UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 25, 1983

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128176.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128176.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128176-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128176-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128176-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128176-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128176-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128176-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128176-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128176.ris

Full Text

 UBC Archives Serial
Selkirk students occupy lounge
By FRANCIS LEW
Selkirk College students occupied
the campus' main lounge in a surprise move Monday, vowing to remain until negotiations between
college workers and the administration are reopened.
Local 26 of the Pulp, Paper and
Woodworkers of Canada, representing the Castlegar college workers,
served 72 hour strike notice Friday.
Outstanding contract issues are
job security and the contracting out
of union work for campus repairs
to non-union members. The strike
vote was carried by a strong majority of 86 per cent.
Contract talks broke off last
week because the union, which has
been without a contract since
September 1982, rejected the administration's final, offers of 0.3 per
cent increase for the first year and
three per cent for the second year
for all support staff except cafeteria
workers.
More than 200 students met early
Monday to discuss the possible
shutdown of campus operations,
said Stephen Learey, Canadian
Federation of Students-Pacific
region chair. At three p.m. 30 students
decided to occupy the campus'
main lounge to protest the potential
disruption of services.
By nightfall, several students had
already settled down with sleeping
bags and others were at work on
posters and pamphlets calling for a
return to the bargaining table by
both sides, he added.
Learey, who was on campus at
the time of the occupation, says
students are concerned over losing
education time, particularly during
the mid-term season.
"And some students on the income assistance program risk losing
all their forthcoming funds if
classes are held up for a week," he
said. (Vocational education programs sponsored by Employment
and Immigration Canada pays
students while they attend classes,
but stop immediately if classes
cease).
The union plans to picket all sites
where instructors work, including
the Cominco Smelter, Castlegar
Airport (which has the aviation program) and area hospitals that host
nursing programs.
A strike could also affect the
David Thompson University Centre, Nelson and Trail campuses.
Selkirk student council met Oct.
20 to hear the union and administration sides in the dispute. A
poll conducted after the meeting
Strike jeopardizes
academic year
By ALAR OLLJUM
UBC students could lose credit
for the academic year if a general
strike occurs, Lisa Hebert, Alma
Mater Society external affairs coordinator said Thursday.
An alternative to a total shutdown of the university is a walk-in
— workers occupying certain
buildings, said Hebert. Services and
classes could continue under this
form of protest and students could
be made aware of the workers' concerns, she said.
Professors could also re-schedule
classes using off campus locations,
Hebert said. About half of the UBC
professors will respect picket lines,
she estimated.
A Canadian Federation of
Students — Pacific executive
member said Thursday students
should occupy Universities Minister
Pat McGeer's UBC office and his
Point Grey constituency office in
the event of a general strike.
But Steve Howard also stressed
classes should not be cancelled.
"The universities should be kept
open, but with cashiers' boxes shut
and the administration shut out,"
he said.
Barry Morrison, a Faculty
Association representative with the
Solidarity Coalition, said professors
will be hesitant about participating
in a general strike. "Faculty will
cross picket lines, unless it is part of
a one day symbolic action.
"Few professors would risk losing pay for refusal to cross picket
lines," Morrison said.
The Universities Act prohibits
professors from taking independent
strike action, but allows them the
right to respect picket lines, said
Andrew Brockett, faculty association executive officer. Faculty lose
pay for each day they remain off
the job, he added.
Hebert said in a memo to AMS
executive that Christmas exams
might not be marked this year even
if professors keep working because
the teaching assistants union voted
overwhelmingly in favor of holding
a strike vote about their own contract and the general strike.
Strike action at UBC could begin
Nov. 1 if 1,600 members of the
B.C. Government Employees
Union are fired at the month's end.
One BCGEU local at UBC, the
fire department, would continue
essential services. But UBC's other
BCGEU local, the lands, parks and
housing department, will strike and
could picket UBC gates.
UBC locals of Canadian Union
of Public Employees and the
Association of University and College Employees will not cross
BCGEU picket lines, respective
union spokespeople said. Office
and Technical Employees Union
representatives were unavailable for
comment.
See page 2: FACULTY
OTIU votes fer strike action
The Alma Mater Society's office staff, which voted overwhelmingly in favor of strike action if wage demands are not met, will resume
contract negotiations Nov. 2.
The one-year contract expired May 31 of this year.
AMS business manager Charles Redden called in a mediator after
talks between the AMS and the 11 members of the Office and
Technical Employees Union Local 15 broke down in late September.
The AMS originally offered its workers a seven per cent wage increase in a one year contract, but later went down to five per cent
when both sides met with the mediator Sept. 20.
The union is asking for a 15 per cent increase and held a strike vote
Sept. 26 because it doesn't want to accept the AMS's offer. Ninety-
two per cent of the workers voted in favor of strike action.
OTEU shop steward Brenda Gibbons and Redden both said they
prefer not to comment while negotiations are in progress.
"I don't want to jeopardize things when they're moving
forward," Gibbons said.
The workers are responsible for accounting and clerical work for
the AMS, the Pit, the Gallery Lounge, the aquatic centre, and several
clubs and services on campus.
showed 55 of the 186 students canvassed would honor picket lines.
"The faculty association plans to
vote Thursday night over whether
or not to cross the union's picket
lines," Learey said. "Some faculty
have said they'll cross but others
say they won't."
Union spokesperson Mickey
Kinakin said at the council meeting:
"This government is ripping unions
apart. This dispute is part and parcel
of what you (students) are fighting
for, cutbacks in areas we all consider vital to the quality of life. This
dispute  is   important   because  of
what's happening in the province."
The administration does not consider job security to be an issue
since the provincial government has
already passed Bill 3, which allows
public sector employees to be fired
where funding is inadequate.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVI, No. 13
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday,October 25,1963
>48  228-2301
OE PA HIMMMT m^mmmi «P^ .
NO
^■^^fefeS^ttW* -
mpury mmtsita
Or
— doug schmidt photo
ABBY HOFFMAN MAKES surprise appearance at refuse the cruise rally, clutching tiny tot yelling, "Daddy,
daddy, look at the nice sign that says No Trespassing. Does dat mean we should leave?" Daddy Hoffman promptly stuck a pacifier in the innocent youth's mouth as several thousand marchers watched in awe. "He'll learn
CD after he learns to walk," Hoffman said.
UBC services for blind students cut
By HOLLY NATHAN
The loss of two grant funded
positions at Crane library for blind
and visually impaired students has
resulted in a dramatic reduction of
services, the library head said Monday.
UBC's 60 blind and visually impaired students will now have to
organize volunteer readers from
their classes or look for alternate
sources of help, said Paul Thiele.
"I was hoping there would be a
solution," said Thiele. "We're having a tough time."
A $50,000 donation made in 1978
by a private contributor funded a
clerical position and a technician
who were responsible for manufacturing the bulk of the library's
books, he said.
The loss of staff is forcing the
library to reduce its hours of operation and to cut substantially the
number of books voluntarily
transcribed by professors and professionals, Thiele said.
"It's tough when you have to do
everything secondhand. The
students are cooperative but they
are also frustrated," he said.
Thiele has appealed to the university administration for funds but he
said the $4.2 million budget shortfall probably means little support
will be given.
Some blind students may decide
against post-secondary education
because of the reduced services and
others may feel restricted from
enrolling in reading-intensive
faculties such as law and medicine,
he said.
Crane library provides extensive
services to Simon Fraser University
and the University of Victoria. It attracted almost 20 students last year
as a result of its facilities.
"If the population begins to
grow, we aren't going to do an adequate job" he said.
Other methods of transcription
such as braille can take up to a year
to do for an average sized book, he
added.
Capilano faculty fired
Canadian University Press
Fourteen regular Capilano College faculty members with up to
nine years employment received
layoff notices Oct. 1, college administrators confirmed recently.
The reductions are necessary
because the administration has to
Find ways to deal with a five per
cent decrease in funding of existing
programs, said college principal
Paul Gallagher.
The layoff notices, which were
sent to faculty because of stipulations in the collective agreement,
will not take effect until this spring,
Gallagher said.
The bulk of the nine positions to
be axed are in the social sciences
and humanities. Gallagher said
career and vocational programs
were  left  unscathed  in  the  first
layoff wave because they have
fewer regular staff members.
"If it (the college's operations)
costs 95 per cent of last year's costs
next year, we'd be laughing," said
Gallagher. But he added with
uncertain budgets and faculty
wages up for negotiation in March
the administration had to be conservative.
Faculty association president
Gordon Wilson said it will be difficult to trim programs at the college and he expected faculty would
be asked to increase teaching hours
to make up for the five per cent
decrease in funds. This is necessary
because classes currently are at full
capacity.
British Columbia community colleges carry vocational, career
diploma and university transfer
programs. Page 2
THE   UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 25,1983
Faculty
hesitant
From page 1
Buses may not travel past UBC's
gates because the Independent
Transit Union also refuses to cross
BCGEU picket lines, but bus service could be limit to outside the
University Endowment Lands.
The Solidarity Coalition's
"escalating strike strategy" calls for
sympathy strikes by CUPE, AUCE
and ICTU after a BCGEU walkout, a Coalition press conference
announced Monday.
Two hundred and 40 delegates
representing 50 B.C. communities
confirmed the strategy leading up to
a general strike at the Coalition
convention held at Langara College
last weekend.
RADICAL
CMI6&-
2QU \Hesr4m. Avenue
Akcat lioo Blinbrxtje toy, RicMrtrnct.
Southern Africa And
The Church
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27
12:30 p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Featuring:
Father Michael Lapsley
Mrs. Susan Nghidinwa
Co-sponsored by Lutheran Campus Ministry
and Cooperative Christian Campus Ministry
Call Roy Schultz 244-1614
for details
THE
THUNDERBIRD
SHOP
HALLOWE'EN PARTYING!?!
MONSTERS, GHOULS, PUNKS, WITCHES,
PIRATES, BABIES, DEVILS, ANGELS,
CLOWNS, BUMS . .  . WHATEVER
SEE US FOR YOUR:
MASKS, MAKE-UP, WIGS,
BODY & SPRAY PAINT, HATS
BUNNY EARS, SOOTHERS ETC.
Lower Level Hours:
Student Union    Mon. to Fri. 8 a.m.
Building U.B.C.       Saturday 10 a.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
7:00 p.m. visa and MasterCard
5 p.m. Accepted
t&X   HAIRCUT $9.00
Spray wet & blow dry
STYLE $12.00
BEARD TRIM $3.00
SENIORS $5.00
STYLE
For the price of Our
$9.00 HAIRCUT
Incl. wash, conditioning, cut and blow dty
TiH Nov. 15. 1963
2105 West 16th
at Arbutus
NOT VALID
(SAT.)
Come in
and
meet Liz
For appointment call
734-2343
THE
APCO COMPUTER
SYSTEM
Compatible with Apple II
Plus™ hardware and software.
Superb keyboard features.
Includes Zenith 12"
monitor and single disc
IN STORE • Various configurations
SERVICE DEPARTMENT    available.
Computer King is your complete hardware and
software specialist. Whether you work with Apple™
or IBM PC™you will appreciate our professional
staff, our service department and our after-sales
support. Please feel free to phone or drop in and
talk to our staff.
I 6 MONTH
WE SELL CORONA      | WARRANTY ON COMPUTER
AN
COMPUTER KING
f^rTPfA^    COMPUTERS AND ELECTRONICS
\ZJKMs\Zy CORPORATION
1535 W. BROADWAY at Granville      736-7794
OPEN TILL 9 WEEKDA YS I^S
STUDENT DISCOUNTS*
m\t
EWLETT
PACKARD
n n n n n n m r-i n-m
innnnl J fin Fir-
Texas Instruments
I NCORPOR AIED
Scientific Programmable
Advanced scientific calculator with permutations & combinations, hyperbolics, random number generator,
extended memory.
Financial Power
A powerful pocket calculator
pre-programmed for financial
applications. Program it yourself, too!
HP-12C
199.99
HP-11C
Personal Computer
So widely used - over
6,000 engineering,
scientific & business
programs available.
So reliable it went
on the space
shuttle.
hp-41 449.99
149.99
T1-35
Student Math Kit
A unique problem
solving kit for
today's math
students. 54 functions plus useful
224 pg. calculator
math book.
Built in statistica
functions let you
compute mean,
standard deviation, linear regressions & trend
analysis.
59.99
29.99
T1-55
Advanced Slide Rule Calc.
Easily handles almost any mathematical operation, logarithmic,
hyperbolic,
roots, powers,
factorials to
advanced
statistical
analysis.
49.99
FURTHER 10% DISCOUNT OFF PRICES SHOWN WITH VALID STUDENT CARD
Stter
Vancouver -
North Shore
2912 West Broadway
736-3461
1615 Lonsdale
986-3471
Burnaby/Coq. - 9600 Cameron Street
(Lougheed Plaza)
421-4434 Tuesday, October 25,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Huge UBC tuition fee hike possible
UBC's tuition fees could increase
by as much as 50 per cent next year,
Lisa Hebert, Alma Mater Society
external affairs co-ordinator said
Monday.
Administration president George
Pedersen confirmed that tuition
fees will definitely increase as a
result of next year's expected five
per cent decrease in university funding, but could not estimate the
possible amount.
Their statements were prompted
by Universities minister Patrick
McGeer, who said at last weekend's
Social Credit convention the
government may force universities
to  raise  tuition  fees  to  cover  a
UBC standards
higher next year
It may be harder to attend UBC next year because the university is thinking of implementing stiffer admission standards and enrolment quotas, according to UBC's vice-president academic.
A presidential advisory committee is currently examining options of
limiting enrolment in the arts, science and education facilities, said committee chair Robert Smith.
"We have fewer and fewer dollars and more and more students," Smith
said. The committee will also consider possible ways of limiting enrolment
in all of UBC's faculties, he added.
But enrolment limitations are difficult to implement, he admitted. One
problem that arises with higher admission standards is "grade inflation,"
he said. This means high school grades are inflated to boost a student's
chances of entering university.
"If this university asks for higher performance for admission, we won't
winnow out the people. Grade inflation is a well known phenomenon."
The committee, which includes the arts, science and education deans,
will prepare its recommendations before next September, Smith said.
"These faculties are the most concerned with the enrolment problem."
Several faculties already have their own enrolment committees studying
the problem, he said. The science and forestry faculties recently set up committees, and the arts and education faculties are in the process of drawing
them up.
Catholic speaks out
SASKATCHEWAN (CUP) —
Pro-life, pro-pregnancy, pro-child,
pro-family, and pro-choice.
And Catholic.
Catholic theologian Marjorie
Maguire says she is all these things,
and there is no conflict in her
beliefs.
Maguire, a member of the
American organization Catholics
for a Free Choice, spoke to
emotionally-charged crowds in
Regina and Saskatoon recently as
part of nation-wide pro-choice activities.
A renegade in the Catholic
church for her pro-choice stand,
Maguire says people get caught up
in labels and don't address the
issue.
She says the "pro-life" label has
New UBC group
Alma Mater Society silence and
inaction concerning the Social
Credit budget has led students to
create a new campus group to
fight the legislation.
UBC Students Against the Budget will address critical issues
neglected by AMS in SAB's first
meeting Wednesday, said SAB
member Kevin Annett, law 1.
"We hope to succeed in pulling
students together on this issue,
something the AMS has not done
so far."
"Our priority should be to fight
the myth of 'restraint' and to
educate students about the true
nature of this legislation," said
Annett.
Law Students Against the
Budget have already voted to join
SAB, which is open to all interested individuals and organizations at UBC, Annett said.
The group will meet Thursday
to inform students about the
Socred budget and legislation,
said Annett.
Prominent individuals will be
addressing the meeting, including
Hanne Jensen, fired director of
the B.C. Human Rights Commissions, UBC law professor Bill
Black and Solidarity Coalition
leader Jean Swanson. Jack Finn-
bogasson, President of College
Institute Educators Association, is
also scheduled to address the
meeting.
been misappropriated by a vocal
group of anti-choice activists.
"I think a true test of pro-life
persons is where they stand on the
nuclear arms race, militarism,
poverty, hunger, racism and sexism," she says. "These are the major threats to fetuses and born persons alike." She says the issue is
often misrepresented either 'pro-
abortion' or 'anti-abortion.'
"I don't know anyone who is
'pro-abortion'," says Maguire.
"Pro-choice does not mean pro-
abortion."
Instead, she says it means the
freedom for a woman to choose her
own destiny.
To be anti-abortion or
"pro-fetus", according to Maguire,
is to say "a woman is only worth as
much as a fertilized egg."
She calls herself "pro-woman",
acknowledging women as peers who
are able to make decisions about
their own lives.
Maguire says a fetus is not a person. She bases personhood on
"sociability", or the ability to interact socially within the context of
the community.
"I would agree that personhood
begins when the woman in whose
womb the pregnancy exists consents
to the pregnancy and resolves to bring the fetal life to birth," says
Maguire.
She says the Catholic Church's
current stand on abortion is a fairly
recent one. While abortion is now
considered a sin punishable by excommunication, it has not always
been so at various times in Catholic
history.
Maguire says the Church is taking a strong stand on abortion
because it has lost control over contraception.
Ooooooooptustss!
The Ubyssey would like to
apologize for an error in Friday's
article, Gracie's workers on firing
tine. Human Resources minister
Grace McCarthy was quoted as saying the government had to diminish
services due to a $1.6 million
deficit. That figure should have
read $1.6 billion. The proofreader
responsible has been banished to
reading bathroom walls.
higher   percentage   of   university
operating costs.
Pedersen said the provincial
government also recently urged
universities in a letter to implement
higher tuition fees for foreign
students.
This recommendation was also
made last year after delegates at the
Social Credit convention voted
over-whelmingly for a two-tiered
tuition system.
Many foreign students are "well-
off" and can afford a tuition increase, said Pedersen. "But my own
preference would be that there not
be an increase for foreign
students," he added.
Hebert said the university senate
clearly rejected differential fees on
previous occasions. "I would be
surprised if Senate so unanimously
reversed their earlier decisions,"
she said.
Foreign students only make up
three per cent of UBC's enrolment
because of strict admission regulations and an increase in their fees
will not generate a substantial
amount of revenue, Hebert said.
The combination of increase tuition, high unemployment and slashed student aid funds means low-
income students will be turned away
from universities, said Hebert.
"It's obvious by McGeer's comments that he's not committed to
accessibility."
— doug Schmidt photo
ALLO I'M READY perks dapper Maggie in Sunday best. "Don't mind me hairy legs or me smudged lipstick,"
the stuffy Brit told photographers at Saturday's demo against the cruise. Maggie was a trifle bored by the rally,
but kept her stiff upper lip for the snaps.
Disarmament rally lacks students
Thousands of Vancouverites
armed with Refuse the Cruise signs,
and immitation Cruise missiles joined a world-wide rally against
nuclear weapons Saturday.
Canes, crutches, bicycles and
baby carriages helped people walk
the three mile route from Jericho
Beach to Vanier Park, in one of the
quietest peace demonstrations Vancouver has seen in years.
A group of lively people who
sang songs against nuclear power
and the Canadian government's
decision to the cruise missile provided the only diversity.
"One, two, three, four,"
chanted other people. "We don't
want a bloody war. Five, six, seven,
eight, we don't want to radiate."
One baby in a stroller wore a sign
which read "I want to have grandchildren."
Few demonstrators stayed at the
rally in Vanier park, which featured
speakers such a the chair of
Veterans for Multilateral Nuclear
Disarmament and MP Pauline
Jewett (NDP-Coquitlam).
Jewett told the audience it should
persist with demonstrations to protest the testing of the Cruise missile
in Alberta.
"Rallies do make a lot of difference to the government," she
said.
Helen Speigelman, an executive
member of the End the Arms Race,
said the organizers expected the low
turnout despite attracting an
estimated 65,000 people to last
April's Walk for Peace.
"The nuclear arms issue isn't as
urgent to Canadians as it is to Europeans," she said, referring to the
European demonstrations on the
same day which drew more than
one million people.
"The (Vancouver) rally was really a support event for the European
demonstrations," Speigelman said.
UBC Students for Peace and
Mutual Disarmament and UBC
educators for Nuclear Disarmament, were represented at the rally,
but students were noticeably absent
from the demonstration.
Forceful men fear law
MONTREAL (CUP) — Men in college would force women into
sexual intercourse more often, if they weren't afraid of getting
caught, says and American report.
And that's on top of the 15 per cent of college men who already
force their female colleagues to have sex. An even higher percentage
confessed they have assaulted women in some way.
A team of psychologists from Auburn University, Alabama, also
found that men who forced intercourse tended to be generally irresponsible, lacking in social conscience and regard violence as an acceptable solution to problems.
The report said women's attitudes contribute to the high percentage of assault. Women's don't realize they have the right to say
"no" or resist assault.
More than 21 per cent of college women surveyed said they had
been coerced into intercourse, 80 per cent said they were a victim of
sexual assault, ranging from unwanted fondling to battery. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 25,1983
tirXjU   /JLrXAjfisTYlAj.
Letters
'Shrill' campus rag forgets facts
This letter is not meant to be a
defence of the use of either napalm
or chemical weapons. The morality
of all weapons of war are
repugnant. Grotesque as it is
however, war is a fact of life. As
Clausewitz said several hundred
years ago, war is an extenstion of
politics.
However, in your ravaging accusation of the big bad United
States directing the use of
"chemical" weapons in El Salvador
(Chemical warfare threatens, Oct.
28), Sarah Cox appears to be confused about the classification of
"chemical" weapons.
She refers in the article to the use
of napalm and other "chemical"
weapons, which are prohibited by
the Geneva Protocol of 1925. Under
the stipulations of both the Geneva
Protocol of 1925 and the Geneva
Convention of 1972, the reference
to "chemical" weapons are directed
at weapons which kill through
"toxic" means.
Napalm as a destructive instrument neutralizes hostile entities
through an incendiary mode, quite
different from toxic weapons such
as mustard gas or tear gas which
operate on a suffocation mode. As
much as I realize that campus rags
are meant to be radical, revolutionary, shrill, and all those other
counter-cultural values which student  newspapers covet,  the least
the clown amuses,
abuses apathetic students
Bill Bennett is a clown. He makes me laugh. Tell me Bill, how is it that
we have such a huge deficit? B.C. Place certainly benefits all of the province, but is it paid off? The northeast coal development has created jobs,
just like you stated on T.V., but too bad you neglected to mention that it
would be cheaper to leave it in the ground.
Reducing the Human Rights Commission and the Rentalsman's Office
to the point of uselessness are positive steps in the name of restraint. But I
wonder if you had ever hinted during the election at what you ar now doing, would you have gotten the support that you now flaunt as your mandate. Oh well, surprises are nice.
Another thing that's funny is how ignorant and apathetic the students at
UBC are. Not only is there going to be cutbacks in provincial funding, but
now Bill feels he should have a hand in setting tuition fees.
Will the students snap back trom party-land into reality when they can't
go to school due to unreal fees, non-existent aid, or when class consists of
one professor and 1500 students? What about when they get evicted for unfair reasons or are sexually harassed oh the job? They'll be crying and I'll be
laughing.
Having never felt strong enough to write, I now feel that this is too
serious a matter to take sitting down. Hopefully others may start to feel this
way. I'd like to leave a quote from the mastermind himself: "This is a party that speaks its mind straight trom the shoulder," Bill Bennett, April,
1982. Thank God he's not in charge of nuclear weapons.
Terry Orr
arts 2
you can do is to get your facts
straight.
Napalm and white phosphorus
bombs are not banned from usage
by either the 1925 Protocol or the
1972 Convention. Although I cannot claim to be an expert on
chemical warfare, the most recent
accusations of the usage of toxic
substances have been that of the
Soviet Union in Afghanistan, the
Vietnamese on the Hmoungs in
Laos, and in the 1979 Sino-
Vietnamese border clashes.
If however, Ms. Cox was referring to the use of vegetation
defoliants, such as Agent Orange in
Vietnam, or the use of icendiary
weapons as "crop dusters", then
she is, in reality referring to the use
of toxic herbicides, an instrument
of war or peace which is not prohibited by international law.
Napalm used as an incendiary
device is not toxic, and thus not
prohibited. If one were to classify
weapons under your definitions for
"chemical" weapons, that is, pertaining to the use of substances
found on the table of elements,
then every country using devices
which contain gunpowder
(potassium nitrate, sulphur and
charcoal) would be guilty of
"chemical warfare." The weapons
prohibited by the Geneva Protocol
and Convention are specifically toxic as opposed to chemical weapons.
There's nothing wrong with
newspapers being shrill and radical,
and judging from the somewhat
polemical editorials, the staff of
The Ubyssey enjoy being called
radical. However, accusations such
as this one border on what some
might call yellow journalism, or
sansationalism or propaganda, if
not all of the above. Such items
belong in totalitarian, government
controlled presses, not progressive
liberal democratic ones.
Nelson Louie
political science 4
Monsters
On Halloween the Socreds won't need masks to pretend they
are monsters.
The firing of 1,600 civil servants takes effect Nov. 1 unless the
government uses more stalling tactics. Massive worker protests in
the form of a general strike will likely follow the firings.
But signs of turmoil among the ranks of B.C.'s students and
the labor movement are appearing already. The student occupation
at Selkirk College is a prime example of the conflict created by the
Social Credit budget.
Average students are occupying the building, not a group of
frustrated radicals. Their action was brought on by a simple concern — their desire to complete their school year.
They are simply demanding their right to save their year
through direct action. Why do they need to take concrete action?
The answer is obvious. The unprecedented attack on workers'
rights is prompting union action.
At Selkirk one of the main concerns of the college union is job
security. Under the new legislation brought in with the Socred
budget, this security is not guaranteed.
So the Selkirk unionists may have jumped the gun with their
strike action, but not much. UBC could be realistically shut down in
November as a result of a general strike, the possibility of which is
looming closer and closer. Even the most valiant efforts may not be
able to prevent the loss of the academic year.
What students must do is to look beyond the horror stories
associated with a general strike, and familiarize themselves with
the central issues — a government using "restraint" as an excuse
for massive centralization of power.
In the event that classes are disrupted because of a strike,
students should remember who triggered the crisis and decide
which side to support. If direct action is needed, so be it. The occupation at the Tranquille Institute in Kamloops over the summer
showed that drastic action done in a non-disruptive manner communicates a message to the public.
The same can be done with the current situation. Follow the
UBC motto, Tuem Est, It's Up To You.
Students targeted
The Social Credit legislative
package, currently being rammed
down the throats of B.C. citizens
despite massive protests, is nothing
less than an unprecedented attack
upon the people of this province by
an unmandated government hiding
behind the lie of restraint. This so-
called "restraint" budget is, in
fiscal terms, actually the most excessive in B.C. in the last 30 years.
We, as students, are especially
targeted by this assault and highly
vulnerable to it. Our classmates
who are poor and may have
dependents could disappear from
Geers justify
tasteless act
It was very interesting to read the
views in last Tuesday's Ubyssey
concerning the supposed Oct. 13
"cutbacks" rally. I feel that many
people who came down heavily on
the engineers fail to understand one
of the reasons behind our actions.
True, we may not have acted in the
best of taste, but more importantly,
it should be realized that not all
students are as strongly behind
Operation Solidarity as their
organizers would have many people
believe.
Ron Finnigan
applied science 3
our midsts because of the greater
priority put on highway construction than on education.
Financial cutbacks in education
are but one aspect. Those of us who
are tenants, wage workers, ill or
physically handicapped face increased oppression and hardship
with the abolition of rent controls,
the decline in labor relations and
the increased costs in health care.
The revision of human rights enforcement amounts to a gutting of
fundamental freedoms for all of us
and the reinforcement of the most
inhuman tendencies in our culture
towards women and ethnic
minorites. The student body is a
microcosm of the larger society. As
members of the educational community, we are likewise faced with
de-democratization of our institutions due to the centralist obsession
of the Socred cabinet.
It is important for all students on
this campus who oppose the Socred
budget to unite in a common
organization to present a united student opposition.
A meeting will be held on
Wednesday, at 12:30 p.m. in SUB
213 for the purposes of forming a
student solidarity group. With the
likelihood of a province-wide
general strike mounting, all interested students are urged to attend Bob Cole
arts
r
THE UBYSSEY
October 25, 1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
Chris Wong writes worse Western News than Sarah Cox who is less tempestuous than Muriel
Draaisma who east less Fellini Salad than Alar Olljum who is taller than Verne McDonald who prints
better photos than Neil Lucente who spends more time in the darkroom than Peter Berlin who does
more Globe & Mail cryptic crosswords than Victor Wong who marches faster than Patti Rather who
has blonder hair than Doug Schmidt who speaks better German than Monte Stewart who loves sports
more than Rory Allen who gets tackled off the field more than Francis Lew who occupies more offices
than Holly Nathan who types faster than Keltey Jo Burke who has a more romantic dispostion than
Steven Wisenthal who hates writing ads more-than Nancy Campbell who has more experience in this
old hack business than Sarah Millin who smokes more pipe tobacco than all the people who put
together this fun, fun edition of The Ubyssey. Tuesday, October 25,1963
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
!
Letters
Jim lacks budget knowledge
In response to Jim Davies letter
(Gears fear loss of voice Oct. 21), I
would like to ask what right do the
engineering students (and no doubt
many other students) think we have
in   demanding   B.C.   taxpayers
dollars for our futures while advocating (or passively accepting)
"restraint" legislation. It's legislation that removes tax dollars for
disabled persons, elderly persons,
and the Human Rights Commission
UBC traffic worsens
The timing of the traffic lights at
the intersection of University
Boulevard and Wesbrook Mall has
recently been changed for the
worse. Formerly the lights for west
and east bound traffic were sequential. First westbound vehicles (most
of which turn left onto Wesbrook)
would proceed, and then east-
bound traffic would take its turn.
There was no interaction between
traffic moving in opposite directions.
Now the lights for both directions
are simultaneous, so that those east-
bound are faced with westbound
vehicles turning onto Wesbrook,
across their path. Those turning
south onto Wesbrook are encouraged to do so by a variety of signs and
signals which seemingly give them
the right of way over those pro-
Watch it George
Congratulations President
Pedersen for speaking out against
government restraint.
Would you also care to comment
on the million dollar renovation of
your new lodgings next to the
Museum of Anthropology?
(formerly the Botanical Education
centre).
Grant Warrington
ubc graduate
MADf-
2££ toesr4m. Avenue
-A*
i
.rt
HOT*!
CHILL1
COOL
SUDS
m
lifts
All the chill
&
bread you can eat
(at tha back ol tha village)
ceeding east. Past habit reinforces
this.
To avert a serious accident at this
heavily used intersection, its signal
should be changed so that east and
west (i.e. south) bound vehicles are
not in it together.
Anders Ourom
westwater research center
Where?
The 1983/84 Student Leadership
Conference was absolutely terrific,
the best conference that I have ever
been to. The organizers of the
event, Robyn Hunter, Tracey
Balcom, Bill Richardson, among
others should be congratulated for
the quality of speakers and of
seminar materials that were
available.
The event was very worthwhile
attending. But unfortunately, the
conference was poorly attended,
with about fifty students attending.
What I would like to know is, where
were all those student leaders?
Gray McMullin
commerce 4
to name only a few areas where
British Columbians will be seriously
effected.
Obviously our dear engineer has
no idea of the contents of the
Socred budget. There is a little more
to it than tax on restaurant food.
The Solidarity Coalition is not concerned with restaurant tax eind
perhaps if our engineer had some
idea of this "restraint budget",
concerns would be clear.
Getting on Bill Bennett's good
side should not be our aim. It is
surely our right as a provincially
funded institution to receive sufficient funds. Linda Nichol
science
TAKE A
MOVIE
HOME
TAHUMfT
»V|a»IIH II IIHIMI»M| ft
V/.95 per day
-'CR & 2 FREE MOVIES
SUN. - THURS.
»1 STUDENT RATE{»:
Hf
m■■■■■■■■■■
Hta'f.MWftitaabaiiM
THE VIDEO STORE
4*08 W. 1OTH AVE. 222-11*4
Discover a sophistication of design,
function and performance that's a
joy to behold...or our name isn't
ZENITH DATA PRODUCTS, a division of Zenith Radio Canada Ltd.
3171 Number Six Road, Richmond, British Columbia V6V 1P5
SLEAP
CHEAP!
Complete Unfinished Pine
Waterbeds From
$169.95
A UBC Special from United Waterbeds! This "Super Single"
(48" by 84") includes: Mattress, Heater, Liner, Pedestal,
Frame & Deckl
STUDENT BODY SPECIALS:
PERCALE SHEET SETS TWO FOR $59.95
BOOKCASE WATERBEDS NOW FROM $229
PHONE ORDERS ACCEPTED!
ASK ABOUT FREE DEL/VERY!
OPEN SEVEN DA YS A WEEK!
UNITED WATERBED
12626 BRIDGEPORT ROAD, RICHMOND
273-7600
MASTERCARD
VISA
Underneath this armor is a Ubyssey staff reporter.
It could be anyone, male or female, tall or short,
thin or fat (or somewhere In between).
The Ubyssey reporter wears this specially-
designed armor because he (or she) knows there's a
battle for him (or her) to fight.
Against ignorance.
Against prejudice.
And especially against apathy.
If you want to make a difference on this campus,
come and see the avengers of the Ubyssey. SUB
241K.
Because the person wearing this armor could be
you.
S.U.B.
BALLROOM
$1.25/
CLASS
OR LESS!!
ty*^2
MON. 3:34* & 4:46*    WED. 3:46* & 4:46*
TUES. 3:46* & 4:46**     THURS. 3:46" & 4:46*
•DYNA-FIT: TOTAL BODY AEROBIC WORKOUT
♦•BODY CLASS: NO AEROBIC, IMPROVE MUSCLE TONE, ETC.
BUY OFF CAMPUS
SAVE 50% &
GET NEXT DAY SERVICE
 AT THE	
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
with your prescription & student i.d. card
ChOOSe ANY FRAME IN OUR STOCK.
Our frame selection is the best you'll
find. Choose from top name designers
such as Dior, Gloria Vanderbilt,
Metzler, Porsche, and vuarnet.
were also fully equipped
for eyewear repairs and lens
duplication.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB
Mon-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 W. 2nd Ave.)
736-7516
1149
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
kjjj UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
LOW! R CONLOURSi
iiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiim Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 25,1983
m
<bjeat<
TODAY
Er UCATORS FOR NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT
Applied mathematician Bernard Bereneau
speaks about a mathematical model for self-
activation of nuclear weapons, 3:30 p.m., Buch.
A204.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper meeting about Solidarity, 6 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
HILLEL HOUSE
Hot home-ccoked dairy lunch, noon, Hillel
House.
UBC CIRCLE K CLUB
Meeting, 3:30 p.m., SUB 211.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTE
General Meeting, noon, Buch. B221.
OVER EATERS ANONYMOUS
Regular meeting, noon, Lutheran Campus centre, conference room.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics class, 4:30-5:30 p.m., SUB 207-209.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Fireside discussion: the role of the teaching
assistant in the university, 8 p.m., Graduate student centre fireside lounge.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture  on  radiology  given  by  Dr.   Newman,
noon, IRC 1.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF
CANADA
"Juggernaut", award-winning film about the introduction of a Canadian atomic reactor to India
in 1967, noon, Buch A204.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
General meeting, important, noon, Buch B221.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 3:30 p.m. go to SUB 235
for details.
WEDNESDAY
HILLEL HOUSE
Diaspora Yeshiva Band in concert, 4 and 8 p.m.,
Jewish Community Centre, 950 W. 41st Ave.
Lunch available, noon, Hillel House.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Noon celebration, Buch. A100.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Weekly pub event, all welcome, 4-6 p.m., details
at SUB 239.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting and slide show, noon, Chem.
150.
UBC STUDENTS AGAINST THE BUDGET
Founding meeting, noon, SUB 213.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Slide/tape show on political killings by governments, noon, SUB 212.
NDP CLUB
General meeting, anyone interested may attend,
noon, Buch A205.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mandarin class — all levels, noon, Asian studies
centre.
CUSO
Information session, slide tape show, 7:30 p.m..
International House upper lounge.
"CUSO overview — A challenge and a change".
THURSDAY
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS
Book table, off the cuff politics, subversive haircuts, noon, SUB main floor.
APOLOGETICS OF CHRISTIAN THOUGHT
IN SCRIPTURE
General meeting and discussion on the uniqueness of the Bible, noon, EMAX 106.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, 1:30 p.m.. International house,
upper lounge.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Slide/tape show on political killings by governments, new members welcome, 7:30 p.m., SUB
215.
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Forum with Hanne Jensen, Bill Black and Jean
Swanson of Solidarity Coalition on human rights
in B.C., noon, Law 101/102.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Policy committee meeting on post-secondary
education, open to all, noon, SUB 111.
ENGLISH 100
Lecture on how to write argumentative essays
with Prof. Lunsford, noon, Buch. A106.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Horizons SF workshop, noon, SUB 215.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Noon study series features Southern Africa and
the church, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
JEWISH STUDENTS NETWORK
Seminar in the changing balance of power in the
Middle East, noon, Hillel House.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Planning meeting, all welcome, 11:30 a.m., SUB
212A.
Speaker — series meeting, all welcome, noon.
Brock 304.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Small group meetings, 7:30 p.m., call 228-8554
for more info.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, St. Mark's College.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men's Varsity annual blue-gold and intersquad
game, noon. War Memorial Gym.
SOLIDARITY COALITION
Information forum, noon. Law 101/102.
GEOLOGICAL COLLOQUIA
Dr.  K. O'Nions on "Mantle Geochemistry and
Convection, noon, Geog. 330A.
FRIDAY
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
New   Mission  MP   Gerry  St.   Germain  speaks,
noon, SUB 215.
UBC DNCE CLUB
Party dances featured in first special Friday class,
noon, SUB ballroom.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Hallowe'en dance, get dressed, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.,
International House.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Communications   and   membership   committee
meeting, noon, SUB 224.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men's Varsity vs. Sev's Slammers, 8:30 p.m..
War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
69th   Annual   Varsity-Alumni   match,   8   p.m.,
Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Women's   Blue-Gold   game,   6:30   p.m.,   War
Memonal gym.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
J. V. men vs. Capilano College in Totem Conference play, 4 p.m., War Memorial gym.
o^illinis
T*»2
from
3 to 4
$2.50
( -VKl ,v Cill-FFl
I per person I
MCFI IS H COFFFF $1.25
(per persani
or lt\: of , onrsc'
MOMM!    FhtlllAY
HilECH|
■ iNNOV    AT    ION    Sal
We    have software
for   VICTOR   9000,
COMMODORE,
APPLE, ATARI, IBM
HiTech   Innovations
has   one of Vancouver's
largest selections    of
software.
and
hardware:
OS21, OS22,
VICTOR 9000.
10% Discount with this ad.
642 W. B ROADWAY 604-873-3766
13 iqocpun
FRIDAY OCTOBER 2£W<>SrWR£*y 0CWLWZW°SUiW<tt0B£R3Cm
S-OOm o. BROCK HOUSE 3875 fbinterey Rd.
SEE HIGH EXPLOSIVE FIREWORKS OVER BURRARD INLET
EXPERIENCE A SPECIAL EFFECTS PARTY IN AN AUTHENTIC HAUNTED HOUSE
WITNESS DRACULA RISE FROM A BURNING COFFIN
FEAST ON A FULL COURSE GOURMET BUFFET
DANCE TO BEST SOUNDS IN TOWN
THIS IS MORE THAN A PARTY, IT'S AN EVENT!
a FAMOUS EVENTS production
TICKETS: $20.00 - AT AM BOX OFFICE OR THE BROCK HOUSE: 224-3317
PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT PTS.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House upper lounge.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Dr. Heather Morris speaks on ethical issues in
medicine, noon. Woodward IRC 4.
HOME ECONOMICS UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
Hallowe'en Howl warming up for Powder Blues,
6 to 9 p.m., SUB ballroom.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Two organizers of women's peace camp at
Greenham Common, England will give talk and
slide presentation, co-sponsored by Students for
Peace and Mutual Disarmament, noon, SUB
auditorium.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Hallowe'en dance, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m., The Edge,
1225 Homer St.
NEWMAN CLUB
Super soup lunch, noon, St. Mark's College
lunch room.
Join other
politically correct people
like yourself in trying to
keep British Columbia at
least as good as it already
is. First, run don't walk to
the founding meeting of
UBC Student against the
Budget on Wednesday,
October 26th in SUB 213.
Second, find out about
the Solidarity coalition at
an information forum on
Thursday, October 27th at
noon   in   Law   101/102.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Grad Game, 4 p.m.. War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD JUNIOR VARSITY
BASKETBALL
Women's Junior Varsity vs. Capilano College,
4:00 p.m., War Memorial gym.
NEWMAN CLUB
Halloween Dance, tickets at door. $2 members,
S3 non-members, 8 p.m. to midnight, St. Marks
College.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men's   varsity   vs.    Meralomas,    8:30   p.m.,
Memorial Gym.
THUNDERBIRD JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL
Men's Junior Varsity vs. Capilano College, 6:30
p.m., War Memorial gym.
PASSPORT
PHOTOS
3 Minute Service
No Appointment
5706 University Boulevard
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1K6
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS1
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; additional
lines. 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
3RD    ANNUAL
•HALLOWEEN"
OTD2E..
MV :    HOLLYBURN
Sal  Oct   2 0   83. 9 pm. SHARP
North  Foot of Danman  Street
Texat mickay draw-muaic CITR
Tickata 1300   AMS box offlca
THE KEG PRIME RIB
AND BOATHOUSE
Have openings for students
wanting to work 2-4 evenings per week. We are looking for enthusiastic, hard
working individuals. No experience needed as we train
our people on the job.
Apply any Wednesday between 2:00-3:00 p.m. 566
Cardero St. by the Bayshore.
35 - LOST
CUSO-UBC
INFORMATION SESSION
Thursday, October 27th
7:30 p.m.
International House
"CUSO     Overview     —     A
challenge and a change"
SLIDE-TAPE SHOW
Returned   volunteers   will   talk
about    their    CUSO    posting
overseas. Recruitment information will be available.
EVERYONE IS WELCOME
LOST: 4 keys on a ring and an AMS
card in Sedgewick or in SUB games room.
Sat. evening. Call Rob, Rm. 482, at
224-9746/224-9901.
40 - MESSAGES
ATTENTION: Black RX-7 owner-Michael,
sorry we didn't connect. Laura & Erin. Call
Laura at 872-0277, days.    	
DOMINIONAUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION
has p/t sales positions available to market
tried & proven necessary car-care service.
Comm. & bonus paid daily. Earn between
$40-60 per eve. Call Leo 688-1463 or Peter
684-1048.
70 - SERVICES
"MODE COLLEGE OF BARBERING AND
STYLING". Students - $4.50 to $6.50.
M7-601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
85 - TYPING
BAHA'I FAITH. Building a United World
Community. Formal and informal discussions on selected topics every Friday. For
more information phone 222-0261.	
SKI    SEASON    OPENS    NOV.    151
Whistler-Silver Star. Cottage, Bed &
Breadkfast Registry. Reserve Ahead.
738-7561.	
7 - LEGAL
11 - FOR SALE - Private
FOR SALE: 1981 Mobylette 40 with helmet
and gas container $350. Evenings 734-3287.
FOR SALE: one way CP Air ticket to Toron-
..toJtec 17/83. $151. Call 734-9516.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judith Alexander.
Graduate of Julliard School of Music.
734-8323 or 261-8515.	
LSAT, GMAT. MCAT preparation Call
National Testing. 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS
INSTUCTORS Required for LSAT, MCAT,
GMAT courses. Leave name and number
738-4618.
WORD PROCESSING: & Typing: term
papers, theses, mscpt., essays, incl.
reports (tech., equational), letters,
resumes, Bilingual. Clemy, 2664S641.
FAST, ACCURATE professional typing.
Double-spaced page, $1.50. Call Audrey,
228-0378.	
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Essays,
Thesis, Manuscripts, Etc. Choice of type
engineering exp. Reasonable 271-6755.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Essays, reports,
projects - $1.00 pr page min. Contact
Louse, after 4 p.m. 731-0594.	
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9867. 	
TYPING: experienced typist; reasonable
rates; all jobs, will pick up and deliver. Tel.
421-0818, Mary Lou.       	
FAST, ACCURATE WORD PROCESSING.
10/hr. essays, term papers, letters, etc.
879-5108. Visa accepted. 	
WORD  PROCESSING  SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends
736-1208.	
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates for thesis typing, $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Phone Jeeva at 876-5333. Tuesday, October 25,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Quebec students may strike
MONTREAL (CUP) —
Quebec's largest student organization is ready to strike Nov. 15. Or
rather, its leaders are.
According to the Association Nationale des Etudiants (es) du
Quebec, individual association
members have not yet decided to
support the strike.
Set on the seventh anniversary of
the election of the Parti Quebecois,
the strike will culminate months of
verbal and written protests over
decreasing 'accessibility to education, cutbacks in student bursaries,
and Law 32 regulating student
associations.
While some francophone student
association leaders will try to rally
their students to support and join
the strike, others have adopted a
wait-and-see attitude.
Patrick Gagnon, external vice-
president for the McGill University
students society, wants McGill
students to wait and see which other
universities support the strike.
Concordia students will probably
not go out on strike, according to
Genevieve Morin, external vice
president of the student association.
Concordia has a large percentage of
part-time and night students who
are not involved in the student
movement.
Gagnon   said   there   is   little
response from student leaders in
McGill faculty associations.
"Nobody seems interested in cutbacks, an issue that affects all
students and should be fought.
They (leaders) are only there for
their (resumes)," Gagnon said.
The hesitant attitude of the two
big anglophone university associations will likely turn into a no-show
at the strike, leaving ANEQ without
the strength of more than 40,000 of
its 200,000 members.
%
ATTENTION LAW APPLICANTS
For first year Law classes beginning in September
1984, both the UBC and UVic Law Schools are requiring all applicants to have written the new LSAT by
the deadline date for applying:
UBC- by Dec. 31/83
UVic-by Mar. 31/84
This new LSAT has been available since the summer
of 1982. If you have not yet written a new LSAT, the
remaining test dates are:
Saturday, Dec. 3/83 (for UBC and UVic)
Saturday, Mar. 3/84 (for UVic only)	
j^ Hairstyling for men & women
The Hairline's team of experts wants
to give students a break!
10% OFF
our regular prices
Monday - Thursday
(Student A.M.S. card required)
2529 Alma
224-2333
Mon. - Fri. 9:00 - 7:00
Sat. - 9:00 - 5:30
VALUABLE COUPON    !
MONDAY to FRIDAY
9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY
9:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
APPOINTMENTS
224-1922   224-9116
Bernard
Labrosse
hair studio inc.
& Ken Hippert
Hair Co. Ltd.
228-1471
IN U.B.C. VILLAGE
NEXT TO BANK OF COMMERCE
WORTH
OFF ANY
HAIR STYLE
Mon., Tues., Wed.
GOOD ONLY ON
PRESENTATION OF
THIS COUPON.
Expires Nov. 30/'83
WE SELL
JO/CO PRODUCTS i
i_^^:  r-
The Incredible AQUA SOCIETY Wind Wear
Clearance Sale
All Remaining Inventory
50% OFF!!
manufactured suggested list price
More Fall Specials:
— Used U.S. Divers Calypso
Vi Regulators $125.00
— Used Pressure Gauges $35.00
— New U.S. Divers Aquarius
Regulator $118.95
SCUBA SWAP
MEET
October 29
8:30-10:00 p.m.
Come and Sell
Your Wares
The Complete Scuba Centre
Located Lower Floor, Student
Union Bldg.
Open Mon. - Fri. 11:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Telephone 228-3329       gUMI !
NOMINATIONS OPEN
October 14th and close Oct. 28th
for the positions of
an Arts Council Rep
&
an
Arts Senate Rep
Information and forms available at
AUS office, Buchanan A107
AT
HALLOWEEN
ITS
««*£
Dance, Exercise & Fashion
/)        //        •L
egwarmers
v      \S
• Shoes
(     \
• Masks
• Tights
• Leotards
• Wigs
• Black lipstick
• Clown costumes
• Belts
• Colour/glitter hairspray
• Metallic body paint
554 W. Georgia               (>2h W. Broadway
(under Scott's)                   Vancouver, BC
681-8757
733-6116 Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 25,1983
Men's soccer team at turning point
For the UBC men's soccer team
everything now hangs on their final
conference game in Victoria a week
today. They need to win or tie to
advance to the national playoffs.
Over the weekend UBC drew 4-4
with Alberta and defeated Saskatchewan 1-0. On the Island the
University of Victoria defeated
both those teams. They shut-out the
Huskies 2-0, Friday and beat the
Bears 3-1 the next day.
Friday's game, played in the
pouring rain on O. J. Todd field
was quite a bizarre affair. The
'Birds leapt out to an early four-goal
lead with Joel Johnson and top
scorer Louis Miljanovic each net
ting a pair. But in the end UBC was
lucky to hold on for a tie said coach
Joe Johnson.
UBC conceded a goal just before
half-time, usually the most
psychologically dangerous moment.
The 'Birds still had a three goal lead
however and Johnson decided to
play his subs in the second half.
Five minutes after the restart the
'Birds were awarded a penalty shot,
which was missed. If the 'Birds had
scored "It would have been the end
of it," said Johnson.
Sure enough the Golden Bears
clawed their way back into the
game, equalizing with five minutes
left and UBC were grateful to hang
on for a draw after that.
Johnson said he thought the team
allowed the game to slip through
their fingers because the four or five
players he inserted for the second
half were cold and wet after standing on the sidelines for an hour.
When he tried to replace them with
the first line, those players had
meanwhile warmed down too.
On Saturday Johnson turned the
game round with a late double
substitution. One of the players he
took off was top scorer Miljanovic
"who had not been himself", said
Johnson. The players he put on
were Kevin Head and Murray
Mollard.
Within a minute the two combined for the winning goal. Head ran
at the Husky defense, went past
four players and then slipped the
ball to Mollard. on the edge of the
six-yard box in an apparently offside position. Mollard who had
earlier appeared totally exhausted
had enough energy left to flick the
ball coolly past the Husky netminder.
The goal was scant reward for the
'Birds. They dominated the game
shutting down the weak Saskatchewan offence and moving crisply
forward themselves when they had
possession.
That they failed to turn a lot of
good possession into more than one
goal can be explained by a combination of good goal tending and over
anxious finishing.
The team flies down to Utah for a
tournament before returning next
week to take on Victoria in that
crucial game.
GP W L T F A Pts
B.C. 9 7 0 2 27   9 16
Victoria 9 6 0 3 22   7 15
Alberta 8 3 3 2 16 14   8
Calgary 8 2 4 2 11 13   6
Saskatchewan 8 15 2   6 15   4
Lethbridge        8 0 7 1    4 28    1
SPORTS
Dinos embarass
hapless 'Birds
ON THE WAY...Terri Drain's shooting helped send 'Birds into finals - rory alien photo
Second place good for finals
The UBC Women's field hockey
team clinched its habitual playoff
berth this weekend in the final
Canada West tournament in Victoria. They go on to the national
final however in the unaccustomed
role of Western runners up.
But the UBC team is not in
decay. Coach Gail Wilson said the
Thunderbirds are the team that has
improved the most dramatically
during Canada West action this,
year. The tie with University of Victoria on Sunday shows that UBC
are at least the western champions'
equal, she added.
At the start of the weekend
UBC's main concern was to ensure
second place. UBC crushed chief
rivals Calgary 4-0 in their first
game. Jodi Blaxland scored two
each and Lisa Lundell and Heather
Benson, with a penalty stroke, added the others. Saturday afternoon
UBC beat Manitoba 3-2. It was a
very tough game, said Wilson.
Manitoba scored first but UBC
came back with goals from Terri
Drain, Joni Franks and Heather
Benson with another penalty
stroke. Both Heather's penalty
stroke goals were turning points,
Wilson said.
In other action Saturday afternoon UBC's bitter rivals UVic did
the 'Birds a favor by defeating
Calgary to knock that team out of
contention.
When UBC arrived at the field
for Sunday morning's game against
Alberta they discovered Manitoba
had just gained a surprise draw with
UVic which meant two wins would
give UBC first place.
The 'Birds responded by destroying Alberta 8-0 to set up a showdown with the hosts in the final
game.
UVic scored after 20 minutes but
Lisa Lundell tied it up for UBC off
a penalty corner six minutes into the
second half. The game, which
Wilson said was "a classic", ended
1-1.
"The team is peaking now," said
Wilson looking forward to the national finals in two weeks.
By MONTE STEWART
The Calgary Dinosaurs moved up
in more ways than one Friday
night.
The Dinosaurs clobbered the
Thunderbird football team 35-1 in
the Alberta city. The victory enabled the Dinosaurs to jump into a tie
for first place in the Western Intercollegiate Football League and it
also vaulted them into top spot in
the national rankings.
Greg Vavra was once again the
main offensive weapon for Calgary.
The lanky quarterback, who also
doubled as the Dinos' place-kicker
and punter, passed for three
touchdowns and 287 yards before
giving way to backups Lew Lawrick
and Greg Phillips.
Josh Borger caught two
touchdown passes while Tim Petros
caught one touchdown pass and ran
for another major for the Dinos.
The remaining points came from
the toe of Vavra.
Kicker Tom Dixon accounted for
the lone UBC point on a 41 yard
single.
Inconsistent passing continued to
haunt the Thunderbirds. Starting
quarterback Jordan Leith completed only seven of 15 attempts for
62 yards. He also threw one interception. Replacement Jay Gard
completed five of 14 attempts for 82
yards.
The UBC running attack, the so
called bread and butter play, was
not very successful. Kent Bowling
led all rushers with 38 yards on five
carries while Peter LeClaire carried
the ball twice for 22 yards. Glenn
Steele, who is now in third place in
league rushing, handled the ball
eight times for a paltry 17 yards.
Steele, who missed the previous
game against Manitoba, is still
bothered by sore ribs.
Tom Dixon shattered his
previous per game punting average
as he punted six times for a 52.4
yard average. The previous record
was 48.7 yards, set on Oct. 1 in
Saskatoon.
Saskatchewan also moved into a
tie for first last weekend. The
Huskies narrowly defeated
Manitoba 28-22. Consequently,
there are still four teams remaining
in the play-off race. With the three
way tie for first, Alberta is all alone
in second place with a 3-3 record,
just two points behind the leaders.
The first and second place teams
advance to the Western Final at the
home of the first place team.
Saskatchewan will have to beat the
'Birds on Nov. 5 at Thunderbird
stadium if they hope to have a shot
at that game. Alberta will have to
defeat the Thunderbirds this Saturday in Edmonton if they want to
keep their play-off hopes alive.
CITR was unable to broadcast
the Calgary game because of
technical difficulties which arose
last week. This week, CITR will
plug into the University of
Alberta's broadcast of the game.
Game time is 1 p.m. PST.
GP W L T F A PTS
Calgary
6 4 2 0 199 109 8
B.C.
6 4 2 0 135   96 8
Sask.
7 4 3 0 168 175 8
Alberta
6 3 3 0 114 145 6
Manitoba
7 16 0    96 186 2
Bureaucrats axe Shrum Bowl    f  'Bird Droppings   )
By MONTE STEWART The two universities were unable    tion   of   Intercollegiate   Athletics   V mm «J J
By MONTE STEWART
The 1983 Shrum Bowl fell victim
to the bureaucratic axe Thursday.
The annual football contest between UBC and Simon Fraser
Univerity was cancelled at the
behest of Western Intercollegiate
Football league.
The WIFL refused to allow the
Thunderbirds to participate in the
game. According to WIFL rules,
teams may schedule only ten games
per season — excluding play-offs.
Each member of the five team
league plays eight regular season
games. UBC has already used up its
two allowable non-conference
games in exhibition contests with a
couple of American universities.
Furthermore, league regulations
also stipulate that no (exhibition)
post-season games may take place
during the week of, or following the
Vanier Cup (the Canadian Intervarsity Athletic Union Football final)
game. The Shrum Bowl had been
tentatively scheduled for Wednesday, November 30 at B.C. Place
Stadium. The Vanier Cup game will
be held Saturday, November 30 at
Varsity-Stadium in Toronto.
The two universities were unable
to schedule the game for a mutually
suitable alternative date because of
timetable conflicts.
The ultimate victim of this
bureaucratic charade is charity.
Proceeds of the Shurm Bowl would
have gone to the United Way Campaign which has received $80,000 in
five years from it.
In the past, both the WIFL and
its governing body, the CIAU, have
allowed the game to take place.
Last season, UBC defeated SFU
19-8 in a rain-soaked affair one
week after their victory over the
University of Western Ontario in
the Vanier Cup.
The general consensus among the
Athletic Department and team officials is that both the WIFL and
the CIAU felt the Shrum Bowl
would discredit both the league and
the CIAU. SFU is the only Canadian university which is not a
member of the CIAU. Therefore, if
UBC were to win the Vanier Cup —
which they could do again this year
— and then lose to SFU, who play
in an American National Associa
tion of Intercollegiate Athletics
division one conference, this might
devalue the CIAU competition.
Naturally, UBC — which was to
host the game this year — could
have avoided both the contravention of the league rules and the
scheduling conflict. UBC could
have played just one exhibition
game (after the Birds' 21-0 loss to
Hamboldt State, they probably
would have liked to) and scheduled
the Shrum Bowl on one of their bye
dates during the season. However,
the relectance of the league to enforce its rules in the past indicated
that such changes were probably
not necessary.
The cancellation of the Shrum
Bowl also means that head coach
Frank Smith has faced his arch
rivals from SFU for the last time.
The veteran coach recently announced his resignation, effective
June 30, 1984.
Nevertheless, the Shrum Bowl is
not dead yet. Both UBC and SFU
— not to mention the United Way
— are looking forward to reviving
the contest in 1984.
SOCCER
The UBC women's soccer team
were shut out for the second week
in a row in league action Sunday.
The team lost 1-0 to Meralomas
in the most frustrating manner.
They conceded a penalty kick in the
second half which substitute goal-
tender Bianca Wolski saved only
for the Meralomas to knock in the
rebound.
UBC did gain some success over
the weekend when they defeated the
Northshore Amazons 2-0, in exhibition play Saturday.
CROSS COUNTRY
The Canada West University
Athletic Association Cross-Country
Championships were held over the
southern part of the UBC endowment lands, Saturday.
Although they were on their
home mud neither UBC team gained the top two finish that would
have advanced them to the national
finals.
Ed Booth of UBC will make the
trip to  Laurentian  University on
November 5 as an individual on the
strength of his fourth place finish.
The UBC women finished sixth
out of seven teams. The University
of Victoria were first and Manitoba
second. These two teams were much
too strong for the rest filling the top
five positions between them.
The UBC men's team finished
third overall in a very tight men's
division. Alberta was first with 56
points, Saskatchewan second with
63, UBC finished two points further
back on 65 and just two more
points behind in fourth were Victoria with 67.
The Lethbridge Pronghorns,
named after the fastest running
animal in North America had
special reason to celebrate this
weekend — they managed an
almost perfect maximum score.
Their five women occupied the last
five places in the women's events,
but the men allowed one Calgary
runner to penetrate their phalanx
and could only manage seven of the
last eight places for a total of 222
points out of a possible 225.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128176/manifest

Comment

Related Items