UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 25, 1980

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128182.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128182.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128182-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128182-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128182-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128182-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128182-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128182-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128182-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128182.ris

Full Text

 ty
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII, No.44
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, January 25,1980
348       228-2301
Moisten your balloting pencils. It's voting time
again.
For the first time in more than four years students
will elect an Alma Mater Society president and four
other AMS executives.
The campaign has passed so quickly most students
missed it. It began quietly yesterday and will finish today after a noon hour all-candidates forum in the SUB
conversation pit.
Students go to the polls Monday to Wednesday next
week to elect either Bruce Armstrong, Shayne Boyd or
Bob Staley as AMS president.
The president's post is the most powerful executive
position under the new AMS constitution and has considerably more power.
The most experienced candidate running for oresi-
dent is Bruce Armstrong, former president and outgoing student board of governors member. Armstrong, author of the new constitution which forced
the at-large elections, only served half of his 1978-79
term as AMS president and now wants the position
back. He resigned in September, 1978 after an administration threat to expel him if his grades did not
improve.
Armstrong has been hospitalized for the past month
and was unavailable for an interview Thursday, but
campaign manager Shirley Waters outlined Armstrong's platform. She said he is running "because he
knows more about the society, the code and constitution, and more about coordinating the society than
anyone on campus."
See page 3: POLITICIANS
Park protest
rakes Kenny
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny packed a public forum
on Discovery Park and then turned
it into a circus, a student leader has
charged.
"I resent that Dr. Kenny turned
the beginning of this meeting into a
circus," Marty Lund, chair of the
student representative assembly
research park committee told 75
people in SUB 200 Thursday evening.
Lund also said after the meeting
Kenny had made it apparent the
public was not welcome at the
meeting and then "loaded it with
faculty."
Kenny started the meeting by
stating he knew of no group opposed to Discovery Park and asked
those in favor of the park to applaud. A call from the crowd for a
vote of opposition to the park produced similar applause.
Point Grey resident Tom Shandel
complained at the meeting about
the lack of public input into the
research park. "If this meeting was
to be held at Lord Byng high school
there'd be a lot more people that
weren't students," he said.
Kenny has refused to attend
forums held off campus.
Shandel, who was an NDP candidate for Vancouver-Quadra in the
last provincial election, also expressed community fears concerning the research park. "Along the
(access) corridors, we want to know
what is going in and out of this
university."
"We are saying allay our fears.
One of the ways to do it is to do it as
openly as possible," Shandel told
Kenny.
Kenny said the park would be
covered by federal government
standards regarding research.
"Those standards are standards
coming out of Ottawt. Our track
record is exemplary," Kenny said.
Kenny and Discovery Park inc.
managing director Don Larsen both
said the park would not permit
development past the experimental
stage. Larsen said fears the park
would be dominated by
smokestacks were "absolute
bunkum".
Gage hotel scheme
disturbs residents
Students living in Gage low-rise
residence expressed concern Thursday over a housing department plan
to turn the building into a hotel.
"I'm not crazy about the idea,"
resident Ian Lepper said about the
proposal to convert the 58-unit residence into a hotel catering to campus visitors.
Housing director Mike Davis said
Wednesday there are currently 15
married couples living in the low-
rise, with the other 38 units occupied by non-married students.
Low-rise resident Tony Bajan,
who shares a suite with his brother,
said the building should not be converted. "I think it should be left the
way it is. I think it's a great alternative," he said.
Gage residents also expressed
concern that visiting athletic teams
would be allowed to use the hotel.
"Most of Gage community council is scared of it because most of us
have been on field trips," said
council president Al Soltis.
"They're worried about security;
things that might just walk away."
Director of athletics R. J. Phillips
said visiting teams select their own
accommodation, but many would
consider staying at a Gage hotel.
"Some would and some
wouldn't. Teams often like to be
downtown so they can go
shopping," Phillips said Thursday.
But Erich Vogt, administration
vice-president of student and faculty affairs, said the plan is still very
much a proposal.
"I think the housing department
is sounding it out. If that's not the
way the students want it used, it
won't be used that way," Vogt said.
Davis will meet Tuesday with
Gage residents to discuss the plan.
The meeting will be in the Maclnnes
lounge at 7:30 p.m.
A LARGE STEP FOR karatekind as martial artist marshalls "Bigfoot" effort to squash obnoxious photographer
Edmond O'Brien. Wide angle lens captures exquisite contours of fighter's sole, but proximity to well-exercised
feet melted glass elements. Actually, karate specialist is practising up in preparation for Canadian call-up, expected in wake of U.S. announcement to reinstate draft in new Cold War developments.
Three vie fer AMS presidency
New beard duo is
lest to lip service
Analysis
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
It was a dark day for student
representation yesterday.
Two little-known engineering students dedicated to the grand cause of
pleasing government-appointed UBC board of governors members were
elected to the board.
John Pellizzon and Anthony Dickinson were elected by frighteningly
large majorities, each getting at least 350 votes more than the other three
candidates.
Students gave Pellizzon 978 votes; Dickinson, 923; Shirley Waters,
559; Valgeet Johl, 445; and Bob Staley, 422. This is the clearest majority
won by any student board members in the past four years and represents a
grave turning point in board representation.
Pellizzon and Dickinson have vowed to use their mandate to work
with the board and "bring respectability" back to student representation, instead of working for traditional student concerns. Pellizzon says
he wants to take time to "get comfortable" with the board and will only
"listen and learn" at his first board meeting on Feb. 5.
But unfortunately Pellizzon and Dickinson will learn that they are expected to kow-tow to the board "line" (which they have said they will do
anyway), while important issues such as the final negotiations on the proposed 58-acre research park will pass through the meeting quietly.
The election of this new "team", vowed to work together, will ensure
students get no voice on the plans for the park. If Pellizzon and Dickinson are so concerned about keeping on the good side of board heavyweights like J. V. Clyne, it is extremely unlikely they will say a word at
what will probably be the board's most important meeting on the park.
And that is a tragedy for student board members with such strong mandate from students.
See page 3: PLAYING Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 25, 1980
■    1     a
SUPER-SALE CONTINUES
.^u
<&&k
v^v^M^W
tf^sr-^T^
1
pioneer SX-880
Continous Power
Output: 60W - 60W
(8 ohms, 20-20,000Hz
BEST BUY ONLY
Both channels driven.
T.H.D. 10.05%]. FM
Sensitivity IHF): Mono:
FM/AM STEREO
RECEIVER
(with DC powar amp)
s448
'~~%
>IOIMEER|l
ICT-F6001
STEREO
CASSETTE
DECK
WITH DOLBY
I Motor:
I Eleelfonleslly-controlled DC motor.
Wow  ft   Flutter:  0.05%   (WRMS)
S/N Ratio: 72 5dB (Dolby on)  Dimensions:
420(W) x 142.5 (H) x 289.5(D)mm  Weight:
5.5 kg.
*>
$249
<te>\ain^n*tt^
KLIPSCHORN
This Is The Ultimate Loudspeaker. The Next Best
Thing To Original Sound.
WORLD FAMOUS — Walnut Oil
$1995e°a°
KLIPSCHORN — Birch Raw
$1395°,°
Tfechnics sl-q2
by Panasonic
Quartz Phase-Locked Dl- flj
rect-Drtve Turntables SL-Q2 «P
Seml-Automatlc
Complete With Cartridge
299
Technics package
by Panasonic
LIMITED
TIME OFFER
A Complete Stereo System
With Perfectly Matched
Components
$549.95
DISCWASHER
THE DISCWASHER SYSTEM
The Superior Record Cleaner Is
The D3 System. The D3 Discwasher System Has A Specially-Designed Brush Mounted On A
Milled, Hand-Finished Walnut
Handle Which Also Stores The D3
Fluid Bottle.
ONLY
JBL 702VX
702VX
RADIANCE SERIES
A Unique Combination Ot Great Sound And Elegant Style. Model 702VX Provides A Smooth Musical Response with A 20 Watt System. 10" Baas.
5" Mid-range, 3" High Frequency Speaker*. 150
Watt Capacity. Radiance JBL Means Quality.
$
199
.95
EACH
rrDK
Buy 5 SA-C90S, Get TDK
CP-15 Stackable Storage
Cabinet
ONLY
$4.99
■ PER 1
PER TAPE
PIONEER CAR
STEREO
PACKAGE
KP8005
TS 160
I.95
PIONEER   SE-2
STEREO
HEADPHONES
Light Weight
Super Sounding
PIONEER
PL-200
AUTO-RETURN
DIRECT DRIVE
TURNTABLE
Complete with
Cartridge
**t
$
189
95
i«
mi
mm
?'/:
\
JBL 502
MBL'S RADIANCE 502's
Flrat With The Pro*.
Thaee New JBL's Are Designed
To Reporduce Music With Accuracy.  They  Have Clean  Highs
And Tight But. Radiance Speakers Require An
Ampullar With Only 10 Watts Per Channel. And
■};<;' - / -• j     : ; .  ,1 Vet They Can Handle Large Power — Up To 200
i/fi/i 'iM '/"/J Watts Per Channel.
WiP^    $16Q.95
I OS*     EACH
1
WmmM
3
o o c:c o
TECHNICS SA-200
STEREO RECEIVER
25 Watts Par Channel, Minimum RMS, Botti
Channels Driven At 8 ohms From 20-
20,000Hz, WHh No Mora Than 0.04% Total
Harmonic Distortion.	
$
279
95
PANASONIC VHS
OMNIVISION
eel
;**■'
It's Portable,
Compact And
Lightweight.
The PANASONIC
OMNIVISION
VHS RECORDER
Model PV-2100K
With 3-Way Power
*1695
.00
COLOR CAMERA
$149500
"VISIT VANCOUVER'S GREATEST RECORD CENTRE"
STEREO CENTRE
2699 W. Broadwav, 733-5914
^^^        Open 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. Thurs. and Fri. till 9 p.m.
•   "WE FINEST FOR LESS"
RECORD CENTRE
2671 W. Broadway, 733-2215 Friday, January 25,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Politicians dash to
fill positions in
AMS student vote
LASER BEAM EYE of CITR disc jockey reads beginning bars of Beethoven's ninth while well into his own fifteenth before utilizing new equipment designed to permit greater fidelity in broadcasting. CITR, which can be
heard on 88.9 FM cable or in the residences, investigates new realms in music from old hole in SUB.
Playing the game 'doesn't work'
From page 1
What have we gotten ourselves
into?
Outgoing student board members
Bruce Armstrong and Glenn Wong
were excellent examples of people
who tried to work "with" the board
and play the game their way. It
didn't work.
This year the board approved an
indexed tuition fee scheme and
58-acres of the campus were slotted
for a research park. The details on
both of these events were kept
secret by student board members to
appease the board and maintain
smooth relations with them.
The Wong-Armstrong approach
didn't work, and the Pellizzon-
Dickinson approach seems doomed
to failure unless the new board
members learn quickly from their
incumbents' mistakes. If Pellizzon
and Dickinson do work as closely as
they have said they are going to,
they should devote their combined
energies to fighting for real issues —
not the right to call other board
members by their first names.
Students gave the new board
members their huge majority
because they were tired of halfhearted student representation.
Last year, Wong became the only
board member to really fight tuition
increases as Armstrong "sold out"
Committee
looks at lots
Gage residents might soon have
220 more parking spaces at the expense of a playing field.
But the proposal has angered and
puzzled members of UBC's land use
committee, who are complaining
they were not informed of the proposal.
Jan DeVries, a UBC soil science
professor and member of the currently suspended committee, said
the committee's responsibilities
were altered, denying its members
access to information about the
parking proposed.
"It has caused confusion and
consternation among members. The
crux of the problem is that UBC
does not have use of the land use
policy," he said.
The proposed parking site, put
forward by a Gage community
council parking committee, would
be located between the north and
south towers of the residence and
construction could begin this summer, said student representative
Craig Brooks.
Parking committee chair Alison
Hughes said proposals to build on
grassy or wooded areas do usually
go through the land use committee
for final approval.
An original proposal for 55 parking spaces was rejected as only a
temporary solution, said Hughes.
for some administration money for
his pet Alma Mater Society projects.
And the year before that, Basil
Peters became known as the invisible board member, while Paul Sandhu single-handedly battled student
issues.
This year students have another
chance for representation by both
their board members, but if Pellizzon and Dickinson keep thejr promises, students might end up with
no representatives. They both accept tuition fee increases tied to inflation and claim to be non-
political.
Maybe that's the problem. Our
new board members are so
representative of the kind of student apathy and political non-
involvement that exists on campus
no one can expect them to fight
strongly against anything. Their
election certainly means a swing to
the right for student representation,
and a move towards the kind of student representatives who have traditionally been administration "yes-
people".
Students can only hope that
Pellizzon and Dickinson will answer
"no" to the question. And many
others posed by the board.
From page 1
"He's worked with the new constitution, he knows the thing inside
out," she said.
Armstrong promises to provide
increased student services, a new
display in SUB to attract students to
AMS clubs and committees, and a
favorable attitude towards working
with the UBC administration to
fight for increased grants.
Waters said although Armstrong
is still in hospital recovering from
an aneurism and will not return to
the campus full-time until March 1,
his health will not be a problem as
president.
"He's looking forward to being
president again," Waters added.
Bob Staley, another veteran of
AMS politics learned of his defeat
in the student board of governors'
race yesterday, and had until last
week denied any interest in runriing
for the president's post. But he said
recent public pressure forced him to
reconsider his decision and Staley
had a campaign under way by Wednesday evening.
"In light of the fact there wasn't
anyone running with real experience, I felt I should give in," he
said.
Staley said he wants to decrease
the power of the student administrative commission, decentralize the
AMS, improve the concerts program, and roll back beer prices in
the Pit. He said the AMS executive
powers are too strong and should be
distributed among various campus
groups.
"I want to see the AMS decentralize. In the past SAC has been a
major source of irritation and I
would like to see SAC's power reduced," he said. "More power
should be given to the clubs and
undergraduate societies."
The third candidate for president
is a newcomer to AMS politics who
wants to remove political squabbling from the AMS executive.
Shayne Boyd is currently Gage residents' representative on the housing
budget committee, and charges the
student representative assembly
with being too political.
"I'd like to see SRA a little more
cohesive as a group, with a lot less
infighting. There's lots of things the
student body can do if we work together," he said.
Boyd said student apathy is his
priority campaign issue. Students
should elect someone who is not in
the "rut" of current student politics
to overcome that apathy, he said.
"I feel it's time we got some new
blood and I'm willing to put the
time in."
In addition to the presidential office, students will also elect a vice-
president, a director of finance, a
director of administration and a coordinator of external affairs.
Yet more campaign premises
JOHNSON . . . help gays
NDP would end
discrimination,
says Johnson
An NDP government would protect gays from discrimination by
amending Canadian law,
Vancouver-Centre NDP candidate
Ron Johnson said Thursday.
Johnson told 95 people in SUB
that if elected he would introduce a
bill to amend that Bill of Rights to
include a prohibition against
discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.
Johnson said Vancouver-Centre
Liberal MP Art Phillips has done
nothing for the gay community
while he has been in office. "The
Liberal MP has not raised the issue
at all."
He added that while Conservative
candidate Pat Carney supports
gays, her party does not.
Johnson said he is also concerned
about the inequality of women in
Canada   and   would   introduce
amendments to guarantee equal pay
for equal work.
He added the federal government
has a responsibility to provide fun-'
ding for child care centres, but the
support should not be limited to
working mothers.
"I think we should have paternity leave as well as maternity leave."
Johnson also said while he
recognizes the problem of student
financing, he is not familiar with
the federal and provincial programs
providing student assistance to
students.
"I gather there are some serious
problems. Students should not have
to take huge loans in order to simply get an education."
While a low-cost housing shortage plagues students in Vancouver-
Centre, he said NDP economic
policies, which encourage more
construction, will not benefit his
riding.
As the election date draws near,
Johnson said the battle for
Vancouver-Centre is becoming
more of a battle between himself
and Phillips.
Johnson said although the student vote is an element in his riding
it does not necessarily ensure an
NDP victory.
Balloting could
mean jail term
TORONTO (CUP) — Orphans
at University of Toronto's residences might be the luckiest voters
in the upcoming election.
Any other residents could end up
with possible 14-year jail terms, according to the local returning officer.
Only residence students who have
"no parents, no guardians or who
have severed all ties and never intend to go home" will be eligible to
vote in the riding, says Spadina riding returning officer Leslie Singer.
Those who lie about their status
and go ahead and vote could wind
up behind bars, he adds.
Residence students who consider
themselves to be "on their own"
are allowed to vote in the riding of
their university residence, states a
guide issued by Elections Canada's
chief electoral officer. Singer claims
other students must vote in the riding of their "ordinary residence" —
the riding of their parents or guardians.
He says students have two options: "To tell the truth and vote
where they're supposed to or lie and
vote where they feel like. Students
caught lying are liable to 14 years in
jail."
But fortunately for students worried about doing time for giving Joe
Clark, Ed Broadbent or Pierre Trudeau the nod, the electoral office
does not agree with Singer's interpretation of the regulations.
Elections Canada communication director Maurice Olivier says
students living in residence can vote
in the university or college riding.
"If the student feels he should
vote in the riding of his (university)
residence it's the student's decision,
not the returning officer's
decision," Olivier said, adding that
information explaining the situation has been issued to returning officers.
But for those in limbo, student
voters' guides which explained
regulations did not arrive at U of T
until early this week.
An official from the office of
chief electoral officer Jean-Marc
Hamel has contacted Singer to
straighten the matter out, said a National Union of Students representative.
But NUS executive officer Morna
Ballantyne says the student organization will be meeting with Hamel
to discuss the problem and ensure
that residence students are informed they can vote in their campus
ridings.
At UBC, residence students are
urged to enumerate themselves at
Walter Gage residence, tower A
north lounge today until Feb. 4. A
revising officer will be available
from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from 7
p.m. to 10 p.m.
Liberals pledge
pension boost
Old age pensions will be increased $35 a month if the Liberals form
the next government, Liberal MP
Art Phillips promised Thursday.
But Phillips admitted the plan,
which carries a $570 million price
tag, will not push the income level
of pensioners above the poverty
line.
"This is the most important election promise and the only one that
costs very substantial dollars that
the Liberal party will be making this
election," said Phillips, who is running against Conservative Pat
Carney and New Democrat Ron
Johnson.
Phillips said B.C. human resources minister Grace McCarthy
has promised that the provincial
government will not reduce its contribution to the guaranteed income
supplement, although it has been
rumored that it would do so.
"Under no circumstances would
the (provincial) government
withhold any portion of that increase. The entire increase would be
passed on to old age pensioners."
Phillips said he called Thursday's
press conference to quash rumors
about the plan that were worrying
pensioners.
The Liberals are also committed
to the proposed stadium at False
Creek and an international transportation exhibition called Transpo
'86, he said.
"There is unequivocal commitment from the Liberal party for aid
if Transpo '86 is awarded to Van- Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 25,1980
'Don't be shy, folks ... he loves the public . . . just don't ask questions
THE UBYSSEY
January 25, 1980
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
Kathryn Munson looked quizzically up at the sky and shouted, "Is it a bird, is it a plane. . .? "No, it's a Rhino," interjected Steve McClure Ito no one's
surprise). But Shaffin, the shariff of the town, decided it could not be a Rhino and asked whether it could be a Menyasz wazz. "No," said Nancie as she rode
up on her Suzuki. "I think it's a Glennbuhr with warts." Wendy thought that it should be hunted down and captured, and a committee struck to decide what it
was. But Kevin Finnegan supposed that if he put the thing in his mouth and ate it, he would identify the thing. "I can taste it now, I think," said the leringjock.
Verne McDonald, however, was not convinced and laid down beside a brookfield for a better look — despite Gary's protestations. Gary was not an easy one to
heatherconn into something and stuck to his contention it was a geofwheetwright. The argument continued as Kerry Reiger surmised that it must be a species
of juliewheelwright. Tom Hawthorn agreed and randyhahnded himself over to make sure. But Peter Ferguson was not conviced, and rightly so. The large grey
thing that loomed in the dark was after all an Ed O'brien.
Power calls • • •
You can sum up the race for the Alma Mater Society presidency
in one word. (Well, two really.)
Sheer opportunism.
Never at UBC has there been a more overt case of power-hungry
candidates climbing for the top. Each one mouths commendable
objectives for students, but with every rosy promise there's a hefty
dose of self-indulgent back patting undermining their genuine concern for change.
Bob Staley, who's been running for student positions at UBC
ever since his first month on campus, says public pressure forced
him to run and adds: "I felt I should give in." How self-righteously
honorable of him to deem himself worthy of our vote.
Student voters can seriously question the desire of Bruce Armstrong, who recently suffered an aneurism and partial paralysis, to
take on the tension-filled position of AMS president next year, take
12 units and graduate. If power and position mean that much to
him . . . (after all, he's already had to abandon the presidency to
avoid failing his academic year).
Shayne Boyd is a newcomer to the AMS circuit who says the
SRA is too political. Gee, why not convert the society to one giant
bureaucratic student administrative commission? That would work
a helluva lot better, right?
He can be admired for attempting to overcome student apathy,
but putting an Inexperienced neophyte, who has not been directly
involved in any crucial AMS issues, past or present, would be
foolishly cut-throat for his sake and dangerously reckless for ours.
In other words, not one of these candidates is worthy of a concerned student's vote. Their own desire for personal advancement
will always override any chance to introduce a radical move.
And without a no vote included on the ballot, students aren't
even getting the opportunity to oppose these candidates. So the
idea that strong leadership and quality representation is promoted
in this campaign is a farce.
You're damned if you do and damned if you don't.
Ignorance is not bliss
Becoming educated. It's a process of opening one's mind to
ideas and considering them in context. Not to be at all confused
with going to school.
Those students going to school at B.C. Institute of Technology
who recently booed when a speaker switched to French weren't
making a political statement. They were showing their ignorance.
Think about it.
Chinese condemn W5's 'distorted9 racism
Last Sunday (Jan. 20, 1980) I attended a meeting at the Chinese
Benevolent Association at 108 East
Pender St. in Vancouver. Besides
myself and another member of the
Pender Guy program, there were
representatives from almost all the
Chinese organizations in Vancouver, including some from UBC. (I
noticed that professor Edgar Wick-
berg of the history department at
UBC was also present at the meeting.) What was so important about
this particular meeting that drew so
many organizations and private citizens together?
Following the lead of so many
Chinese communities across Canada, the Chinese organizations in
Vancouver met to establish a common committee against the W5 segment entitled Campus Giveaway
which was aired on the CTV network Sept. 30, 1979.
This segment focused upon the
influx of foreign students in the Canadian universities. W5 reported at
least 100,000 students or at least
one out of every 10 students as being foreign. In particular W5 implied that too many foreign
students are of Chinese descent and
that Canadians are being turned
away from Canadian universities to
allow room for these "sub-Canadians" as W5 called them.
Besides lashing out these figures,
W5 also made some inexcusable in
sinuations against the Chinese population of Canada in general. For
example every time they mentioned
"foreign student," they showed an
Oriental face. Not once did they
show a black face, an Italian face, a
Jewish face etc. (Oriental students
do not make up the total foreign
student population in Canada, as
W5 implied.)
Chinese cultural events were also
shown to add to the "fact" that
"the Chinese students themselves
do not mix well with the other students." And to make matters worse,
Oriental music was taped in the
background. In effect, the W5 program labeled all students of Chi
nese origin as being foreign and all
foreign students as being Chinese.
None of the above allegations are
in any way justifiable. For one
thing, the figures cited by W5 were
grossly distorted and for another
thing, most of the Chinese students
in Canadian universities are landed
immigrants (permanent residents as
the government calls them now),
native-born Chinese-Canadians, or
have become Canadian citizens
through naturalization.
The figures reported by W5
(there are also other figures I did
not mention) have been disputed by
Alan Earp, president of the Association of Universities and Colleges
of Canada.
'Park hearings a sham without moratorium
At an open forum late last term,
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny told a lunchtime
crowd that he was surprised to find
students hostile to plans to erect a
major applied research facility on
the fringes of campus. His shock
would have been considerably lessened if he had asked in advance.
In drafting the concept, no attempt was ever made to solicit the
opinions of faculty, staff, students
or local residents. Yet we are the
ones the most to gain from such a
development. And the most to lose.
Negotiations have been conducted
under a shroud of secrecy and information released to the ' public
sparsely and reluctantly.
It is the secrecy of the affair that
scares me. The Social Credit government in Victoria has allowed
universities minister Pat McGeer to
bypass the legislature in order to get
his pet project off the ground. The
use of an order-in-council to release
the first $3 million to Discovery
Park Corporation was no doubt politically expedient. With such a
move, Bennett and McGeer were
able to avoid potential public opposition which would likely have
erupted had the proposal been
taken before the legislature.
The amount of money involved
alone warrants the attention of our
elected representatives. No doubt
the initial expenditures will grow exponentially. The cost of access
roads and services (water, hydro,
sewage, security etc.) not to mention the loss of scarce urban forest,
will be borne by the public. A responsible government would listen
to the concerns of the people in this
regard. We're still waiting to be
heard.
Discovery Parks Corporation is a
crown corporation. Its mandate is
to serve the public interest. There is
little question that Canada imports
far too much technology and that
we need more research and development here in B.C. Our high standard of living is maintained only by
the wholesale export of our abundant but finite natural resources.
The proposed research park will
be occupied by tenants whose aim is
to make a profit. In itself this poses
little threat. But if profit is to be the
sole motivation for research, what
assurances do we have that only benign, ecologically sound and useful
products will be developed at the
public expense.
Because private research on this
campus will be publicly funded in
part, the public has a right to scrutinize the nature of this research.
This necessitates the provision in
the charter of the corporation of
some mechanism which will allow
ongoing public input into the criteria for initial and continued
tenancy.
Kenny claims he is sensitive and
responsive to the needs of the com
munity surrounding the university.
But where in writing have we seen
any assurances that the local residents will not be adversely affected?
Kenny has repeatedly assured
concerned students that the risk to
the community will be minimal in
relation to potential benefits. Can
we believe him? What benefits?
What risks? We have no way of
even beginning to know until the
details of secret negotiations between the university and Discovery
Park are made public.
This must occur before contracts
are signed and become legally binding. Kenny, McGeer and Don Larson of Discovery Park must listen
and respond to demands for public
hearings. A moratorium on further
development must be called until
such hearings have occurred. Without a moratorium, the hearings
could only be a sham.
Mike Satterfield
science 4
In a letter to the CTV network,
Alan Earp pointed out all the
"gross inaccuracies and deliberate
distortions" made by W5 and demanded that the record be corrected. Instead of correcting the record
W5 replied that they have "proof"
to the "facts" they reported and
that they were preparing a follow-
up story to the Campus Giveaway
to be aired at the end of January
(probably this coming Sunday, Jan.
27, 1980).
AUCC is not the only one upset
with the W5 program. There are
many other individuals and organizations who have reacted strongly
against W5. In Toronto, the ad hoc
committee of CCCO against W5
was formed in November, 1979.
This committee is comprised of representatives from nine community
organizations and four elected
directors. The CCCO has decided
to stage a rally at the CTV station in
Toronto on Jan. 26, 1980.
Joseph Wong of the Council of
Chinese-Canadians in Ontario came
to Vancouver on Jan. 4, 1980 to ask
for the support from the Vancouver
Chinese-Canadian community and
in the Chinese Benevolent Association meeting last Sunday, most of
the Chinese organizations in Vancouver did pledge their full support.
In the CBA meeting, it was decided that Vancouver should organize its own committee,  not  only
against   the   W5   issue   but   also
against any similar problems in the
future.  And although their reactions were slow in coming, the Chinese  organizations   in   Vancouver
have, nevertheless, decided to join
forces to create a "united front."
Jennifer Li
arts 2
member
Pender Guy radio program  T^^^WyT^t^11^
HaaHaaaaajai
Spiros says it
By WENDY HUNT
/ am tired of your
coming around just for Valiums
Enslave yourself to me
Or forget it
If you like your poetry polite
enough to take with afternoon tea,
don't read Spiros Zafiris.
If you like your poetry as delicate
as a spring watercolor, don't read
Spiros Zafiris.
If you like your poetry bare, as
bare as a baby's bottom, read
Spiros Zafiris. He dares expose the
raw edge of life.
Very Personal
Poems by Spiros Zafiris
In Vancouver bookstores
The themes of Very Personal are
the ones most important to Zafiris
himself and which have the greatest
impact on his daily existence.
Zafiris' poems are not padded with
fat of social convention and conformity. He revels in emotion and
looks for neither approval or rejection.
With this strong grounding in
emotion, Zafiris relates to women
on an elemental level, to the archetype rather than the stereotype.
He speaks of women in conjunction
with sex and love. Sex and love
become an explosive mixture when
Zafiris adds the conflicts of
tenderness and agressiveness, and
adoration and frustration. He
makes no moral pronouncements.
He only tells what he feels.
fuck the history of it all
woman
if you were near me
right this moment
I would give you the best screw
ever had
I hate going home
and coming in my sleep
what is worst
I've been balling
some pretty unbailable women
come home sweet Mona Lisa
or I'll take the next plane to Miami
and whip you with my belt
Most of Zafiris' poems are fairly
short. He distills one or two images
and creates a clear picture of the
action while uncovering hidden
emotions. His best images have
their roots in daily events. His
longer poems are less successful
than his others. The images come
thick and fast and their sheer
volume muddies the water of the
imagination. One poem in particular, Visions, lacks the concrete
images, clarity and discipline of his
shorter poems.
Although Zafiris is serious about
his work, he has not steeped
himself in seriousness. A wry sense
of humor creeps into his poems and
conversation.
/ haven't written a long poem
Since I don't know when
I love you. I love you
I like five lines
I love you. I love you
"I'm only thirty and I'm getting
fan mail already," says Zafiris with a
delighted chuckle. "Girls in Ottawa
send me fan mail. It's great."
Zafiris was recently in Vancouver
selling and promoting Very Personal. He was near the end of a
month-long tour which had taken
him to Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton,
Winnipeg and Calgary.
Zafiris had sent his poems to
several publishers but had not had
any response. He was celebrating
the death of a friend when he ran
into a noted Canadian poet. He
read Zafiris' poems, and gave him
encouragement and $200 for
publication costs. Zafiris borrowed
$200 each from three other friends.
In the Montreal bars which are his
natural habitat he sold 95 copies of
a signed special edition for $20 each
before his book had even gone into
print and finally had enough cash to
put Very Personal into production.
Late last March Zafiris had.his
first public reading of his new book
at Night Magic, a bar known for its
famous patrons, where he
distributed the signed copies.
Zafiris disputes the contention
that poetry is out of fashion. Between  November and January  he
sold 800 copies from the 2,000 production run. In Canada 2,000 copies
sold puts a poetry book on the
bestseller list.
Zafiris sells his book not just to
bookstores but to individuals as
well.
"In Toronto I spent many days
walking the streets. I'd go to merchants and say 'Read a few poems
and buy it if you like it.' I sold many,
many books that way," Zafiris says.
"I  go into bars where murderers
and gangsters hang out and sell my
book."
Zafiris believes his book is
popular because he speaks his own
truth and that fact can be
understood and appreciated by
other people.
"I write lyric poetry, a monody.
It's a poet speaking to the world.
It's about himself. I believe in being
as simple as possible but good,"
says Zafiris. "I have guys who can't
even read newspapers but can read
my book slowly and understand."
"I want to be known throughout
the world. I want to be heard. It's
my work, my life."
Very Personal is a portrait of the
uncivilized soul, as conflicting,
disturbing, unreasonable as that
may be. It is as much a statement
about the person as well as the poet
that Zafiris has the perseverance
and the talent to make himself
heard.
Midsummer Night becomes wet dream
By VERNE McDONALD
Dreams, fairies, moonlight and
mad lovers. A Midsummer Night's
Dream is just as engaging on a
foggy winter evening as any other
time. More so now when any
thought of summer is welcome.
Shakespeare's fairy tale of love
and mischief is woven together like
a fragile spell, all too easily broken
or dispersed. If at times Klaus
Strassmann's image of .this spell
wavers it does not break and
dreams, after all, have inconsistencies.
A Midsummer Night's Dream
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
Frederic Wood Theatre
Until Feb. 2
Strassmann attempts to give a
literary as well as a dramatic interpretation of the play and displays
a    thorough    knowledge   of    its
themes and how they intertwine. In
doing so, he discovers and gives up
to us more laughter than in the
usual interpretations of the play.
The fairies can be seen as gossamer and light and little else; the
lovers can be tragic and draw our
sympathy. Strassmann invites us
instead to laugh with Puck at the
antics and frustration of the young
people, who can no more deal with
love than with the fairy who tricks
them.
For the audience to see it all as a
frolic, in line with Puck's point of
view, Strassmann needs an excellent player for Puck. And he has
one in Robin Mossley.
Mossley is a delight as the ageless, foolish-wise boy who cannot
resist laughing at lovers. Amoral as
flower-petal or a hare, he bows to
no power, not even the law of
gravity, except Oberon his king.
And  even   pompous  Oberon  can
find   himself  the  butt  of  Puck's
humor.
The four lovers who are the centre of the plot are played with skill
and a great deal of energy. Miriam
Smith as Hermia, Jonathan Hobbs
as Demetrius, Don Plant as Ly-
sander and Catherine McLellan as
Helena hold up well through their
exhausting ordeal.
Paul-Emile Frappier as Bottom is
hilarious, even if at times he out-
Bottoms Bottom. In the last scene
he gives his character some grace in
compensation.
Strassmann keeps the action going at a high rate, using Robert
Dalhstrom's minimalist set to the
fullest extent. At times it is the busy
activity itself that stretches indulgence close to tedium.
Puck's confusion of the lovers to
tire them out, leading them with
false voices, goes on longer than it
should. Also, where the magic so
far had been suggested and ether
eal, suddenly at that time the stage
is littered with props and special effects.
The lovers' quarrels also suffer
slightly from being so busy.
Though the dialogue is the least essential of any in the play, it should
not be as lost in the thumping as it
is.
The strenuous pace also left
some of the actors a little breathless
at times, unable to project their
lines properly to be heard.
But never mind. Other Midsummer Night's Dreams may be meant
to reflect a romantic and gossamer
world, but Strassmann's is a more
real one. He allows the palpable
grossness of humanity to intrude in
the fairy dream. Sex and violence,
he points out, cannot be separated
from love and dreams. Puck may be
light and sexless, but we mortals
are chained within flesh.
And so we have the play begin
ning with a wedding preparation
that resembles ritualized rape and
continuing with more than a hint of
lust, oral sex and sado-masochism,
all under the slightly harsh white
light of the moon. A long way from
gossamer fairyland.
Strassman's Midsummer Night's
Dream is valuable not only for those
who have not been introduced to
the play on stage but for those
seeking an intelligent interpretation
of Shakespeare's themes.
As always, the last comment is
saved for those who are most behind. It is a tribute to the students
in the production that the most irritating stage presence is that of an
equity association actor, John
Brighton, who is so consummate a
professional that he can't stop acting. As Oberon, his superfluous
movements while supposedly observing invisibly are nothing more
than distracting.
Page Friday 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 25, 1980 'f^pr^FK-ww^-.;--
^t^fpfp'^^
USIC
:■- -4
Orbison hits town and the high notes
By TOM HAWTHORN
Mercy.
It's not all that often Vancouver gets to see a real live rock 'n'
roll legend. Especially one that can
still sing.
But Roy Orbison, the ugly kid
from the early '60s who was constantly losing his girl, has been convincing sold out houses at the Cave
all week that the Big O's magic was
no historical oddity.
Roy Orbison
at the Cave until Saturday
$8.50 in advance, $10.50 at the
door
There's something slightly
ghoulish about going to hear these
old golden oldie performers. Half
the audience is there to hear Orbison muff those incredibly long
notes that were his trademark. The
rest, mostly in their forties, are
there for some reminiscences,
some reminder of when they didn't
go to analysts.
And those who never saw him in
his heyday fear that he might be a
parody of himself, an Elvis-type
figure with rhinestones,  no vocal
chords and a ballooning torso.
The Big O showed that there is
indeed reason why an Orbison
show is a treat.
His voice is incredibly strong and
vibrant, without even a hint of his
age or the massive heart attack he
suffered two years ago.
And while he started his set of
old songs to pleasant applause, Orbison soon had the crowd up on its
feet, clapping, cheering, singing,
even crying, as the melodic notes
swept everyone into that strange
world where all that matters is the
girl (or boy), and when they leave
you.
He opened with Only the Lonely,
a baleful 1960 hit, shyly approaching the microphone. Orbison
looked uncomfortable, unsure of
himself, the crowd and the
response.
But when Orbison launched into
Crying, he snagged the audience into his own self-pity, the universal
self-pity of never winning
someone's love. He toyed with Crying, sweeping the audience along
on his emotion, catching every
note, hooking everyone along. It's
hard to describe . . . Orbison is an
emotional singer who wants, and
gets, an emotional response.
After Crying, Orbison had won.
The vultures stopped circling and
everyone settled back for the experience. And was that just the hint
of a smile creeping on Roy's face?
Listening to Orbison, one quickly
realizes the incredible impact he's
had on pop music, although he is
often ignored. Ask Linda Ronstadt,
who made Orbison rich in 1977 with
Blue Bayou royalties. Ask John
Lennon and the Beatles, who say
they styled Please Please Me, their
first real British hit, after Orbison.
Ask Bruce Springsteen, who was
weened on the guitar chords opening Oh, Pretty Woman.
After Orbison proved he was no
lounge act, proved that his voice is
still one of the best, there was no
doubting his ability among the
faithful. Note after note, song after
song, Orbison caught those oh-so-
moving notes that were his
trademark and the reason for his
string of hits. He did Dream Baby
(1962), In Dreams (1963), Leah,
Blue Bayou (1963), Candy Man
(1961), an incredible Blue Angel
(1960). Then into a rock jam with
the five member Price brothers (and
a percussionist).
By then, Roy was beaming, and
. . . hey, didn't he just move his
hips ever so slightly out there.
Orbison moves so little that if he
stopped tapping his foot when he
sings, well, hell, maybe those were
just his records playing. But no, Orbison was there, and he sounded
just like he did 17 years ago.
By this time, Orbison had worked
the crowd into as wild a frenzy as
one can with 40-year-old salesmen
and their wives as an audience. On
their feet, swaying, laughing, singing, one could see that most were
no longer dreary suburbanites, but
boppers come to hear the idol, The
Voice.
And one wonders how Orbison,
43, paunchy, as homely as ever,
could possibly be a sex symbol,
even for those aging with him. But
there is something gentle in his
character, something attractive in
his wallowing self-pity, something
in the black outfit he wears,
something about the dark glasses
he constantly wears.
"Turn me on, baby," oozed a
younger woman in the balcony dur
ing Blue Angel. And all during the
show, men and women went to Orbison, pressing forward scraps of
paper for autographs, or a hand to
touch the legend. One woman
brought her own towels, which,
after Orbison obligingly wiped the
sweat from under his glasses, must
now certainly occupy a shrine in
some home.
There's this song, see, called
Running Scared, and for the umpteenth time that night it looks like
Orbison is going to lose his girl to
another guy. But this is the song
with the toughest vocals, as Roy
quietly inhales, and with his natural
voice soaring, delivers: "You turn
and walk away with me." It's his
famous eight-second
"meeeeeeee. . ." and he holds it in
as fine a form as he could in '62.
And as has become the tradition at
an Orbison show, he completes the
note, accepts the applause and accolade, smiles shyly, signals behind
his back to the band, and launches
into the last part of the song again.
And while that's supposed to be
a challenge to the audience, an exhibition that he can sing as good as
See PF 6
ORBISON ... the big O eats the Beatles for lunch
Friday, January 25, 1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 3 CITR spreads waves over public
By STEVE McCLURE
What choice does the Vancouver
radio listener have when searching
for something remotely interesting
on the old crystal set?
At first you might say that CFOX
is the one to listen to, but unless
you want to hear Foreigner and Abba all day long CFOX is definitely
avoidable. Radiophiles can tune into Co-op radio if they want something a little more intelligent, but
such a disparate group of tastes are
served that it's rarely satisfying to
listen to all day.
But if it's strictly music that you
want and you prefer the kind of
music that isn't fossilized and moribund then you might give a listen to
CITR, UBC's very own radio station.
CITR is run by students for the
university community as a whole
but in the main reflects the musical
tastes and interests of UBC students. Their playlist is heavily dominated by "new wave" music and is
usually a good indicator of where
the preferences of Vancouver's record-buying public lie.
The station has attained a degree
of professionalism unknown in past
years when only a select company
of SUB janitors and insomniac
students ever bothered to listen to
CITR. Their playlist is valued by
music industry figures as an indicator of musical trends among the
under-25 age group. In addition to
spinning discs, the station sponsors
the weekly Fog Show in the Pit,
from which it derives most of its
revenue.
But despite the improvements
over the years, CITR still has its
share of problems. Its ability to
transmit is still limited, confined to
a carrier current system that allows
only 28 per cent of UBC residences
to pick up CITR. For a few cable
subscribers in Greater Vancouver,
CITR provides an alternative to
commercial AM-FM pap, but the
vast majority of Vancouver radio
listeners still don't even know of the
station's existence.
So CITR has embarked upon a
promotional campaign to reach the
ears and hearts of Vancouver radio
listeners. An application for a low-
power FM license has been made to
the Canadian Radio and Telecommunication Commission so that the
station can reach all of Vancouver
west of Granville Street. Coupled
with this proposal is a bid to hire a
full-time station manager from outside the university. It is this proposal which has caused the most
controversy in all the talk surrounding CITR's future.
The bulk of the CITR staff seem
solidly in favor of expanding their
broadcast range. They feel frustrated by the current situation which
severely limits their audience and
sometimes gives them the feeling
that they are talking only to themselves. Others question the idea of
CITR branching out into the city
and feel that CITR should serve
UBC first. But staffers are quick to
point out that in reaching the city
they will be able to serve the university that much better as they are
currently more able to serve the city
than UBC because of the inefficient
transmission system that links them
to the campus.
"If we could reach UBC better
than we do now I'm sure people
would be more supportive," says
promotions director Susanne Tab-
ata. Tabata lists the station's goals
as "to become as accessible as
possible to as many students as
possible on campus, to publicize
our availability, and to make our
type of music available to the
Greater Vancouver area."
Members of the general public
not connected with UBC are aware
of the station's existence and the
playlist is distributed to local record
stores. But it is still felt that CITR
needs to grow in the coming years.
"We anticipate that we'll still be
based in the university community
and we'll be providing campus-
oriented news and information,"
says Tabata, adding that she would
like to see more contact develop between other on-campus groups and
CITR.
But if the station is to expand the
question of where it will get its operating costs becomes a key issue.
CITR currently finances itself
through the Fog Show and by doing on- and off-campus discos. The
station wants to pay the station
manager a minimum of $14,400 per
year, and is asking the AMS to foot
the bill. CITR staffers say that the
station manager would occupy a
position much like the AMS Publications Office ad manager who
runs the business affairs of The
Ubyssey.
Some critics of the station feel,
however, that hiring a station manager would remove effective control from students and that the
manager would wield a greater degree of influence than is desirable in
a student club.
Some media people doubt whether CITR will be able to find anyone in the broadcast industry willing to work for what by industry
stands is an extremely low wage.
So the $14,400 figure is a minimum
salary and the amount paid to the
station manager would likely be
much higher.
In long-range terms CITR hopes
to eventually get a limited commercial license that will let them accept
advertising and increase their revenue to a point where they would
again be self-supporting.
The problem is trying to determine who they would aim their advertising at, since the station (according to their projections) would
be reaching half of Vancouver and
not just UBC. Some critics feel that
CITR should remain an essentially
CITR . . . producing
campus-oriented club and should
not attempt to "build empires."
In keeping with their conception
of the station's role, however, station members see CITR as providing a link between a UBC that is often too insular and self-absorbed
and a city that is out of contact with
western Canada's largest educational institution.
Critics also feel that CITR's quality as a broadcaster of serious
alternative music may be compromised by such a move.
But the members of CITR feel
the sound that sells
that their musical format is a more
accurate reflection of where Vancouver's musical tastes lie and are
not worried by any possible dilution
of their program content by having
to cater to a mass audience.
Vancouver media people are generally supportive of the station's efforts to expand its operations.
"They're one of the few radio
stations that's tuned into what's
happening with new music," says
John Tanner, long-time LG-FM
disc jockey and now host of Cable
Ten's Nite Dreems. "The commercial stations seem to think that all
people want to listen to is garbage;
maybe CITR can fill the gap."
Tanner, a long-time veteran of
the Vancouver radio scene, was
himself fired from LG-FM (now
CFOX) for failing to adhere to play-
lists drawn up by the station's management.
Local promoter Norm Perry is also solidly behind the station's bid
for a low power FM license. "It
would be a shame if they didn't get
it," says Perry, whose company has
brought many new wave acts to
town, and adds that "college radio
can be cliquish and emotional, but
this is not the case with CITR."
CITR tends to be well in advance
of other local stations in playing hot
new groups which gives their overall format a distinctive sound. One
problem is a tendency towards a
homogenized and predictable
sound, always identified by the incessant new wave beat that dominates the CITR airwaves at the expense perhaps of other types of
music.
If they can avoid megalomania
and keep their feet on the ground,
CITR could develop into a potent
media force in Vancouver. As long
as they remember that ultimately
they serve UBC they should become a valuable link between the
university and the real world.
NEWS ROOM . . . taking print to the waves
This article does not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the entire
Page Friday. It is purely the opinion
of the writer.
Page Friday 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 25,1980 !*■»■■»"■■"«' i    ; J i     ^Ffamtp^ig.
q^f^^^^fP^^^pip
Urn©!▼ IC ▼▼ '
Ultravox
By KATHRYN THURMAN
Evening of Jan. 7, Commodore
Ballroom.
Comfortably perched on the edge
of a rotting upholstered armchair in
one corner of the backstage foyer,
Ultravox drummer Warren Cann
smiles, his profile reflected in a
warm shadow on the wail.
"We're very much happier with
the group as it is now," he says.
At one time this wasn't so.
Eight years ago Vancouver native
Warren Cann was not satisfied as a
hairdresser at Crimpers or as a
drummer for occasional club dates
with such early '70s local bands as
Python and Five Man Cargo.
"I hated the strangle-hold that
the clubs had on the music scene
here. I hated the whole system . . .
the way it was next to impossible
for a band to try and achieve
anything playing their own music. I
didn't want to be a juke-box so I
just thought 'Everybody can go
stuff themselves'. And I left."
Shortly after his arrival in England, Cann became involved in recording the musical sound track for a
pornographic film version of Ain't
Misbehavin'.
By April of 1974, however, the
original Ultravox lineup had formed
with Cann (drums, vocals), Billy
Currie (keyboards, electric violin),
Chris Cross (bass, synthesizer),
Stevie Shears (guitar), and John
Foxx (lead vocals).
At that time the British music
scene was a desert of banal bands
like the Sweet and Gary Glitter.
Ultravox was a welcome oasis, with
its progressive new wave sound
flowing with blustering energy,
eerie imagery, and synthesizer
melodies.
By 1976 the band had signed with
Island Records and subsequently
recorded their debut album with
Brian Eno and Steve Lillywhite as
co-producers. A year later their second album Ha! Ha! Ha!, ar,
Ultravox-Lillywhite co-production,
was released.
"Actually we produce our own
records. We let people work with
us because we like having one person in the studio control room who
is not one of the band, for us to
bounce off of . . . and to keep
things lively. It's just good to have a
different personality in the room,
otherwise it can become a bit incestuous sometimes.
"We've got all the creative ideas
we need. We gave them (Eno,
Lillywhite, Connie Plant) co-
producers credits, (but) they're not
producers, they're technicians . . .
with their machines."
In early 1978 (just after Shears
was replaced by Robin Simon)
while Ultravox recorded their third
album, Systems of Romance, near
Cologne, West Germany, the band
members felt that lead vocalist and
lyricist John Foxx was becoming
very awkward to work with.
"John wrote all of the lyrics . . .
let's put it this way, it (writing
lyrics  by other  members of the
band) wasn't exactly encouraged
from John's point of view," Cann
quips. "We could no longer get
along with him ... he didn't like
touring, he didn't agree on our
strategies we wanted with the
record companies. It just got so
that everything we wanted to do he.
didn't want to do. So we thought
It can't go any further. You go your
way, we'll go our way. That's it!' "
With admitted hostility Cann
adds, "John Foxx must be the
world's most boring person ... a
boring old fart!"
Simultaneously the band experienced disenchantment with
their record company (Island),
which they had erroneously judged
as that most attuned to their
musical aspirations.
"They were not interested in getting us to the public on this side of
the world. They didn't think we'd
do a thing over here.
"They thought 'Well, we can't
make Superstars out of Bob Marley
and Robert Palmer and they are admittedly a lot closer to the Top 40
format than Ultravox.' And then
they would play us tapes of really
popular radio stations in America
and say 'Look, this is what you're
contending with. Now you're never
going to get on there in a million
years.' And we would say 'But
things will change.' But they
couldn't see that," he sighs.
Ultravox officially left the label on
Dec. 31, 1978.
"And since then we've done two
URE . }. synthesizing a new sound
CANN
very successful tours of North
America (Spring '79 and current
tour) without any record company
support.
"On the first tour we actually
made a profit because we borrowed
a lot of equipment from The Police
who were very good to us and
helped us. This tour we will probably just about break even."
The band has successfully
traversed North America this winter
in a rented station wagon and an
equipment van, incurring expenses
of $750 a day. They've managed to
keep out of the red by routing their
gigs very logically to avoid wasting
time.
"Whether we do a gig or not
every day costs us money because
we've got to pay for the hotel,
food, petrol, and wages . . . you
kind of 'float' shows. You might
make a fair profit on one show and
on the next you might break even.
You're juggling all the time on what
you gross and on what your expenses are."
No matter how carefully a tour is
planned there are seemingly
unavoidable pitfalls. Not only is it
essential for a band to be
meticulously organized, the people
at the other end, the promoters,
must be competent and informed
as well.
According to Cann, in Toronto
Ultravox was booked at The Edge
by a promoter who asked "Ultravox
who?"
"I didn't like The Edge. It should
stay as a restaurant and not try to
put bands on. The stage is tiny and
you can't do a proper sound check
because people sit there eating their
hamburgers.
"Next time (in Toronto) we'll
make damn sure there's some promoter who knows what time of the
day it is and who'll find us a decent
place to play," he emphasizes.
"I personally think that the promoters in Toronto just don't know
what's happening. They're not in
touch with what's going on . . .
'cause from what we've seen of
Canada, Vancouver's definitely the
most aware city. The promoter, Riley O'Connor of Perryscope Con-
drummed out
cert Productions, we're working
with here is very, very together. He
knows what's he's doing. They're
excellent. They're one of the best
sets of people we've dealt with."
Cann also feels it's crucial for a
band to be financially aware.
"Musicians are the easiest people in
the world to rip off.
"Musicians are not as naive as
they used to be . . . but it's still far
too easy (to get ripped off) because
it's such a pain in the ass to try to
keep your finger on everything
that's going on. We managed
ourselves for a long time because
we had some bad experiences with
managers but we've finally found
two Irish managers, Morrison and
O'Donnell (who manage The Who,
Pink Floyd, Queen, and Thin Lizzy)
who are very competent advisors.
They have a very good reputation .
. . they're not conside-ed sharks.
"The music business has become
so complicated ... if you don't
have people who can give you good
advice you'll quickly make mistakes
that you'll never dig yourself out of.
And you can kiss your career goodbye."
Ultravox has built up a particularly energetic following in Britain and
in Europe, especially Germany.
America has not been as susceptible to their technical spell — until
now. "It's finally beginning to happen on this side of the world too,"
says Cann.
"We've never looked to America
for our source of inspiration like a
lot of other English bands have
done. With time we seem to have
mutated towards being European
and maybe that's why we're
popular over there. They can feel
that and pick it up."
Cann cannot understand why
people find it difficult to understand
that the use of synthesizer
technology can produce very emotional music.
"Machines are . . . instruments . .
. and you can make them very emotional because there is no essential
difference between a guitar and a
synthesizer. You can make them
both talk, or cry and you get all
SeePF8
Friday, January 25,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 5 Organic food co-operative
makes groceries cost plus
Rv fiERRE GALVIN Rueaer savs The Familv's Drices     $100 in shares in the co-OD.  The
By GERRE GALVIN
"Food for people, not for profit"
is the slogan of the newly opened
co-op on Fourth Ave. The Family is
a natural food co-operative, the first
of its kind in Vancouver.
"Our main goal is quality food at
a reasonable price," says manager
Duncan Rueger. "We offer
organically grown staple foods at
low prices to members and non-
members," he added. (The marked
prices on all items are 25 per cent
above cost and members buy the
products at the marked price. Non-
members pay 12 per cent above the
marked prices. All customers pay
the same prices for kitchenware
and books.)
Rueger says The Family's prices
are the lowest in town. But comparison shopping suggests that is
not always the case. Safeway sells
eggs at $1.09 per dozen, while The
Family's price is $1.25. Safeway
sells broccoli at 39c per pound while
the co-op charges 79c per pound.
(The co-op's prices don't include
the 12 per cent surcharge for non-
members).
The Family's prices compare
favorably with other natural food
stores, but only for members of the
co-op. The surcharge for non-
members makes shopping at The
Family unreasonable.
Becoming a member is simple.
There is an initial membership fee of
When Big O hits town
the boppers hit their
heads on a star
From PF 3
he once did, this night it is merely
Orbison titillating an already thrilled
audience. There is no challenge.
He's already won.
He dared (as much himself as
anyone else) and he won. He then
proceeded to play a new song, Taking the Easy Way Out, although
everyone is there to hear the old
hits. The tune is well received, but
has a suspect disco flavor and pro
vides no showcase for Orbison's
voice.
Next is It's Over. Then, Oh, Pretty Woman, but the drummer's
opening beat continues much
longer than usual as Orbison tries to
accommodate the dozens of fans
crushed up near the microphone,
begging for autographs. And when
it is finally all over, the loneliest man
in rock gives a polite thank you, a
wave, and quickly dashes away.
$100 in shares in the co-op. The
$100 is refundable on the member's
request or when the co-op has the
money, Rueger says.
Members are also required to
contribute three hours of work each
month to keep the store running
smoothly. If they decide to opt out
of the work, they must pay an additional monthly service fee of $10.
Co-op members who contribute a
regular weekly shift of four to five
hours pay only five per cent above
cost for their food.
Rueger says the work-sharing
concept is working reasonably well.
"So far we haven't had any problems with covering work shifts
and everything is running
smoothly," he said.
And Rueger says the co-op supports local farmers by buying the
bulk of their crops. Other items are
purchased from Vancouver's only
organic manufacturer.
The Family is only barely breaking even, says Rueger, but he adds
he is hopeful that business will build
up through word of mouth and the
attraction of their low prices.
The Family co-op is an
economical alternative for food
buying for those people willing to
become members and contribute
some of their time and effort.
And it's a pleasant way to meet
new people and take an active part
in a growing community effort.
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUSVILLAGE
733-1722
Pacific Cinematheque Presents
Bernardo Bertolucci's
1900
Sunday, January 27th
MATINEE ONLY
2:00 PM
Doors Open at 1:30 pm
VARSITY FINE ARTS THEATRE
4375 W. 10th
MUSSOC PRESENTS
January 31 - February 10
8:30 pm-
U.B.C. Old Auditorium
PREVIEWS: Jan. 29 and 30
Tickets:
STUDENTS $3.00
ITues., Wed., Thur.)
ADULTS $4.00
Vancouver Ticket Centre or
A.M.S. Business Office
226 S.U.B.
STUDENT MATINEE
Feb. 7th - 12:30
TICKETS $2.00 (Students)
jL'i »
^INTRAMURALS
CoRec Cross Country Skiing at Manning Park
Sat. Feb. 2, 7:00 - 7:00 registration $6 includes
rentals & transportation. Register by Wed.
Jan. 30 - Rm. 210 War Memorial.
CoRec Volleyball Thursdays 7:30 - 9:30 Drop-in
NEEDED IMMEDIATELY
Hockey Referees
Tues. & Thurs. evenings
pay $5 per hour
Something New For Long Hair
SPIRAL PERMS
PHONE: 228-9345
15% off any service with this ad
yTTa'ci jamioni.
4605  WEST 10TH AVE
TELEPHONE  228-9345
Lintzxnatujiiallu ^nuiriiui miaiiiluliiti
® CUSO
Dialogues On
Development
TUESDAY, JANUARY 29th
"Communications—Through the Media's Eyes'
Part I of a six-part series on some issues of development which will include
talks, audio-visuals, simulation games and discussion. Fee: $5.00 for CUSO
volunteers and UBC students. To pre-register call CUSO UBC at 228-4886.
Upper Lounge, International House,
7:30 p.m., Tuesday
Sponsored by The Centre for Continuing Education
and CUSO UBC.
IT'S OUR
TWO FOR ONE
TACO SALE
AGAIN!
Last year, Senor McTaco had a two for one taco
sale that was so popular that we've decided to do it
again this year, too.
For 95c and the coupon below, you'll get two of
our delicious tacos . . . two for the price of one!
That's a big deal for big appetites, especially if you
know that our tacos are the best tacos in town. Just
cut out the coupon below and bring it into either
Senor McTaco's restaurant. Ole!
(MCTACOV)
3396 West Broadway (at Waterloo)
Also at Robson Square Food Fair, in the Courthouse Complex
or 393 W. 12th Ave. (at Kingsway)
!   2 TACOS FOR 95c •
^P This coupon is good tor the purchase ot two tacos ^^
A for 95C- Coupon must be presented. One offer per A
^fc person. Offer expires January 31, 1980. ^fc
Page Friday 6
THE    UBY.SSEY.
Friday, January 25, 1980 >, **
Dracula Sucks deadlier than the count
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
Yes, Dracula sucks. This Dracula
not only sucks blood, he also sucks
breasts, thighs and whatever else
Dracula Sucks
Playing at the Capitol 6
he can get his hands on, or should I
say what ever he can sink his teeth
into.
Dracula Sucks, or Dracula Sucks
Blood (depending on what you
believe, the newspaper ads or film
credits), is obviously hardcore hardware sloppily cut into a soft-porn
product (I dread to call it a film).
The diluted Canadian version of
Dracula Sucks is just barely an
hour's worth of countless cases of
Heinz Ketchup (more probably, the
local Safeway brand), Frederick's
of Hollywood negligees, and a
dracula whose eyes take on a funny
red glow everytime he gets excited.
Dracula passes off very well as a
comedy; i.e., the whole evening's a
laugh.
You hand over the $4.00 to the
cashier,   wondering  what's  going
Electric cowboy meets horse,
gets journalist, loses both
By SHAFFIN SHARIFF
There are few films as modest as
The Electric Horseman. This tale of
an aging cowboy, his decisions and
choices, and a subsequent romance
is unassuming and generally low-
key even with the presence of two
magnetic superstars, Robert Redford and Jane Fonda.
The Electric Horseman
Starring Robert Redford
and Jane Fonda
Playing at the Odeon
Redford plays Sonny Steele, five-
time All-American Cowboy and
now reduced to being an unwitting
spokesman for Ranch Breakfast
Cereal. One of the morals of The
Electric Horseman may be that old
cowboys, like old soldiers, never die
— they just fade away, painfully.
Steele is fast realizing that his
rewarding and illustrious days as a
cowboy in the arena are over, to be
replaced with manipulative promotional stints.
He is an unhappy man, quietly
longing for the past. He has lost his
wife (Valerie Perrine) to his hard-
drinking ways, complaints fall on
deaf ears and his friends don't really
understand him; in short, he has no
future to look forward to.
The Electric Horseman is a direct
attack on Madison Avenue hijinks.
Companies and advertisers indulge
in unethical and outright questionable practices for a fast buck.
The Electric Horseman, directed
by Sidney Pollack, is as much about
corrupt conglomerates as it is
about human values. When Steele
rides off with Riding Star, the company's $12 million thoroughbred,
the act never comes across as being
wrong. Steele's motive is
unselfishly simple: to set the prize
horse free in its own natural en-
Scenery is great but
Europeans as boring as
New England cousins
By PETER MENYASZ
What happens when you remove
the sex, violence, plot, action and
dialogue from a motion picture?
You get The Europeans.
It's not a popular joke yet, and
likely won't be considering the
number of people seeing The Europeans at the Fine Arts Cindrna.
There are movies that are so boring
there is little to say about them —
The Europeans is such a movie.
The Europeans
Starring Lee Remick
At the Fine Arts Cinema
The only saving grace for this
production of Henry James' slow-
moving novel is the scenery and
cinematography, which are stunning. But good scenery and
cinematography do not a movie
make. The fine New England landscapes of Massachusetts drift
across the screen. Close-ups of the
stars' faces that usually predominate in movies are replaced by long
panoramic shots that emphasize
the colors of the trees.
The plot is miniscule and
unweighty. A European
noblewoman of American descent
escapes the continent to return to
her American homeland after a
disastrous marriage. She finds her
American "cousins" boring, and
she in turn offends their Puritanical
morals. Her arrival with her brother
throws her American relatives into
an uproar, upsetting marriage plans
and creating new ones.
There is an interesting interplay
between the moral standards of the
American-bred-and-true Bosto-
nians and the "immoral"
foreigners. But even this provides
only a few moments of humor,
eventually fading to monotony with
the rest of the motion picture.
The Europeans is hailed as
breathtaking, sweeping, magnificent. It simply isn't. But its showing
at the Fine Arts has one redeeming
point in its favor. At least it's better
fare than the antiquated Tom and
Jerry cartoon and Lome Greene
tour of the Canadian Rockies that
precede each showing.
One patron leaving the theatre
after the showing commented that
it seemed impossible that so much
action had taken place during the
movie's two hours without anyone
taking notice of it. A good assessment.
If you find yourself in front of the
Fine Arts Cinema trying to decide
whether or not to see The Europeans, there is a viable alternative
you might consider — take the $4
(or $8 if you are considering taking
someone with you) and invest it in a
good dessert and a strong cup of
espresso coffee. At least the coffee
will keep you awake for your
money.
vironment, where it cannot be
needled with steroids. But his quest
becomes as much a journey to set
the horse free as one to discover
himself.
Fonda is the woman who helps
him. Initially interested only in getting the story, she becomes drawn
to Steele and his trek across the terrains.
In The Electric Horseman, Jane
Fonda has her most relaxed role in a
long time. This time it's not the
confused housewife of Coming
Home or the hard-driving reporter
of The China Syndrome. Although
she plays a newswoman as she did
in The China Syndrome, she is not
pivotal. The Electric Horseman is
very much a Robert Redford but
that is not to say that Fonda's role
is minor .or unimportant. On the
contrary, she is essential to the film
and her performance is gratifying.
In other roles she has had a
threatening tendency to dominate
but not in The Electric Horseman.
Just as satisfying is Redford's
performance. Lingering doubts, if
any exist at all, about his ability and
versatility as an actor should disappear after one sees The Electric
Horseman. Redford has developed
forcefully since the days of Butch
Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and
The Sting with films like All the
President's Men and Three days of
the Condor (also a Sidney Pollack
film). He combines tenderness,
humor and above all humanity in a
most pleasing role.
The Electric Horseman unfolds
smoothly, a pace kept on track
through the film. Perhaps what is
so refreshing about the film is that it
is, to use an old cliche, a whimper
rather than a bang; it is used here
not in the usual condescending
sense but a lucid one. Not all
aspects of life are stabs in the back;
the best things happen naturally,
the film seems to say.
The Electric Horseman is full of
important insights but it is all done
in such a lighthearted way that even
if you miss them, the film is no less
affecting or illuminating.
through her mind when you tell her
what show you want to see. Once
inside the theatre, there is the usual
minutes which seem to drag on for
hours on end while waiting for the
lights to go off and the curtain to go
up. The apprehension is heightened
by the anticipation of "frequent
nudity and sex", as promised by the
B.C. classifier.
It's all a matter of interpretation.
The R-rating and the over-cautious
warning are really unintentional,
and untrue, advertisements for this
cheap trick.
First there is an unmatching, boring, nobody-gives-a-damn-about
documentary on how Ontario
farmers utilize nasty seaweed as
fertilizer or mix it with shredded
cardboard for cattle feed. Pure torture. Some guy in the front seat
shouts out some obscenity and the
audience breaks out in laughter.
This sort of thing happens
throughout Dracula Sucks too.
A Pink Panther cartoon called
Pink in the Thread comes on. Mixed
reaction from the audience.
Next the coming attractions for
Going in Style and Star Trek — The
Motion Picture. An important
message flashes on the screen:
Coming this Christmas at a theatre
near you. More laughter, more
obscenities.
Finally: "Famous Players — Our
Feature Presentation", which takes
too long to materialize. Credits roll.
Dracula    Sucks.    Starring    Jamie
Gillis, Annette Haven, John
Holmes, Serena, John Leslie, etc.
etc. Written by David J. Kern and
Daryl A. Marshak. Based on the
novel by Bram Stoker. (How dare
they?) Directed by Philip Marshak.
I'm only mentioning this to get my
revenge at the end of the year or
perhaps get the Soviet Union to invade the purveyors' make-believe
studio.
Ordinarily, the above-mentioned
stars (for lack of a better word)
would get my blood boiling. No one
cares who they are because you
can't tell who's who unless you see
their well-publicized attributes in
action. Action is the least of what
you get because what really happens is that you get ripped off.
A couple of scenes start out promisingly. You know, the type of
scene where the man and the
woman take a walk in the woods;
they stop; she bends down and
leans toward him; grunt, grunt,
chop, chop-— on to the next scene.
To be fair there is one brief sex
scene, shared by a nurse and an intern whose penis has been bitten by
one of dracula's maidens. Snicker,
snicker.
Also included are conservative
touches of lesbianism and suggestions of homosexuality. There is a
horny madman, Dracula's servant,
who repeatedly pleads to his master
' to "play with me."
You have never seen a Dracula
like this before and you wouldn't
want to either.
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
A Midsummer Night's Dream
by William Shakespeare
with Paul-Emile Frappier
JANUARY 25 - FEBRUARY 2
(Previews — Jan. 23 Et 24)
8:00 p.m.
STUDENT TICKETS: $3.00
BOX OFFICE - FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Room 207
MATINEES - Tues. Jan. 29
Thurs. Jan. 31
12:30 Noon
Students $2.50
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
ALL CANDIDATES
MEETING
SUB Conversation Pit
Friday, January 25,1980
12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Come out and hear
the candidates who have been
nominated for the AMS
at-large executive positions.
Friday, January 25, 1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 7 Ultravox rolls with wave
From PF 5
kinds of emotions out of them. It's
just getting over the initial hurdle of
thinking 'Oh, machines, it's cold
and robot-like!'
"We don't look at it that way.
When we have done cold, hard,
removed and distant songs we have
done them on purpose for an effect. Machines are a very efficient
way of working."
The band's sophisticated synthesizer sounds are vaguely similar
to several of their contemporaries
— Magazine, Kraftwerk, and Gary
Numan and Tubeway Army. Currently Ultravox is partial to Gothic
and Russian melodies. But Cann
stresses that "The only thing you
can expect from Ultravox is constant change ... we don't want to
become a greatest hits band. I'm
not saying we don't want to
become successful. But we're going to do it on our own terms
because we are an essentially
selfish band. We just write what we
like.
"It's not the most commercial
standpoint one could take. I want
to be able to look at myself in the
mirror . . . and be able to play a
record I've made and like it. And if
everybody hates it and we die a
death, well I'm very disappointed
but at least I can say to myself that I
liked it."
West End: The following morning.
By mid-morning the sky had
turned grey-brown. The darkened
clouds swelled like a bruise and a
thin, slow drift of snowflakes silently invaded the air.
Within the drably furnished hotel
room. Midge Ure's (Ultravox's lead
vocalist, guitarist) engagingly
humourous manner unabashedly
disrupts the controlled severity of
his surroundings.
Impishly leaning forward, the
Glasgow-born Scotsman candidly
reveals that his first professional
band was a Bay City Rollers clone
called Slik.
"We were incredibly successful
in Britain in '76. We had No. 1
records, but because it was that
type of band we just couldn't get
any credibility. So the band just fell
apart.
"Funnily though we went
through the same sort of problems
when I joined the Rich Kids, a three
chord new wave - punk band. But
we did knock down the barrier for
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
LSAT
^3  LSAT • MCAT • GRE
GRE PSYCH • GRE BIO
GMAT • DAT • OCAT • PCAT
VAT • MAT • SAT
NATL MED BDS
ECFMG • FLEX • VQE
NDB-NPBI•NLE
€fe*£eg-H. KAPLAN
EDUCATIONAL  CENTER
Test Preparation Specialists
Since 1938
For information. Please CaU:
aaaaaaa (206) 523-7617  aaaaaa
KORRES
—."MOVING andTe
LO TRANSFER LTD. \~
"STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th~
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages. Basements. Yards
CLEAN-UPS
other bands like Elvis Costello and
Nick Lowe and all the pop orientated bands that have shone
through in the last year or so."
By mid-79 Ultravox had just completed its first American tour. Robin
Simon and John Foxx had just left
the band and the remaining
members were feeling slightly
despondent. To boost his morale,
Billy Currie embarked on a studio
album with Midge Ure and Rusty
Egan (ex-Rich Kids), three
members of Magazine and London
socialite Steve Strange, forming a
band called Visage.
During the production of the
Visage album (a very synthesized
alternative form of dance music)
Currie mentioned that Ultravox was
holding auditions for a lead vocalist
and guitarist.
"I just said when they couldn't
find the right guy to give me a call.
And he never believed me. Later on
he thought that he'd come up with
the idea of asking me to join
Ultravox!" says Ure.
After joining Ultravox, Ure had
the opportunity to help a friend,
Phil Lynott, out of a sticky situation. Lynott's band Thin Lizzy had
just sacked its guitarist Gary Moore
for not bothering to show up at a
couple of their American gigs. Contrary to popular gossip at the time,
Ure was only a temporary replacement.
"It was simply to keep myself
alive. To make money (to buy a string synthesizer he needed for
Ultravox) . . . And it was fun! I'm
very adaptable," he laughs.
Currently without a record label,
Ultravox is carefully shopping
around. Ure doesn't think there are
any good record companies in
England. "I think they're all
pathetic," he claims, momentarily
serious.
"Ask The Damned if they ever
get paid for any of their albums (on
Stiff). I know Rat Scabies fairly well
and I know he hasn't been paid a
penny for any of The Damned
records. But that was the old Stiff,
back in the early days. It may be
totally different now."
As the conversation turns to the
subject of radio I glance at the
cabinet' behind Ure, upon which
regally rests proof of Japan's
technical wizardry, a radio component, its chrome plating glistening
in the half light of the little room.
"I thought FM music over here
(America) was suppose to be free
music. But it just doesn't happen.
You switch on FM radio here and
it's Boston, Styx, and Foreigner,"
he complains.
Cann, who has just entered the
room, smirks "We've been listening
to Cream songs on the radio over
here."
Ure is pleased though about the
local radio stations presenting an
English new wave hour. "Well it's
not much," he concedes after I
mention it's only an hour or so a
week.  "But it's a start,  he says.
He then confesses he hasn't actually heard many American bands.
"It is totally removed from stuff that
I listen to. My influences are
steeped in the depths of Europe.
"I know Talking Heads are doing
something . . . they're making a
name for themselves. And Devo are
very tongue-in-cheek but they're
fun to watch. All the people I like
are the obvious people, who are a
bit stale now, like Bowie, Kraftwerk
and some German bands."
After our conversation Ure, proudly demonstrating the use of his
radio, switches it on. David Bowie's
Panic In Detroit blares from the
speakers. "That's great! That's the
only place where I've been able to
switch on the radio and leave it
on," says Ure. "Yesterday I heard
three Bowie tracks and XTC." I said
I bet it was Waiting For Nigel, the
only track off the XTC album that
gets played. He nods.
"Still it's better than having to
listen to Boston," he concedes.
"The first song they played in the
new year was Boston!" quips
photographer Stanley Westby.
Sigh. Welcome to the {JO'S.
Don't Lose
Your Vote!
As your Liberal candidate for Vancouver
Quadra, and a professor at UBC, PETER
PEARSE is concerned that many students have
not been informed about voter registration.
To vote in Vancouver Quadra you must
register unless you were enumerated here last
May.
Residents of UBC may register in the Lounge
of Walter Gage North Tower Residence
from 10:00 to 11:00 a.m. and from 7:00 to
10:00 p.m., January 25 to February 4.
For those who live off campus, contact the
Returning Officer for Quadra (phone 266-1394)
for information concerning the Court of Revision
in your area.
If you need further help with voter registration
contact the UBC Liberal Association in SUB
216C (phone 228-4385).
Although this campaign will be short, PETER
PEARSE will spend as much time as possible on
campus to let you know his position on all of the
issues, particularly those of concern to you.
Authorized by the official agent for Peter Pearse.
Le Groupe
de la Place
Royale
jS&y?"^-
.V
CONTROVERSIAL DANCE
FROM OTTAWA!
"A brave new era of dance creativity
which now includes the use of voice with dance."
TWO PERFORMANCES ONLY FEB 1 & 2—8.30 pm
NORTH VANCOUVER CENTENNIAL THEATRE. 23rd t LONSDALE
Tickets $6 S $4.50—All VTC Outlets & Eatons
A Presentation House Canadance Production. For info. Call 986-1351
^■i:M.]M?ii].]jtiTinTT™
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL 687-1515
Warning:
Coarse language throughout; some nudity, sug
gestive scenes and violence. B.C. Dir.
T>CWHO   PRESENTS THE MOVIE
QUADROPHENIA
A WAY OF LIFE!
voquE
   Showtimes: 2:25   nniodaYsiroy
'86aGSR543r 4:507:159:40 AN ASTRAL F.LMS RELEASE
851   GRANVILLE
685  6828
STEVE MARTIN
ThejEKK
Showtimes
2:00 4:00 6:00
8:00 10:00
CORONET 2
851   GRANVILLE
685  6828
DROAdwAV 1
[70 7   W   BROADWAY
874-1927
TIM CONWAY
IN
Showtimes: Coronet V30
3:30 5:30 7:30 9:30
Broadway 7:15 9:15
THE PRIZE
FIGHTER
OOEON
RANVILLE
duNDAR
DUNBAR  at 30th
224-7252
ROBERT REDFORD
JANE FONDA
Warning:     Occasional
s32sB'o^2:,5 THE ELECTRIC
4:40   7:25   9:45   Dunbar
7:30 9:40
HORSEMAN
Warning: Oc
casional nudi
ty and swear-
Showtimes:     ing. B.C. Dir
7:30 9:30
; DUSTIN HOFFMAN
CAMBIE at 18th
876-2747
KRAMER VS. KRAMER
Warning:  Religious ridicule: some     ?
nudity and coarse language.  B.C.
Director.
Showtimes: 7:30 9:30
bROAdw/w2
707 W. BROADWAY
8741927
"Restores the word epic to
its original force. A
masterpiece of cinema art."
Irene Papas   Michael Cac.oyannis s
IPHIGENIA
'A ;rh  Tatiana Papamosko^   Music uy M'k,'- : ^eoclor.-^ i-
Showtimes: 7:30 10:30
Matinee of Bertolucci's "1900" with
Robert     Deniro    and     Donald
224 3730               Sutherland at 2 pm
4375 w. ioth (Greek w/English subtitles)
VARSITy
Page Friday 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 25, 1980 -•"■■•■"•ipMlJiw^fiiMBSW
The Canadian Catholic Conference is sponsoring a display of
the Bishop's Collection in the
SUB art gallery. This collection, a
series of paintings, drawings and
prints done by Canadian artists examines the close ties between
spirituality, art and culture. The display is part of the Festival of Art and
Religion and will continue until Friday, Feb. 1. Gallery hours 10 to 5
p.m., Monday to Friday.
Vancouver photographer Nomi
Kaplan has her work on display in
the UBC fine arts gallery in the
basement of the main library.
Kaplan takes her photos in black
and white and adds color later. The
show runs until Saturday, Feb. 2
and the gallery is open Tuesday to
Saturday, 10 to 5 p.m.
The Danny Grossman Dance
Company will perform in the SFU
theatre Thursday and Friday, Jan.
24 and 25 at 8 p.m. SFU box office
291-3514.
Mussoc is presenting a produc
tion of Sweet Charity, previewing
Jan. 29 and 30 at 8:30 p.m. in the
Old Auditorium. The show will run
from Jan. 31 to Feb. 9, with a student matinee at 12:30 p.m. Feb. 7.
Theatre Beyond Words,-which
recently returned from a seven
week tour of Japan, will be performing at Spratt's Ark on Richards St. until Feb. 2. The company
blends zany comedy with mime.
Evening performances are at 8 p.m.
and tickets can be purchased at
VTC outlets and all Eaton's stores.
The music department of UBC
is sponsoring a series of public lectures in ethnomusicology. Lou
Harrison is the guest composer-
lecturer who will speak on Tuesday,
Jan. 29 at 12:30 p.m. in room 113 of
the music building. The lecture is
entitled Some Aspects of the Influence of Non-Western Music in 20th
Century Composition.
A SUBFILMS
PRESENTATION
1:00 SUB Aud.
Thurs. Sun. 7:00
Fri. Sat.
7:00 9:30
CLASS OF '80
Written Applications are now
being accepted for:
1. The $4.00 per graduating student rebate for funding of grad composites
and/or functions. The application
must specify:
(a) what your committee will be using the funds
for;
(b) The funds required;
(c) In the case of composites, submit photographers name, and;
(d) In the case of a Grad function, submit date,
place and details;
(e) Name of applicant and their faculty or department.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FEBRUARY 1, 1980
2. Grad Class Gifts and Projects; The
proposed Gifts and/or Projects should
provide a service to the University
Community and/or the Community at
large. The applications must include:
(a) The name of the group requesting
funds;
(b) The nature of the gift or project;
(c) If it is a gift OR project;
(d) The amount sought;
(e) A one-hundred (100) word description of the gift OR project and of the
planned allocation of any funds
granted.
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS IS
FEBRUARY 20, 1980
Send applications (and questions) to SUB Box 118. No applications will be
accepted after the deadlines indicated.
FIRST GENERAL MEETING
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7. 1980 - 12:30
Please watch for further details
Signed:
Grad Class Council
232SW
fltomfad
&e6krfood
<t^084gp<
CALIFORNIA STYLE
MEXICAN COOKING
2.904 W. •*«» AVE.    753-37J3?
An eating experience not to be under
estimated as one of the best mexican restaurants north of California.' Thats what
it is all about!
OPEN TUES. SUN.
TAKE OUT ORDERS WELCOME!
LICENSED
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOOD
.   (Self Serve
Restaurant)
i% 5732 University Blvd. /^
/^ Eat In and Take Out j£
•ft OPEN EVERY DAY xft
„     4:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.   jK
3? PHONE: 224-6121 A
Live Belly Dancing on
Friday Et Saturday Nights
LUNCH   11:30-3:00 Mon. - Sat.
DINNER   5:00-1:00 Mon.-Sat.
5:00- 11:00 Sunday
417>w.lOmA>«.
UBG Gantpas
Pizza
Steak & Pizza — Lasagna
Spare Ribs — Ravioli
Chicken — Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224-4218 - 224-0529
Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 11:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m.; Fri.
11:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.; Sat. 4:00 p.m.-3:00 a.m.;
Sun. 4:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m.
2136 Western Parkway
WHITE TOWER PIZZA &
SPAGHETTI HOUSE LTD.
KITS - DUNBAR - PT. GREY
A variety of great dishes including    Moussaka,    Kalama^
Souvlakia, and Greek
salads.
Mon- Thurs 4 pm-2:30 am
Fri & Sat 4 pm-3:30 am^
Sunday   4   pm-12   pm,
738-9520
or 738-1113      | DOWNTOWN
3611 We»t Broadway 'vJL^SV*"
PARKING AT REAR ••••5*»<
Dining lounge - Full Facilities -
Take Out or Homa Dalivary
Late delivery call '/; hour before closing-
ALLIES
FRASER ARMS
1450 S.W. Marine Dr.
'•••••'
:
i
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
f,     228-9114
F^ FREE DELIVERY
,tft from 4:30 p.m.
10% Discount on all
cash pickup orders
    2142 Western Parkway
\/n*      U.E.L. Vancouver, B.C.
THE "SUPER"CURRY
IN TOWN
XUHE^ KOUSe
1754 WEST 4TH 732-5313
Open 5 P.M. Every Day
FULLY LICENSED
CHARGEX MASTERCHARGE
AMEX DINNERSCLUB
[ITtllA
Salad Bar * Caesar Salad
Charbroiled Steaks * Seafood
Licensed Lounge
PIZZA
Free Delivery
Open Daily from 11 a.m.
SUNDAY from 4 p.m.
4450 W. 10th Ave.
224-3434 224-6336
SPECIALIZING IN
GREEK CUISINE
& PIZZA
FREE FAST DELIVERY.
228-9513
4510 W. 10th Ave.
a
a
a
a
a
T\Slrf=l.=IBIlfalr=li=lr=lrtJfafa]^J^I.^^IgJnJr=lr=l^,:
Friday, January 25,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page Friday 9 'Tween classes
TODAY
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Featuring paintings from 16th and 19th century
India, Museum of Anthropology.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION
AND THE ARTS
Film: Hiding Place, noon, SUB auditorium.
Observations on Zen Buddhism and contemporary music, noon, SUB art gallery.
Literature   open   stage,   3:30  p.m.,   SUB   art
gallery.
George Bowering and Robin Blaser, a poetry
reading, 7:30 p.m., SUB art gallery.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
Party  music and  refreshments,  8  p.m.,   St.
Marie's College.
EDUCATION
Debate with the debating club, noon, Scarfe
100.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Planning meeting, noon, SUB 115.
SAINT MARK'S
Beer night, 8:30 p.m., St. Andrew's residence.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General   meeting,   noon,   International   House
lounge.
SATURDAY
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Republic day celebrations, 6:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND ARTS
Conference on process thought and esthetics, 9
a.m., Vancouver School of Theology.
Music and metaphysics at the moment, 8 p.m.,
SUB art gallery.
SUNDAY
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND ARTS
Process  thought  and  esthetics conference,  9
a.m., Vancouver School of Theology.
Worship, 7:30 p.m., VST, chapel of the Epi
phany.
Lecture by Bernard Lee and Marty Dilling, 8:30
p.m., SUB art gallery.
UBC SPORTS CAR CLUB
Novice slalom series, regardless of weather, 9
p.m., B-lot.
MONDAY
CCCM
Anglican-United  communion,   noon,   Lutheran
Campus Centre.
Hot flashes
.4     \*S £
JMacDonafcf due
to deliver here
Sometimes the great leaders
from on high descend from the
snowy hill in Ottawa to bring
messages to the masses. And in the
season of an election we've had
many such gods visiting and they all
want something.
Secretary of state David MacDonald will be speaking at UBC
next Tuesday on the topic of the
status of women. You will be able
to see and hear him, noon, in room
169 of the Law building.
Hippy Bothdayf
Remember those great birthday
parties when you were a kid?
Balloon, ice cream, the Federman's
dog getting sick and your parents
being the last to come and pick you
up? Well, Speakeasy can't recapture that sticky nostalgia but they
do promise cake, balloons and fun,
fun, fun.
They are now 10, yes 10, years
old and they are celebrating the
auspicious occasion with a birthday
party next Tuesday on SUB's main
floor. So bring your patent leather,
tooters and streamers. They're a
friendly bunch.
Rhino charges
Nothing can bring back the
splendor in the grass but John
"Eh?" McDonald, your local
Rhinoceros party candidate, will bring back corruption to the railways,
the railways as the national wet
dream and gin to the house of commons.
McDonald, who may or may not,
and probably isn't, the illegitimate
grandson of Sir John A., says he
will end hangovers at UBC and
stands for the liberation of mari-
jauna. The beast can be reached at
228-2307 for rent-a-quotes, free
beer, comment and reaction. Or
just plain action.
Don't dare err
The AMS at large elections are
coming up and next Tuesday,
noon, there will be an all candidates
meeting in the SUB conversation
pit.
MARXIST-LENINIST PARTY OF CANADA
Hardial Bains, party president and Allan Soroka,
candidate   for   Vancouver-Quadra   speaking,
noon, SUB 215.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND ARTS
Dennis Larson, noon, SUB art gallery.
HUMAN RIGHTS IN CHILE
News and music of Latin America, 6:15 p.m.,
CITR.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Two French films, 7 p.m.. Ridge theatre.
TUESDAY
CUSO
Dialogue on development, 7:30 p.m.. International House lounge.
RUSSIAN CLUB
Russian folk music, noon, 8uch. 1256.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND ARTS
Towne Wayte, noon, SUB art gallery.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS
Baroque concert, noon, SUB art gallery.
Rona Murray reads her poetry, 3:30 p.m., SUB
art gallery.
Film: Who Has Seen the Wind, 7:30 p.m., SUB
auditorium.
SPEAKEASY
Celebrate  our  tenth  anniversary,   noon,   SUB
main mall.
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
Regular meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
FIRST YEAR COUNCIL
General meeting, noon, SUB 117.
PRE-MED
Lecture on pediatrics, noon, IRC 1.
EL CIRCULO
General meeting and discussion,  noon,  Buch.
218.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
WEDNESDAY
TM PROGRAM
Introductory lectures, noon and 8 p.m., Angus
306.
CHRISTIAN ENGINEERS
Breakfast, 7:15 a.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
CCCM
Anglican-United-SCM   community   meal,   5:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
DEPARTMENT OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
Lecture on the Soviet Union by Jan Solecki,
noon, Buch. 102.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Fat is a feminist issue discussion group, noon,
SUB 130.
PHOTOSOC
Social evening, 7:30 p.m., SUB 212.
AMS ART GALLERY
General meeting, noon, SUB 230.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Toronto poet Ian Young, noon, SUB 212.
THURSDAY
LSA FILM COMMITTEE
Film: I Am An Old Tree, impressions of Cuba
1974, noon. Law 101.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, SUB 130.
IYS
Lecture by Imaiai Rhemtulla, noon, SUB 215.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS
Lecture on What is beauty?, noon, SUB art
gallery.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Winter ball,  dinner dance, 6 p.m.,  graduate
students' centre.
Recommending products formulated
, by th* Institute of Trichology
HNMNK
HAIRWORLD
2620 SASAMAT (WlOth AVE & SASAMAT)
224-4912
224-1862
>-t«E *ss
Legislative  Internship Programme
Office of the Speaker
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
LEGISLATIVE INTERNSHIPS 1981
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATIONS
February 1st, 1980
SUBMIT APPLICATIONS TO:
Dr. Jeremy Wilson
Director, Legislative Internship Programme
Department of Political Science
University of Victoria
Victoria, B.C. V8W 2Y2
TEACHER INTERVIEWS
SCHOOL DISTRICT 80 (Kitimat)
A recruiting team from Kitimat will be interviewing prospective Elementary
and Secondary Teachers at the Four Seasons Hotel in Vancouver from March
31 - April 1, inclusive. Interested applicants are requested to forward a completed resume and formal application to:
The District Superintendent of Schools,
1515 Kingfisher Ave.,
Kitimat, B.C.
V8C 1S5
on or before February 15, 1980. Check with the Canada Employment Centre
on campus for further details.
UBC
READING, WRITING AND
STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
COMMENCING THE WEEK OF FEBRUARY 2, 1980 THE
UBC READING, WRITING AND STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
WILL OFFER SHORT COURSES IN GRAMMAR REVIEW,
READING IMPROVEMENT, STUDY SKILLS DEVELOPMENT, WRITING IMPROVEMENT, VOCABULARY
DEVELOPMENT AND SPELLING IMPROVEMENT. ALL
COURSES HAVE LIMITED ENROLMENT AND PRE-
REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.
FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION
CALL 228-2181 LOC 245
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines. 1 day $1.50; additional lines 36c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $3.00; additional lines
90c. Additional days $2.75 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Deadline isU:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
30 - Jobs
The Vancouver Institute
FREE PUBLIC LECTURE
HON. SIR
GEORGE BAKER
Royal Courts of Justice, London, England
FAMILY LAW
Sir George opens the spring lecture series
sponsored by the Vsncouver Institute. He
retired recently from the English bench and
for meny years was president of the family
division of the High Court of Justice.
LECTURE HALL 2,
WOODWARD BUILDING
Saturday, Jan. 26, at 8:15 p.m.
PART TIME STAFF for Young Alumni
Club bar function on Friday nights, approx.
8 p.m.-2 a.m. Contact UBC Alumni
Association, 228-3313.
WANTED: Part-time driver for courier
service. Afternoons. Male or female. Must
have own car. 228-1818.
35 — Lost
65 — Scandals
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS SPECIALS: Sherwood H12ROK Hockey sticks $4.95: grey
sweat pants $9.95: polyester hockey jerseys
$9.95: racquetball racquets $9.95: bicycle
panniers, $14.95; Wilson World Class tennis racquets $29.95 (strung); grey-colored
down jackets $34.95; Nike LOV Or Osaga
joggers $39.95; Waxless X-Country ski
package $79.50; and dozens of other well-
priced items at 3615 West Broadway,
733-1612.
THE  "PAPER  DOLLS" and  "THE  LIPS"
will be at The Pit for the Fog Show Monday
January 28th.
MALE 24 is looking for travelling companion
for trip to Europe. Leave May stay 3-4"
months. Please reply to 702-550 W. 12th
Ave., Vancouver. V5Z 1M3
70 — Services
PREGNANT7 NEED HELP7 Call Birthright
for free confidential help. 687-7223. We
care about you.
INDEPENDENT BEAUTY Consultant for
Mary Kay Cosmetics. Call Joan, 733-9701,
for your complimentary facial.
CALCULATORS
HP-41C $435.00
Printer, Card Reader, other
models also available.
FOR PRICES CALL:
734-3026
VOTERS
VANCOUVER CENTRE
(Kitsilano-South Granville)
REGISTER TO VOTE FEBRUARY 18
S.U.B. Progressive Conservative Table
Fri. Jan. 25. Mon. Jan. 28. Tues. Jan. 29
12:30- 1:30
80 — Tutoring
11 — For Sale - Private
85 — Typing
15 — Found
20 — Housing
SHARED ACCOMMODATION; quiet nonsmoking (preferred) male/female to share
2 bedrooms on the main floor of house
near 1st Er Alma with male. $200.00 per
month inclusive. 733-2677 evenings.
SHARED ACCOMMODATION in double
rooms on campus is available at Totem Park
and Place Vanier residences. Contact the
Student Housing Office in the Ponderosa
Building 8:30 to 4:30, Monday through Friday. Phone 228-2811 for further info.
FACULTY MEMBER offers board and room
with private bath and separate entrance at
low rate to responsible and relaxed person
willing to do occasional evening babysitting. Call 228-4040 or 228-4049 before four,
or 732-1576 after four and weekends.
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 266-6641.
YEAR ROUND expert essay and theses
typing from legible work. Phone 738-6829
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
90 - Wanted
99 — Miscellaneous
25 — Instruction
Page Friday 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 25,1980 Friday, January 25,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Julius Schmid makes the most popular brands
of condoms in Canada.
So why would we want to talk toyou
about other methods of contraception?
The Diaphragm
The diaphragm is a soft rubber cup which 'fits'
into the vagina to cover the cervix (the opening
to the uterus, or womb). It comes in various sizes
and requires both a prescription and initial fitting
by a doctor or trained
nurse. To be effective,
the diaphragm must
be used in conjunction y^t^i, t    t m$§jffifflfflffi%/
with a spermicidal jelly >u*.>.^.
or cream applied to all     '' m^y
sides of the cup and to its rim. Additional applications of the spermicidal jelly or cream are
needed if intercourse is delayed by several hours,
or is repeated prior to the removal of the diaphragm. The diaphragm must be left in place for
at least six hours after sexual contact. It can be
left for as long as twenty-four hours, after which
it should be removed, washed and dried. With
correct use, the contraception rate for the
diaphragm is very good. It is safe to use and
produces no unwanted side effects.
Contraceptive Chemicals
Contraceptive foams, jellies, creams, foaming
tablets and suppositories work in
much the same way. That is, by
establishing a mechanical barrier
to the sperm and/or by directly
killing the sperm on contact.
They must be inserted into the
vagina before intercourse and
reapplied with each
subsequent sexual act.
Suppositories (the
.     ,,  ,        .,      least effective) re-
rOt MvT^t-      ''\\      quire about fifteen
vj" L       ;.<v ":.\\      minutes to dissolve;
foaming tablets require five. Spermicidal foams, creams
and jellies are effective immediately. In all cases douching should be
avoided for at least six hours after intercourse.
Side effects are infrequent, although some
women and some men find that chemicals cause
an irritating burning sensation during intercourse
or discomfort afterwards.
m:A
The Pill
The pill, taken by women once a day for twenty-
one or twenty-eight consecutive days, is designed
to prevent ovulation. If no egg is released, conception cannot occur. Most of the pills available
today contain a combination of two female sex
hormones in synthetic form —estrogen and
progesterone.
The pill's main drawback is the side effects
that some women experience. Minor side effects
like nausea, spotting or breakthrough bleeding,
bloating and breast tenderness are fairly common but usually subside after a few months. The
pill is also sometimes associated with weight
gain and, to a lesser degree, weight loss; with
minor but irritating vaginal infections, headaches, depression, and an increased need for
vitamins Bc and B12.
So far as serious side effects are concerned,
it is known that women taking the pill run four
to seven times the risk of developing blood clots
and nearly eight times the risk of dying as a
result of a clot which lodges in a vital organ.
Recent evidence suggests that the risk of
developing a stroke (an extremely
rare condition among women of
child-bearing age) is increased
nine-fold. Because the risk is
greatest with women who smoke
cigarettes, it is strongly recommended that women over 30
should either stop smoking
or use another method of
birth control.
Because we're concerned.
The response to the advertisements
we have been running has made us aware
that there is still a surprising lack of
knowledge among young people about the
various methods of contraception.
This is supported by a Statistics
Canada report on the alarming increase in
unwanted pregnancies among young
women in the 16 to 24 age bracket.
What we plan to do in this advertisement is give you an honest and objective
look at other methods of contraception.
We will consider the advantages and disadvantages of each and leave you, the
reader, to make up your own mind which
method you prefer.
Space limitations make it impossible
for us to go into minute detail. So for
further information, we strongly recommend that you contact your local physician,
pharmacist or family planning clinic.
Douching
Although the method has
been in use for centuries,
douching with plain water
soap, or chemicals is
very ineffective. In fact
it's only slightly
better than taking no
precautions at all.
Rhythm
y...
The rhythm method
requires abstinence from
intercourse during the
woman's fertile time
of the month. The
difficulty even
today lies in predicting when the
fertile period is
likely to begin.
The various aids
currently used to
help determine
the fertility
cycle include
electronic calculators, special rhythm calendars,
clocks and chemical tests. The most common and
most accurate method is the charting of the
woman's basic body temperature which must be
taken with a special thermometer each morning
before she gets out of bed. Unfortunately, a
slight illness (a cold, for example) can affect
temperature readings and create the impression
that ovulation has already occured.
The intrauterine device (IUD)
The IUD is a small device usually made of
plastic or metal, or a combination of both, which
a gynecologist places inside the uterus where it
remains for as long as contraception is desired.
Aside from checking after menstruation to be
sure the device has not been expelled, little more
needs to be done.
How the IUD works
is still unclear. The
current school of
thought believes that the
device sets up a chemical
state which incapacitates the sperm
or the egg; or that its placement in
the body speeds up the movement of
the ovum (egg) so that it passes
through the tube before becoming
fertilized. As an additional safeguard,
some doctors recommend use of a spermicidal
foam or cream in conjunction with the IUD
—especially during midcycle when conception is
most likely to occur. This approach means that
the IUD loses one of its most attractive features:
the fact that it requires little effort and is
unrelated to the sex act.
Like all other methods, the IUD has its
drawbacks. Some users spontaneously expel the
device. In other cases, excessive bleeding and
cramping or other side effects make its removal
necessary. The IUD is not recommended for
women who have pelvic inflammatory disease or
any abnormality of the uterus or a history of
painful or heavy periods or cancer of the cervix
or uterus.
Sterilization
Male vasectomy is a simple surgical technique
(only a local anesthetic is required) which
involves cutting the ducts
that carry sperm into the
ejaculate. Following
vasectomy, a couple
should use some other
method of contraception until two consecutive
tests show that no sperm remain in the ejaculate.
Many doctors advise a repeat of the test six to
twelve months later to ensure that the ducts
have not grown back together.
Female sterilization (or tubal ligation)
involves cutting the Fallopian tubes that carry
eggs from the ovaries to the uterus. It is a
somewhat more complicated procedure than .
vasectomy. Although brief hospitalization is
usually required, new and simplified techniques
make it possible to carry out the operation in
a hospital-based clinic without overnight
hospitalization. The rare failures occur when the
tubes manage to grow back together.
The condom
jkw*
')
Plain end
m-
Sensi-Shape
Uilia^J'
"V>r
■ ML-liaMllllllHilillilmj)
f
Resenwir end
rrrm
The condom is second only
in popularity to the pill as
a method of birth control.
A thin sheath usually
made of rubber or animal
skin, it is put over the
erect penis to catch the
ejaculate. For maximum
effectiveness, the condom
should be used before intercourse to prevent any
escape of semen in fore-
play. It's also important
to withdraw the penis
while still erect to prevent
spillage of semen. Sensi-Shape Ribbed
The effectiveness of the condom, like the
diaphragm, varies with the user. The condom's
only disadvantage is that it must be used at the
time of intercourse, requiring interruption of
lovemaking. On the plus side, it is easy to use,
perfectly safe and offers protection against the
transmission of venereal disease. It can be
purchased at the drug store without a doctor's
prescription.
Julius Schmid manufactures Canada's most popular
brands of condoms. Ramses, Fourex, Sheik, NuForm,
Excita, Fiesta, Fetherlite.
If you would like some free samples of our
products, fill in the coupon below and we'll send
you everything in a plain envelope.
Name	
Address.
City	
_Prov.-
-PC-
JULIUS SCHMID OF CANADA LTD.
34 Metropolitan Road
Scarborough, Ontario MlR 2T8 Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, January 25,1980
36121-September Morn
Neil Diamond NEW!
38310-G rea test Hits
Electric Light Orch. NEW!
Records
$4.49
PLUS:
36324
36229
34474
36188
33796
36172
30617
36154
33453
36120
31360
36104
33060
36104
34400
36103
34729
36100
34974
36087
36305
36060
36312
36000
35375
36064
36647
36769
36751
36067
36609
36241
30
36709
35813
36066
36102
36110
36327
36294
32544
33146
33848
36318
Tapes
$4.99
Records
$4.49
Tapes
$4.99
36334-Star Trek-
Original Soundtrack NEW
Records
$4.79
Records   Tapes
1064
36037
36730
36745
36140
36203
IN THE BEGINNING-Journey (2-LP-set-NEW)
HYDRA-TotolNEW)
ANIMALS-Pink Floyd
WILLIE NELSON SINGS KRISTOFFERSON-Willie Nelson
BORN TO RUN- Bruce Springsteen
KEEP THE FIRE- Kenny Loggins
ME AND BOBBY McGEE- Kris Kristofferson
MARATHON - Santana
WISH YOU WERE HERE- Pink Floyd
SLOW TRAIN COMING- Bob Dylan
GREATEST HITS-Simon and Garfunkel
13—Chicago
GREATEST HITS-Santana
DO IT YOURSELF- Ian Dury
CHEAP TRICK - Cheap Trick
GOMM WITH THE WIND- Ian Gomm
DOWN TWO THEN LEFT-Boz Scaggs
BORN TO BE ALIVE- Patrick Hernandez
BAT OUT OF HELL- Meatloaf
LABOUR OF LUST-Nick Lowe
STARDUST-Willie Nelson
A NIGHT IN THE RUTS-Aero Smith (NEW)
HEAVEN TONIGHT-Cheap Trick
STATE OF SHOCK-Ted Nugent
SONGBIRD - Barbra Streisand
ONE FOR THE ROAD-Willie Nelson/Leon Rusell (2-LP-set)
THE BEST OF- Earth, Wind & Fire
DREAM POLICE-Cheap Trick
DISCOVERY- Electric Light Orch.
MILLION MILE REFLECTION-Charlie Daniels Band
BACK TO THE EGG - McCartney & Wings
52nd STREET- Billy Joel
ONE ON ONE-Bob James & Earl Klugh (New)
CIRCLES IN THE STREAM- Bruce Cockburn (2-LP-set)
ARMED FORCES-Elvis Costello
SOONER OR LATER-Rex Smith
LUCKY SEVEN-Bob James
STATELESS-Lene Lovich
FLIRTIN' WITH DISASTER- Molly Hatchet
THE ELECTRIC HORSEMAN -Orig. Soundtrack (NEW)
LIVE COAST TO COAST-Teddy Pendergrass (2-LP-set/NEW)
PIANO MAN-Billy Joel
STREETLIFE SERENADE - Billy Joel
TURNSTILES-Billy Joel
DARKNESS ON THE EDGE OF TOWN- Bruce Springsteen
LIFE FOR THE TAKING-Eddie Money
WHISPERING RAIN-Murray McLauchlan
DANCING IN THE DRAGON'S JAW-Bruce Cockburn
STRANGER-Billy Joel
HOT STREETS - Chicago
PHOENIX-Dan Fogelberg
NIGHTOUT-Ellen Foley
ROCK 'N ROLL MACHINE-Truimph
AT BUDOKAN- Cheap Trick
WET- Barbra Streisand
MOVE IT ON OVER -George Thorogood
MY AIM IS TRUE- Eh/Is Costello
lAM-Earth.Wind&Fire
OFF THE WALL- Michael Jackson
NINE LIVES- Reo Speedwagon
OASIS—limmy Messina (NEW)
MISS THE MISSISSIPPI-Cryatal Gayle
A.AAA
2 DAYS
ONLY
D.M.O. DENOTES
'Display Model Only'
(Quantities Vary)
CHECK OUR
MANY
"IN-STORE
SPECIALS"
r
Good for your system"
6025 Belt-Drive Manual
Turntable with Auto-Return
.  o.07% Wow and Flutter (WRMS)
.  Marantz Exclusive S-Shaped Tone Arm
.  AC Synchronous Motor
.  Viscous Damped Cueing
.   Dust Cover and Base
$129.95
JENSEN
SOUND LABORATORIES
sss^--
Jensen's Triaxial
(The 6" x 9" Triax)
Three-way sound. Jensen started it all
with the 6" x 9" Triax. The first car stereo
speaker ever with a separate woofer,
tweeter and midrange. And its popularity
is still going strong, aqq qjj
l v5/5/«5/Oper pair
YAMAHA O
TEAC
a
CR-220 AM/FM
Stereo Receiver
15 watts RMS per channel with o.o5%
distortion. Drive main speakers in your living room, plus extension speakers in your
bedroom or den. Continously variable
loudness allows you to compensate at
any listening level for the natural drop of
the ears response.
$199.95
A-106
Cassette Deck
All the features of the Teac A-103 PLUS
memory rewind for ease of rechecking
recordings; output level control for perfect
matchups and adjusting headphone
volume.
JVC
JRS 61W RECEIVER
18  watts  per  channel,   hi  filter,   fm
muting  ideal for an apartment.
D.M.O. $179.95
MARANTZ HD 550
SPEAKERS
High definition series, 3 way, dome
tweeter.
$179.95 ea
y\
$299.95
AIWA
Ei.
:X     .—     t
T-1
TWO SPEED
CASSETTE DECK
Two-speed cassette deck offers
dramatic improvements in frequency
response, signal-to-noise, and
dynamic range — plus Dolby for less
noise and clearer more detailed sound.
$329.95
AIWA AD6700
CASSETTE DECK
Wireless remote control if you are
looking for a high quality cassette deck
then check this one out. Dual motor
drive system, feather touch electronic
switching, metal tape capability,
repeat, peak hold and a lot lot more.
D.M.O. $775.00
CRAIG T606   3only
ln-dash road rated receiver R3 digital
realout & clock.
$249.95
JUST EXAMPLES OF 100'S OF
CLEARANCE VALUES TO BE FOUND   I
sound
556 SEYMOUR ST. DOWNTOWN
Open until 9 Thursday and Friday
687-5837

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128182/manifest

Comment

Related Items