walking near Mundell Park on south
campus at around 10:10 p.m on
Sunday, Feb. 22, was grabbed
from behind by a male stranger. After she fought back and
got away, the man fled. She
did not receive any injuries or
require hospitalization.
The RCMP used police dogs to
search for the suspect, but were
not able to locate him.
According to an RCMP media
release, the suspect is male, has
olive-coloured skin and was
wearing a puffy army green vest,
a dark long-sleeved shirt and
dark pants on Sunday night. He is
approximately 5'4 to 5'6 in height
and is 18 to 20 years of age.
Police are currently continuing
the search for the attacker and
asking anyone with information
about the assault to contact them.
This latest assault incident
comes after a string of sexual assaults on campus in the fall of 2013.
"We recognize that incidents
of this nature can be alarming
to those regularly walking alone
at night," said RCMP Corporal
Brenda Winpenny in the media
release. "Although we believe
this to be an isolated incident,
as always, we recommend for
the general public walking alone
late in the evening or early in the
morning to remain extra vigilant
of their surroundings and take
every precaution to enhance
their personal safety." 31 NEWS    I   THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2015
STUDENTS»
MAGIC »
Sauder student participating in Miss
World Canada pageant
Psychology prof on magic and the brain
=HOTO COURTESY BETPF LU
Betty Yenlei Lu is participating in this year's Miss World Canada pageant.
Mateo Ospina
Senior StaffWriter
Third-year Sauder student Betty
Yunlei Lu is a proud competitor at
the Miss World Canada pageant.
Lu is new to the experience of
competing in beauty pageants, but
her background in modelling and
dancing has helped her to excel.
After winning the China International Model Advertising Contest,
Lu was given a scholarship and
invitation to participate in the Miss
World competition.
Accordingto Lu, she was
hesitant about entering at first
due to misunderstanding ofthe
significance ofthe pageant, but
eventually decided to take part after
seeing the influence and power that
contestants have to contribute to
charitable causes.
Lu said, "It's not just about competing in outside beauty, but about
using your platform to make a better
impact [on the world]."
Her experiences at Sauder
have prepared her to view this
as an opportunity to put into
practice her experience with
organizing fundraisers and social
entrepreneurial projects.
"Sauder did a good job training
me in leadership skills so I can use
them whenever I'm organizing my
own charity events," said Lu about
a freeze mob she put together to
raise awareness for children with
special needs.
Lu is running on a platform that
focuses on ideas of multiculturalism and improving awareness for
disabilities in children.
She plans on hosting events such
as multicultural performances and
cultural exchange events to promote diversity in Vancouver. Her
interest in multiculturalism began
at a young age when her family
immigrated to Canada.
"I want to do something for
newcomers to Canada, like how my
family was at one point," said Lu.
Lu seeks to represent and empower the multicultural communities in Canada through her role
with Miss World Canada.
"I'm still leading the same events
and involved in the same things I
was before," said Lu, "just through
my involvement [in the pageant] I
can tell that my impact is stronger."
Lu is representing Vancouver and
UBC as a whole at Miss World Canada and hopes to receive the support
of her classmates.
"UBC is my home school. I am
proud to be a UBC student, representing UBC and Vancouver." 31
Professor Ronald Rensink believes studying magic
Mariam Baldeh
Contributor
Magic tricks have always been
an intriguing phenomenon, but
what is the relationship between
human psychology and magic?
Ronald Rensink, a professor in
the psychology and computer
science departments at UBC, has
been exploring that question for
more than five years.
Rensink was first drawn to the
topic after an experiment several
years ago pointed to similarities
in the ways that magicians can
control people's attention as they
perform various tricks.
"To see change, you need
attention," said Rensink.
"[Magicians] control people's
attention. They change something, then use certain methods
to make sure people don't see the
change."
LLUSTRATIONJULIANYUfTHE UBYSSEY
can offer great insight into many topics in psychology.
So what magicians do then,
Rensink said, is hijack their audience's concentration and create
a different reality. For instance,
the viewer may be convinced
they are seeing something appear
and disappear, although that isn't
really happening.
"The picture you have ofthe
world is not directly what comes
into your eyes," said Rensink.
"The picture you experience is a
production your brain is putting
this together."
Rensink was also part of a
study, conducted by researchers from both UBC and McGill
University, that looked at the
technique of "forcing." In forcing
tricks, magicians get participants to pick a specific card they
already had in mind while the
participants remain oblivious
and confident that they picked
Want to write the
next big news story?
EMAIL NEWS@UBYSSEY.CA OR
COME BY OUR EDITORIAL OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
the card out of their own free
will, despite actually having been
made to do so.
In a controlled experiment
setting in a lab using a computer screen to control the timing,
size and colour ofthe cards, the
forcing technique worked 30
per cent ofthe time, whereas it
worked almost 100 per cent of
the time when performed by magician Jay Olson, Rensink said.
"Timing [is] a major component [in forcing]," said Rensink.
"The memorability ofthe card,
or whether or not people liked
a particular card [seemed in the
experiment] to have no impact,
but showing the [pre-selected]
card slightly longer than the rest
did." Participants, however, do
not notice this time discrepancy.
Accordingto Rensink, experiments like this offer some
interesting insights into how
magicians control these mechanisms, and provide scientists with
learning opportunities.
Rensink believes that the
study of magic has much to offer
to the field of psychology.
"To learn at what age children
develop object permanence, we can
use magic tricks," Rensink said.
"If the child is surprised when the
object disappears, [he/she] has object permanence. If not [surprised],
then you know they don't yet."
Secondly, magic tricks can be
used to study wonder, and the
particular sense of wonder that
is unique to people looking at
magic tricks. It can be useful in
exploring whether or not there
are different types of wonder,
things that trigger it and the
purpose of it.
Rensink also said that studying magic provides avenues to
study tricks specifically — which
are a phenomenon in their own
right — as well as to study magic
in a general sense. This can
lead to creating a taxonomy of
different kinds of tricks, which
can then be used to compare and
build connections among them. 31
' The most certain way
to succeed is always to try
just one more time."
Thomas Edison: Relentless Inventiveness
Failure is no biggie. Just ask Edison. If he stopped at failure, he would never have moved
on to invent a little thing called the light bulb. So if you've failed a class somewhere else,
or have a scheduling conflict, come on over. You can catch up with our world-recognized
online courses, then move on to bigger successes.Talkabout a light bulb moment.
Athabasca
University
open, online, everywhere.
Learn more @ athabascau.ca/edison II Culture I
CHAN CENTRE »
JENICA MONTGOMERY
MUSIC »
A night of illusion and suspended
disbelief with Beyond Words
=HOTO COURTESY LAU RAMURRAYPR
Steven Galloway is a UBC professor and a well-known Canadian author.
Tammy Hsieh
Contributor
Novelists are said to be magicians
of words, but what happens when
a novelist meets a magician? The
upcoming Beyond Words series
presented by the Chan Centre
will answer that very question on
Thursday night. Inspired by The
Confabulist, the show presents
celebrated Canadian author Steven
Galloway and master magician
David Gifford.
The Beyond Words series takes
on the challenge of exploring
the power of words using other
methods, hoping to ignite more
possibility and passion amongst
the audience.
"It's very rare for me to be
excited about an event featuring
me," said Galloway. Like the audience, he has no idea what tricks
David Gifford will perform. The
event is not simply a show and tell
but a display ofthe theories and
principles ofthe novel in the form
of illusions.
The event surrounds Galloway's
The Confabulist which tells the
story ofthe world's most well-
known magician, Harry Houdini.
The story is told through the lens
of everyday man Martin Strauss,
who claims to have killed Houdini
(twice).
"Because he's so ridiculously
famous ... it's really useful when
the reader is asking himself
self-consciously: is that actually
something Houdini did or the
author made up. There's something I can do when that's part of
the question in a reader's mind
that I couldn't do with a made-up
magician. If I make up a fictional
magician, no one's ever wondering whether he did it or not," said
Galloway on why he chose to focus
on Houdini.
The Confabulist, he believes, is
also the most structurally interesting and technically challenging
book he has written. The magic
tricks were especially difficult
because they rely on visual effects.
So the task lies on the author
to make the readers picture the
magic tricks through description
alone.
Swinging between reality and
illusion, Galloway wants to challenge the assumption people have
about memory and brains.
"I was interested in the ways in
which the brain remembers things
and how we like to think of brains
as computers. In fact, it's not even
a little bit like a computer. If you
look at the way memories are
formed, catalogued and kept. The
brain is a story telling device. It's a
dynamic device. Magicians use the
way the brain forms memories to
make magic tricks work."
But we are not always being
tricked unconsciously — instead,
we often consent to the deception.
"When people read a novel,
they're agreeing to pretend that
something that isn't real is, right?
You don't read a novel and say
the whole time, 'well, that never
happened,'" said Galloway. This
suspension of disbelief also enables us to enjoy a magic show. The
Telus Studio Theatre provides the
audience the best possible position
to watch the show. With only 150
seats, the round arena allows the
audience to observe the magician
from a very close distance.
"It's going to be tough on [Gifford]. That's his problem. I can
read anywhere," said Galloway.
If you haven't read the book, it's
not a reason to miss the show. "I'm
going to operate under the premise
that people haven't read the book.
I'll pick parts that stand by themselves," said Galloway.
As the audience renders themselves into suspended disbelief,
they might find another way to see
reality.
Beyond Words with Steven
Galloway and David Gifford will be
on February 26 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Telus Studio Theatre. Tickets are
available online. Xi
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COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
Jimmy and the Jets to play Koerner's Pub
Jenica Montgomery
Culture Editor
First- and second-year law students James Struthers and Yvan
Larocque, alongside Capilano
university jazz student Jack Col-
ish, will be playing their first gig
as Jimmy and the Jets at Koerners
on Thursday.
Struthers and Larocque were
both professional musicians before
entering UBC as law students.
Struthers wrote and produced his
own music, touring the country and
performing alongside local band
Hey Ocean! Larocque, who was in
the Navy for a number of years and
studied music in New York, was
a musician for the military show
band, performing for troops across
the world.
Both Struthers and Larocque
weren't getting what they wanted out ofthe musician's life and
each decided to try law school.
"I just started thinking about
what I wanted out of the next
X amount of years in my life
and sleeping in my car and only
being able to afford to eat ramen
noodles was not what I wanted to
do," said Struthers.
"I just kind of got sick of
being on the road all the time,
living out of a suitcase and never
seeing my friends and family, so
I decided to come to law school
so I could not see my friends and
family," said Larocque.
However, music still plays a
large role in their day-to-day
lives. Both Struthers and Larocque commented on the hardships that professional musicians
face and the importance of doing
something you love for fun.
"I originally wanted to [start
a band] when I got out here just
cause I didn't want to stop doing
what I cared about and that's
obviously a huge part of it, but I
realized pretty quickly that it's
James Struthers had a solo career before entering law school.
=HOTO COURTESY DAN PRIEST
a huge part of my sanity at law
school," said Struthers.
Jimmy and the Jets will
be playing a combination of
original tunes and covers of
popular songs. The band can
play anything from R Kelly to
Bruce Springsteen.
"Some of them are totally inappropriate as acoustic songs but
I think that's what we like about
it," said Struthers.
Koerner's has become a well-
known venue for UBC-based
musicians, continuing to support
the arts and culture community
on campus.
"I think it's really great that
they're lending a helping hand to
local musicians," said Larocque.
"It's a great venue, it's a great
place, good people, for us it's a
chance for us to have fun, get our
friends out and share our music
with some people. And for a first
gig it's pretty low-key."
Jimmy and the Jets will be
playing at 9 p.m. on Thursday February 25 at Koerner's Pub. Tickets
are not required. Xi
New
Master of
Accounting
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Accounting (MAcc), a rigourous program that will provide students with a gateway to a
career as a Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA).
Program features:
• Accredited by CPA Ontario. MAcc graduates may proceed directly to the
CPA Common Final Exam.
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• Develop work experience through a fall internship.
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• Highly qualified and committed faculty members who have been actively
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The program starts in May 2015.
To learn more about the program and to apply, visit:
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Carleton
Canada's Capital Uni
a
SPROTT CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2015
"—- ^^^^^^
Kaylan Mackinnon
Contributor
Graduate from UBC? Check. Compete in the Olympics? Check. Start
comedy troupe and participate
in large sketch comedy festival?
Check.
Annamay Pierse can proudly
admit to being a UBC graduate,
an Olympian and now a sketch
comedian with her comedy
troupe Highbrau.
Pierse moved from Edmonton
out to Vancouver to attend UBC
primarily for swimming. She
trained during her school years
and graduated with a degree in
psychology. And, at the age of 24
while still studying, she competed
in the 2008 Beijing Olympics.
Once she graduated, Pierse
moved out to Toronto, where she
is currently attending teachers'
college. Pierse didn't know anyone
in the city at the time, so she
decided to take a drop-in class at
The Second City Improv Centre in
downtown Toronto.
"I went one day to just a drop-in
class and loved it, and did another
one later on that night and then
"I went one day
to just a drop-in
class and loved
it, and did another one later
on that night and
then signed up
the next day and
started classes/'
signed up the next day and started
classes," said Pierse.
Since training with Second City,
she has now formed her own comedy sketch troupe called Highbrau,
which consists of five comedians.
Highbrau, as Pierse explained,
is a way of describing upper-crest
comedy. However, to make it a
little more humorous, they used
the spelling of brau, which means
beer in German.
"I've always loved being in front
of people and on stage. If I hadn't
been a swimmer, I probably would
have tried to be an actor," said
Pierse.
Their first comedy festival as
a troupe was at Toronto's Fringe
Festival. Since then, Pierse and the
rest of her troupe applied for the
10th Annual Toronto Sketch Comedy Festival and were accepted.
"We had to apply and it was a
pretty rigorous. I guess they look
at your videos and see what you've
done around the city and kind of
see if you have a name for yourself,
so it's a pretty big honour that we
got into it. It's going to be so much
fun," said Pierse. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2015    I    CULTURE
Their first comedy festival as a troupe
was at Toronto's Fringe Festival. Since
then, Pierse and the rest of her troupe applied for the 10th
Annual Toronto Sketch Comedy Festival and
were      accepted.
They get to perform for 30
minutes, which will consist of
six to eight different sketches, all
written and produced by their
troupe. The troupe will also share
the stage with one ofthe festival's
headlines and SNL's very own
Kate McKinnon.
Pierse's next move in the
comedy world with Highbrau is to
apply for the Montreal Sketch Fest,
as well as to continue hosting their
monthly hour-length shows. 31
■
fffl
pic
:inis
IBS
2008 Beijing
Breaststroke 200m
6th
Breaststroke loom
10th
Medley Relay 4x100m
pyth
nterests
Competitive swimming
Shoes, chocolate and wine
Sketch comedy 8    I    CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26,2015
PROJECTS » FOOD »
New project highlights the Common Energy encourages food
inacessibiiity of medicine   sustainability across campus
Chew on This aims to increase awareness around sustainable eating.
Pictures for Progress combines activism and art.
=HOTO COURTESY PICTURESFOR PROGRESS
Anuja Kapoor
Contributor
A new UBC campaign, Pictures
for Progress, highlights issues
of inaccessibility to medication
through the use of visual images
and creative artwork.
The project is driven by the
UBC chapter of UAEM (Universities Allied for Essential Medicines), an international group
dedicated to enhancing the impact
of universities' biomedical research on global health.
The campaign encourages
student engagement and submission of interpretive art and
photography as an effective means
to promote access to medication
for all.
"The issue is not something that
is out there and far from us, but
rather something we see on a local
scale — especially on campus,"
said Angela Ji, president ofthe
campaign and second year pharmacy student.
While inaccessibility is used
as a broad term to encompass
the various barriers the public
can face, the issue is in fact more
complex.
Complications often arise
from a combination of disadvantageous factors including patent
laws, health policies, lack of
effective knowledge dissemination and pharmaceutical industry
values.
To filter these facts, Pictures
for Progress members serve as
a link between pharmacists and
the public.
"[Lack of] access to information and information dissemination is a barrier we are trying to
break," said Ji.
Information provided on their
website assists individuals to
better afford the prescriptions
they need. Topics such as over-
medication, overuse of antibiotics, comparisons of generic
vs. brand-name drugs and B.C.
PharmaCare are addressed in
detail to give students a more solid
foundation.
The biggest concern is still cost
of medication.
At advocacy events held at the
SUB and the pharmacy atrium
between January 10-20, members found upon discussions with
students that their medication can
often be expensive and unafford-
able. This is particularly true in
and around a campus environment.
Furthermore, students are often
unaware ofthe resources available to them, and the organisation
gathered that one in 10 people
struggle to access affordable medicines or lack knowledge of campus
and B.C. health care coverage.
The project is ongoing, and as
for its future, Ji has high hopes.
The team hopes to exhibit a series
of over 100 photographs at the
AMS Art Gallery next semester,
for promotion, advocacy and
outreach. 31
Mischa Milne
Contributor
With the wrap-up of Common
Energy's third annual Chew on
This event, students at UBC were
exposed to a greater focus on food
sustainability than ever.
Chew on This, which ran
from January 26-30, was held by
Common Energy's Food and Connections team. Events included a
documentary about food waste, a
lecture on the benefits of eating
insects, a nettle foraging workshop
and an international food night,
finishing up with the UBC Farm
Symposium and Community Eats
at Sprouts.
The week kicked off with the
documentary screening of Just Eat
It, which was filmed in Vancouver.
The film highlighted the amount
of food that is wasted at all levels
of production, following the path
of food from farms to grocery
stores. It explored the imbalance
between the amount of food that
is produced in North America,
and the amount that actually gets
eaten.
Yann Herrera, third year
environmental science student
and co-coordinator of Food and
Connections, noted that although
UBC has a number of initiatives to
promote food sustainability, there
is still a tremendous amount of
food that gets wasted.
However, that doesn't mean
things aren't improving. He added
that one ofthe most successful
results of Chew on This was
being able to reach beyond the
Common Energy community, as
students from multiple faculties,
both undergraduate and graduate,
and even those from outside UBC
attended the events.
"We wanted to make Chew on
This a really fun event that also
had an impact, in the sense that
we tried to incorporate different
=ILE PHOTO GEOFF LISTERfTHE UBYSSEY
aspects of education but also
hands-on activities into one
week-long event where anyone
was welcome," he said.
The growth of Common
Energy over the past four years
is indicative of a campus-wide
engagement in environment and
sustainability issues. Chew on
This is one of several events that
Common Energy hosts throughout the year, and it involved
collaboration with other campus
sustainability groups, including
the UBC Farm, Sprouts and the
International Forestry Students
Association.
"I think one ofthe greatest
aspects of Chew on This was that
we were able to reach out to a lot
of different campus partners ...
to build that sense of community
around food sustainability culture. People are really concerned
about the way food is being
used," said Herrera. 31
February 27
Sprouts
Pay for the bowl you purchase
Sprouts, Community Eats, and the Pottery Club
are presenting their second annual Souper Bowl
this Friday. Purchase a handmade bowl from the
Pottery Club and fill it with delicious soup from
Community Eats.
February 25-March 1
7 p.m., 1:30 p.m. Dorothy Sommerset Studios
$6 for members, $12 for non-members
UBC's oldest club, the Players' club, is hosting their
Festival Dionysia. The theatre festival presents a host
of one-act plays, some written by students. This event
promises a night of drama and excitement.
One Card. All UBC.
ID. Food. Transit (UPass).
All access. With just one card,
Obtain yours online
at ubccard.ubc.ca // Opinions
DIVESTMENT »
Vote no on Israel divestment
disputed territories, but I do
believe in a resolution mutually
agreed upon by both Israelis and
Palestinians, and BDS is not a
way to achieve such a resolution.
BDS does little to convince Israel
to make a policy change, and will
likely have the opposite effect.
If you want to help Palestinians
why not help them, instead of
looking to hurt Israel.
The potential referendum
question advocates boycotting
Israeli products and divesting
from Israeli companies, meaning if this were to pass, then the
AMS should not use any current
Microsoft operating systems,
any phone with a 4G chip (I'm
looking at your iPhone) or any
SMS messaging (it was developed
in Israel) and forget about any
Coca-Cola products too. SPHR
does not decide what is boycotted
and what is not; the AMS would
have to follow the guidelines laid
out by the question.
In their mission statement,
the AMS states, "the Society
will foster communication, both
internally and externally, in order
to be democratic, fair, accountable to and accessible to its
members.... It will cultivate unity
and goodwill among its members,
but will also encourage free and
open debate, as well as respect
for differing views." BDS does not
"foster communication," instead
it shuts down any pro-Israel dialogue, labelling the entire country as criminal. The opportunity
for dialogue, and thus peace,
dies when BDS takes hold on a
campus. But worst of all, BDS will
make the AMS inaccessible to its
members if it passes.
This year, at the University of
California, Davis, just hours after
the student government passed a
BDS resolution, swastikas were
spray painted on a Jewish fraternity. In a development at the
Durban University of Technology
in South Africa, their student
society, "demanded that Jewish
students, especially those who
'do not support the Palestinian
struggle,' leave the school." This
is happening right now, in 2015.
Jewish students being asked to
leave universities is strikingly
reminiscent ofthe Nuremberg
Laws of 1935. BDS marginalizes Jewish and Israeli students,
building hate and shutting
down dialogue.
The AMS should absolutely take a stand on complicated
international issues in a fashion
that is based on Canadian and
UBC's values. Instead of marginalizing and isolating Jewish and
Israeli students by trying to harm
Israel, the AMS should look to
help Palestinians by supporting
organizations and movements
that seek to create peace in the
Middle East. We should support
an organization like Seeds of
Peace which brings Israeli and
Palestinian youth together to
foster understanding and provide
the tools necessary to create
lasting peace.
Should the campaign succeed,
you have the opportunity to do
the right thing: vote NO to BDS.
Vote NO to antisemitism. Vote
NO on this referendum.
Koby Michaels is a first-year
student and a staff writer for The
Ubyssey. 31
GRAPHICCHERIHAN HASSUWHE UBYSSEY
KOBY MICHAELS
Op-ed
UBC's branch of Solidarity for
Palestinian Human Rights (SPHR)
is currently campaigning to have
the AMS include a BDS resolution
against the State of Israel on the
upcoming student government's
election ballot. If the campaign is
successful, we cannot allow this
referendum to pass.
The BDS movement, which
stands for Boycott, Divest and
Sanction, looks to punish Israel
for its alleged "war crimes,"
through economic means. They
call for a boycott of Israeli products along with divestment from,
and sanctions of, Israeli companies. In practice however, BDS
spreads hatred and intolerance,
especially on North American
university campuses.
Ahmed Moor, a Palestinian-American political commentator and BDS supporter,
said that, "ending the occupation doesn't mean anything if
it doesn't mean upending the
Jewish state itself... BDS does
mean the end ofthe Jewish
state," in an article published
on mondowiess.net. BDS does
not want peace, they want to
destroy Israel. As'ad AbuKhalil,
an American university professor
and prominent BDS supporter, wrote "the real aim of BDS
is to bring down the state of
Israel.... That should be stated
as an unambiguous goal," in an
opinion piece on al-akhbar.com.
BDS does not want peace, it does
not want to help Palestinians; it
wants to destroy Israel.
Bassem Eid, the found of
the Palestinian Human Rights
Monitoring Group and "a proud
Palestinian who grew up in a
refugee camp," wrote, in an
opinion piece in the Times of
Israel, that Israel "has a right to
exist. It is the nation ofthe Jews
but also a nation for Israeli Arabs
who have better lives than Arabs
anywhere in Arab countries....
The antisemitism promoted
by Hamas, Fatah and the BDS
movement is not the answer for
us Palestinians.... The answer is
to live in peace and democracy."
Mahmoud Abbas, the Palestinian
Authority President, said "no,
we do not support the boycott
of Israel. Palestinians don't like
the BDS movement, neither do
Israelis; BDS is about spreading
antisemitism, not about helping
Palestinians.
I am pro-Israeli and pro-Palestinian, the two are not mutually
exclusive. Israel is not a perfect
country and I, personally, don't
agree with Israeli actions in the
ii'liUMM111^'^'^
WITH
WITH
GET DOWN WITH A FREE YOGA CLASS FOLLOWED BY A
STRAIGHT-UP CHAT WITH  RELATIONSHIP AND  HEALTH
EXPERTS ON  HOW TO  BREAK UP WITH THE  BAD THINGS
IN YOUR LIFE AND  LET  IN THE  GOOD.
THURSDAY
MARCH 5IS
DOORS AT 2PM
STUDENT RECREATION CENTRE, UBC
6000 STUDENT UNION BOULEVARD
FREE
JUICE
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STUDENTS ONLY. SPACE IS LIMITED.
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BY MARCH 3rd TO SAVE YOUR SPOT.
BREAKUPANDMOVE.CA // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
VIDEO GAMES »
eSports Club on gaming, competition and "real sports"
The competitive team is looking forward to the NACC tournament, where $400,000 in scholarship money is up for grabs.
Jack Hauen
Sports and Rec Editor
Competitive eSports — playing video games like League of
Legends and DOTA against other
teams, often in tournaments with
prize money — is a growing sport
all over the world. A little-known
fact to many students here is that
the UBC hosts arguably the best
college eSports team in North
America. The eSports Club went
to three major tournaments
last year, and this year, they're
confident about their chances
at the top prize of $180,000 at
the North American Collegiate
Championships. We caught up
with a few members of their
competitive team.
Manager - Carman Lam "Chi-
yeuk" (CL)
Jungle - Jason Dong "Proo-
fOfPayment" (JD)
Mid - Bob Qin "BobqinXD"
(BQ)
ADC - Sean Wang "Heat
Waves" (SW)
Support - Jeremy Koberstein
"Remie" (JK)
Sub (ADC) - Brian Choi "Teh-
BChoi" (BC)
What's a brief summary
of your club, for someone
who doesn't know anything
about it?
CL: The club is more ofthe social aspect. They organize events
such as viewing parties for important tournaments that people
would want to watch together.
They also organize competitive
tournaments that are open to
anyone of any level. It's not, like,
hardcore-hardcore. They also
hold fan meets sometimes if
we can get pro players who are
in Vancouver.
You guys just finished a leg
of a tournament, right?
JD: We played IvyLoL and
CSL (Collegiate StarLeague) at
the same time, which are two of
the tournaments that qualify us
into the seeding for the really
big tournament that's coming
up (North American Collegiate
Championships). We won first
place in both of them — basically,
we stomped the competition.
BQ: Way to be humble, Jason.
[Laughs]
When are you moving on to
the NACC?
CL: We move on to the playoffs
in April. They have 16 seeds, and
eight of them have been determined so far.... They'll be playing
in the middle of March, and after
they've determined that, we'll start
with playoffs for those 16 teams.
There's a bunch of prize
money up for grabs, right?
CL: Yeah, in scholarships.
JD: The total prize pool for the
tournament is around $400,000, so
for first place that's $180,000 split
six ways.
What do you think your chances of winning are?
BC: Easy.
[Laughs]
JD: Yeah, our team's
pretty confident.
What would it mean to you if
you won?
JD: For us, getting our name out
would be pretty big, I know some
of us are big showoffs on the
team, so we like getting our name
out there.
CL: Bob.
BC:Bob.
JD: So that'd be a big ego
boost. And, you know, the
$30,000 is good too.
CL: We'd also like to get the
faculty and staff more involved.
I don't have any concrete plans
yet, but I have reached out to
them before, during their sports
review ... maybe instead of UBC
eSports being a social club, we
could be a competitive club.
How should people go
about getting involved
with either the club or the
competitive team?
JD: We have tryouts for the
teams. Sometimes we'll have
members ofthe premier team,
like some of us, try out the newer
members who have reached a
certain rank and we'll see if
they're good enough. At first
we'll put them on one of our B
teams to see if they can work
together competitively.
How do tryouts work?
JD: It's just a standard 5v5,
they just play the game and we
see how they play and if they're
good or not.
Just like any sport.
JD: Yeah.
Do you guys consider
eSports to be a "real" sport?
JD: I think I would. It's just
such a big thing, you know?
Like the Staples Center last
PHOTO WILLMCDONALDfTHE UBYSSEY
year, there were so many people
there. It was a sold-out stadium
— it's really like going to any
other sport.
JK: I'd call it closer to chess
than any other sport.
JD: Well it's more dynamic
[than chess]. Things are constantly happening and it's really
exciting, whereas with chess ...
CL: I think the culture is more
sports-like, with all the hype
and stuff, but for the players
themselves, it might be more like
playing chess.
What do you think is
the best way to get people
into eSports?
JD: I think a lot of it has to
do with the company. So, Riot
Games, they can hold a big part
in promoting eSports itself, like
what DOTA 2 did with The International ... real players threw
money into a fund, and it made
this huge 12 million dollar prize
pool tournament. So if Riot could
do something like that it'd really
promote the growth of eSports
really quickly.
CL: Yeah, the Compendium [prize pool] got a lot of
media attention.
JK: I think eSports is just
growing on its own, you don't
have to do too much about
it, it's just going to run its
course naturally.
Do you guys livestream as a
club or as individuals?
JD: Some of us have tried
streaming, it's kind of hard to get
viewers ... I've streamed before
but I don't anymore, it's just too
much of a pain.
JK: It's really hard to get a
fanbase. It's like feast or famine.
The more viewers you have, the
higher you go on the list. And
then [as a viewer] you start looking at the top ofthe list. So everyone just goes in and watches
whatever the highest one is.
BQ: In other games it's not
that hard. I was streaming
different games, and by the time
I was on my third stream I was
getting hundreds of viewers.
That's because, in League, there's
so many big name people, but in
other games if you're just good,
or have something to show specifically, you don't have to have a
big starting base.
What about streaming as a
club, is that something you're
going to do in the future?
JD: I'm not sure how well
it'd work.
BQ: It'd be hard, because
people either watch you for entertainment purposes, or because
you're a pro player ... I don't think
a lot of people are attracted to
just watching a club play League
of Legends.
Do any of you make money
doing this?
JD: I think Bob has made a bit
of money.
BQ: I used to play for a lot
of teams.
Is the only way to
make money through
winning tournaments?
BQ: Yeah, basically.
JD: Mostly, [as well as]
sponsorships ... that's about it,
right Bob?
[Laughs]
Do any of you guys plan to
make this into a career?
JD: I think right now it's
more of a hobby, because to do it
seriously you have to give up a lot
of things.
Are there any games you
don't compete in that you'd
like to?
JD: Do we have to be good
at them?
Nope.
CL: Hearthstone.
JK: Hearthstone.
JD: I'd love to play CS:GO, that
game's so much fun!
Mario Party?
CL: No.
Are you organizing any
tournaments here?
CL: Every year we have the
UBC Cup, where we host tournaments for all the games, like
Smash, Hearthstone I'm not sure
about, League of Legends, DOTA-
JD:CS:GO!
Search "UBC eSports" on
Facebook and Twitter, or go to ub-
cesports.com if you're interested in
joining, or for more information. Xi THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26,2015    I    SPORTS    I   11
THUNDERBIRDS »
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
CHARISMATIC CAPTAINS
1. When you need to inspire your team, what
do you do and/or say?
2. What's the worst piece of advice you've
ever received?
When I want to inspire my
team I just crush a 51 and
say"LETSGOOO...to
Bims!"
The worst piece of advice was when someone
told me to be a middle
blocker instead of an
outside hitter...
I tell them team to reach
down, grab their privates
and count to two. If they
can't count to two then
we got a big problem, or
asmallone.
"Life is like a box of
chocolates." Screw you
Forest Gump, I hate
chocolates.
I don't need to do orsay
much at all. We resort
to Pitch Perfect inspired
riff-offs to get us fired
up.
"Don't guzzle Jack Daniels like water" — Mom.
It's playoff time and
we've had many injuries
so "Doc Rob only treats
winners" seems fitting.
Aftergames Joe Antilla
often yells "everybody
drinks, everybody
drives!"
The loser gets a 45-sec-
ond drill.
"If you don't have anything nice to say, don't
say anything at all."
3. What's the worst piece of advice you've
ever given?
The worst piece of
advice I've ever given
was to not listen to my
advice.
"Dude, don't worry,
you'll be fine." Then
they doit and get in
trouble, and I run away
laughing.
"We can just take it
easy tonight" ...which
is always the exact
opposite of what ends
up happening.
"If it is a grizzly play dead,
if it is a black bearfight
back."
"Winning isn't everything."
4. If you could wake up tomorrow in the body
of someone else, who would you pick and
what would you do?
I'd have to choose to be
Blake Lively. She wakes
up as a 10, and secondly
because she wakes up
nexttoalO, aka Ryan
Reynolds.
My girlfriend, so I could
wake up and look at myself and be like "Damn,
that's a nice piece of
buttersittingonsome
hot flap jacks."
would beacharacterin
MeanGirlssolcouldbe
the fifth memberofthe
plastics and make fetch
happen.
Since we're fantasizing
might as well time travel.
would wake up February las Pete Carroll and
would put the ball in the
hands of Marshawn.
would wake up as Air
Bud. Shoot the movie
Puck Buddy and make
my millions.
5. Who on your team would have won the
Laura MacTaggartfor
Yuri Kisil, hands down.
Zoe Gillis aka "Zigapoc-
Jessi Hilton. This love-
Jenna Carpen-
Oscar for Best Actor/Actress?
her performance ofthe
He would have won
alypse". She rocked her
struck, 6'3 heartthrob
ter-Boesch.She
line "ARE YOU NOT
both. HisShakira "Hips
T-Bird Idol performance,
could puttogethera
would easily win best
ENTERTAINED!?" while
Don't Lie" dance is hilar
complete with a unigue
tear-jerking romantic
actress for her role in
walking intothe gymna
ious, and he looks good
interpretive dance style.
performance.
Mouth-Breathers.
sium at Uof A.
doing it.
Thunderbird playoff action this weekend
Women's hockey
Canada West semifinals vs. U Manitoba Bisons
vjl;; CANADA
Deadline:
March 31
Game 1: Friday at 7:00
Game 2: Saturday at 3:00
Game 3 (if necessary): Sunday at 3:00
All at Father David Bauer Arena.
Women's basketball
Canada West quarterfinals vs. U Regina Cougars
Game 1: Friday at 6:00
Game 2: Saturday at 5:00
Game 3 (if necessary): Sunday at 2:00
All at War Memorial Gym.
Men's basketball
Canada West quarterfinals vs. UNBC Cougars
Game 1: Thursday at 7:00
Game 2: Friday time TBA
Game 3 (if necessary): Saturday, time TBA
All at War Memorial Gym.
IMAGINE
CULTURE (C'U
PHOTO   CONTEST ^M^''
Explore cultural traditions
through photography.
• Win cash prizes of up to $1,000!
• Open to youth up to age 29.
Submit your photo at
www.passagescanada.ca
1.866.701.1867
historicacanada.c
A  PROJECT  OF:
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SUPPORT  OF:
Citizenship and Citr
Immigration Canada      Irr 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 26,2015
Going to check your mail at midnight can by a somewhat eerie experience. K @psiemens
PHOTO PETER SIEMENS/THE UBYSSEY
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= EB23 ANSWERS
ACROSS
1-Let_
5- Prefix with meter
9-Seeps
14-Still
Satirist Mort
Give guns again
"The Time Machine" people
Explorer Tasman
Army leader?
Powerfully binding
Evergreen tree
"... the cows come home"
Former Virginia senator
Charles
27-Hotelier Helmsley
15
16-
17-
18-
19
20
23
24
25
SOURTESYBESTCROSSWORDS.COM
31-Psychic
33-Kitchen addition
37-Buries
39- Writer Hentoff
40-Desertlike
41-In spite of
44-Merriment
45- Debtor's letters
46- Comfort in misfortune
47- Crew needs
48-Ship's company
50-Wallops
51- Sounds of disapprova
53-Lubricate
55-Snapshot
58- Produced in the bone marrow
64- Boise's state
66-Uris's"      18"
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= EB23 ANSWERS
67-Mogul capital until 1658
68-Aromatic wood
69-Hgt.
70- Panhandles
71-Sample
72-Baseball team
73-Meets with
DOWN
1- Frozen treats
2- Currency unit in Western Samoa
3-Voting group
4- Chieftain, usually in Africa
5-Me too
6-Tabs
COURTESY KRAZYDAD.COM
7- Not now
38-Adhesive
8-Abuse
42-Cavalry
9-Toothbrush brand
43-Aristocratic
10-Not'neath
49- Like many mittens
11-Madcap
52- Campfire treat
12-Ashtabula's lake
54-       at the office
13-Diving duck
55-Ancient Briton
21-Pong maker
56-Thought
22-Main arteries
57-Heels
26- Parish officer
59- Taylor of "Mystic Pizza"
27-Vernacular
60-Apprehends
28-Nameon a bomber
61-Arch type
29-Aquatic mammal
62- Impulse
30- Freshest
63-Backtalk
32-Come afterward
65-Boater or bowler
34- Experiment
35-Tinged
36- Boundaries

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