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The Ubyssey Oct 18, 1966

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 We got
everything
THE
Vol. XLVIII, No. 13
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,   TUESDAY,   OCTOBER   TO,   1966
-G	
McGill threatens
—kurt   hilger photo
MYSTIFIED STUDENTS WONDER why food services, kitchens bulging with modern cooking apparatus, fail to approach flavor quality of primitive Indian methods. Students
downed 200 pounds of pink delicacy at Monday's salmon barbecue, presided over by
Squamish   and   Campbell   River   band   Indians,   kicking   off   Homecoming   week.
AMS to poll residences
When new residences are
ibuilt students' views will help
decide how.
The Alma Mater Society
moved Monday to request housing co-ordinator Kay Larsen
and architecture student Judah
Schumiatcher to make a survey of residence student opinion.
The survey will be used for
background'when the proposed
clients' committee to UBC President John Macdonald recommends its housing plans to the
board of governors.
The board will decide early
next year the type of new residences to be .built in its current
housing expansion program.
New residences are to toe
ready by 1970.
"A clients' committee with
some solid proposals has a very
good chance of getting its viewpoints acress to the architects
and to the board," said AMS
president Peter Braund.
First vice-president Charlie
Boylan charged that students'
views would have little impact
on any plans.
"The committee will not report after the site is chosen. I
charge that all the plans are
already drawn."
"We have been duped again.
We wanted a clients' committee now to help plan these residences — we have been given
the worst kind of tokenism. We
are allowed to make suggestions to the architects but
we have no choice as to the
site," Boylan said.
"We know that same plans
for the new residences have
been drawn up by the board,"
said Braund.
"The board will do nothing
until the master plans of the
architects from San Francisco
(the master planners for the
university) are studied,"
Braund said.
"I believe these plans include an extension of the
Totem Park type of dormitory."
Tim Flegel, grad studies 2,
suggested council make up a
report of facts and figures to
back its statements on desirable locations and forms for
residences.
"Grad studies did such a
survey report on married grad
students and it breezed through
the board of governors without
a hitch," said Flegel.
"This question is worthy of
discussion," said Braund. "If
we don't say something about
these plans before they go to
the board we are finished."
"The   committee   should   be
ready to report by January,"
said Hudson.
In other business, council
approved a finance committee
motion, that the AMS no longer
pay for faculty editions of
The Ubyssey.
"My feeling is that AMS
funds should be used for more
worthwhile publications," said
Hudson.
"Most of these faculty things
are terrible. If they need legitimate publicity they can get
it through usual Ubyssey channels."
Winner of the United Ap-
p e a 1 campaign, announced
Commerce president Phil Walton, is home economics with a
per capita average donation of
45 cents.
The faculty donations range
down to arts with a per capita
average of 0.006 cents per student.
The council meeting, held at
Totem Park, was the first of
several to be held in residences.
Several resident students spoke
briefly  on housing  conditions.
More downtown service,
seats with new buses
Bigger and better buses are coming to UBC.
Seven new 49-seat GF diesel buses will replace
the 42-seat, gasoline-powered buses now in service.
In addition, a direct bus service from downtown to
UBC wil be provided in the evening and all day Sunday
as of Oct. 28.
January vote
holds decision
MONTREAL (UNS) — McGill University may follow
the University of Alberta out of the Canadian Union of
Students.
McGill students' society
decided Monday to hold a referendum in mid-January to
decide whether to pull out of
CUS.
The referendum will also
decide whether McGill will
join Union Generale Etudiants
de Quebec or remain independent of both student organizations.
The motion, based on recommendations of a report made
by McGill external vice-president Arnie Alberman, also said
McGill will withhold its CUS
fees pending the vote.
In his report, Alberman said
the McGill delegate's actions
at the 30th CUS congress in
September were based on the
assumption it would be a "violation of the basic political freedom of choice" for them to
make decisions on political
questions.
University of Alberta quit
CUS Sept. 19.
Newfoundland's Memorial
University voted to leave CUS
at the .beginning of the fall
conference.
At present three other universities — Bishop's, Acadia
and St. Dunstan's — are reconsidering their position in CUS.
A fourth, University of Waterloo, held a major referendum
Monday on CUS education
policy.
CUS president Doug Ward
made no immediate comment
on a possible McGill pullout.
Ward said he is "going to
talk with McGill first" before
making any statement.
He made it clear CUS plans
to bill McGill for at least partial payment of its $7,000 CUS
fees.
The $100,000 CUS budget is
already strained to the breaking point.
McGill's first installment of
CUS fees is due at the end of
Novemlber, Ward said.
"This is our low time of the
year as far as money goes, and
we will .be asking McGill for its
first installment," he added.
"It's about time," was the
reaction of UBC Alma Mater
Society president Peter Braund
to the proposed pullout.
"It is in the students' best
interests if they get out of CUS
and join UGEQ," said Braund.
AMS vice-president Charlie
Boylan agreed that McGill
ought to join UGEQ.
"There is complete harmony
between CUS and UGEQ," said
Boylan.
"UGEQ is a federation of
Quebec students and McGill
students live in Quebec. UGEQ
is the logical place for them."
DOUG WARD
.  .  .  deserted
Housing short
for many, says
legislator
By  MURRAY  McMILLAN
MLA-elect Tom Berger says
students aren't the only ones
who can't get housing at a reasonable price.
Berger (NUP - Vancouver
Burrard) told 200 students in
Brock Lounge Friday noon,
they are only one of three
groups affected by accommodation shortages.
He said the others are old
age pensioners and poor families.
Berger blamed the present
shortage on Vancouver's building boom — old houses, once
used by low income groups,
have been torn down for
apartments   and   offices.
Berger said he supports the
AMS attempt to have the city
relax Point Grey zoning laws,
but believes housing is the responsibility of the provincial
government.
He called for establishment
of a provincial department of
housing and urban development Ao supervise construction
of  new  accommodation.
The department would see
that some of these dwellings
are kept under government
control to ensure low rentals,
he said.
Loud hissing met Berger's
proposal for a capital gains
tax on unearned increment
from undeveloped urban
lands. He said the tax would
promote building.
The MLA said labor is
neither a fat cat nor a hungry
lion — phrases used on NDP
posters at UBC. Labor is a
hungry cfat with little power
compared to giant corporations, he said. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  October   18,   1966
WILD MAN DANCE, ancestor of modern frug, kicks off Homecoming Week celebrations
in front of Field House Monday noon. Squamish band medicine man Dominique Charlie
drums up a storm for dancing which preceded salmon barbecue. Students joined
Indians for final  friendship  dance,  then   munched salmon around roaring fire.
'REASSESS  CUP
Islanders call vote
CHARLOTTETOWN (CUP)—
Citing discontent with the aims
and benefits of membership in
the Canadian Union of Students, the students' union president at St. Dunstan's Univer-
city has called for a referendum
on CUS membership.
At a meeting this week,
Charley McMillan called for
students at the island university "to reassess some of our
past programs, and to consider
whether the money which has
been put in one area might not
be 'better used in other areas
of student activity."
If St. Dunstan's withdraws,
it will join five other student
bodies who have severed CUS
ties so far this fall.
Another two universities,
Bishop's and Acadia, are now
reconsidering their position in
the 160,000-student organization.
McMillan was critical of CUS
involvement in political issues,
saying:
"Aside from the dubious
benefits of mere fact of membership in such organizations,
it is now important to consider
what else is worthwhile from
them.
"If they (CUS and World
University Service) can't stand
the pressure of re-examination
Professor
dies in VGH
UBC education professor
Dr. Rex Boughton died Saturday night at Vancouver General Hospital after a short illness.
Boughton taught science education to elementary education students.
Boughton, who was 60, had
been at UBC since the education faculty was formed in
1956.
There will be no funeral
service. Memorial gifts may
be sent to UBC's Child Study
Centre or to any charity.
or even convince the student i then we have no choice but to
ibody of their worth — both in   spend money elsewhere,
terms of their cost . .  . and      No date has been announced
positive results accomplished— I for the referendum.
Eligibility queries,
AMS nearly not
For  a   while   Monday   ni;
wasn't.
In a 20-minute wrangle,
councillors accused each other
of being academically ineligible, moved to have each other
investigated, and backed off
again in apparent fear of total
dissolution.
The AMS consitution requires that councillors pass
their previous sessional examinations and carry enough
units to gain a year's credit.
Undergraduate society presidents are also required to be
undergraduates.
It all started when arts U.S.
president Don Wise tried to
have his new arts constitution
approved.
Council, led by science president Frank Flynn, indicated
several errors in the constitution.
The new constitution states
that only first, second, first,
third, fourth and fifth year
students in arts are members
of the arts U.S.
Wise explained that arts has
"an animal called double honors program" in which fifth
year students are still undergraduates.
Science president Flynn
pointed out that Wise is in
arts 6.
"Yes," said Wise, "I graduated last summer, but when elected last spring I was arts 3."
The constitution was approved and it was suggested that
Wise was now ineligible to sit
on council.
Wise then added an amendment that all councillor's eleg-
ibility be investigated.
ght,   students   council   nearly
"At the risk of sounding paranoic, why single me out?" he
queried.
"Most of you are ineligible,
too. If I have to resign, arts will
collapse."
"The only ones who would
oppose such a move are the failures who are afraid of the consequences," declared Wise.
"I'm all right, Peter," yelled
Law president John Trueman.
"Opposed?" said Braund.
"All the failures," commented Wise.
"I stand on my record," retorted Hudson, voting no.
"I passed," said Flynn proudly, voting no.
The motion was defeated and
Braund censured the council
for spending time wrangling
when they should (be discussing
weighter matters.
Cash causes comfort in
new metallurgy stacks
Metallurgy students will be able to study in comfort
in their very own stacks.
The Board of Governors has authorized $600 for
library furniture in the new metallurgy building.
An additional contract for $114,938 has been awarded to Biely Construction Ltd. to finish the interior of
the building.
Notice to Graduating Students in
ARTS
A meeting will be held in Room 104, Buchanan Building
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER  19th  at  12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
GRADUATE EMPLOYMENT
(fflTPlJ)
CANADA
CptplcijtneHt %tertfiwA
Our representatives will be visiting the campus
7th, 8th, 9th and 10th November
to interview graduating and post-graduate students in
the following disciplines who are interested in a career
in industry.
Regular Employment:
Mechanical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Mining Engineering
Engineering Science
General Arts or Science
Mathematics
Electrical Engineering
Engineering Physics
Chemistry   and/or   Physics
Commerce  or  Business
Administration
Statistics
Econometrics
An interview appointment can be made at your Placement Office on campus where you may obtain position
descriptions and information about the Company. If
supplies of these are depleted, please fill in the coupon
below and forward to us for immediate attention.
Summer Employment:
We will have a number of interesting openings for undergraduates in chemical, mechanical and electrical engineering, one, two and three years from graduation as
well as for undergraduates in chemistry, commerce or
business "administration.
Summer employees, particularly those who will be entering their senior year provide the additional technical
manpower required to carry out many important investigations of a challenging nature.
DU PONT OF CANADA
Personnel Division, P.O. Box 660, Montreal, P.Q.
COUPON
Dear Sir:
Kindly forward immediately information on openings
for 1967 graduates and a copy of your booklet "From
University to Industry With Du Pont of Canada".
NAME
ADDRESS
FAC. & YEAR
(please print)
Homecoming '66 Ball
to be held at the
ARMOURIES FIELD HOUSE
Vancouver Accents Kentish Steele and the Shantelles
Big Band Sounds of Phil Stansfelt Eric   Sandquisfs  Tenette
FEATURING "SANDY AND JEANIE" AND
THE CROWNING OF THE HOMECOMING '66 QUEEN
Tickets available at A.M.S. Office or phone 224-3242 Tuesday, October   18,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Teach-in
gives slant
on China
A China teach-in similar to
one this week-end at University of Toronto will be held at
UBC in November.
Professor William Willmott
of the anthropology department is organizing the teach-
in to be held Nov. 11-12.
Franz Schurmann, China
scholar from Berkeley, will attend.
UBC Asian Studies professor Rene Goldman, who attended the Toronto teach-in,
said Monday the event was
successful because it was well
attended by "students who
knew little about modern
China.
"They had their interests
aroused,"  said  Goldman.
Goldman said he liked the
idea of bringing together
scholars and public figures.
"I spoke at a pre-teach-in
session on the changes that
communism brought to the social position of the student,"
he said.
James Lyu, of Princeton
University, spoke with Goldman, giving the historical background of the social and political role of the Chinese student.
"I was impressed by the orderly proceedings. There was
very little heckling," Goldman said.
"University enrollment in
China increased six-fold during the sixties," Goldman told
the teach-in.
"Academic freedom disappeared because of the communist need to remold intellectual thinking. The greatest barrage of propaganda was aimed at students."
Other speakers included professor John Gittings, who called on Canada to recognize
China, India's communist leader Hirendra Mukerjee who
condemned the U.S. for "ruthless agression" in Vietnam,
and writer Stuart Schram of
Paris.
Cash, glory
awaits two
UBC artists
UBC's arts faculty will
award two $150 prizes for
two works of art to hang in
new seminar rooms in Buchanan.
Oils, graphics, and water-
colours, limited to a maximum
of 36 inches on any one side,
will be accepted for judging
by a three-man jury.
The contest is open to any
student   registered  at  UBC.
Closing date for entries in
the contest is Nov. 1. The two
prize winners will be announced at a reception in UBC's International House on Nov. 8.
Full details are available in
fine arts and architecture offices, the faculty of education,
and in Bu. 369.
Defiling
PANGO PANGO (UNS) —
Puce blorgs in control of this
island city's communcations
centres and government houses
today issued a universal ban
on the pain of death against
defiling the.
MORE PLANS
ENGINEER'S OFFICE .
—powell   hargrave   photo
a long drop
Engineers straiten
Ubyssey columnist
A fourth-year arts student strapped into a strait jacket
jumped through a second-storey window Monday to free
himself from a group of engineers.
Ubyssey    columnist    Gabor
Mate, who was grabbed by
about 25 engineers as he left
a class at 11:30 a.m., broke
his fall by landing in a tree
beneath the window and was
not injured.
Mate said the engineers who
kidnapped him told him he
was being taken to an engineering undergraduate society
general meeting to have his
hair cut.
He said when he protested
the abduction, he was locked
in the strait jacket.
Witnesses said Mate was
held in the EUS office on the
second floor of the civil engineering building. He freed
himself by running into the
glass and falling to West Mall.
Mate said he was later freed
by a geology professor and
UBC   traffic   patrolmen.
Several other students were
injured'by the engineers when
they tried to protest the abduction,   but  none   seriously.
Mrs. Nancy Corbett, arts 4,
said she was forcibly prevented from entering the building, and suffered a bruised
arm and shoulder.
She said she gave a statement to campus RCMP officers, but would not press
charges.
The campus police said they
were reluctant to enter student disputes because the university would not back them
if charges were laid.
An RCMP spokesman said
the university was reluctant
to see students charged for alleged criminal acts on campus
because a conviction would
remain on their records and
possibly damage their futures.
He said the RCMP is powerless until a fairly serious
crime is committed.
Said Mrs. Corbett: "If something like this happened on
.Jranville Street, there •would
certainly be charges.
"Why are we protecting
people just because they happen to be students?" she asked.
Students sought
tor kits blitz
The United Services Appeal — formerly the Community Chest—needs help.
Students are needed to
participate in a blitz canvass
of- the Kitsilano area one
evening later this week.
Interested persons should
phone Mrs. Doreen Poussette
at 228-8141.
Brief advocates
end of frosh fees
By TOM MORRIS
Student councils at three B.C. universities have recommended abolition of first-year fees.
The recommendation is con
tained in a brief to be submitted Friday to B.C. education
minister Les Peterson by the
student councils of UBC, Victoria University and Simon
Fraser Academy.
The brief asks the government to establish a long-term
education blueprint. The blueprint would outline educational development over the next
five years and the costs of
development.
It would include a progressive abolition of fees starting
in the first year of university.
The councils express dissatisfaction with the arrangement of joint control of higher
education between both federal and provincial governments.
They claim the system
leads to abrogation of responsibility and a policy of jurisdictional badminton.
"The issues of education financing cannot be solved until
we overcome the larger problem of the definition of responsibility," the brief reads.
The councils recommended
that provincial governments
take absolute control of financing education.
The brief asks the province
to demand the responsibility
and revenues that will enable
them to undertake the financing of all forms of post-secondary education in each province.
The federal government
would provide tax refunds or
grants-in-aid to provinces lacking adequate resources.
The federal government's proposed 10,000 bursaries would
be administered by the provinces using increased tax allotments.
The brief also recommends
that:
The federal government retain and expand its research
grants program;
Student union building projects be eligible for provincial
capital grants or Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation
loans;
The provincial government's
existing "money for marks"
program be changed into a
bursary system, based on summer income, costs, and minimum academic qualification;
Particular attention be shown
out-of-town students through
the establishment of an equalization grant bursary  fund;
The Canadian student loans
program be discontinued and
individual provinces set up
programs of student aid;
A greater degree of participation by all elements of the
educational community in advising government on the decisions that relate specifically
to higher education in B.C.;
The councils want Peterson
to present the brief before the
October federal-provincial conference on financing higher
education.
New arts
mean new
teaching
The proposed new arts program calls for a complete revision in first year teaching
methods, the assistant to the
dean of arts said Saturday.
"The aim of a liberal arts
education should be to form in
the student an attitude of enquiry, and to stimulate him
to individual and creative
thought," said political science
assistant professor Walter
Young.
Young, speaking to the weekend leadership conference in
Haney, said today's first year
student is bored, indifferent,
and hostile toward his subjects.
He suggested that it is not
the content but the quality of
the work and student involv-
ment with it which is important.
"Under the present system,
many students leave university
without discovering the excitement which can inspire a man
to devote his whole life to an
academic career," said Young.
"In the present five-course
system, the student jumps madly from course to course, gaining only superficial knowledge
of each subject."
Young said the proposed
first year arts program would
provide intellectual experience
to prepare the student's mind
and writing ability for later
years.
"The purpose is to get the
student committed intellectually by engaging him with four
or five general topics, such as
love, war, or death, throughout the year," said Young.
Bad cheques
bounce here
A total of 640 cheques have
been returned to UBC this
month, UBC accounting office
has reported.
"We're all young once,"
assistant accountant N. A.
Housden said. "We can all
make, mistakes."
The cheques are returned
for many reasons other than
not enough funds in the account. Many students transfer
accounts to campus banks.
Some even simply forget to
sign the cheque, he said.
"We try to be understanding
when collecting the money,"
Housden explained.
"We send letters as well as
phoning the student's home.
But if he hasn't paid up by the
end of the year, he doesn't receive his marks transcript."
No estimate of money involved in the bad cheques was
available Monday. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The   Ubyssey   publishes   Page   Friday,   a   weekly  commentary   and   review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
OCTOBER  18,  1966
AH great changes are irksome to the human
mind, especially those which are attended
with great dangers and uncertain effects.
—John Adams,  1776
Johns a myth
"As I was going up the stair
I met a man who wasn't there.
He wasn't there again today.
I wish, I wish he'd stay away."
—Hughes Mearns
Thursday's open door time at the president's office
finally brought it all back home.
UBC president John B. Macdonald doesn't exist.
Well, not really. He's there, that man, sitting in his
office working as damn hard as he can to administer
the UBC place.
The tooth fairy and God are around too, working
just as hard to tend their affairs.
Everybody knows all three exist —Mac, the tooth
fairy and God —but in today's society they don't have
much to do with the mundane things that are the stuff
of life. Things like car pools, English 200, losing your
library card, cheese sandwiches again, impressing a date
and brushing teeth.
Thursday was the test drive against bigness, the first
monthly open door day for students to spill their beans
at the top—the big beans, anyway.
Seven student bureaucrats in three delegations came,
all with nice, big official problems.
But just as only 300 curious students were welcomed at Mac's second annual armory speech two
weeks ago, the 17,300-great mass doesn't consider Macdonald relevant.
It's not that they don't have problems and suggestions. Ask anybody loafing around the library what's
wrong with this place — you'll be lucky to escape with
your sensibilities intact.
There's simply no connection between a problem or
a suggestion and That Man, He Who Rules.
He's too remote, too much a ghostly myth to actually
be real.
Just as huge, impersonal society has killed God for
much of modern theology, the monster university has
killed its president as a man relevant to anybody in it.
That's the essence of the bigness problem, which
Macdonald is obviously very worried about, and which
he's tunning knee over ear after as he tries to stay in
the same place.
His own fade-out from a man to a ghostly winter
re-run is a perfect symbol of the bigness he can't fight,
no matter how hard he tries.
After all, he only wants important problems, which
is all the man really has time or facilities for. So, jeez,
what could be important enough to go to the president
of the university with?
Just as bigness hits the student councillor in the
eye,, and makes himi no longer a student, no longer able
to represent his constituents because he can never see
them, the university president is a victim of the thing
he's fighting.
While he's in a chair sufficiently exalted to view
the bigness from, he can't combat it because he is it.
It's very sad, and frustrating.
It's also a strong case for an ombudsman who does
nothing but play around with the little problems that
get lost in bigness.
Beyond that, we'll have to opt out of the editorial
tradition and offer no solutions, just our sympathy for
the man who isn't there.
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
'Uncivil me
Editor, The Ubyssey:
An open letter to the EUS
president:
Dear Mr. Newhell (or what-
zayurname),
I apologize for not staying
for your general meeting
Monday, but I had businesss
elsewhere.
I also beg forgiveness, Mr.
Newgears, for breaking your
window. I realize now it was
very uncivil of me.
I would also like to inform
you, sir, that the next time
your Cinderellas take it upon
themselves to issue forceful
invitations of a similar nature, I will prefer criminal
charges.
Again, sorry about that
window.
Try jumping out of it sometime, it's fun.
Still ruefully yours,
GABOR MATE
'maxim applies'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Today I witnessed approximately six rather large
gentlemen, gather up one
(not two or 63) Gabor Mate
and hustle him off to what I
was later told was an impromptu exercise in hair-
styling.
Since these gentlemen saw
fit to use SS tactics, it is probably not far out of line to
assume that they also have a
similar mentality.
Apparently, the old maxim
still applies—"If a limb offend
thee, cut it off." Or simply,
EDITOR: John Kelsey
Managing         __.—  Richard Blair
News   _              Carol Wilson
City ._   Danny SrofFman
Photo       _ _      Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    .            Claudia Gwinn
Focus ....     Rosemary Hyman
CUP    .               Bert Hill
Ass't News        Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf
Ass't Photo      Dennis Gans
"Shoot  first,   and   ask   questions later."
I ask these barbers to publish their names so that they
may receive public credit or
whatever it is they deserve
for their vigilante action.
Since I don't believe these
people will do this and since
I don't like their methods of
dealing with people with
whom they disagree, I remain,
ONE ANONYMOUS.
'Least sense
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We wish to take offense
with several remarks made
by our so-called benevolent
dictator, Sir Ouvry Roberts,
in your paper of October 14.
According to your reporter,
Sir Ouvry said, "It is our
policy to restrict in every way
possible the number of cars
driving on University roads."
The particular instance of.
this enforcement policy which
makes the least sense is the
current closing of east mall
to students during the morning rush.
Sure, Sir Ouvry will say
there's a sign prohibiting students from entering the campus between 7:30 a.m. and 5
p.m. but the existence of this
sign is not a justification for
a lousy student traffic policy.
The absurdity of having a
patrolman on East Mall in the
mornings is obvious when one
observes how well traffic
moves when the officer is
absent in comparison to the
long line-ups which have occurred lately.
Surely, this officer's capabilities could be more effect
ively utilized by having him
pick up discarded parking
tickets in C lot.
ROY A. CLARKE,
commerce 3
'No humility
WHERE ITS  AT
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Reading Galbor Mate on Dal-
ton Camp was like going
through Mark Anthony's "He is
an honorable man." Whatever
witty qualities Mate possesses,
they do not apparently include
humility, sincerity, or depth of
perception.
This humible reader of the
very humble Ubyssey suggests
a page of Page Friday might
better have been given to the
text of Camp's noon hour
speech.
Perusing groovy Gabor's
article en toto, then reading
it again with only Mr. Camp's
quotations, without all those
humble, facetious, unidentified
inserted comments, this humble writer was left with conflicting impressions of Dalton
Camp.
Gabor Mate's article was
s u lb 11 e y sarcastic, cocktail-
party clever — a fine example
of superficial, irresponsible reporting. But then, who cares
for responsible reporting—it's
not in.
And, of course, I was not in
the radsoc inner sanctum during the interview. I have
known Mr. Camp personally
for only the last three years;
I am not a Conservative, but
am active in another political
party; and I've .been foolish
enough to critize little Gabor
the great.
PENNY DAMM
Librarian assistant
IN TORONTO
Minute improvements
Rod Wilczak, John Appleby,
Kris Emmott, Tom Morris, Ron
Simmer and Norman Gidney reported raucously. So did Lin Tse-
hsu, Jill Green, Ann Bishop, Murray McMillan, Val Thorn, beaming
Boni Lee, Mary Ussner, Maria
G.ardini, Angela Ottho, Kathy
Harkness, and Charlotte Haire.
Invaluable was copyrunning council watcher Val Zuker.
Cameroids were Kurt Hilger
and Derrek Webb. Support mental  health  like  crazy.
Reprinted from the October 7 edition
of the University of Toronto Varsity.-
Allowing three members of the University of Toronto President's Council
to sit in on the meetings of the university's Board of Governors is not going to make that ibody a democratic
institution. Nor is it going to Ibridge the
tremendous gap which exists between
the academic community and the Board.
It is a minuscule departure from the
past.
And yet it represents a giant step forward in improving communications
within this institution and making its
structure more acceptable to its members.
President Claude Bissell has indicated
by his announcement that he is not
satisfied with the state of affairs which
prevail at the administrative level of
the university. While his hands may be
tied by provincial laws which don't
allow members of the university to sit
on the board, he has done the university
a considerable service by demonstrating
that good intentions may be translated
into action despite all other circumstances.
We commend the Board of Governors
for their forward-looking acceptance of
three academics among their numbers.
The board did not have to do this. In
fact, it had to go out of its way to give
them "observer" status. Their progres-
siveness is admirable regardless of
their motives.
The board's action followed recommendations by the two commissioners
who studied university government in
Canada last year, Sir James Duff and
Robert Berdahl. The commissioners
said: "At the two or three Canadian
universities on our intinerary which do
elect faculty members to the board, we
questioned the board and found that in
every case they thought the board was
strengthened."
The board's action came after increasing unrest and dissatisfaction among
the academic community albout the
separation of powers in the university
structure and the continued subordination of an institution of learning to the
direction of non-academics.
In one sense, the Duff-Berdahl report
legitimized the academic community's
claims to a greater voice in its own constitution. The small innovation announced toy Dr. Bissell is a recognition
of those claims.
The report makes dozens of other recommendations, -which cannot be ignored. Amendments to the University of
Toronto Act must be made at the next
session of the legislature to allow some.
One of the important recommendations of the report concerns the participation of students in university government at departmental, faculty, Senate
and board levels. Students are still the
largest segment of the university. To
most people, they represent the university's reason for being. And yet they
are not even considered junior partners,
but fully dependent apprentices.
The board's reforms must appease the
discontented among both faculty and
students for the time being. But unless
further steps are taken, before long the
discontent will likely recur, in stronger
form. i FOCUS ON CANADA i
Campus Liberals deflated
By BARRY RUST
CUP   Staff   Writer
OTTAWA — English-
speaking University Liberals
left here Thursday showing
little of the determination
and exuberance that characterized their arrival Sunday for the Liberal Party of
Canada's national conference.
Throughout the three-day
conference, those delegates,
who along with Quebec University Liberals comprise the
Canadian University Liberal
Federation, ran into brick
walls as they introduced resolutions calling for a national student bursary plan, a
student   salary   scheme,   and
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Tuesday, October   18,   1966
government assistance programs for universities, colleges and technical institutes.
For what it means, the conference did accept the principle of universal accessibility, which was defined as removal of all social and financial barriers  to  education.
The resolution was narrowly passed after a powerful
speech by Gerry Ohlsen of
the University of Alberta,
who pleaded: "It doesn't matter who enacts it," and warned Liberals would "alienate
all university students if you
fail to accept this principle."
The resolution was amended to say the federal government should insure at the
next federal-provincial conference did accept the prin-
in a position to carry out the
objective while still recognizing the provisions of Section 93 of the BNA Act which
makes education a provincial
responsibility.
All other CULF resolutions
were defeated in workshops,
referred to the standing Liberal policy committee (in effect a polite way of burying
the proposal) or placed so low
on the agenda that they were
without hope of coming before plenary sessions.
Reference to the BNA Act
in the universal accessibility resolution was made to
underline the right of provinces to opt out of any federal program involving areas
of exclusive provincial jurisdiction such as education.
The amendment was introduced at the insistence of
Quebec delegates who maintained,, and eventually convinced the conference, that
the national party had no
right to draft resolutions on
education.
CULF resolutions on education Tuesday threatened to
split the conference along
English-French lines. However,   by   Wednesday   work
shops an "federalism" and
"Canadianism" had fully endorsed strict adherence to
the BNA Act, driving the anticipated rift underground
and rendering education resolutions all but useless.
Fiery speeches by Walter
Gordon — "We must respect
the sensitivities of our Quebec friends"; Maurice Sauve
— "We (Quebec ministers)
must not be weakened by a
resolution contrary to our
position in Quebec"; and
Paul Martin led to a unanimous resolution emphasizing
that regardless of any problems of national dimensions,
the current division of powers must be "scrupulously"
respected by all levels of
government until the constitution is changed.
Mr. Martin spoke directly
to the resolution, calling it
"the most important single
resolution any conference of
any party has ever been asked to support. They (French
Canadians) were among the
first to build Canada, and
they will be the last to see it
destroyed," he told delegates.
The speech drew the external affairs minister, a
standing, two-minute ovation
during which he was surround by backslappers, most
of whom were young Quebec
delegates.
When it became apparent
the majority of conference
delegates were going to unite
on the provincial nights issue,
CULF abandoned their carefully prepared  resolutions.
A small group of CULF
delegates did, however, attempt to introduce a resolution that would have the
monarchy abolished and replaced with a republic similar to that of India.
They saw it promptly referred to the standing policy
committee.
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For further information contact your  University Placement Officer
DEPARTMENT OF MANPOWER AND IMMIGRATION
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5 'FOCUS ON CANADA'
Fee whisper threatens
'noise across the land'
By DON SELLAR
CUP Staff Writer
OTTAWA — An ominous
whisper issued recently at a
tiny Maritime university will
soon reverberate in the ears
of more than 200,000 Canadian students.
Very soon.
And when it does, campus
newspaper editors across the
country will start rolling out
their biggest, blackest headline type.
Administration officials
will run to their medicine
cabinets for large quantities
of headache tablets.
Politicians (out of power)
will lend their voices to the
student song. Government
leaders will simply lay in a
supply of earplugs with
which to drown it out.
As the call to arms is
sounded by student leaders
forced into the fray by their
sunny statements in favor of
things like universal accessibility to post-secondary education, free tuition and student stipends, poster paint
and cardboard sales will skyrocket at hundreds of profiteering stationery stores.
There will be lengthy,
weighty briefs written and
presented to the mighty foe.
There will be a great noise
across the land, with marches, 'boycotts or other manifestations of student concern.
The annual fee fight fought
on anywhere between 10 and
25 campuses has begun
quietly.
It has begun at tiny Mount
Allison University, where
Argosy Weekly editor Colin
Maurice Paul David Leonard
hangs his hat.
For last week, Leonard became the first campus newspaper editor in Canada to
mention a fee hike in his
newspaper, when he ran a
front-page story headed: "Not
Again! Fee Increase?"
This honor is one of a series
reserved for editors who publish such gems as the First
Housing Discrimination Story
of September and the Initial
Sex Scandal of the Year, or
exposes such as Our Cafeteria Food is Poison and Is
Our University President for
Real?
A Mount Allison official
identified only as a "Mr.
Wheeler" ibecame the first
administration spokesman in
Canada to ibe quoted on the
question of a possible tuition
fee or residence rent hike—
this year — when an Argosy
Weekly reporter cornered
him recently in a dark bureaucratic alley.
"I can see no possibility of
holding the line," he told the
intrepid reporter flatly.
Writing his story with an
air of resignation, the reporter commented:
"This then, is the situation.
It appears safe to assume that
a fee increase of at least $50
will be made effective next
year. Our complaint is that
such announcements are
never made until after Christ-
Page 6
mas at the earliest, and often
much later than that."
Which raises an interesting
point about fee fights.
Students always complain
the Administration (capital A)
is inconveniencing them by
announcing budgetary ad-
mustments too late in the
year for young polemicists
and revolutionaries to do
much about them.
As the Argosy reporter
himself put it: "The very
principle behind this is
neither fair nor democratic.
"Surely the administration
must know pretty well by
now what the fee increase
for next year will be, and
they will surely know by
Christmas.or it does not say
too much for them as businessmen."
A reasonable amount of
warning, he suggested, would
consist of a hint delivered before Christmas.
Well, Colin Leonard and
his peers across the country
are probably out writing an
editorial in which they can
point to the spiralling cost of
education today, the flaming
economy and the  universal
accessibility "problem" as
factors which university administrators had better consider before they raise the
fees.
Or else.
Or else Mount Allison students will march and call
people bad names and sing
freedom songs and boycott
the classes they usually just
skip. And you know what
else they'll do?
They'll call in the  Canadian Union of Students . . .
if they still belong to CUS
. . . for help.
CUS printing services will
start rattling off policy declarations, pamphlets and
'how to conduct a march' information sheets for them.
Then they'll create a national sensation by marching
. . . with smiling faces, for
the cameras, you understand ... and unfurling
their ruddy banners.
And when it's time for
them to go back to neglected
books and term papers as
exams loom large next
spring, the fee fight syndrome will have revealed its
inevitable secret: After you
March forth, there is no tomorrow.
Dalhousie housing made
possible through grant
HALIFAX — CUP) — The federal government
has approved two loans totalling more than $2.6 million
towards construction of student housing facilities at
Dalhousie University.
Labor minister John R. Nicholson, recently made
the announcement which will enable DalhoUsie to
construct a married students residence as well as extend
the present women's residence.
It is, the first federal loan in Canada to be granted
for such a project.
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Have Your
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The Mobile Studio is at the
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now and until Oct. 19
No Cost - No Appointment Needed
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Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CANADIAN AMERICAN SEMINAR:
C.U.S. Committee is receiving applications for the
Canadian American Seminar to be held at the University of Windsor, Nov. 2-4..1&66, on "An Independent
Canadian Foreign Policy: Fact or Fiction?" Applications must Ibe in toy Oct. 20th, Box 153, Brock. More
information is available from the CUS office, Brock
Extension 258.
COMPANY OF YOUNG CANADIANS:
Students interested in (a) programming or (to) recruiting for the Company of Young Canadians, and
interested in forming a local U.B.C. committee to
form a communications liaison with the national headquarters are asked to apply in writing (stating interest,
experience, faculty and year) to the A.M.S. Secretary,
Box 54, Brock Hall.
HIGH  SCHOOL VISITATION
COMMITTEE:
Students interested in participating in a joint U.B.C.-
S.F.U. student high school visitation committee are
asked to apply in writing (stating interest, experience,
faculty, and year) to the Secretary, Box 54, Brock
Hall. First and Second year students are particularly
encouraged to apply.
ASSISTANT PUBLIC OFFICER:
Applications are being received for the position of
Assistant Public Officer for the Alma Mater Society.
Qualification is a belief in the value of active student
participation in university and community affairs.
Apply in writing to Box 54 or to Brock 210 for further
information
FINANCE COMMITTEE:
Grant Request Forms for conferences to toe held during the first term, 1966-1967, will be accepted by the
Treasurer until 4:00 p.m., Thursday, October 27, 1966.
("Request Forms" are available from the Accountant,
Mrs. Hyslop, in the A.M.S. Office).
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October  18,  1966 Tuesday, October   18,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
HOMECOMING EDITION
Dances, gunfights
Accent theme
UBC GOES WESTERN
WESTERN FOLK SINGERS Sunday Jeanie will provide the entertainment during the
Homecoming Queen's crowning in the Armory Saturday night. Vying for the title are
18  faculty  and  residence representatives.
ALUMNUS HONORED
Trekker winner named
The Great Trekker of 1966
will be presented with the
award Thursday.
The award is made annually to an alumnus who has
made outstanding contributions to both university and
public life.
Last year's recipient, Mrs.
Sherwood Lett, was named
and presented with the
award during the Cairn Ceremony.
However, this year the
winner will be named today
during a downtown press
conference at the University
Club and the presentation
during the noon-hour pep
meet Thursday.
He—or she—will make a
short speech after the pres-
MRS. LETT
.  1965 trekker
entation which will be made
by Sandy Stewart, a member
of the Homecoming Committee.
The Cairn ceremony, usually held during the Homecoming Week will be held
later this year and will be
arranged by the Alumni
Association.
Highlighting the Pep Meet
will be The Stringers, an
entertaining folk-rock group
that will also be entertaining at the Bunkhouse.
Student entertainment will
be provided by the Pop
Band, a display in the Western Theme by the UBC
cheerleaders, and introduction of the 18 beautiful
Homecoming Queen candidates.
Students, alumni
wanted for bash
Wanted: Students and aJumni — preferably alive — to
saunter in and help celebrate Homecoming.
Chicken    bar-b-q's,     square
dancing, fast draw demonstrations and old-time movies accent the western theme of
Homecoming this  year.
Homecoming Week, which
started Monday, winds up with
a double-barreled bash on
campus Saturday.
The Armory dance will feature Derek Cave and the Vancouver Accents along with the
Big Band Sound of Phil Stans-
felt.
At the Field House, Kentish
Steele and the Shantelles and
Eric Sandquist's Tenette will
bring the house down.
The Homecoming Queen will
be crowned at half time in the
Armory with the entertainment by folk singers Sandy
and Jeanie.
Both dances start at 9 p.m.
and last until 1 a.m.
Tickets, at $3.75- a couple,
are available at the AMS office
in Brock Hall or by phoning
224-3242.
Homecoming Week itself is
jammed with actific activities
to please any hombre.
The Queens' fashion show
today at noon will have the 18
queen candidates, representing
residences and faculties, strutting down the ramp in Brock
lounge in the finest of Western
regalia.
Costumes and Western garb
have been supplied by the
Corral Shop.
Homecoming parade will
start at Burrard and Hastings
at 9 a.m. Saturday with Queens,
20 floats and the UBC pipe
band.
The parade travels east on
Hastings to Granville, south on
Granville to George, and turns
west on Georgia to Burrard
where it terminates.
Saturday, starting at noon,
students and alumni will lunch
in the Field House on Bar-b-q
cooked by the Aggies while the
kids ride ponies.
Following the chicken, the
UBC Thunderbirds will host
the University of Alberta
Golden Bears in the Hocecom-
ing football game at 2 p.m. in
UBC stadium. The Queen will
also be present.
Follow the crowds Thursday
noon to the War Memorial
Gym for the homecoming Rep
Meet.
The queen candidates will be
presented along with the
Stringers and Pat Paulson, the
cranial painter.
And that's not all.
A sock hop, jazz, and folk
rock featuring Brian Frozen
and his Honkytonk piano help
to make this the week of the
year.
A sports car rally, basketball
game, curling, golf tournament
and family skating make this
week the week that is.
JOE 6UNFIGHTER
. . . wants you
Parade goes
through city
Twenty-five floats and two
marching bands will wind
through downtown Vancouver
Saturday morning in the annual UBC Homecoming Parade.'
The parade starts at Burrard
and Hastings at 10:30 a.m.
It will travel east to Granville, up Granville to Georgia
and up Georgia to Burrard
where it ends.
Marchers will proceed to
the campus and reform at Wesbrook Crescent for the trip to
the stadium and pregame
show.
The parade includes entries
from clubs, fraternities and
sororities, faculties, and undergraduate societies.
A trophy will be awarded
for the best float. Floats, decorated cars, walking entries or
bands many be entered. Page 8.
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  October   18,   1966
QUEEN HOPEFULS LINE UP FOR TITLE
CATHY JOHNSON
Miss Pharmacy
SUSAN WEINTJIS
Miss Fort Camp
PAT McGUIRE
Miss Acadia Camp
JILL NEWBY
Miss Arts
JOHANNA REES
Miss Medicine
mary Mclaughlin
Miss Frosh
DALE WOOD
Miss Commerce
BARBARA McCLATCHIE
Miss Law
MARCIA FERWORN
Miss ATC
*  *.VV..
MELISSA DEWDNEY
Miss   Lower  Mall
TRISHA FRENCH
Miss  Totem  Park
LAURA TOWNSLEY
Miss Agriculture
QUESTION MARK
Miss Mystery Candidate Tuesday, October   18,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
Dr. Peter A. Larkin, one
experts,, has returned to UBC
Larkin, a UBC faculty member from 1948 to 1963, was director of the Institute of Fisheries from 1955 until he resigned to direct the federal
government's Fisheries Research Board biological station
in Nanaimo.
Professor William Hoar,
UBC zoology head, said Larkin 'would join a departmental research team studying natural populations which are
essential as food sources.
He said that UBC already
has an outstanding team doing
population studies on birds, insects and small animals.
"The addition of Dr. Larkin, who has had extensive experience with fish populations,
will give UBC the most powerful research group in Canada
working in this field," Hoar
said.
He added that the UBC research team will work with
scientists at provincial and
(federal government research
laboratories.
When Larkin originally
joined UBC in 1948, he was
named the first full-time biologist for the provincial game
department and guided the
management of B.C. sport
fisheries.
courses, will operate out of
two small bare rooms near the
University of Washington campus.
Over 250 students have enrolled in courses ranging from
film-making to the New Left.
The courses cost the students $10 for the first and $3
for  each  additional  course.
Ron Richardson, a university founder, said: "The Free
University exists as a result of
dissent to the University of
Washington system.
"In some vague way we're
trying to say we're dissatisfied
with higher American University education. We're trying
to set up a model."
"None of the instructors
will be paid. The only reason
they will be teaching is that
they are genuinely interested
in their topic." said Richardson.
"We have tried to get instructors promoting every possible view point."
All the teachers and all the
students will meet once a
month or oftener to decide
policy, discuss the direction of
the school and plan curricula.
Richardson said most of the
students are also students at
the Univ. of Washington.
"The Free University will
give some students the opportunity to compare two completely different systems," he
said.
There are similar free universities in New York city,
of Canada's foremost fisheries Berkeley, Palo Alto, and
as professor of zoology. Boulder City, Colorado.
SMALL   SCHOOL
Free university
opens in Seattle
SEATTLE — The  Pacific  northwest's first free  university has been launched in Seattle.
The University,  offering 29
will
MURDER
IN THE CATHEDRAL
BECKET
With
RICHARD  BURTON
PETER O'TOOLE
THURS., OCT. 20th
AUDITORIUM
—kurt hilger photo
OTIS JAZZ TRIO, sponsored by Special Events, entertained
in Brock lounge Thursday in a noon-hour concert before
a small crowd of students.
Fish man beefs up
food research team
Attention: Members of International
House
NOTICE OF 3RD ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
Tuesday, November 1, 1966 — 8 p.m.
Lower Lounge,  International  House,
U.B.C.
Annual Reports
Amendments to the Constitution
(copies available after October 18)
Election  of  Board  Members
COFFEE  7:30 P.M.
Come early to view the W.U.S. "Treasure Van."
Classical Guitar
Instruction in  Technique
and Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096 or 874-3547
Studio   at 2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4022
BRITISH SCIENTISTS
Senior scientists from Imperial Chemical Industries
Limited, England, will be visiting the Campus on
OCTOBER 26th and 27th
They wculd very much like to meet British scientists
to discuss careers with I.C.I, in the United Kingdom.
Recent arrivals, as well as those who are considering
the possibility of returning to Britain, are invited to get
in touch with them through:
OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES
ZETA PSI  FRATERNITY
takes great pleasure in  introducing
miss mary Mclaughlin
candidate for
HOMECOMING QUEEN
October   19,  1966
Panorama   Roof
Hotel  Vancouver
R.S.V.P.:  G.  B.  Lount
$100 Per  Plate
Semi-Formal
All   Proceeds To:
Citizens for Mary Committee
HARVARD BUSINESS
SCHOOL VISITOR
Assistant Dean Anthony G. Athos, Director of Admissions, of the Harvard Graduate School of Business
Administration, will visit the University of British Columbia on Thursday, October 20th, to talk to students interested in business as a career of excitement and creative
opportunity.
Requirements for admission to the two-year course,
leading to a degree of Master in Business Administration
(MBA), include a college degree in any field of concentration, a standing in at least the to.p third of the
class, and a record of progressive achievement in campus activities, business,  the military,  or elsewhere.
The MBA Program at the Harvard Business School
is based on the experience-oriented case method, pioneered at the Harvard Business School to develop the practical, analytical, and decision-making capacities that are
the key to managerial effectiveness.
For outstanding students in each first-year class
(of roughly 690) there are 60 fellowships available. Approximately, 40 per cent of the Harvard Business School
student body also makes use of the Deferred Payment
or Loan Program which enables all students admitted
to the Harvard MBA Program to attend even though
their sources  of funds are  inadequate.
Seniors, or others, wishing to talk to Dr. Athos may
make an appointment through the office of Mr. J. C.
Craik,  Placement Officer.
U
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OPEN FRIDAY 'TIL 9 Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  October   18,   1966
Gift aids construction
of student faculty study
Tv/rnAT.f°jmer Seneral manager of the Fraser Valley
™ Producers Association has donated $10,000 to the
UBC faculty of agriculture.
The gift, from Ernest G. Sherwood, will be used to
aid construction of a student-faculty study and research
centre in animal science.
The centre is part of the animal husbandry facilities
planned for the south end of the campus.
ton.., S-attle Cava!,.- (,n dork uniforms) who went on lo win th. gome Sunday27-6.
WUS treasure van ban
hits South Africans
WINDSOR (CUP) — World
University Service of Canada
has decided to ban the sale of
South African goods in Treasure Van, its annual cross-
Canada fund raising project.
A resolution passed by about
120 delegates at the 21st WUS
national assembly resulted in
the ban.
Observers here interpreted
the defeat of a motion urging
WUS not to discriminate for
political reasons in selecting
Treasure Van goods, as a
"death blow" to South African goods.
Another resolution approved at the assembly stipulates
that some profits from Treasure Van should go directly to
the WUS International Program of Action (IPA).
In the past, all profits have
gone toward financing WUSC
operations and Toronto offices.
The resolution makes the
WUSC national committee responsible for deciding what
percentage of profits will go
abroad.
At last month's Canadian
Union of Students Congress in
Halifax, outgoing CUS president Pat Kenniff charged the
funds' use was being misrepresented to the public. Kenniff had suggested Treasure
Van funds should go to IPA.
But CUS president-elect
Hugh Armstrong, a delegate
at the weekend talks, anticipated the percentage of profits
sent abroad will be small, and
labelled the MUSC move "dishonest."
Other resolutions approved
at the assembly were designed to:
Seek ways of obtaining collective, not individual contributions to WUSC from Canadian students;
Permit French - Canadian
WUSC committees to earmark
funds for individual projects;
Set up regional talks each
year to evaluate WUS aims
and principles;
Study the possibility of establishing   the   post   of   WUSC
president;
Seek  a   per-capita  levy  of
50 cents from staff members
at universities having WUSC
committees.
Re-elected national commit
tee chairman at this year's assembly was Uapoleon LeBlanc
dean of social science at Laval
University.
and
HOMECOMING
present
Jack   Weinburg
One of the leaders of the Free Speech Movement
"Berkeley in 1966 and
Democracy in the University"
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 12:30
AUDITORIUM
35c
This is the world of AIR CANADA.The planes.
The people. The places. Exciting! Isn't it time you took a trip?
Al R CANADA
-_,«. _»,„» . U.S.A. • „_,„.„ . BSHA„S . „„„-,,, . maJm . cmLKm . ^^    ^^    mmm _ switzebJJ"  »^tba
4576 West 10th Avenue CA 4-3262
Get your tickets here - 1 Block from UBC Gates
FOR STUDY OR PLEASURE
Book through . . .
World-Wide International Travel
5700 University Blvd. (In the Village)
Call Miss Robyn Maskell, Mgr., 224-4391 Tuesday, October   18,   1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  11
r    V'r*v ■-,..>*
LANCE FLETCHER IN ACTION
.  .  he got a touchdown, too
Manitoba upsets
Golden Bears 4-2
The University of Manitoba
Bisons surprised the University of Alberta Golden Bears
with a 4-2 decision in a Western Canadian Intercollegiate
football game in Winnipeg
Saturday.
The victory moved the Bisons into a first-place tie with
the Golden Bears, who journey to the coast this week to
meet the UBC Thunderbirds
in the campus squad's first
Western Intercollegiate effort
of the season.
Manitoba's inspired defence
held off the powerful Alberta
attack while Dick Kohler booted a field goal and a single for
the Bisons.
Alberta's two points came
on a safety-touch late in the
game.
In another Western Intercollegiate contest, the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies outlasted the University of Calgary Dinosaurs 19-
Skiing flick
raises cash
A showing of ski mogul Warren Miller's action film, Ski
on the Wild Side, is scheduled
for the Queen Elizabeth Theatre Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.
Proceeds will go to the
Whistler Mountain interdenominational ski chapel and
the Garibaldi ski patrol.
Tickets are available at the
Vancouver Ticket Centre and
local ski shops.
14. It was the Huskies second
win in five games.
Previously top - ranked
Queen' Golden Gaels broke a
second-place tie in the Ontario-
Quebec League with Western
Ontario by smashing the Mustangs 24-9 Saturday in London.
Hockey note
UBC hockey coach Bob Hindmarch reminds campus icemen
that hockey practices have
started.
He asks that players consult
lists posted in Memorial Gym
to find out their team assignments and when they play.
Birds massacre
Missionaries
The   UBC   football   Thunderbirds   exploded   for   nine
touchdowns and rolled up the highest score ever recorded
by a UBC squad in humbling the Whitman College Missionaries Saturday in Walla Walla, Wash.
The    Birds,    who    defeated
Whitman 14-7 last year in
Varsity Stadium, scored on the
second play from scrimmage
when quarterback Dick Gibbons combined with end Chip
Barrett on a 75-yard pass and
run play.
Sonny Brandt kicked the
extra point, and with only 36
seconds gone UBC had the
lead.
CORCORAN SCORES
Fullback Dave Corcoran
bulled over with the first of
his two touchdowns five minutes later to give UBC its winning margin.
Corcoran scored again before the first quarter ended,
and Whitman retaliated feebly
with an unconverted major
by quarterback Dan Paterson
to make the first-quarter score
20-6.
The Birds simply ran away
with the game in the second
period, adding two more touchdowns to lead 33-6 at the half.
Lance Fletcher caught Gibbons' second scoring pass, and
Gibbons ran one across himself.
GIBBONS  SHINES
The Bird field general had a
fine day, connecting on 13 of
18 passes even though he was
taken out in the third quarter.
Kent Yaniw replaced Gibbons, and the Birds' second
string offensive team kept
rolling.
Halfbacks Eric Savics and
Bob Sweet scored touchdowns
in the third quarter to give the
Birds a 46-6 bulge.
Yaniw took the ball into the
end zone and Ben Stapleton
scored, too, to finish UBC's
assault.
Whitman's final touchdown
came in the last minute of
play.
'S,i_.j.
"''■- *%$$*
Lff«
College Life is for you.
makes sense, doesn't it?
College Life is for people.
like people?
College Life is for free,
like free?
Old ladies are not invited to College Life,
young ladies are!
Neither are pets allowed at College Life,
not even aardvarks.
College Life is for you.
searching for an answer?
need a purpose for living?
College Life is for you.
like you?
Step out to College Life.
Examine with us the adventure of the Christian life.
Check out its relevancy in the world today.
Intramurals
Got some
spare time?
Intramural bowling starts tonight at 7 o'clock with all
teams in action except physical
education and forestry 1, who
have first-round byes.
Touch football also kicks
off this week, with Wednesday
noon contests scheduled as follows:
Engineering 9 vs. Alpha
Delts; Delta Kappa Epsilon vs.
Nisei Varsity; engineering 6
vs. fifth-year physical education; and Zeta Psi vs. botany.
Cavaliers
smother
Jayvees
By ARDEN OSTRANDER
Fumbles and bad snaps plus
the fine running game of the
Seattle Cavaliers added up to
a 26-7 defeat for the UBC football Junior Varsity Sunday in
the mud of Thunderbird play^
ing fields.
The Jayvees, playing without
first-string quarterback Gordon
Hardy, lacked the offensive
poise and finish Hardy had
supplied.
Dave Penner scored UBC's
only touchdown in the third
quarter. Jayvee punter John
Bellamy recovered a bad pass
from centre and threw the ball
to Penner, who scampered 50
yards for the major.
The Jayvees had been showing improvement with each
game and were beginning to
move the ball with authority.
Hardy, out for the season
with a shoulder injury, will
be missed by the Jayvees when
they embark on a trip to Moscow, Idaho, to meet the strong
University of Idaho freshman
team Friday.
Vancouver Woman's Musical Club
presents
GERALD MOORE
In An Evening of Music and Mirth
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
OCT. 28, 8:30 p.m.
Tickets at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St.,
and at all Eaton Stores - $3.00
Students $1.50 on presentation of A.M.S. card
DEAN'S
WELCOMES
ALL U.B.C. ALUMNI
TO HOMECOMING '66
FULL DINING FACILITIES
Demi's Restaurant and Dining Room
4544 West  10th
Phone 224-6919
r
Point Grey Service
Your Local CHEVRON DEALER
Ted Dash Rob Quesnel
NEW LOCATION AT 16th & DUNBAR
On your way to class — Get some Gas
Lubrication   &  Service   Specialists
Standard Oil Products
Car Washing
OPEN 7 A.M. - 11  P.M.
WE TAKE BETTER CARE OF YOUR CAR Page 12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  October   18,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Free speecher speaks
SPECIAL EVENTS
Jack Weiniburg, leader in
Berkeley Free Speech movement speaks at noon Wednesday in the auditorium. Admission 35 cents.
SCM
Dr. W. Wilmott will speak
on the Necessity for Intellectual
Schizophrenia Wednesday noon
in Ang. 110 .
SQUASH CLUB
General meeting noon today
in Bu. 212. All members who
signed up and all those interested in coaching please attend.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Homecoming    rally    Friday
starts at noon at the top of C-lot.
Bring a city map.
CLASSICS CLUB
First   meeting   Thursday,   8
p.m.,  4495  W.  7th Ave.  New
members welcome.
FILM SOC
Flimsoc presents film version
of Jean Anouilh's play "Thomas
A' Beckett", starring Burton
and O'Toole, Thursday noon in
the auditorium. Admission 50
cents.
COMMUNITY IPLANNING
Film Traffic in Town, Wednesday noon in Lass. 102.
MUS SOC
Meeting today at noon, budi-
torium, for anyone interested
in writing for or acting in November Revue.
LIBRARIANSHIP CLUB
General meeting noon today
UBC's Guyanese
get Expo word
Expo 67 wants to hear from
all Guyanese students at
UBC.
The students will be filled
in on plans for their country's
exhibit at Montreal. The
country will sponsor a joint
pavilion with Barbados.
Premier Forbes Burnham
will attend Guyana Day July
11.
Guyanese are asked to contact Hutton Archer, 7905
Querbes Ave., Montreal.
. in Bu. 225. Election of officers.
GAMMA DELTA
More  About  Playboy,  Ang.
204, Wednesday noon.
SEAFORTHS UBC
Parade tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
UBC Armory. Highland battle-
dress.
DEMOLAY CLUB
General meeting, Wednesday
noon in Bu. 216. New members
welcome.
IH
Sip tea or coffee free at IH
3 to 5 p.m. today.
BADMINTON CLUB
Meeting  tonight  at  8:30  in
Memorial Gym. New members
welcome.
CUSO
Introductory meeting for all
those interested in serving overseas at noon today in Bu. 102.
Collin Johnston, return volunteer, speaker.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Last minute tickets still available for the Vancouver Opera
Association products. Apply at
Special Events office, BE 255.
FINANCE CLUB
Meeting Wednesday noon in
Ang. 213. Murray Leith speaks
on How Not to Make Money in
the Stock Market.
VCF
Toronto's Wilbur Sutherland
speaks   on   the   Bent   World,
Wednesday noon in Bu. 100.
PREMED SOCIETY
Dean McCreary speaks on the
new medical complex. Wednesday noon in Wesbrook 201.
LIBERAL CLUB
What really happened at the
Liberal Convention. A report
by Russell Brink in Bu. 214 at
noon today.
ONTOLOGICAL SOCIETY
Ron Polack speaks on Man,
the Creator, Wednesday noon in
Bu. 223.
Transportation  Problems?
Lease-A-Honda
$28.95 per month
Incl. helmet, insur., servicing
MU 2-7912
MURDER
IN THE CATHEDRAL
BECKET
with
RICHARD  BURTON
PETER O'TOOLE
THURS., OCT. 20th
AUDITORIUM
GRAD CLASS
First General Meeting
Membership: all students in the winter session who are
registered in the final year of a course leading to a
Bachelor's or the M.D. degree shall be members of the
Grad Class.
—positions   open are: President, Vice-president, Treasurer,
Secretary, Social  Convenor,  Public  Relations  Officer,
—a meeting of the Grad class (all graduating students)
for the first time on MONDAY, OCTOBER 24, AT  12:30
IN THE AUDITORIUM.
—nominations may be sent to the Secretary, AMS, post-
box 54.
IS YOUR READING LOAD
GETTING YOU DOWN?
MAYBE YOU ARENT AN EFFECTIVE READER!
Effective Reading is the ability to vary both your reading rate and technique
according  to  the  style,   purpose,  importance  and   difficulty  of  the   material
being read.
LEARN HOW YOU CAN BECOME AN EFFECTIVE READER BY ATTENDING OUR:
FREE    DEMONSTRATIONS
 1
u
TONIGHT - TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 1966
UNIVERSITY HILL SECONDARY  SCHOOL AUDITORIUM
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1966
GEORGIA  HOTEL - BALLROOM    __     _____      .
THURSDAY,   OCTOBER   20.   1966
GEORGIA HOTEL - BALLROOM    __         ..
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1966
VANCOUVER HOTEL - SALON "A" 5:00 & 8:00 p.m.
.5:00 & 8:00 p.m.
.5:00 & 8:00 p.m.
.5:00 & 8:00 p.m.
Npw Registering For Winter Classes.
Last Series Before The Christmas Holidays.
"J
READING DYNAMICS OF B.C. LTD.
Phone 685-2374
549 Howe Street
Vancouver, B.C.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
LOST RAINCOAT AND WALLET
outside BI. 3001. Phone B. Bale,
738-0550.
POUND:     MAN'S     RING    WITH
stone   in   College   Library   wash
room. Contact Barry Rowden, 278-
6354.
TONNEAU COVER FOR SPORTS
car. In "B" lot Wed. afternoon,
Oct. 12. Probably for a Triumph.
Phone Steve, 435-1669 after 6 p.m.
FOUND:    SLIDE   RULE   OUTSIDE
library. Claim: 228-2415 or 228-2416
AUTOMATIC DATE WATCH LOST
Sept.  29.  Reward.  Phone  224-0532.
FOUND: 24 JEWEL WATCH IN
the Ponderosa on Thursday noon.
Claim  in  Publications  office.
Coming Dances
12A
HOMECOMING '66 BALL, SAT.,
Oct. 22. Tickets on sale now at
AMS Office, $3.75 per couple.
Armouries   &   Fieldhouse.
DANCE TO THE EXCITING NEW
sound of the brave new world at
The Black Cat Ball, Saturday,
October 29 (the Armory, 8:30 to
12:30.  Admission  $1.25 per person.
Special Notices
13
• * * CHEM * • •
JUST ARRIVED: — "A complete
Guide to Chem. 101 Labs Limited
supply. Get yours today at the College Shop, Brock Extension. Now on
sale for only  $1.95.	
WHY PAT HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted  Elliott,  224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM — F & G-116
open Monday-Friday 12.30-1.30.
Students Faculty and Staff Welcome.
PIZZA PATIO CONTINUES TO
expand, specializing in Pizza
take-out and delivery. Pizza Patio's normal policy of making
part-time employment available
to those students over 21 with
clean drivers' licences to work
one or two evenings a week is
again in effect. Openings are
available at any one of their six
locations. For further information contact 681-2822, 10-4. P.S.—
For   campus   delivery,   736-9422.
DOES B.N.W.
mean    banish    nuclear    weapons?
Find out Thursday.	
DO YOU KNOW YOU CAN JET TO
Europe for less than a half-penny
per mile? It can be done on the
AMS  charter flight.	
HEY ! ! !
It's New. It's Camp. Vote Marcia
Miss A.T.C. for Homecoming
Queen.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FOR TWO FROM
Marpole 8:30's staying late three
nights   a   week.   Kathy,   277-2996.
Wanted
15
WANTED !  !  !
Votes for Marcia, Miss A.T.C.  for
Homecoming Queen.	
WILL PAY MAXIMUM $20 FOR
full size clean working girl's bike.
Call Patsy CA 4-9449,  5-7.
AUTOMOTIVE   ft  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1963 M.G. Midget, 21,000 miles; engine, body & accessories in excellent condition. Best offer. RE 8
9661.
1959 VOLVO P.V. 444, IMMACU
late condition. Phone 738-0685
after  5   p.m.   Ask  for  Wally.
'53 CHEV. FOR SALE. GOOD
shape. Good motor. Clean. 584-
5170.
CAR LOCATOR: TAKE ADVAN-
tage of me! What price and type
of vehicle do you want?—new or
used. Use my time to get the
best possible deal for yourself.
NO CHARGE! Phone Ian, 261-
2503 after 6 p.m.
58 V.W. NEW ENGINE, BRAKES,
muffler, brakes, tires. Best offer
over   $500.   684-3050   evenings.
MUST SELL 1956 CHEV. FOUR-
Door V-8. Blue and white. Good
campus car. Phone Bill Phillips,
224-4814  day,   or  731-6921   after  5.
58 RAMBLER 4-DR. STANDARD
trans., radio, pulmanized, city-
tested,   $350.   733-7108.
1960     VOLKSWAGEN,     $550.     TEL.
921-7059.
FOR SALE — NICE BODY — '56
Chev. — $350 or highest offer.
Phone  731-8497  after  6.
1959 VOLVO, VERY GOOD CON-
dition, radio, six good tires (2
snov.'Q.   327-3584  after  6 —  Ron.	
1957 PLYMOUTH, V8, AUTOMATIC
transmission,  winter tires,  best offer, call Ken at 224-7230 after 5:00
'51    PLYMOUTH,    RELIABLE,    1st
$100,000 takes.  733-1007.
67 GRADUATES BUY YOUR NEW
car now, start payments after
graduation. Phone Bill Stonier,
733-1007.
Automobiles for Hire
24
WHAT HAS TWO FENDERS AND
is great for trips? The B.N.W.
soon!
Motorcycles
27
FOR SALE: HONDA 50CC SPORT,
2000 miles. Like new—1965. Phone
922-4992  and leave message.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Scandals
39A
AL HARVEY CAN'T PAY HIS
own way. Girls BEWARE! Yellow
peril and white trash.
LORD G. B. LOUNT SPEAKS at
semi formal dinner. Refer to display ad in today's paper.
MURDER IN THE CATHEDRAL.
See it done by Richard Burton
and Peter O'Toole Thursday in
the auditorium 12:30, 3:30, 6:00,
9 p.m. 60c.
HOLY   HUXLEY!
THE
B N W
Typewriters  ft  Repairs 42
Typing
43
EXPERT TYPIST AVAILABLE
for home typing of essays and
theses.  Phone  922-6839.
TYPING,     ESSAY    AND    THESIS.
Call Joan 228-8384.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
WANTED — TWO ACTION GIRLS
baby we mean action! Phone
Gary  922-4003,   Jim  733-9042.
FREE PRIVATE ROOM AND
bathroom for mature female student in exchange for light household duties. Also some remuneration —  224-5253.
BECKET — THE FILM VERSION
of the play by Jean Annouilh.
Thursday. Auditorium 12:30 —
3:30 — 6  p.m.  — 9  p.m.  50c.
INSTRUCTION —  SCHOOLS
Auditions
61
OPEN AUDITIONS THUR. 12:30-
2:30, Tues. 7:00-9:00, Fr. Wood 16,
casting 4. Short plays by UBC
authors   for   public   performance.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTORY
lessons by tutor, B.A., M.A.,
B.L.S. Also pronunciation lessons in French, Spanish, German, Russian, qualified tutors.
736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office. Brock Hall.
FOR SALE: SEVERAL PROFES-
sionally completed manuscripts —
Authors Agency, 767 Kingsway,
TR  6-6362.
NATIONAL BASS AND AND NEW
Kalamazoo amp., hardly used,
both  $325.  AM  6-5701,  Michael.
FOR SALE: 7 DRAWER OAK
desk $15; 5 piece maple dining
room suite $25; 2 piece danish
living room suite $50; playpen $3.
Phone 733-1661.
RENTALS  & REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
ACCOMMODATION FOR COUPLE,
with use of living room and gas
range.   Must  be  reliable.   736-6244.
ROOM FOR EVERY ONE TO SEE
Becket in the auditorium Thursday 12:30 — 3:30 — 6:00 — 9 p.m.
50c.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
SENIOR STUDENT HAS SUITE
wants to share (male) RE 1-4219
between 5  &  7.
Unfurn. Houses   ftApts.
84
LARGE SUITE FOR RENT. TWO
bed room and large living room.
Fridge & electric heating. Private
garden and garage. Near SpaniBh
Banks. available Oct. 1, 1966 $115
month, phone day 879-3821 after
6. 224-0124.
CLASSIFIED
BUY -  SELL  -  RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY

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