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The Ubyssey Feb 9, 1967

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Array Happy Year
of the Ram
Vol. XLVIII, No. 46
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 9,  1967
224-3916
SULLIVAN
5
Arts profs
named to run
new program
Eleven professors who will
run next year's experimental
new arts program were named Wednesday.
The professors will work in
two groups of six. One group,
headed by economics professor Fr. G. F. McGuigan, includes Jean Elder (history),
Fred Stockholder (English),
Alan Shucard (English), George
Rosenberg (fine arts) and a
sixth not yet named.
English professor Ian Ross's
group includes Robert Kubicek
(history), Adrian Marriage
(sociology), Ruby JNemser (English), Peter Remnant (philosophy), and Brian Mayne (English).
The twelve were selected
from an original volunteers
group of 28 during meetings
last week.
Each group wil teach 120
students.
Ross said Wednesday a statement of curriculum and basic
readings would toe completed
in March.
The 1967-68 UBC calendar
will ask for students to volunteer for the program. Names
will be picked at random and
not according to any academic
criteria.
McGuigan and Ross stressed that they are seeking student opinion on the new arts
program.
FACING RADSOC MIKE, AMS president-elect Shaun Sullivan tells the world what he's thinking of doing next year.
Defeated candidate. Bob Cruise, looks at something  else.
Record numbers cast vote
despite vanishing polls
By NORMAN GIDNEY
A combination of good weather, student
interest in a possible strike, and clear-cut
campaign issues made a record, vote in Wednesday's AMS elections.
Last year*  6,000  votes  were cast;   this
year a record 6,800 students voted.
Several   polls   were   shifted   during   the
middle   of  voting.
MEEHAN
hour before and the auditorium cafe-
shifted to the engineering build-
kt 2:30 pan.
FChief returning officer Pat Meehan, engineering 4, said: "Certain polls used up
ballots including their extras. We took polls
in outlying areas of low traffic and moved
them complete to the polls with heaviest
traffic."
MJeehan said there were signs on all
tables indicating the polls had been moved.
Asked about rumors of voting irregularities,
Meehan said he had no official complaints
and he couldn't "consider what may only
be a rumor."
Ballot counting in the Brock TV room
started at 7 p.m. and lasted three and one-
half hours.
Meehan had his hands full as more than
a hundred students crowded into the smoke
filled room to count and to observe.
As the first totals for the strike referendum went up the ballot counters booed,
hissed or applauded according to their preferences.
Meehan's pleas to "quiet down" and
"Let's have a little quiet from the peanut
gallery" were met by laughter and table
thumping from the counters.
The whole affair turned rather comical
as counters and observers hurled epithets
at one another.
"This is so absurd," commented Special
Events chairman-cum-ballot counter Brian
Plummer.
"They're the candidates for the second
slate," laughed law undergrad president
John Trueman.
TO
Campbell wins,
strike squelched
Shaun Sullivan is next year's AMS president.
The  third-year   commerce   student  won   Wednesday's
election with 4,515 votes over opponent Bob Cruise's 2,294.
In the race for second vice
president, Kim Campbell, arts
3, polled 3,723 votes compared
to 2,270 for Doug Halverson,
arts 4, and 570 for Maynard
Hogg,  science 2.
The referendum calling foi
a student strike to back demands for $66 million provincial grants to universities
was defeated by a vote of 5,747
to 1,063.
Cruise, law 3, and Halverson
were running on the same
radical platform as Cathy Kerr,
acclaimed AMS secretary last
Thursday.
Wednesday's election turnout was the highest in AMS
election history.
Returning officer Pat Meehan
said only the student union
building referendum two years
ago drew more voters—about
7,2000.
He said the 4,515 votes for he will do on taking office
Sullivan was the highest total will be to see that the student
ever cast for an AMS president,   point of view is heard by the
Sullivan said the first thing   board of governors.
Cruise to haunt Brock
KIM  CAMPBELL
. . . delighted
"Students must be consulted
on decisions," he said, "now
that operating costs have not
been met."
Sullivan said that student
representation on the board
was not of high priority yet.
"We should think about
students on the senate first,"
he said.
Defeated presidential candidate Cruise said that the
results of the election indicate
a strong anti-strike attitude
on the campus—and probably
an anti-left attitude as well.
"But the things people hope
to vote out of existence still
continue and we will still continue to haunt those Sureau-
crats,"  he said.
Cruise said he still plans to
carry out the "Free University" project.
"This and other projects
which I considered the core
of my program, he said, "will
go ahead provided we have
the financial resources."
Second vice-president elect
Kim Campbell said she was
"delighted".
Miss Campbell said one reas-
son she won was because she
was "cuddlier".
"But I would like to see
students informed about what
is being done with their
money," she said.
Her platform included plans
to write a column for The
Ubyssey.
McGill votes opt-out,
rejects CUS for UGEQ
MONTREAL (CUP) — Canadian Union of Students
Wednesday bade goodbye to its last Quebec stronghold,
after McGill students voted 58 per cent to join Union Generate Des Etudiants Du Quebec.
In the two-part referendum, McGill voted 3,168 to
924 in favor of joining a national union, then dumped its
CUS ties 2,063 to 1,489.
The McGill withdrawal, eighth from CUS in the past
five months, was no surprise to CUS president Doug Ward,
who called the move a. "priority political decision".
Commented Ward: "If I had been a student on the McGill campus, I would have voted the same way.
Ward's enthusiasm wasn't shared by McGill council
president Jim McCoubrey, who said while results indicated
McGill students wanted to leave CUS and join UGE, the
vote was "extremely close". Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 9, 1967
— kurt hilger photo
"WHO  SAYS  you   can't  get  heartburn   in   Brock   Hall?"
screams sauve Elsnerd Swallower as he  downs another
conflagration as part of the Contemporary Arts Festival's
Radial Changes presentation.
'Only screwballs
back capitalism'
Centennial
jobs open
in summer
Interested in a summer job
with competitive salaries that
offers you a chance to travel?
If so the centennial student
exchange program is the place
for you. It offers a wide variety
of public service summer jobs
in all provinces of Canada.
The Canadian Centennial
Commission pays travel costs.
The exchange program aims
to let students observe . firsthand conditions of employment and career openings in
government service.
Interested students should
consult the UBC student placement office before Feb. 28 for
information and application
forms.
Selected students will be
notified before March 31.
The only defenders of Canada's free enterprise capitalism
are "certain screwball intellectual elements" claims Ross
Dawson, executive secretary of
the League for Socialist Action.
Dawson was speaking to 14
students in Buchanan.
He pointed to uniquely Canadian socialist institutions like
the CNR and provincial hydro
authorities.
"It poses to intelligent minds
that there is something in
socialism," Dawson said.
He called the U.S. and Canada "the last redoubts of
capitalism in the world."
"The drive to socialism is irrepressible and consistent. Regardless of the labor and communist parties the movement
goes ahead."
WATCH FOR
TUESDAY
AT THE FRIAR
4423 Watt 10th Ava.
DIAMOND 5 WEDDING RINGS
What better time than Valentine"* Day — to give her
that long-awaited Miller's
Diamond Ring? Designed
with the Young in Mind.
Illustrated Ring from $295.
in 14-18K Brushed Gold.
Special Courtesy Discounts
for UBC Students and Personnel.
IHillcrs
655 Granville Street.
47 West Hastings Street.
Vancouver, B.C.
622 Columbia Street
New Westminster, B.C.
EXTENDED TERMS
Collect all your beefs,
the door opens Friday
The door opens again Friday to UBC president
John Macdonald's office — enter critics, beefers, and
the curious.
Macdonald has had two open door days since they
were first announced in Sept., 1966. At that time he
promised one a month.
The first two involved about a dozen bodies from
student government and The Ubyssey.
This is students' only chance to see their president
with their ideas and problems. Enter the door between
10 a.m. and 5 p.m. this Friday.
The New
Tenant
comedy of
the absurd
by  Eugene  lonesco
directed  by Judith  Penner
FREDERIC WOOD
STUDIO
Thursday
Feb. 9
12:30
OPPORTUNITIES FOR
GRADUATES IN LIBRARY SCIENCE
with the
NATIONAL LIBRARY
and
MAIN LIBRARIES OF GOVERNMENT
DEPARTMENTS
AT OTTAWA
AND OTHER CENTRES
$6110 - $6489
Interviews on campus February 15, 16 and 17.
Appointments for  interview may   be arranged  through
the Office of the Director of the Library School.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15, 1967
TUESDAYS   —
WEDNESDAYS —
12:45
2:45 p.m.*
2:00 - 3:30 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.'*
3:00 - 5:00 p.m.»*
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
12:45 - 2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
♦Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
♦♦Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
ADMISSION: Afternoons —   Students .35      Adults .60
Evenings      —   Students .50     Adults .75
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
FRIDAYS   —
SATURDAYS  —
SUNDAYS   —
Arts Festival
AL NHL TRIO
j/imOmO
Today International House Upper Lounge        3:30-.35c Thursday, Feburary 9,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
' kurt hilger photo
ARMORY BEDS . . . waiting for blood-filled donors
Bleeders: where are you?
The UBC blood drive needs about
1,000 students to give blood today and
Friday or else the drive ends in catastrophe.
At least 800 pints are needed to
meet this year's quota of 3,400 pints.
. Last year 11 per cent of the students gave 3,100 pints. In 1957, with a
smaller student body, they gave more
blood in the first week than in the
same period this year.
"This is the first time at  the end
of the first part of the UBC blood
clinic that there has been a shortage
of blood," said Dr. T. D. Stout of the
Red Cross blood transfusion service.
"Last week we were about 400 pints
short. This week we are 800 pints
short."
Among faculties dentistry is leading with 86 per cent, among residerices,
Fort Camp leads with 25 per cent, and
Psi Upsilon leads fraternities with 80
per cent.
m»> * ^m^vrnx _*#',
SAYS POET
Xeep harangue quiet'
"One shouldn't draw attention to it," said Michael
Steele, arts 2, of the poetry
anarchist harangue in the
auditorium cafeteria Monday.
"Anarchists belong to a
negative, chaotic, pseudo-
ideological movement which
has in the past been conducted by irresponsible unrealistic revolutionaries and I see
no reason why its tendencies
should be any different in the
future," he said.
"It is a destructive movement." But that is a moot
point when you hear what
they are after.
"We are trying to blow
everybody's mind,'' said
Steve Garrod.
"We must be concerned
and involved all of the time
with the world around us."
"If you treat everything
with concern for individual
freedoms then your own freedom will be guaranteed.
♦Things don't happen as
they should because people
refuse to get involved. People
ignore the world around them.
"This leads to situations
such as Nazi Germany where
Indians  future
to  be  discussed
at  local meeting
The future of Canadian
Indians will be presented in
a symposium Feb. 9 to 11 at
the school of social work.
Nearly 150 Indians and
university students are expected to attend the symposium which will deal with
the potential of Indian communities.
Organizer Marie Baker
said the creative possibilities
of the young people's future
will take prominence over
the welfare aspects.
people have denied their responsibilities as human beings."
Garrod read Poem From
Jail by Ed Sanders, who was
jailed for attacking the nuclear sub Patrick Henry.
Anihilist? No. "He just
doesn't believe in war and its
weapons."
"Instead of voting, cells of
students should be formed to
further the revolution." said
poet  Scott  Lawrence.
"Revolution is happening in
a really big way. We are concerned, anti-war and anarchist," he said.
"This is a love revolution.
The psychedelic affairs are
means of focussing attention
on the revolution.
"Only people that are already interested in art and
love are really involved. We
must take it to the streets. A
street dance would be a good
thing."
AT SIMON FRASER
Three students
to sit on senate
BURNABY (UNS) — Three students will sit on the
Simon Fraser Academy senate, it was announced Monday.
The senate made the move on the recommednation of
its student representation committee.
Dr. Patrick McTaggart-Cowan, president, said: "The committee sought to find out why students wanted representation
on the senate, how they felt they should be represented and
what they felt they could contribute to senate meetings.
"The committee recommended a student representative
be added yearly to the senate to a maximum of three elected
representatives, but the senate decided to establish places for
three elected students immediately."
The committee, initiated by the senate, consisted of four
sentate members and three student representatives.
The senate deals with courses and course content. Today it consists of 30 persons, six of whom are elected by
academy graduates.
When and how the students will elect their representatives has not been decided. It has flbeen suggested that the
senate's decision will not go into effect until the fall.
SFA will be the second university in Canada to put
students on the senate. The first was the University of
Victoria.
Simon Fould, editor of the SFA student newspaper, the
Peak, described the senate as a "rubber stamp organization—
very formal and tedious.
"But this decision is indicative of the willingness of faculty
and administration to adopt modern ideas," he said.
MAC NOT BACKED'
Administration public relations officer Ralph Daly Wednesday charged B.C.'s two other university presidents with
failing to stand behind UBC president John Macdonald in the
Bennett budget fight.
"Simon Fraser's Dr. Patrick McTaggart-Cowan and University of Victoria's Dr. Malcolm Taylor are letting Macdonald
do all the work," claimed Daly.
"Of course, Simon Fraser feels they have a direct pipeline to the government," Daly added.
Macdonald said Friday the $53 million of the $66 million
required for operating and capital building finances is a disappointing figure.
"There is no new capital provided at a time when additional building money is critically needed," he said.
McTaggart-Cowan and Taylor have not publicly commented on the $53 million grant.
Macdonald refused to talk to The Ubyssey Wednesday
Reporters wanted to ask him whether UBC students will suffer
a fee raise if the provincial grant is divided between the three
universities in the same ratio used last year.
The president said through Daly that he will not speculate
until the government's university grants board makes its decision on the split.
Saskatchewan engineers
gather giant paper crop
SASKATOON (Special) — The student newspaper here
arrived on campus over three hours late Friday following
a high-jacking of nearly the entire press run by college
pranksters.
Over 8,000 copies of the Sheaf were wisked away by a
group of students from the college of engineering, following
allegations by the college that previous editions of the newspaper had failed to give adequate advance coverage to a
recent engineering show.
At 11 a.m. Friday, the students met a truck delivering the
papers, signed for them, and made off with them in another
vehicle — all before circulation staff arrived to take regular
delivery.
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Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
The tygers ot wrath are wiser than the
horses of instruction.
- Wm. Blake
FEBRUARY 9,  1967
Shaunanigans
Cheers to Shaun Sullivan and hearty congratulations
to his campaign workers for their fight — pushing an
unknown but good man into the presidential chair in a
mere three-day campaign.
It is unfortunate that the fight was won over a
strike issue fouled from the start by a council which
couldn't make up its mind and couldn't formulate a
realistic program for students to consider. But through
his campaign Sullivan adopted and forwarded a program of sound thinking and broad policy.
He comes to the presidency, then, with little AMS
experience iheyond a stint as Liberal club president, and
commitments to push the AMS into academic affairs,
create a second Back Mac campaign, and make a number
of reforms in university structure that will require
support from both the administration and the government.
The program is good, and if Sullivan can implement it students will have made a wise choice. We wish
him best success.
Turf Meehan
We admit there are difficulties conducting a poll
on a campus of 17,300 students, but Wednesday was
ridiculous.
Returning officer Pat, Meehan, through lack of foresight, did not print enough ballots for heavy voting areas
such as engineering, education and the Angus building.
So Meehan removed whole polling booths from, respectively, the auditorium cafeteria, the biological sciences
building and the gymnasium.
His excuse: traffic was light in those areas. The
same absurd logic could be used provincially to close
the whole, light-voting Atlin constituency at noon and
bring the ballot boxes to populated East Vancouver.
We always thought the basic premise of a representational democracy was the inalienable right of all
citizens to vote. That premise makes it impossible to
close a poll in the middle of election day.
There were other irregujarities, the normal ones:
people manning polls told students the issues and how
to vote, polls all over campus closed early, box stuffing
was attempted.
But there is no precedent anywhere for eliminating
polls in an attempt to ease traffic — the simple solution
is simply to print enough ballots, or to move unused ballot
pads. But never remove the boxes.
Meehan's thinking clearly makes him incompetent
to conduct a. democratic election. We suggest he be
removed from his post before next week's second slate.
Blud
Hey — we're going to win the inter-faculty blood
drive trophy.
Yesterday alone, 36 per cent of The Ubyssey's editorial board bled their life fluids into Red Cross bottles;
800 more bleeding pints will bring the spring total to
quota: 3,400 pints.
Those 3,400 pints will re-establish UBC students as
the largest group of blood donors in the province. Think
about it . . . one crummy pint you'll never miss might
save somebody's life. It's a real bargain.
With pretty and/or motherly nurses thrown in, free
cookies and orange juice, the ordeal gets almost pleasant.
Brock, all day today. Armory, all day Friday. Bleed.
Blue? Certainly ifs  bluel
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
^Refute  charges
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I hope you will give me
the opportunity to refute the
false charges made against
me by Bob Cruise. Here are
the facts:
1) At the beginning of
October, 1965, then AMS
president Byron Hender told
me the prime minister had
accepted his invitation to turn
the sod for SUB, and this
surprised me because I was
an active Liberal and did not
know this was even under
consideration;
2) Hender asked me, in my
capacity as ass't. public relations officer, to handle the
arrangements for this event;
3) this I did along with
Derry Nelson, a well-known
campus Conservative <w h o
had no objections) and Rick
Blair of The Ubyssey staff;
4) this I consider most important, I have never received any reward from the Liberal party nor have I ever
been a paid official of the
Liberal party. I worked in
the house of commons the
summer preceding the P.M.'s
visit to UBC, as I did last
summer.
I hope this will clear up
Mr. Cruise's ridiculous statements and I am sorry he had
to indulge in that kind of
electioneering.
KEITH MITCHELL
Arts 4
Were moderate
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The ineffectiveness of our
present council rests primarily in that its measures are
too radical, publicly unacceptable, and unobjectively explained. As students we are
confused over AMS issues, improperly led, and as a result,
totally without influence.
It would be interesting to
see what a less radical council could do — particularly
one that understands the
"politicing" involved when
dealing with authority. We
are more moderate than
council would like to believe:
the majority of us are not re
actionary, and do not wish—
as does Mr. Cruise — to do
away with society's bureaucratic institutions.
We desire an education; we
desire smaller fees; we desire good accommodation. We
desire that these things be
known. But we do not want
them recognized through irresponsible, immature, pressure.
We are not a vocal student
body: but we are able to designate where our real choice
lies. We can vote for a council that has not only our interests in mind — but also
our methods.
V.   HUNTINGTON
Arts  4
Illogical Allen
Editor, The  Ubyssey:
I would like to reply to
Don Allen's confused letter
in the Jan. 27th Ubyssey.
His message seems to be that
"marches are useless," and
that education should remain
an individual choice, whatever that means.
He supports his contention
that marches are useless by
claiming they alienate the
support of the voting public.
Part of that letter read
"marches from UBC are giving Canadians the impression
that we are left-wingers, unproductive, spongers, and
have time for ridiculous affairs — all on the public's
'free' money ..."
This morning I was told
that the engineers had held a
"protest march" downtown
on Friday night. When I
arrived on campus I saw
toilet paper strung all over
the trees and bushes of the
central campus area. I saw
buildings and sidewalks defaced with red spray paint.
There was an ugly red-brown
At noon, bombs exploded,
stain in the library pond.
For left-wingers in the paragraph above read engineers.
This must be Allen's
"mature plan to educate the
people." He is not only 4th
year engineer tout always up
in the front line during the
the stunts.
That letter was not only
illogical and semi-understandable, it was hypocritical.
DENNIS GANS
EDITOR: John Kelsey
City        _.       Danny Stoffman
News "__ Al Birnie
Photo . —       Powell Hargrave
Page Friday    .    .      Claudia Gwinn
Sports  Sue Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Focus  Kris Emmott
Ass't News  Al Donald
Ass't City -_    .   _    __  _. Tom Morris
CUP     Bert Hill
Bleeding and voting day saw
late - night electioneers Norman
Gidney and Charlotte Haire scrutinizing poll-movers, counters and
candidates. Mary Ussner went
medial, turned-on as usual. Peter
Shapiro, David Hastings, Boni
Lee, Don Stanley, Peggy Eng,
Jackie Leahy, Margaret Ladbury
and the ferociously inconceivable
Wang Ming wrote wisely, while
celebrating New  Years.
Ross Evans, Mike Jessen and
Pio Uran rowed the sports page
home.
Professor Kurt Hilger and crass
Chris  Blake   fotograffed.
Revolutionary celebration Saturday nite. Details on board.
Maple Leaves
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SfS.,- *.- Thursday, Feburary 9,  1967
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
'WE'RE ROMANTIC"
Victoria, SFA are cold
"UBC  is very  romantic."
So says Quebec university
student Regina Ricci.
"Simon Fraser and the University of Victoria seem cold
by comparison," she added.
"I'd really looked forward to
coming to Vancouver."
"Back home we have Pat
Burns who tells us how lousy
Montreal is and how wonderful Vancouver is."
Miss Ricci is one of nine
English-speaking students
from the English university,
St. Joseph's, in Montreal, who
spent last week in Vancouver
as part of the student teachers
exchange pilot program.
Accompanied by  professor
Real Boulianne who instigated the program, the students
spent a crowded week as
guests of the education faculty studying educational differences at UBC.
Bill Busay, one of the visitors, was impressed 'by UBC's
"superior   facilities.
"The only other noticeable
difference in teacher training
is your five year program in
secondary education," h e
said.
"I'm planning to return to
Vancouver," he added, "But I
don't know where I'll stand
with my degree obtained under Quebec's four year program."
North Viet premier
'doesn't want to fight'
North Vietnamese premier
Ho Chi Minh is a civilized aristocrat, according to UBC anthropology professor Bill Willmott.
Speaking to a crowd of 150
students and faculty in his
second lecture on Vietnam
Willmott compared Ho with
Mao Tse Tung.
"Ho has not the desire for
fighting as does Mao. He prefers politics to military solutions."
Willmott went on to compare the first Indochina war
with the one now.
"French public opinion was
not behind the war; the antiwar sentiment was largely
pro-Communist sentiment."
The war ended May 7, 1954
after France's surrender of
Dien Bien Phu. The cease fire
agreement set up the Joint
Commission and the International Control Commission.
It also required Ho to evacuate South Vietnam and to
postpone an election for two
years, at which time it would
be supervised by an international body.
"Ho agreed because he feared the U.S. would enter the
war,"   Willmott  said.
"If the elections had been
held at that time, 80 per cent
of the population would have
voted for Ho."
WATCH FOR
TUESDAY
AT THE FRIAR
4423 Watt 10th Ave.
Some things
You DESIRE ...
Some You Need!
And one of these is education. Imperatively! Once it
was a prerequisite of success.
Now you need it just to get
by! YOU know this. Consult
us. Vancouver's first tutoring college. (Still here because we get results). To
third year University — Our
staff is fully qualified. Success rate? Above 90 per cent
pass in subjects tutored.
Universal Tutoring
College
(Vancouver) Ltd.
571 Howe  Street
683-8464
VALENTINE
SPECIAL
ENGAGEMENT RINGS
Specially  Priced
from $50 - $100 - $200
Petted
695 Granville at Georgia
s&fet.
USED     •■
Nine UBC education students are presently in Montreal on a return visit, accompanied by education professor Frank Hardwick.
They are: Constance Young
ed. 2, Barbara Henry ed. 3,
Helen Stuart ed. 2, Dianne
Defieux ed. 3, Brenda Lim
ed. 3, Ronald Parks ed. 3,
Leslie McDiarmid ed. 4,
Pamela Walker ed. 2, and
Kerry Elfstrom ed. 2.
Huberman
Educational
Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
Public School, High School,
University Subjects
Morris  Huberman,
Educational  Consultant
Knowledffe and Success
through -.earning Power
215* W. 12th Ay*., Vancouver
For Appointment, Phone
732-5535        263-4
CONTACT
WEARERS!
LENSINE
MURINE
EXCLUSIVE!
Free removable carrying.
case! Provides hygienic,
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for your
lenses.
One solution
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lens care
Lensine's special properties
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a drop or two will do it. When
used for cleaning, a unique
Lensine formula helps retard
buildup of contaminants and
foreign deposits on the
lenses. It's self-sterilizing
add antiseptic. Ideal for wet
storage or "soaking" of
lenses. Lensine reduces
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FREE CARRYING CASE. Exclusive removable carrying
case with every bottle of
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GETTING MARRIED?
PLEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME	
M ADDRESS	
MR.  ROY YACHT,  Consultant
™* CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard MU 4-4011
Advertisement:
CANADIAN INDIAN YOUTH SYMPOSIUM-FEB. 9-11
The Indian Future Now —
Topics:  Colonialism  in Canada?
Sei-determinism for  Indian Communities
The Indian leader: a profile
THE ROLE OF THE UNIVERSITY RE: CANADIAN INDIAN.
The Community Development Program: the future?
Where:  Thurs.  and  Fri.  — 9:00-5:00  Green Park Bldg.
(next to sch. of soc. wk.)
Thursday — BLAB NITE — Advance Mattress
Fri. — The Internationalists — Acadia Camp,
8:00 p.m., Women's Lounge
Saturday  — Green Park, 9-1:00
BYRON USED
CHECKMATE!
In one of Lord Byron's recently recovered letters to
Thomas Moore, the indefatiguable "amant" confesses that it was through CHECKMATE that he met
most of his "lady-friends". "OPERATION CHECKMATE," Byron writes, "has permitted me to indulge
my excesses. Don't reprimand me. I am convinced
that "The road of excess leads to the palace of
wisdom/. If I remain in Venice much longer, I
shall soon  be wiser than Socrates . .  ."
OPERATION CHECKMATE
The   computer-dating   company   with  a
record  of success!
FREE   BROCHURES   WILL   BE   DISTRIBUTED   WITH THE   UBYSSEY   FRIDAY I
BE SURE TO PICK ONE UP I
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^>
Romance flourishes at Grassies on Seymour. So
do basic economics. For those who take advantage of Grassies' 10% Student Preferential Discount Policy. A fully comprehensive
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on all their merchandise. And on diamond
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* $350: Retail Volue/$315: To You.
566 SEYMOUR - 685-2271 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 9,  1967
How they voted
Poll by poll, here's how AMS president-elect Shaun
Sullivan amassed 4,515 votes to 2,294 for radical Bob
Cruise.
The strike went down 5,747 votes no to 1,063 yes.
For president:
Cruise Sullivan Spoil
South Brock      ___          196 540 8
North  Brock      __     ___   .      144 251 4
Bioscience        ____..-        63 106 2
Buchanan   1          —      153 208 4
Buchanan   2         __   -      124 189 5
Bus   stop       _-     —      195 396 6
College         __     —           150 203 6
Cafeteria            83 68 5
Education       _.     —      155 233 5
Engineering   -   __                   51 245 1
Angus   __        _              97 195 5
Home ec ________        14 88 0
Library            196 301 1
Physics    -       62 174 2
Ponderosa   __....__            85 280 1
VGH  __        __              24 61 2
Gym  __     __          ._..        49 95 1
Wesbrook              __       66 153 3
Acadia             ___        -61 114 1
Fort         118 243 4
Lower Mall      .              102 242 3
Totem     .                             106 130 1
Total __   .   2,294 4,515 70
Against strike:
Yes No Spoil
South   Brock                   113 623 6
North   Brock    __                   78 317 3
Bioscience        __               20 148 2
Buchanan    1        __              71 292 1
Buchanan   2              __        53 263 0
Bus   stop      -.   __    __    _       95 498 3
College              __     __        66 287 5
Cafeteria         _                 45 107 4
Education __      __        59 329 1
Engineering   ______        10 289 0
Angus                             48 246 4
Home  ec    _                              5 97 0
Library            __        96 399 0
Physics             30 207 2
Ponderosa      __        37 323 2
VGH        _.           7 78 2
Gym       __                              17 127 0
Wesbrook         .__     __        31 190 2
Acadia                   30 145 1
Fort         ._           ___        61 300 2
Lower   Mall             __        45 296 2
Totem __    ___   __ ._.     -        46 186 1
ABRAM and HAGAR
CHECKMATED
Recent archaeological findings confirm the widely
held speculation that Abram and Hagar had met
through CHECKMATE, the Canadian computer-dating
company. Sarai, Abram's wife, using the name
"Sarah," also joined CHECKMATE 13 years later.
Much fo her consternation, her first date was with
Abram's head slave who though in all other instances was faithful to his master kept silent about
this particular meeting. "Sarah's" second date was
with one Abraham who, as history records, turned
out to be none other than her husband I
Since then, CHECKMATE has altered its policy
slightly (married individuals are not encouraged
to join) but if you are :
1. SINGLE,    DIVORCED,   WIDOWED    or    RATTY
(like Abram  and  Sarai) and
2. INTERESTED   IN  MEETING MEMBERS OF   THE
OPPOSITE SEX
WATCH FOR
TUESDAY
AT THE FRIAR
4423 West  10th Ave.
Fast, accurate typing of essay* and
theses on IBM Electric typewirter.
Reasonable Terms. Call Mrs. Mug-
eridge, 684-4145 day or 263-4023
evenings.
FLAME
sumt clui
HE 4-5434
SPECIAL
EVENTS
PRESENTS
Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra
TODAY - ARMORIES -12:30 - 35c
Featuring Works from Rimsky-Korsakov, Ravel, Strauss
AMS Charter Flight to Europe!
>New DATES! #Wew FARES!
Vancouver - London and Return
MAY 11th - Aug. 29th
$37500
Call in at the AMS Office or Phone 224-3242
(SORRY ^ NO ONE-WAYS)
OPERATION CHECKMATE
The   computer-dating   company  with   a
history  of   success.
FREE BROCHURES AVAILABLE FRIDAY. PILES WILL BE DISTRIBUTED WITH
THE  UBYSSEYI
"Tooooaoooooooooooooooooooccoooooooooogpooooooy"
Tickets on sale at Vancouver Ticket Centre, 630 Hamilton St., MU 3-3255; ail Eaton's Stores (charge them);
and Town & Country Home Furnishings in Kerrisdale and Richmond.
STUDENT SPECIAL:  HALF-PRICE FOR ALL EVENING  PERFORMANCES
$100 FOR SATURDAY MATINEE
ARTS US OFFICIAL
NOTICE OF
NOMINATIONS
FOR:
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
SECRETARY TREASURER
Nomination forms available in AMS
office. Must be posted in Arts US office
Brock Extension no. 359, by February
20th, 4:00 p.m. Thursday, Feburary 9,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC ATHLETES HIT QUEBEC
FIRST CANADIAN
WINTER GAMES
QUEBEC
FEBRUARY 11-19
1967
THE SEVEN ski events will take place at Mont Ste-Anne. 165 males and 88 females
are competing here. Racing will be conducted according to the rules of the Canadian
Amateur Ski Association.
Wrestlers ready and waiting
There are three UBC wrestlers on the
eight man team which will represent B.C.
at the First Canadian Winter Games.
They are Colin Macleod, Ken Kerluke
and Chris Nemeth. All are 19 years old.
They leave Feb. 16 for the Games.
Macleod will wrestle in the 147 lb. class,
Kerluke in the 175 lb. class and Nemeth in
the 205 lb. class. All have a good background in wrestling. Macleod and Nemeth
started wrestling when they were eleven.
Nemeth has had some experince in national competition before. Macleod was high
school champion of B.C. in 1965.
UBC wrestling coach, Paul Nemeth, who
is going to Quebec as the team's manager,
said that Kerluke and Nemeth are the best
bets. He has high hopes of the team bringing (back a gold medal or two.
Coach Nemeth added that he expects
the toughest competition to come from the
Ontario entry and possibly the Alberta team.
Rod Carrow will coach the B.C. boys
who will join a total of 100 amateur wrestlers representing the ten provinces and the
North West Territories. All are in the 16-21
age group.
The rest of the B.C. wrestling team is
composed of two high school boys from
North Vancouver, two from Burnaby South
school and one from Burnaby Central.
The UBC men get a workout this weekend against Royal Roads Military College.
Competition will be held in the women's
gym on Saturday at 1 p.m.
Birds to find old enemies on ice
The ice hockey Birds are preparing this
week for the most important series of the
season.
From a league double-header against the
University of Manitoba Bisons on Friday
and Saturday, the team will fly to Quebec
City to participate in the First Canadian
Winter Games.
The Thunderbirds, representing B.C. in
the hockey tourney, will be pitted against
university teams from the other nine provinces and the North West Territories.
Their schedule is as follows: Feb. 13 —
New Brunswick; Feb. 14 — Saskatchewan;
Feb. 15 — MIcMaster; Feb. 16 — North West
Territories; Feb. 18 — Newfoundland.
If the Birds finish in the winner or runner-up spot, they advance to the championship on Feb. 19.
Competition will be stiff.
The site chosen for the tournament is
the Quebec Coliseum. It seats 10,000 fans.
International rules, generally employed
in Canadian intercollegiate hockey, will be
used.
The provinces will be divided into two
groups selected by draw, each playing
round robin. The winners of each division
will compete to determine the champions
and the runners-up in general classification.
The second place squads in each group
will also compete to determine the third and
fourth positions in general standings.
THE FAMOUS Quebec Coliseum is to be the meeting place for 11  ice hockey teams, all
composed of Canadian university students.
Canadian competitors
united through sports
After four years of planning, a former dream of the
First Canadian Winter Games has been realized.
Quebec is the chosen home of what may well be the
athletic event of the century. Snow being the most important natural link between all Canadians, it is believed
that all those Canadians who enjoy snow, in a city whose
reputation for hospitality and festivities is already
established, will constitute an authentic Canadian manis-
festation and a good omen for the next centennial.
The tournaments will taken place in various sports
centres of the Quebec region.
All technical delegates of National Associations concerned with sports included in the Games convened to
finally establish the eligibility standards and the regulations.
13 sports are officially accepted and now embodied
in the Games. They are: badminton, basketball, curling,
gymnastics, figure skating, ice hockey, shooting, synchronized swimming, table tennis, volleyball, speed skating,
skiing, and wrestling.
The motto of the Games, "Unity through Sports",
is a reminder that the aim of the Games is not only to
stimulate the enthusiasm for sports across the country,
but also to give the largest possible number of athletes
the opportunity to participate in a higher degree of
competition, to enhance the importance of minor sports
and increase the number of their adepts, and to tighten
the cordial relationship between competitors from different parts of Canada.
Best of luck to our UBC representatives.
Three skiers fate fast rivalry
Skiing is the thing this time of year and for UBC skiers
the action is high-caliber competition and busy schedules.
The next big meet is part of the First Canadian Winter
Games in Quebec. The skiing will take place on Mont Ste-Anne,
about 40 miles north of Quebec City, and will run Feb. 13 -19.
The ski meet is sanctioned by the Canadian Amateur Ski
Association and the competing teams will represent the team
members' home provinces.
UBC skiers on the B.C. squad are Rolf Pederson, a
Thunderbird ski team member, Dave Turner, also a Bird
skier, and Bob Calladine.
Pederson is entered in his specialty, the cross-country.
UBC ski coach, Tom Jenkin, says Pederson can be expected to
do very well.
Turner and Calladine are both entered in the slalom and
and the giant slalom. They will ski against tough competition
but have shown in the past that they can match with the best
of them.
Members of the Canada National Ski Team are not expected to be competing because of schedule conflicts. Their
absence immediately increases everyone else's chances.
While the Games are in progress in Quebec, there will
be an intercollegiate ski meet at Crystal Mountain Feb.
16-18. The Bird ski team will be going against such strong
ski colleges as University of Washington and possibly University of Idaho.
Pederson, who will be finished competing in the Games
on Feb. 15, will be flown back in time, if possible, to run
in the cross-country race at the Crystal meet.
WAA well represented
The UBC basketball Thunderettes, who were narrowly
defeated in their bid to become B.C.'s representative at the
First Canadian Winter Games, will nevertheless be well shown.
Vancouver Molsons have added three UBC players to their
roster to strengthen the team at Quebec.
Leaving with the team this weekend are Pauline Gensick,
Elaine Stewart, and Janet Douglas.
Other UBC students chosen for Quebec are Connie Bryde
and Arnice Wagstaff. They form part of the B.C. volleyball
team. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 9,  1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Fans face tricks
during UBC rally
UBCSCC
Noon   hour   gimmick   rally
leaves top of C-lot, noon, today.
CONTEMPORARY ARTS
FESTIVAL
Thursday's events: Gwendolyn McEwan reads her own
work, today, noon, Bu. 104;
premiere performance of A
Cento on Eldon Grier's An
Ecstacy, Cantata Rubana, today, noon, Bu. 106. Performed
by the University Chamber
singers; the Al Neil Trio, 3:30,
upper lounge, IH, admission 35
cents.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra performs works of Ravel,
Strauss, and Rimsky-Korsakov
today at noon in armory. Admission 35 cents.
CUS
Colonialism in Canada, examination of Indian situation,
Green Park, Northwest Marine
Drive, : information at CUS
office in Brock.
PHOTOSOC
Showing, judging of contest
slides, announcement of prin-
test contest winners  today at
noon, Bu. 203.
ALPHA OMEGA
Choir   practice   tonight   at
7:30, UCC centre; phone Mike
for further information.
SCM ,
Rev. Shaver reports on In
stitute    on    Bonhoeffer    and
Church   Renewal,   today at  8
p.m., board room, Union College.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Spiritual awakening at Berkeley   tonight   at   9:01   p.m.,
Lower Mall lounge.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Those wishing to go to Father
Bennet's church in Seattle,
Friday, call Berk. 224-9029.
EAST ASIA SOC
Talk with slides by Clive
Ainsley on the Red Guards today at noon in Bu. 102. Admission 25 cents.
WATCH FOR
TUESDAY
AT THE FRIAR
4423 West  10th Ave.
STEREO TAPE CENTE
ALL  TYPES  OF
PRE-RECORDED TAPES
-REEL TO REEL
-488 TRACK CARTRIDGES
Home  and Auto Tape  Players and
Recorders.
- TAPE RENTALS -
B.C. RECORDS
& TAPE LTD.
596 W.  Georgia 684-4107
Jl
MUSSOC'S EXCITING MUSICAL
"How To Succeed In Business
Without Really Trying'
STUDENT PERFORMANCE
NOON TODAY IN
AUDITORIUM-75c
Feb. 6-11 -8:30
Tickets $1.50, $2.00, $2.50
At Auditorium Box Office
Call CA 0-3176
_>v -Diamond with (Confidence
"Flair"
from
$100
Special  10% Discount to all  UBC Students
on ^Diamond   Engagement   Rings
FIRBANKS
DOWNTOWN
BRENTWOOD
PARK  ROYAL
Vojue
FLOWERS
"Originality  in Flowers
For  All   Occasions"
10% OFF CORSAGES
Phone 736-7344
•     2197 West Broadway     •
Newman  Centre  Presents
"SCHEMA  19"
DANCE WITH 'THE TRIPP'
Friday, Feb. 10, 9-1
Newman Lounge (St. Mark's College)
$1.00/person (members 75c)
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads are not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
WOULD PERSON WHO FOUND
H. Wood's wallet please drop It
in_ maiL_I will pay postage.        _
FOUND: PAIR OF DARK HORN-
rimmed glasses in yellow patterned case. Claim Bu 253.
FOUND: ENGLISH PROSE OF
the Victorian Era. No name in it.
Identify by the book marks.
Phone Ted, 736-5104.
FOUND: LADY'S GLASSES IN
case, behind Angus bldg. Claim in
Publication  Office,   Brock  Hall.
Valentine Greetings
12
BE ORIGINAL—SAVE MAILING A
card. Send Valentine Greetings to
your friends with a Classified ad.
(Feb. 14). Make arrangements this
week in the Publications office,
Brock Hall. "Deadline Monday
11  a.m."
Coming Dances
12A
SLAVIC FROLIC FEB. 11, 8-1. I.H.
Dancing to the Bruce Fairburn
Quartet. Entertainment by the
"South Slavs". Single $1.50.
Couple $2.50.	
OPEN AIR HOPPENING — JAMES
Brown and the fabulous UBC
rugby team in the Stadium today.
Special Notices
13
JOX RECS & MICKEY MOUSERS.
P._5. Valentine's Dance—The Cardiac Thump, Fri. Feb. 10. $3.00 per
couple. Tickets at noon in the
gym.
FINAL CLEARANCE AT THE
Campus Shoppe, 5732 University
Blvd. (in the village). Where
prices are always right. CA 8-8110.
SPANISH CLUB PRESENTS CUBA
Today. Bill James, CKLG News
Director, will give a talk on
Castro's Cuba Friday evening in
Bu. 204 8:30 slides.	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM OPEN MON.-
Fri. 12:30-1:30 F.&G. 116 — come
and see our minerals and fossils.
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's —
downtown.    Single    $1.50.    Couple
_$2.75.	
500 GIRLS NEEDED MARCH 3 & 4.
Transportation
14
WANTED RIDE FROM 26th
and MacDonald area. Phone 738-
1762.
IS THERE ANYONE LIVING IN
vicinity of Lester Pearson High
School in New West who could
give me a ride home Mon., Wed.,
Thurs. at 5:30? Please call Lorraine 521-4189.
RIDE NEEDED FROM CAMBIE
12th area 9:30 Monday to Friday.
Call   874-9773.
RIDE WANTED FROM NORTH
Burnaby Monday to Friday. Convenient times. Phone Lloyd, 298-
1015.
WOULD APPRECIATE RIDE, 8:30
classes Monday to Friday. Vicinity of Boundary and Kingsway.
Phone   434-0422.
RIDE FOR THREE WANTED TO
Frisco. Leaving Monday or Tuesday.   Call  731-9334.
RIDE WANTED: MARINE &
Stride, Burnaby for 8:30 class,
Monday, Wednesday, F r.i d a y
Hans  626-8370.
GIRLS WANT RIDE TO KELOW-
na; midterm break. Share expenses.  Ph.  224-9746 Rm.  469.
NEED RIDE TO WEST KOOTE-
nay on Feb. 15th or 16th. Please
phone   "Peter"  at  299-9859.
RIDE WANTED: MIDDLEGATE
Shopping Centre, Burnaby for
8:30 classes. Phone Randy 621-
2878.
Wanted
15  Sewing  & Alterations
Travel Opportunities
16
FOR SALE A.M.S. CHARTER
Flight ticket one way Vancouver/
London, leaving May 11th. Phone
Cherry  —  224-9731.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'63 CHEV — GOOD RELIABLE
transportation $76. Call Dick at
731-3881   or   224-9769.
57 PONTIAC V-8 A.T. W.W. RA-
dio $450. Phone Don 988-8706.
(eves.)
1959 CHEV. SEDAN. NEW
brakes, clutch, battery, etc. Phone
AM 6-2527.
59 RENAULT. GOOD CONDITION.
Extensive repairs, offers. Phone
LA   2-7469.
350.   '58  PONTIAC AUTO.  BEAUT,
cond. Mike 731-6295.
1962 TEMPEST. GOOD CONDI-
tion. Selling for my son who
needs money in Europe. Phone
261-8737.
Automobile Parts
21A
'61   FIAT   SPYDER
top,    clutch,     tires
parts.   CY  9-4874.
PARTS,
trans..
NEW
body
Bodywork, Glass
23
Motorcycles
27
WANTED     MO-PED     OR     SMALL
Motorcycle,     cheap.     Call     Brian
MacKenzie   at   733-6506   after  6:00
p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
39A
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. — "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T.. Eaton's
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.	
THEY MAY BE FROM BERKE-
ley but are they revolting? Find
out   today,   noon   in   the  Stadium.
I'M    NOT    PREJUDICED    — I'LL
fix   any   year   Volkswagen. Auto
Henneken 263-8121.  Oak and S.W.
Marine  Dr.
LET    IT   BE    KNOWN   THAT
WILLY   E.  AND   DOG
ARE NOT PLEASED
The slanderous statement perpetrated by Tommy Skin and such
lesser morons as Obese Lucyk,
Crash Sherwood, Gibbskin, and Calder the Cancel were sly attempts
to destroy our egos. However, this
is not the case. We fel that these
individuals were crassly attempting
to cover their own deficiencies. We
shall   elaborate.
Who but J. Lucyk could win the
Centennial Drinking Muscle Award?
What does Ross S. do when not
fighting with Gail? What the hell
do you think he does?
Who but B. Gibbs would shoot
out the lights at Mardi Gras? Got
the  bill yet Brian?
Why does Hunter C. only sleep
with Joey G. ? Ask  Jackie..
Why won't girls go out with
Tommy F., the Supreme Moron?
Because   he's   the  Foreskin?
The   Shadow   has   spoken!
P.S. Just who the hell is Surfer
Swisdahl?
Signed Willy E.  and  Dog
HEYC.C.   I  HEAR  IT'S  CURTAINS
on  the  48-hour party.
WILL JIMBO ASK JANIE TO
Post Exam Party before Ash
Wednesday?	
KEEP ABREAST WITH THE
times: T-man club had a feel
trip to the torch.
A.N.T.D.T.T.
TEMPO TEDDY PLAYS ORCHAR-
ina while Surf Swisdahl hangs 69
in toilet bowl — Magor's Mother
marvels.
CAR POOL — Vicinity 25th and
Granville and 41st. Drivers wanted. Phone Doug RE 3-6050,
Graeme AM 6-4787.
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
40
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE    EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4530
FAST, ACCURATE THESES TYP-
ing. Electric typewriter. Fully
exp.   Inger  872-7380.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
WANTED: COUNSELLOR APPLI-
cations for Diabetic Summer
Camp, last two weeks, August.
(Especially Girls). Phone Mr. Russell,  325-3756.
MALE AND FEMALE SUMMER
Camp Counsellors. Committed
Christians with camping experience required for Salvation Army
Day and Resident Camps. July
and August, 1967. Apply to: Major
Bruce Halsey, M.S.W. Family Service Centre, 319 East Hastings
Street,  Vancouver 4, B.C.
Music
63
FENDER DELUXE-REVERB AMP.
New $400. Sell $290. 3 mos. old.
TR  6-4200 after 6  p.m.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
EXPERT TUTORING IN MATH,
Science, Engineering. $3/hr. Minimum. 5 lessons. 876-1859.
Special Classes
65
EVERY BOY IS A RUNNER, A
rider, and a passer! Today, noon,
vs.   California.
Instruction Wanted
66
TUTOR WANTED FOR CHEM. II
student 1 or 2 hrs a week. Reasonable rates.  261-0129  after 5  p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
GETTING ENGAGED: I CAN SAVE
you up to 50% on any diamond
ring. Satisfaction guaranteed or
your money refunded. Call Mur-
ray 261-6671.	
PAIR OF KASTLE SLALOM SKIS
205m. Good condition. Phone
Bruce   AM   6-5859.
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen's Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
Beer   Bottle   Drive-in
at Rear of Store
SKIIS 185cm. STEEL EDGES,
laminated, safety harness and
poles, brand new. Phone 263-5148
after 5 p.m.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
Room & Board
82
FOR CONVENIENCE, COMFORT,
and congeniality, stay at Zeta PSI
Fraternity, 2250 Wesbrook Cres.
Phone 224-9662 between 5:00 p.m.
and  7:00 p.m.	
TRAFFIC PROBLEMS? MOVE ON
campus and forget them! Room
and board. Feb. 1. 2280 Wesbrook.
224-9986.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.        84
WANTED TO RENT. 3 BEDROOM
house, Dunbar, Point Grey area,
as soon as possible. Phone 224-
3005.
Real Estate
86

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