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The Ubyssey Nov 23, 1984

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 22
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, November 23,1984
m
228-2301
Government cuts funds for deaf
By ROBERT BEYNON
Three deaf UBC students will be
without interpreters Monday
because the provincial universities
ministry cut a $20,000 grant helping
pay for deaf translators.
Both Henry Vlug, law 3, and
Nigel Howard, arts 2, said the cut
will hurt their studies considerably
and they will do everything they can
to find the money required to pay
their interpreters.
Howard said he wants to become
a clinical psychologist working with
other deaf people, particularly
adolescents, but without a
translator this will be very difficult.
"Without an interpreter I will fall
behind," Howard said. "I'll depend more on others' notes and
textbooks rather than on lectures."
Howard currently has an interpreter, Karen, who attends class
with him and speaks to the professor and students for him.
Deaf students have a right to a
university education, Howard said,
and either the university or the provincial government should provide
the funds for an interpreter.
"I pay the same as any other student," Howard said, "but they get
something in return for that money.
I won't get the same quality of
education."
In New York state, where
Howard hopes to finish his educa
tion, law requires that institutions
provide interpreters for the deaf
and blind, Howard said. He said
B.C. should have a similar law.
Vlug, Greater Vancouver
Association of The Deaf president,
said it will be very difficult for him
to complete his law degree this year,
particularly as he has seminar
courses, but he intends to do it
anyways.
He said the university ministry's
refusal to provide the grant appears
to be the end of a long struggle the
association has waged to procure
interpreters for the deaf as a right.
The grant's end is a serious blow,
the Western Institute for the Deaf's
executive director said Thursday.
The  institute  organized  the  program.
Lynn Fiddawary said the ministry
provided only $20,000 of the program's $50,000 budget in the past
and refused to pay even that this
year. Fiddawary said the ministry
claims interpreters should be provided by UBC, and UBC rightly
says it has no money for interpreters, she added.
Jane Burnes, assistant to universities minister Pat McGeer, said the
ministry applied for the grant but
the treasury board turned them
down. But she said the ministry has
no responsibility to provide the
grant. The ministry only did so for
the institute in the past, Burnes
said, to help its work, not to supply
translators.
Mission campus closing
By STUART COLCLEUGH
Fraser Valley College's Mission
campus is the latest casualty in the,
B.C. government's policy of cutting
educational services in the province.
The Mission facility will be shut
down at the end of the 1985 summer
semester, leaving approximately
3,000 students our of luck, Earling
Close, Fraser Valley College's student and college services dean, said
Thursday.
"You ain't seen nothing yet,"
Close said. "This is just an early
warning of what we can expect in
the future."
The Mission campus shutdown
comes in the wake of funding cut-
Vote rules broken
HOWARD
loses interpreter
Firings hurt deficit
By PATTI FLATHER
UBC needs a special provincial
government grant so it can afford
severance pay next year for fired or
early retiring professors without
running a deficit, a student board
of governors representative said
Thursday.
"We have to get it," said Dave
Frank, adding $4 million dollars
was spent in the last two years on
severance pay. "We've been calling
it early retirement."
Frank said firing at UBC has
been done "politely" until now,
but firing cannot now be avoided.
"That's quite clear, and we'll have
to nuke programs."
Frank said these measures are
necessary because the largest expected provincial grant will be a
zero per cent increase over last year
and a five per cent cut is more likely.
A five per cent cut "gives us a $16
million shortfall out of a budget of
$211 million," Frank said.
Sixteen million dollars translates
into about 450 faculty salaries of
$35,000 per year, Frank said. "That
doesn't mean we're going to fire
450 people," he said. "That's just
the magnitude of the problem."
The Universities Act does not allow universities to run a deficit.
The deficit figure is based on several assumptions, including a 10 per
cent tuition hike, a modest wage increase for faculty, and an increase
in first and second year enrolment
even though the former dropped
significantly this year, Frank said.
"They might be forced to raise
tuition more than that," he added.
Frank said utility costs will be cut
one million per year to reduce the
deficit. People will be expected to
work harder and UBC will actively
encourage more students to enrol,
he added.
Faculty association president Elmer Ogryzlo said faculty representatives are now working on a firing
agreement with the administration,
-gotiations are going on at
this very minute," Ogryzlo said
Thursday. He said he hopes any terminations due to UBC's financial
crisis will be done voluntarily.
"Involuntary procedures for terminations are always a problem.
They usually tear an institution to
pieces."
He said once negotiations are finished faculty must vote on the
agreement.
Bruce Gellatly, vice presidence finance, said he and vice president
academic Robert Smith have until
Christmas to decide what programs
and services will be cut.
But Gellatly said he is working
with an optimistic $7.4 million deficit figure which assumes a zero per
cent increase in provincial funds.
Asked if the figure is too optimistic,
Gellatly said, "I have no idea."
By PATTI FLATHER
Once again election irregularities
have struck at UBC as two different
publications violated the advertising ban and a ballot box was left
untended during the Canadian Federation of Students membership
referendum.
Elections commissioner Donald
Mustard said a Science Undergraduate Society newsletter and a pamphlet were both being distributed
after the referendum began Wednesday, in violation of student referendum rules.
The SUS newsletter ran an anti-
CFS letter by CFS No committee
member Harvey Klatt. And Mustard said graduate student Frank
Frigon was handing out pro-CFS
pamphlets with misinformation
about voting procedures.
"The SUS newsletters have been
ordered to be removed," Mustard
said. He added he now has a Dig pile
in his office to be held until next
week before redistribution.
"There isn't much more you can
do except remove them and make
sure nothing else comes out," Mustard said, adding he did not think
many people had a chance to see the
newsletter.
And Mustard said he wanted to
clarify how graduate students vote
in light of Frigon's pamphlet. Graduate students vote on one ballot
which counts towards two decisions: whether the Alma Mater So
ciety will join CFS and whether the
Graduate Student Society will join,
with it being possible the outcomes
will be different, he said.
Mustard said he must check over
advertising during a campaign, adding he did not approve either the
newsletter or the pamphlets.
But Mustard said the irregularities are not serious enough to warrant invalidating the vote on whether UBC students should pay $7.50
each per year to join CFS.
And Yes committee member
Lawrence Kootnikoff said he found
a ballot box unattended for half an
hour Wednesday in Woodward
building. He said he told Mustard
and was told ballot counters will
compare student signatures and
numbers against the number of
ballots to check for ballot stuffing.
Kootnikoff said he also reported
the SUS newsletter distribution to
Mustard and has not seen any
around since.
SUS president Lonn Myronuk
claimed it was a mistake the newsletter was dated Wednesday.
"It was out Tuesday sometime
around 11. Definitely no later than
3:30," Myronuk said. "I realize the
date says Wednesday on it. I don't
know exactly why it says that."
Myronuk said it was unfortunate
the date was not changed and some
newsletters were still around Wednesday morning.
backs this year that forced the curtailment or elimination of services
and programs to universities and
colleges throughout the province,
Close said.
The B.C. government is eliminating funding to satellite campuses
that are within 50 kilometres of
main (college) campuses such as
Fraser Valley College in Abbots-
ford, he said. These funds include
lease or rental payments for the use
of existing space in public schools
and recreation centres in the satellite communities, Close added.
"It's a policy which is spreading
all across the province's college system," Close said. "They (the government) are just cutting back and
cutting back until they get some
kind of public response," he said.
Close said the college was particularly proud of their cut community outreach program which
provided educational services to native Indian reserves in the Fraser
Valley. "We have one of the largest
per capita native student enrolments in the province," he said.
Close said students at Mission
campus, "will have to cross the
(Fraser) river and take their
chances" at Fraser Valley College.
He said this may prove impossible
for many of the displaced students
because FVC has enrolment restrictions now.
The students include 2,403 in
continuing education — including
university transfer students, 321 in
office careers, 144 in adult basic education, 61 in English as a second
language and 16 in the homemaker
training program which provides
people trained to give in-home
co6king assistance to the sick and
elderly.
The Okanagan College board recently announced it will probably
end university programs and fire
faculty at its Salmon Arm and Pen-
ticton campuses.
"WE THINK YOU'RE a big meanie and so would Mr. Elvis!" screams
irate demonstrator. Angry mob chants verses from Jailhouse Rock as
unnamed fisheries minister tries to conceal contraband fish and evade
cameras. (Okay, okayl Some people were just shooting a movie outside
SUB.) It didn't REALLY happen. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 23,1984
Students rap
banks9 support
of apartheid
OTTAWA(CUP)—While rioting
and unprecedented levels of
violence continue in black South
African townships, Ontario
students are fighting against financial support for that country's apartheid regime.
The latest round of student activism has seen a march on a Peterborough bank prompting a call to
police, an exchange of correspondence between bank officials
and student politicians at Trent
University, and a brief and petition
with more than 1,600 signatures
presented to the University of
Toronto's governing council
demanding the divestment of the
university's holdings in corporations and banks dealing in South
Africa.
In addition, the faculty association at the University of Windsor
recently rejected a motion to construct moral guidelines for the investment of the organization's pension fund.
The Oct. 26 march on a Canadian
Imperial Bank of Commerce
branch by about 35 Trent students
and a community members was
sparked by the Oct. 3 arrest of 358
black South Africans by 7,000 combat troops. The arrests took place in
what the South African government called the removal of
"criminal and revolutionary
elements".
The march led to the CIBC
because the Trent student council is
protesting the installation on campus of an Instant Teller machine by
a bank the council says financially
supports apartheid.
"We all marched in and asked
the manager for a statement," said
Trent graduate David Melvill, a
white South African. "His reaction
was one of belligerence and arrogance. He just said 'no comment'
and told us to get out."
Bank manager A. McLellan
phoned Peterborough police, who
met the protesters as they were leaving the bank. No charges were laid.
More recently, R. Plentl, CIBC
vice-president and general manager
of the Ontario Central East region,
responded to a Trent student council resolution sent Oct. 17 by
Thomas Haig, student council international commissioner.
In part, the resolution condemned the CIBC for loan extensions to
South Africa. It also noted Trent's
policy on non-investment and non-
support for banks that invest in
South Africa, passed by senate in
1980.
Plentl's letter said student council
members "appear to be misinformed" about the bank's lending
policies.
"The Commerce has not made
any new loans or any loan renewals
to the government of South Africa
or to any of its agencies since
1975," the letter stated.
Plentl's letter said the CIBC
"abhor(s) the discriminatory practices inherent in such a policy (of
apartheid) and members of the executive at the Commerce, including
the Chairman, have stated so
publicly on many occasions."
Haig said the resolution's wording failed to make clear the student council's opposition to loans
to any business which deals in
South Africa.
The U of T divestment committee
will appear at the university's governing council in mid-November to
force the university to divest $3.6
million in holdings it has in corporations and banks dealing in
South Africa.
The committee has prepared a
brief to be accompanied by a petition with more than 1,600
signatures.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
PRESENTS
$2 DROP IN
FROM NOV. 19 - NOV. 30
FOR ALL CLASSES
This is a great way for all newcomers and former
dancers to try our classes in
JAZZ
BALLET
MODERN
DANCERSIZE
SPECIAL RATE FOR DROP INS:
If they register now for winter session they can have the rest
of the Fall session for FREE.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
COME TO SUB 216E
OR PHONE 228-6668
NOTE: New Ballet I teacher Monday 3:30-5:00
Leslie Whitfield
cM
inis
Nightly Specials for $6.95
5pm 9pm
monday    QUICHE or chili
tues.and wed.
EGG PLANT MOUSSAKA or chili
thurs.    TUNA VEGETABLE CASSEROLE or chili
f riday     HEARTY WINTER RAGOUT or chili
with choice of soup or salad, slice of cheesecake,
coffee, tea or cappucino.
1BR0NG0 DOWN AND 2 TO GO!
Enter the Long Distance Contest, now!
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Congratulations to Andrew Smith, a fourth year Science major at University
of Manitoba in Winnipeg. He's the winner of the first of three Bronco lis.
TWO MORE LUCKY STUDENTS WILL EACH WIN AN '85 BRONCO IN THE SECOND AND THIRD DRAWS: NOVEMBER 28,1984 AND FEBRUARY 20,1985
PLEASE ENTER ME IN THE
Clip out this entry lorm and keep it handy Fill it in as you make your long
distance calls As soon as you have completed three calls, mail the form or send
the required entry information (see rule #1) to MAKE SOMEONE HAPPY LONG
DISTANCE CONTEST BOX 1468, STATION A, TORONTO, ONTARIO M5W 2E8
;   HAKE
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HAPPY <
St;
LONG DISTANCE CONTEST
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1 have read the contest rules and agree to abide by them
Signature
1 lo enter print your name address and telephone number on an official Telecom Canada entry torn or a 3  o   dici'i piece o' paper Also
print telephone numbers (including urea codes) and dates of three (3) long Distance calls' completed between August \h *984 and February
20 1985 tach group at three :3l completed long Distance colls may be entered only once
OR
On on 8 1/2 x II piece of paper print your name address and telephone number Also prml the numbers including the area codes) 0' 'he
three (3) 1 ong Distance calls you would like to make and beside each a hand written description at not less lhan 25 words stating why you
would like lo make the call Only the original hand written copies will be acceptable Any mechanically duplicated copies will be disqualified
2 Enter as often as you can however, be sure lo mail your entry or entries bearing sufficient posloge NOTE  0NIY ONE ENTRY PER ENVELOPE
Entries should be mailed to MAKE SOMEONE HAPPY LONG DISTANCE CONTEST BOX 1*66 STATION A, TORONTO, ONTARIO M5W 2E0
3 There will be a total at three (3) prizes awarded (see Rule 4 tor prize distribution) Each prize will consist of a 1985 Ford Standard Bronco II
with all standard equipment plus the following options H 0 bonery AM radio tinted glass automatic locking hubs, deluxe tu-fone point guage
package Approximate retail value SI3 245 each Local delivery, provincial and municipal faxes as applicable are included os port of the prize at
no cost to the winner Drivers permit insurance and vehicle license will be the responsiblity of each winner Each vehicle will be delivered lo the
Ford dealer nearest the winner s residence m Canoda All prizes will be awarded Only one prize per person Prizes must be accepted as
awarded no substitutions Prizes will be delivered to the winners as quickly as circumstances permit Prizes may nol be exactly as illustrated
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contest closing date February 20 1985 Prizes will be awarded as follows one (1) Bronco II will be oworded from all entries received Dy NOON
October 17 November 28, t984 and February 20 t985 respectively Entries other than the winning one m the October 17 draw will automatically
be entered for the November 28.1984 draw Entries other than the winning one m the November 28. 084 draw will automatically be entered tor
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Decisions of the contest organization shall be final By entering, winners agree to me use of their name address and photograph for resulting
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The names of me winners may be obtained by sending o stomped, sell addressed envelope to Telecom Conada. 410 Laurier Ave W Room
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5 This contest is open only to students or the oge ot moionfy m the province m which they reside who are registered full rime at any accredited
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All taxes eligible under me Loi sur les lotertes les courses les concours publicitanes el les apareiis |
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submitted to me Regie des lolenes et courses au Quebec                                                                TplPPfifTJ f*Jif7Jiffj9
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Long Distance Friday, November 23,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Eastern students oppose cuts
OTTAWA (CUP) — Thousands of
Ontario students mobilized against
post-secondary education under-
funding during a provincial day of
action Nov. 15, while more than
600 of their counterparts in Quebec
marched on the legislative assembly
to protest the government's plan to
thaw the province's frozen tuition
fees.
The Ontario action, carried out
across the province, protested the
planned drop of the Bovey Commission bomb on colleges and
universities. The three-member fact
finding commission set up to plan
the reshaping of Ontario's post-
secondary education system, headed by entrepreneur Edmund Bovey,
was to deliver its findings that day
to the provincial government, but
has postponed its submission for at
least two weeks, and possibly into
the new year.
"It's not a surprise," said Beth
Olley, chair of Canada's national
student lobby group, the Canadian
Federation of Students. Olley, who
attended a rally on Parliament Hill
in   Ottawa   which   drew    1,500
students said the government may
be trying to diffuse protest against
the Bovey report by postponing it.
"That wouldn't surprise me one
bit if that's what they're doing,"
she said.
While students rallied in the
freezing rain in Ottawa, students
from l'Association national des etu-
diant(e)s du Quebec marched on the
national assembly as politicians
worked late into the night on back-
to-work legislation for Montreal's
striking transit workers.
ANEQ organizer Francois
Giguere said Quebec students are
protesting against the Parti
Quebecois government's plan to
end a 14-year freeze on tuition fees.
"I think it's obvious that the people here tonight are not just the
radical few," Giguere. "They are
just people who, like me, want to go
to school."
In Ontario, students took part in
different actions across the province. In London, more than 1,600
marched on city hall, while in Sudbury 500 students crammed into the
Laurentian cafeteria for a rally.
Several hundred Guelph students
took to downtown streets,
McMaster students held a weiner
roast, and enterprising students at
Wilfrid Laurier in Waterloo sold
peanuts and turned over the money
to the government for education.
"Students have not forgotten
Bovey," said Monika Turner, Ontario Federation of Students chair.
She said the Bovey commission
recommendations will likely lead to
higher tuition fees, a decline in accessibility and cuts in programs
and courses.
Turner said a petition was
presented in the provincial
legislature with 9.Q43 signatures,
along with another 3,000 signatures
from the University of Ottawa francophone students.
Three hundred UBC students
Monday protested library hour cuts
in law, medicine, and library
sciences. They presented petitions
and a bag of coins to UBC president
George Pederson and university
librarian Douglas Mclnnes.
Teaching assistants
support food drive
—ray mcfetridga photo
MAD HATTER DOES strange things with poll . . .oops, I mean pole. Hatter tries manipulating invisible ballots
... oh dear, mallets, that is, but to no avail. Worker failed to change direction of vote ... oh, moat, because
supervisor caught on.
The Teaching Assistants' Union
will begin a food drive for Vancouver's food bank starting Monday,
the TAU president said Thursday.
Horacio de la Cueva said, "I'm
hoping the university community
will realize the amount of food the
food banks need to survive and give
generously."
The food bank gives out 2,500
bags per week, de la Cueva said, but
it still turns away approximately 700
people.
He said the TAs, many of whom
are graduate students working as
markers and tutors, decided to hold
the drive at a general meeting in
order to help alleviate the lack of
food in Vancouver.
De la Cueva said he did not know
where the food boxes will be placed
but people in charge of different
areas of the campus will put up
posters, place food boxes and collect the food.
"We hope this will alleviate the
problem," he said, "but we know it
won't solve the food problem."
Until we have a social contract
that is fair to everyone we will have
to help those in need, he added.
Survey response to trial Gage beer night favours continuation
A recent survey of Gage students
concerning a beer night will probably be favourable, the Gage
Community Council president said
Thursday.
Max Pethybridge said all the
surveys have been collected and sent
to the student housing office where
they will be compiled and
evaluated.
Although he has not studied
them closely, Pethybridge said it
appears students strongly supported
the beer night.
Peace activist speaks at UBC
Peace activist Helen Caldicott
will be zeroing in this Monday for a
speech at UBC.
Caldicott, an Australian physician who founded the U.S. chapter
of Physicians for Social Responsibility, will be in the War Memorial
gym Nov. 26 at 8 p.m. for a talk entitled Stop the Nuclear Madness.
Caldicott gained prominence
when she appeared in the Academy
Award-winning film If You Love
This Planet which chronicled the
possible effects of a nuclear war.
The film gained additional notice
when U.S. president Ronald Reagan labelled the film propaganda
and refused to allow it in the U.S.
Tickets for the speech, sponsored
by UBC Students for Peace and
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT —
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Programs, are $5 for students and
seniors and $6 for the general public. They are available at all VTC/-
CBO outlets.
The beer night was held Wednesday Nov. 16 on a trial basis. Over
the summer housing ended organized parties Sunday to Thursday but
after Gage students petitioned
housing the department agreed to
hold an experimental beer night
there and measure student
response.
The Alcohol Policy Review Committee, attached to housing, will
determine if Gage can have midweek beer nights after the results
are evaluated.
Pethybridge said the committee
has been very fair dealing with him
so far. "They sent the survey to me
as president before it was
distributed to students so I could
check the questions (to see if they
were slanted)," he said.
Students did not immediately
return the surveys which advisors
placed in their mailboxes after the
beer night, Pethybridge said. But he
said after a couple of days many
surveys were handed in.
Housing director Mary Flores did
not return Ubyssey phone calls
Thursday.
Although both the Totem and
Place Vanier also had restrictions
placed on mid-week drinking events
neither of them received a trial
night.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 23,1984
Denial
Three deaf UBC students will not have translators as of Monday because
the university ministry could not pay a $20,000 grant this year.
They are one more group within this province who are being denied a
quality education or an education all together. But for them the plight is
more severe than for most — no matter what good luck they have and no
matter how hard they work a quality education will be beyond their grasp.
This is not just, for all people within society have the right to an education, but these deaf people are being denied it.
This is not intelligent, just as other moves which limit accessibility are
not. Education is the engine that drives society. The denial of an education
to these students and other will ultimately leave society with fewer people
with valuable skills seeking industrial, economic and social answers for our
society. This can only hurt us.
The government is taking far too short-sighted and narrow a view on the
entire matter of university accessibility and the right to an education. The
treasury board should allow the university ministry to provide money for
these deaf students.
More than that, the cabinet should take a harder look at education and
how it's being destroyed in B.C. If the universities and colleges have made
poor policy decisions in the past that should not be alleviated by denying
students an education or by cutting our universities' budgets so severely
they can no longer function as credible institutions.
Education is a right. Respecting it as a right promotes respect for the
belief that all people deserve an equal opportunity.
watch ue-xx   vveELKs  e.piso"c>e-  wheu
COWF30V   ROokM£   TAICES OO     dE>JT«_Al_ AMElRACLA-
t-
Lit&eys
Violence not answer for world's problems
In response to Amritpal Singh
ShergilPs letter (Kumar wrong to
defend Gandhi, Nov. 16), I was
simply stunned by what I read.
The recent events in New Delhi
has consequences for not only India, but for the whole world. The
basic issue is can we condone violence because of a cause. My humble opinion is no.
If we support violence then all of
us must agree with the U.S. and
USSR arms race. Both the
Americans and Russians feel that
nuclear arms are needed to prevent
them being consumed by each other
politically. This will cause the whole
world to be destroyed.
So how valid, in today's world,
are the actions of irresponsible
rebels. Are the PLO, IRA, or FLQ
right in their violent tactics? NO!
The Sikh terrorists are no better
than the above groups. The Sikh
terrorists are violent, irrational and
undemocratic. For example, the
Consul General of India is the only
diplomat in Vancouver with round
the clock bodyguards. The reason
for this is the enormous threat on
his life by those Sikhs who have no
regard for freedom of speech and
freedom of press.
Another example proving that
the terrorists are undemocratic is
they don't allow anyone to say or
write anything contradictory to
their viewpoint. For example, if the
Sikh President (in my eyes he will
always be a good Sikh) cares to
disagree with anything these rebels
say, he is excommunicated.
I feel that is why India is a
democracy. People (Hindu in this
case) can say anything without fear
of being violently abused. In every
democracy you will get • the odd
dissenter. However, the Sikh terrorists don't allow anything to be
said to weaken their cause.
The Sikhs have chosen
undemocratic, violent methods to
express their political grievances in
India and the rest of the world.
In the early 1970's, the FLQ were
a group in Canada, who wanted
Quebec to separate from Canada.
Did the FLQ have the right to
assassinate Trudeau (Prime
Minister at that time) however
much they disagreed with him or
however just their cause? If a group
uses violent methods, they will have
very little public sympathy. If people use non-violent methods, they
will gain the world's respect.
Mahatma Gandhi's whole
philosophy was non-violence and he
achieved his goal of India being independent from the British.
The choice in today's world is
one of intelligent solutions to complex problems. It is vital in today's
world   (especially   with   nuclear
weapons) that we don't choose
violent means. This choice faces not
only India but all of humankind.
Sharmila Kumar
arts 3
Rajesh Prakash
unclassified
Library booked
I would like to compliment your
reporter, Stephen Wisenthal, on the
time and effort that he devoted to
his recent article on the space problem of the Main library (Room
running out for Main library books,
Nov. 9).
One correction that must be
made, however, relates to the
removal of books to storage areas.
The recent storage proiect involved
the relocation of 65,000 volumes
(not 100,000) to an area of the Main
library that is not open to the
public. The books are still
available, but must be requested at
the circulation desk and retrieved
by staff. Paging of books from
storage is normally done once a
day.
While I would agree with Mr.
Wisenthal's other comments on the
disadvantages of storage, it is not
correct to suggest that moving
books to closed storage increases
the risk of damage. The reverse is
true: books that are left on overcrowded open shelves are far more
likely to be damaged since they
can't be reshelved easily. They are
sometimes piled on the floor or
jammed in where there isn't sufficient space. In spite of the obvious
disadvantages of closed storage for
library collections, the storage areas
that we are currently using do provide more protection than the
books would receive on the open
shelves.
Douglas N. Mclnnes
university librarian
THE UBYSSEY
November 23, 1984
The Ubyssey Is pubNshed Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
"I want another beer," said Stuart Colcleugh. "Noooo, we've got a paper to put out." said Charlie
Fidelman. "Oh piss on the paper, I want another one too," said Robert Beynon. "You guys are getting
to be as bad as Yaku," said Patti Rather. "What are you, drunks or reporters?" "They're both," chimed Lawrence Becker and Ingo Brieg. "Yea, well Chris Wong is buying for once so I want another one
too," said Javier Campos. "Let's compromise, Kevin Hall can go get a dozen beers and we can drink
and put the paper outl" said Peter Prongos. Rory Allen was passed out so he didn't do either. Nobody
remembers how the paper got out that night.
Gandhi no "sweetheart"
Sharmila Kumar truly exposes
her naivety of the political realities
of India ('Irrational' letter on Indian crisis shocks, Nov. 14).
Her sweeping claims that "no
other country in the world had such
freedom of speech, freedom of
press, freedom of action" as India
is not only ludicrous but is based on
a grade school view of reality.
The state of so-called emergency
with the suspension of civil rights
for two complete years does not define democratic action.
News recently that the people in
the Punjab and the Assam province
will not be allowed to vote in the
upcoming December elections in In-
Firefighters slow
Peaceful solutions only answer
to problems, student says
In reply to Sharmila Kumar, I am
simply shocked by her lack of
knowledge of Sikh history, and her
continuous use of generalizations
('Irrational' letter on Indian crisis
shocks, Nov. 14).
In saying 'India is the biggest
democracy in the world' she is obviously choosing to ignore the
truth.
Exactly how democratic is a nation where the prime minister
declares a 'state of emergency', jails
all the leaders the opposition party,
puts off the forthcoming elections,
and censors the press for a period of
two years.
As for her assertions that the
Sikhs are given key positions in the
Indian government, the president of
India is a Sikh, etc., one would
hope that these people were appointed on merit.
Hatred against any person is not
a worthy pursuit. Mob behaviour
instigated by members of Indira
Gandhi's own Congress party will
not solve anything. Peaceful action
is the only answer.
Nikki Sandhu
art 1
Stuart Affleck has a problem.
That wouldn't bother me, except
for the fact that Mr. Affleck is the
University Endowment Lands assistant fire chief, and some day I may
need him to save my life.
On Wednesday, Nov. 14 at 9:35
p.m. I was with a friend walking
towards Gage Lowrise. Fire was
raging in one of the suites. While I
went in to the building to sound the
alarm, my friend ran into Gage
Towers to phone the fire department.
Apparently our trusty fire
brigade believes in truly personal
service and prefers to respond to
phone calls rather than the harsh,
impersonal call of a mere fire
alarm.
Contrary to Mr. Affleck's comments (Fire guts Gage suite 118,
Nov. 16) the fire trucks arrived at
the scene 12 minutes after the alarm
was pulled, not three minutes.
Another five minutes was spent trying to get into the room to see if
anybody was trapped inside. By this
time a large crowd had gathered at
the scene, and it was not uncommon to hear cries of "Where's the
chief?".
It is a shame that a man of Mr.
Affleck's stature could have been so
blatantly dishonest in his report to
The Ubyssey. One cannot speculate
as to how much damage could have
been prevented had the response of
the fire department been more comparable to true professionalism, but
the residents of Gage Lowrise can
just be thankful that the building is
constructed with cement.
Ian McKay
arts
dia shows how true Rajiv Gandhi
wants to remain to the principles of
his mother!
Kumar also asserts that "there
were rapes being committed inside
(the Golden Temple)". No self-
respecting person would make such
baseless charges. I challenge her to
verify and substantiate this mindless
accusation.
While the likes of Kumar only
saw Indira Gandhi as one who
"wanted peace in the true sense of
the word", it was the innocent
Sikhs who had to bear her wrath. It
is the Sikhs who must face police
torture, jail, daily curfews, and
travel restrictions in the "world's
greatest democracy".
The "flushing out" of a few terrorists did not justify the murder of
10,000 innocent worshippers at the
Golden Temple. Neither did it
justify the celebration, and the
distribution of sweets by the Hindu
majority, as was shown on the
news, at the murder of the Sikhs.
If Indian people are to live in
peace, they must do away with the
hidden fanaticism of people such as
Shirmila Kumar. One must be accepting and accomodating of
others. Violence and hatred will not
solve anything.
Bhagwant Singh
science 4 Friday, November 23,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
McGill denies fuel bomb research for military
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill
university and Canada's Department of National Defence contradict each other on whether the
DND is funding research into fuel-
air explosions at McGill.
Gordon Machlachlan, McGill's
dean of research, told 35 people at a
recent debate on the university's
role in peace that two McGill professors' contracts with DND had
concluded. Maclachlan is responsible for all research contracts which
go through McGill.
But in a recent Canadian Press
report, Navy Lieutenant Jeff Ag-
new, a spokesperson for defence
headquarters in Ottawa, said the second DND contract with the two
McGill professors runs until June
1986.
Agnew   said   Ottawa   allocated
University of Victoria
deregisters students
VICTORIA (CUP)—With a flick
of a switch, University of Victoria
registrars are blotting out the computer stored marks of students who
failed to pay their tuition on time.
It's called "deregistration" and
means dozens of students must seek
emergency loans immediately to
cover their education costs.
UVic ombudsperson Joy 111-
ington said "deregistration" is a
"draconian method" of forcing
students to pay before the deadline.
Large, lump sum fee payments do
not fit into students' style of
budgeting, she added.
Illington said she knows of at
least a dozen students who are worried about losing registered status
and are searching for ways to come
up with the money. She thinks the
university should use more creative
payment plans such as a monthly
collection.
Nels Granewell, UVic student aid
officer, said some students did not
realize the university would zap
their marks out of existence, and
spent their loan dollars on other
costs other than tuition.
Loan money must be first allotted
to tuition fees and then to expenses
such as food and rent, according to
student loan regulations.
UVic administration vice-
president Robert McQueen, who
claims students owe $1.1 million to
the university, said the administration implemented its "deregistration" policy for the first time ever
"because in recent years the university has experienced an increase in
the number of students who go for
the whole year without settling their
accounts."
Loss of registered status means
students will not receive a statement
of marks and will not be on file until all fees, interest and a $25 fee is
paid.
Jack Daniel Distillery Named a National Historic Place by the United States Gove nmert
AT THE JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY, you
can taste for yourself why our whiskey is so
uncommonly smooth.
As soon as you sip the water we
use, you can tell it's
something special.
That's because it flows,
pure and iron-free,
from a limestone
spring located deep
^ under the ground.
Iron-free from an underground spring   f\X.    |3XZlC    L/tLTlld
Distillery, we've used this iron-free
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in 1866. Once you try our whiskey,
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K^
London
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$465,335 for the McGill research.
When asked later to confirm the
figures, Agnew said they were
"quite correct." He would not answer any further questions, saying
the file had been turned over to the
media relations department.
Officials at the media relations
department did not return phone
calls.
Fuel-air explosives produce an
explosion of a size and intensity
that observers say is "the closest
thing to an atomic bomb." Agnew
said fuel-air explosives are "actually quite harmless."
While the two McGill professors,
R. Knystausus and J.H.S. Lee,
have told reporters the practical ap-
plications of their research are in
safety, Agnew confirmed the small-
scale results from McGill are used in
large-scale testing in Alberta.
The tests at Suffield base west of
Medicine Hat, Alta. are examining
ways that explosions can be set off
by spilling volatile gas around a target and letting it mix with air before
igniting it.
The gas could destroy heavily armored bunkers by seeping inside
them before being detonated, DND
said, but the main thrust of the testing is to come up with a means of
clearing minefields.
Fuel-air explosions have been
condemned by the International
Peace Research Institute in Stock
holm as "inhumane and indiscrim-
, inate weapons."
About 50 students from a group
calling themselves McGill Employees for Nuclear Disarmament recently protested the explosives research. According to the group,
fuel-air explosives have "clear military implications" and should be
banned from the university.
UBC receives more than $350,000
in research funds from DND. Last
spring a group of students organized a referendum asking to ban research on weapons for mass destruction. A majority of students
voted yes but the vote failed to
reach quorum.
It you'd like a booklet about Jack Daniel's Whiskey write us * letter here in Lynchburg Tennessee 37352. USA
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DAL GRAUER
MEMORIAL LECTURES
ERIC KIERANS
Mr. Eric Kierans, a well-respected Canadian economist and politician, is a native
of Montreal, he was Professor of Commerce and Finance at McGill University. In
1960-63 he served as President of the Montreal and Canadian Stock Exchanges.
Following that, he was appointed, first, Quebec's Minister of Revenue and, later,
Minister of Health. For the next decade, Mr. Kierans held a number of significant
federal government posts: Postmaster-General and Minister responsible for the
Department of Communications, and Minister of Communication. In 1968, Mr.
Kierans was a candidate for the federal Liberal leadership. He returned to McGill
University in 1972 as Professor of Management and that year was engaged by the
Manitoba government as a consultant on resources policy, resulting in the controversial "Report on Natural Resources Policy in Manitoba." Mr. Kierans is currently a radio commentator of "Morningside" for the CBC.
Lecture Series — In Room 101/102, Curtis Building, Faculty of Law
CANADA: THE QUEST FOR COMMUNITY
Part I The Foundations, Monday, November 26 at 12:30
Part II The Institutions, Wednesday, November 28 at 12:30
HAIR
*q*     (CORKY'S
*j0
731-4191
3644 W. 4th (at Alma)
CORKY'S FROSH AWARD
Awarded seasonally to outstanding freshman male and
female Thunderbird athletes.
September-October Winners
BRIAN KENNEDY
ZENOBIA PISANI
A twenty three year old
goalkeeper for the Thunderbird
soccer team, Brian was named
an All-Canadian for his efforts
in helping the Thunderbirds to
the Canadian soccer championship in early November.
A twenty year old Arts student,
Zenobia played midfield for the
UBC Thunderbird women's
soccer team which won its second consecutive Canada West
championship in October.
NOMINEES
Tom Vlasic-Football
Rob Shelley-Soccer
NOMINEE
Shannah Biggam-Soccer
THE FROSH AWARD: each male and female frosh award winner receives
$20 worth of hair care products, free hairstyling plus a CORKY'S t-shirt.
Nominees also receive a t-shirt. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 23,1984
D    ^    w
reviews reviews reviews reviews reviews reviews
i'l^Bs*
I
Jane follows mainstream
By INGO BREIG
A sense of discovery surrounds a
newly-risen star on the Canadian
pop scene, and the feeling followed
her to the SUB auditorium Tuesday
night. Front and centre, Jane Si-
berry led her four band members
enthusiastically and professionally
through the music from her second
and latest album, No Borders Here.
While her whole band shows talent and dedication, the spotlight
and the audience's eyes remain
stuck on Jane who delivers a flawless act.
Siberry stands quite still and a bit
crookedly, extending a hand sideways or poking an elbow out to
punctuate some aspect of her music
with her angular posture.
Throughout the show she restores
parts to her songs which are omitted
from the recorded versions due to
the time constraints of an LP. Most
of the live songs are longer. Blended
in among mainstream-sounding
music (close your eyes during the in-
strumentals and the exotic becomes
the familiar), are little dialogues,
comments and stories which add detail and texture to the lyrics that lets
the listener into the music behind
the lights and equipment on stage.
Her musical style may best be compared with the often upbeat, often
dreamlike layered melodies of the
Eurythmics, but Jane's music is
lighter and less bound to the electronic rhythm machine. In contrast
to the synthesizers on stage right,
her lead guitarist picks up drumsticks and plays an instrument made
of wood and apple juice cans on
stage left. The band uses high technology but is not limited to it.
All her lyrics are rich with visual
imagery. She creates landscapes,
beaches and ocean scenes in which
some of her songs get their strength.
Vocally she is upfront; her voice is
fresh; it comes straight at you. Her
singing style has much in common
with Nancy White's style; they both
play around with compressing many
syllables into a short line and stressing words in unusual, often awkward places.
Her topics vary from the personal
to the familiar. Dancing Class is a
dreamy, sentimental song about a
relationship, about time gone by,
about wanting something that can't
be had. Jane's high-status demeanor saves songs like this from
drowning in their own goopy emotionalism.
At the opposite end of the spectrum, Symmetry (the way things
have to be) reveals' Jane's love of
order and precision, and Extra Ex-
— ingo breig photo
SIBERRY . . .coming straight at you—good, solid enjoyable music
ecutives deals with the obsessed
businessman's tunnel vision, a filter
which turns human relationships into business transactions.
While her music adheres closely
to the FM soft pop style, during the
evening she made forays into promising territory with hymn-like singing and drumming, simultaneous
monologues, and unconventional
playing styles. Her drummer began
one song by playing pipes offstage,
always had my hands on a piano"
— and three and one-half years
with the band, she had finally netted a contract for several albums.
She is now free from waitressing to
pay the bills. "The whole point is to
reach what your vision is."
"I try to become more and more
objective. I believe in order. I take a
great many words when I am speaking, but in poetry and music I can
go back and fix it until it's right."
believe in order... in poetry and music I can go back
and fix it until it's right."
then the light stands, and eventually
seating himself at the drum kit.
As a musician, Jane enjoys the
freedom to experiment. "I don't
like to be diluted," she said, referring to interference by producers
and engineers who add their input.
She believes in order and high aspirations. In Mimi on the Beach she
refers to the "great leveller," which
she explains, "is a lot of things. It's
the suburbs. It's the people on the
beach."
In the song, the great leveller is
"going to take those mountains and
shove them into the valleys until
there's nothing left except a vast expanse. . ."
After many years of work — "I
She adds that she tries to say specific things with her words, not just
come up with great-sounding lines
that contain nothing.
While one might expect her ideas
to lead to more alternative music,
after all is said and done Jane Si-
berry creates music as we know it
rather than stepping into the realm
into which so many observers
would like to place her: the avant
garde.
To slip into the mainstream is no
loss, however. She produces good,
solid enjoyable music that highlights her individual talent. Here lies
an irony: Now the great leveller is
sitting in the suburbs and on the
beaches listening to Jane Siberry.
Insights revealing
By LAWRENCE BECKER
Timothy Findley's Can You See
Me Yet?, being presented by a theatre group of Master of Fine Arts
students, offers insights into the human potential for giving.
The play is set in 1938 in the outer
yard of an asylum. Here the patients interact and reveal their various quirks to the audience. All the
patients are controlled by their dictatorial nurse Alma (Ethel Whitty)
who settles minor disputes with a
slap in the face or a blow of her
police whistle.
Can You See Me Yet?
By Timothy Findley
At the Dorothy Somerset Studio
Until Saturday
Arguments among the patients
occupy the first quarter of the play.
These disputes help counteract the
dramatic impact when Cassandra
(Delwyn Smith) joins the group as a
new patient from the isolation
ward.
Cassandra sways between the reality of the asylum and of Laurel,
her home town, where she encounters her family and its breakdown.
She grapples with the fact that she is
unable to prevent the accompany
ing pain and suffering of this disintegration.
A fire, the killing of a dog, and
WWI are more tragic events that interact with asylum life and with life
in the town. Like the woes of Cassandra's family, these tragedies are
inescapable.
Enid (Debra Barrs) and Franklin
(Stephen G. Bland) add a comic
note which carries the play. This is
especially true in places where the
play's dramatic content becomes
too redundant, threatening to lose
the audience. Franklin's conflict
with his father Edward (Gavin
Rhodes) is a necessary jolt to the
tragedy of the play.
At the climax Cassandra finally
realizes that she is unable to halt the
pain in the world around her and
screams desperately for a chance to
act as a sanctuary for somebody or
some cause. Her flight from the
stage is stopped by Doberman
(David U. Garfinkle) who plays a
dog that awakens in response to
Cassandra's pleas.
In this instant of compassion
Cassandra is finally needed. The
audience is shown how human potential for helping can go unrealized
until people are allowed to change
some of the torment which surrounds us all.
G   E
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*    .      **  ..v.-*' Friday, November 23,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
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reviews reviews reviews reviews reviews reviews
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DANNY . . .stripping for a thorough inspection
On The Road takes safe bet
By PETER PRONGOS
Any production which stars Ann
Mortifee is worth checking out. Her
latest effort, "I'm Getting My Act
Together (and Taking It on the
Road)", is no exception. There are,
however, some problems with the
> act on stage intact
way in which the play's ideas are
developed.
I'm Getting My Act Together and
Taking it on The Road
at the Arts Club Granville Island
The musical is set in a night club
where Heather (Ann Mortifee) is
rehearsing her new act, along with
back-up vocalists Cheryl (Moira
Walley) and Alice (Lelani Marrell).
It is Heather's 39th birthday, and it
is no coincidence that she wants her
new show to honestly reflect what's
important in her life: both its
strengths (love, independence, integrity) . and its problems
(loneliness, confusion, compromise).
Her song, Smile, is a powerful
commentary on the cultural conditioning of women to develop their
"charm" as a way to manipulate
men. Mortifee's sarcastic rendition
.   .   .  takes a  swipe at
middle-class concepts of
what women want.
of In A Simple Way I Love You is
an hilarious send up of such self-
sacrificing tunes as Stand By Your
Man. And Miss America takes a
telling swipe at middle-class concepts of what women want from
life.
Tension arises when her
manager, Joe (Allan Gray), resists
Heather's efforts to change the act.
On a business level, he prefers that
she do bland and upbeat material.
"What good is integrity if no one
buys it?" Joe asks.
But at a more personal level, Joe
reflects the dilemma of many men
who, while sympathetic to women's
struggle, find that even progressive
change can be painful.
Although this play could be considered feminist it is hardly radical.
Rather, it is gentle and liberal in the
manner of the film Unmarried
Woman. Joe's character is complex
and sympathetic, and not a sexist
stereotype.
The play evolves around the conflicts between Heather and Joe, and
also those within the characters
themselves. This element of the play
is less than convincing. The
dialogue is sometimes stilted and
predictable. At times Heather
becomes a bit too preachy, and
can't resist telling Joe what he
should do to get his own act
together.
And Heather's father is a one-
dimensional character who lacks
depth. But this criticism is more a
reflection on the script than on the
performance itself. The production
shines for a number of reasons.
The quality of the music itself is
consistently high. From poignant
ballads like Old Friend to rockers
such as Feel the Love, Natural
High, and Put In A Package And
Sold, both the lyrics and the music
are exciting. The singers are gifted,
producing marvellously under the
musical direction of Bruce Kellett.
Several of the short skits stood
out. Mortifee's depection of a
women as a child lunatic was right
on the mark. Moira Walley
displayed good range and a flair for
comedy in a number of character
roles. Director Bill Millerd has
shown again that he knows how to
get texture and nuance from his actors.
Waffs heavy
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Walls is a true story. In 1975
three inmates took a few prison
staff hostage. The female social
worker was killed when the prison
tactical squad stormed in to free
them.
Walls is a heavy footed film that
sympathizes with the plight of the
prisoners. The guards are portrayed
as unfeeling, sadistic clods who
view the present penal system as the
only system of justice and deterrence.
Walls: A Canadian feature
Directed by Tom Shandel
At the Studio Cinema
The prisoners, on the other hand,
despite serving life sentences  for
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murder and assault, are shown as
sensitive victims of the justice system and of course they are enthusiastic to join the rehabilitation program.
Walls begins with the camera's
eye tracking the prison halls and
bars. The music is of the sombre,
minimalist, mood-evoking kind of
suspense thrillers with lots of drumming to punctuate clanging doors
and upcoming tragedies.
Despite the heavy handedness of
a biased topic, Walls comes together very well. Joan Tremblay
(Andre Pelletier) along with establishment civil-libertarian lawyer
Ron Simmons (Alan Scarfe),
launch a lawsuit against the prison
They   claim   the   "hole"
is    cruel    and    unusual
punishment.
over its practice of solitary confinement.
They claim solitary confinement
is cruel and unusual punishment
that is contrary to the Bill of Rights.
But Joan and Ron cannot do it
alone. They require testimonies
from prisoners confined to the
"hole." And here lies the strength
of the film. The cinematography alternates between the "hole" under
dark blue lighting and the classification officer's bright sunny room.
The guards were also shown in the
same blue light and never in a light
of white benevolence.
The conflict in Walls is reinforced
through the alternations of pro and
con mood, music, lighting, and dialogue about the prisoner situation
in the B.C. Penitentiary.
Joan convinces Warden Lou Gallagher to allow her to introduce a
more humane attitude into the penitentiary. She singles Danny Baker
(Winston Rekert) out as an influential prisoner among other prisoners
and has him transferred back into
the public area. But not without
struggle on his part. He wants nothing to do with naive Joan and Ron
who think they can do something
for the good of stinking, rotting humanity.
Baker does cooperate but only after slashing his wrist with a razor
that a cruel guard tossed into his
cell. This was one very explicit
scene.
Joan's principle opponents, Mc-
Intyre, head of prison security, and
his cohort, Hiller, fearing their
power and authority will be usurped
if the prison system's status quo is
not defended, frame Baker. They
plant drugs in his cell, a transgression that will return him to the
"hole."
At the prospect of spending five
more years in the "hole," Baker
and two other convicts try to blitz
their way to freedom through a hostage taking.
The ending is inevitable but it is a
believable sequence of events; believable because of the acting in the
desperate situation of Baker the
convict in solitary confinement and
the constant provocation by two
malicious guards.
The film climaxes with the death
of Joan in the traditional freeze-
frame agony. The assault was led by
Mclntyre and Hiller. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 23,1984
Classes boring?
Need a break?
Come into SUB 241K for an exciting afternoon away
from studying and getting depressed. We'll stimulate
your minds in ways textbooks wouldn't even dream of.
Mondays and Thursdays are press days and our weekly
staff meetings are Wednesdays at noon. Take the
plunge today. You'll be glad you did.
Canada,
will be autographing copies o!
book at the UBC
BOOKSTORE at 11:30 a.m
NOVEMBER 2f) before reading from
his work at Hebb Theatre at 12:30 p.m. He
will also be available for a short time after
the reading to autograph the book at the
theatre. If you would like a signed copy but
are unable either to attend the reading oi
autographing session, you may reserve one
by calling the UBC BOOKSTORE before
11:3() a.m. November 26.
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
Itabooclles
SING ALONG WITH SANTA . . .
'iufrtft
Neon Shoelaces •
Clickets • Stamp Pencils
• dumptruck/robot •
crystals • magnifying
bug boxes • robot
watches • sunprint kit •
space fidgits • frog
miniatures • climbing
santas • irridescent
T-shirt paint • ice cream
rainbow earrings • soft
hamburger fridge
magnets • multi-colour-
pop-a-point-pencil •
water squeeze games •
bunny clips • penguin
night light • Kid's Guide
to Vancouver • soft vinyl
letters • tiny rubber frogs
& pigs • foam rocks •
new stickers • pre-school
puzzles • Mamma Gollies
4462 W. 10th Ave.
near Sasamat
224-5311
OPEN SUNDAYS 12-5
• monkees • satin
unicorn mobiles •   • little
shopping carts • Beatrix
Potter Baby Books • first
year calendar • growth
charts • digital potato
clocks • piggy and pussy
tea cosies or pyjama
bags • Teddy bear
calendars • peek-a-boo
turtle puppets • honey
bear hot water bottles •
polygraph lenses • sound
and light robot • •
carousel music boxes •
ballet bags • Christmas
cards & wraps • steel
safe money box •
gumball dispensers •
snuffles bear • ride'em
trucks • corduroy back
pack • car watches •
pustifix bubbles • wind-
ups •
OPEN DECEMBER
EVENINGS
Kids Only Market
Granville Island
684-0066
SUNDAYS 9-6 Friday, November 23,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
See Chris watch Michael sing
as the Gloved Virgin leads the mob in a groupthink orgy
By CHRIS WONG
What's this? A reporter from The
Ubyssey — that despicable leftist
pinko rag — at Jacksoj
What has become^
press? While therfj
ternative cultuQ
over the cityj
abysmal ga
ing of cd
phemy
like Rolj
dinistafej',
itV*toe3
squats** |H]
like.
KeSah-.
uncoolest and
caught at. I mean
pus. Michael and
nds ar
ists
ai
ure if word gets
"ojourn with the
Place. Instead of
ing   worthv^ile | sJTcial  effl
llection orsfioV uSiial assod
he trendy art ga43»vP12f've
Sail princi^S and    Te aar
n   the   thlorigl^hy are
Suki's haircut
;om Cab-
dly
his f.
siden
tenti
name
out  a
Jackso:
reviewi
like thi
photos a]
leries,
self-resMufteT j
under trfe dome.
and skinny
bages and Ki
faded memori
These a^i^ft^i^mrbirBjjBrlukhts |
careeniagN|jK&gh T^y fmjbd. as I
enteriwKKOTving doors
hous|j5lN$riRS'm just in tj
of tinp T^gJjKror saps^oji^
outsiMthKT^oJhtffice were']
ticketpSncel wILnot be 1c
Fort|QJjicJ<;s uplraht or no 1
I poalerme'^eiise^raefices<
ruly%iob disco^erirp my so|
entry ^"^JppJ^ghly Iovete4.-||
mentary tlckek. I cJjjjsee the.,
lines  cleally:| "Student Tearnalis
stoned to 5Joi>dy pulp at Jacksons'
concert." | {
PhewTl wiUllive to meet yet an-
othe| dqadfifk. J will once again tap
the ijce^ of -my favorite Underwood!"H«Ms not lost. But for the
moment, I must block out all sense
of reality and lock into the heavenly
phenomenon about to appear somewhere on the seven storey high
stage. As a good portion of the
26,600 lights on stage come on, and
five figures slowly rise from the
fiery mist, I suddenly realize what
brought me to this close encounter
of a Jackson kind.
My destiny makes sense now. I
recall that I witnessed gigs by the
biggies. I celebrated life with that
balding guy named after the two
Beatles.   You   know,   what's   his
name — John Paul II, Guido Sar-
ducci's mentor. And I heard the
word from Billy Graham. (How's
t for name-dropping?) Now that
1 Jackson is joining the list,
gy will be complete.
reasoning for my mere
Jacksons' concert
mind is com-
doubts and
can sit back
|the soothing
hey call The
f% is awry. The
is incredibly
lacking in the
'vity £HHakes a concert a
safe
Qftsual at
"ft
en are
that matter
diets? And
displays? I'i
lite? As,
ter
th
|ope dealers? For
are the dope ad-
\t the fireworks
falking about the
stage,  but the
if dangerous ex-
that go pop in
concert. And
peopf
impanioi
ramp t
iere is no
ig or
pneerf i| truly a
ute now, I
rench to
iel or Jer-
wrenching
mustfbe content
What do I
ce?
a thriller?
e gross me
e Jacfc
yaff^.
xpect Buffy 4nd
fjump out next to
maine*fi
as.
witn the
hink of 1
Areahe'i
Does |he
dea^y^
.,^A-sJ^i siplooking very much the
critic with a dispassionate and
phlegmatic disposition, I try to
avoid the nauseating euphoria that
surrounds me and I do my best to
suppress my quasi-ambient-neo-ba-
roque musical upbringing to make
an informed appraisal of the situation. Even my companion's cultlike arm waving has no impact on
my psyche.
Musically, the concert was about
as exciting as a pepped up Lawrence
Welk. Only a few tunes merit mention because of their strong har
monies and Michael's bursting, if
not contrived enthusiasm. The rest
— just a clump of average to dull
songs suddenly deemed sensational
because of the performers behind
the microphones. The Commodores, Earth Wind and Fire and a
host of other male vocal groups
have done, and done better what
the Jacksons are currently peddling.
I'll give them credit for avoiding
the traditional tactic old groups
usually rely on. Namely, the 'Let's
play a long and boring medley featuring 40-second snippets of all our
hits' routine, but I wish that guy up
front who all the fuss is about,
could be shrunken back down to
the cute, loveable guy who filled the
airways with a soulful voice on
tunes like ABC and Bei;. Back then,
Michael Jackson's voice was what
carried the group, not overproduction, overdramatics and an overblown obsession with sexual titilla-
tion.
. The press says he's a virgin. If he
is, he must have worn out his copy
of the Joy of Sex. He k nows all the
moves. His writhing, bending,
moaning and moon walking is a
show in itself. P.T. Barnum could
have made a mint with this guy as
the world's greatest contortionist.
Indeed, the non-musical aspects
of the Jacksons' show are what
keeps my poor brain from turning
to complete mush — an abyss of
jello. Not the silly special effects I
saw in Star Trek 10 years ago, but
Michael's routine, preplanned' actions. Like when in a sudden burst
of spontaneity, he asks the crowd if
he can sit on the edge of the stage.
Tricky devil that Jackson boy. And
then one of the Jacksons asks everyone to sway and then they ask for a
V sign for Victory. Never before
have I seen groupthink enacted in
so quick a time span.
Luckily, when the last explosions
go off, and the subtle stadium
lighting, which gave me sunstroke
dim, I escape with my senses relatively intact. Me and my companion, who to my dismay is now thoroughly   enamored   of  the   whole
Jackson scene, somehow fend off
our urge to rip off some kid's 12
buck Victory tour book. It's been a
night of pure decadence, where excess has been the norm. So we spring for a pedicab. "On to the parking lot," we command, where my
car sits with my punk rock tapes
ready to roll.
Oh yeah, see you at the Prince
concert. Wm
Dr. HELEN
CALDICOTT
"STOP THE NUCLEAR
MADNESS"
MON., NOV. 26
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
UBC • 8 P.M.
STUDENTS, SENIORS $5.00
GEN. ADMIT. $6.00
(Plus $1.00 CBO Charge)
Childcare Provided
Tickets: All VTC/CBO Outlets;
Lower Mainland Eaton's
& Woodward's;
AMS Ticket Office/UBC
Info: 280-4411
AMS Christinas
Craft Fair
Nov. 26-Dec. 21
Mon.-Fri.
SUB Main Concourse
—TOYS —POTTERY
—HANDKNITS —CANDY
—JEWELLERY WOODCRAFTS
Come And Take A Look!
Food shortage I?!
Ncfc at ttve. t*ce\le*>t Eodre*-*.  I* £xcY Uveu
Juwt a. Surplus. So for Hve vyxtmVfc of *
Wjors jy a buc£ ksl ^
o*«* v\tel> a 6ca*e.e m q<v<w2wvu
Vo Y-eMi^ ttw^-W H£ \kvu bes?
v* Vt>*v\. So c^w ^^ ^ fcfl-s,
swt a Mkw av^ ^ovj a Wu ftv*, \owra
3A3\ VJesY S*r>akw<U}        iSfc-Sl^B
£uA\y license.*     • 6pevx u-.^o'VvV UVe Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 23,1984
TODAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Friday evening coffee house, Music of Chile, 8
p.m., Lutheran Campus centre.
LIBERAL CLUB
Meeting for those interested in model parliament, noon, SUB 224.
THUNDERBIRD WRESTLING
Wrestling  meet versus Calgary  Dinosaurs,  5
p.m., Osborne centre.
AMS ART GALLERY
Paintings by NeviMe Grey and Susan Vedoy, 10
a.m.-4 p.m., AMS art gallery.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Organizational   meeting   for   Caldicott   event,
noon, SUB 206.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Gym night, all members welcome, 8-11 p.m.,
Osborne gym A.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration, noon, SUB 216E.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of classes, $2 drop-in fee, all day, SUB
207/209, partyroom and ballroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Soiree de jeux, 8 p.m., details at Friday meeting.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Bzzr garden, 4-7:30 p.m., graduate centre ballroom.
Pub night, 7:30 p.m.-midnight, garden room,
graduate student centre.
NDP CLUB
Controversial former resources,  minister Bob
Williams, noon, Buch penthouse.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
League' game   versus  league-leading   Alberta
Golden Bears, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Women's Canada West tournament, all day.
War Memoriel gym.
THUNDERBIRD WRESTLING
At SFU invitational meet, all day, SFU.
EMERGENCY RESPONSE COALITION
Demonstration   (against   U.S.   intervention   in
Central America), noon,  U.S. consulate,  1075
W. Georgia.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Sports tournament, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., gym B and F;
post-tournament dance, 7:30 p.m., SUB party-
room.
SUNDAY
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Fireside discussion group.  Dialogue on Chile,
7:30 p.m., Lutheran campus centre.
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsals with Renald Rab and Jennifer Mas-
call, 2 p.m., SUB room 212.
THE COMPLETE
AMS LINE-UP
Monday, Nov. 26-UBC Memorial Gym
Dr. Helen Caldicott
Tuesday, Nov. 27 — Commodore Ballroom
Parachute Club/Bolero Lava
Wed. & Thurs., Dec. 5 & 6 — Sub Auditorium
Jonathon Richmond
Honey, don't
forget bread,
milk and the
Kinko's Copies
Copies
O
Binding Service
Fine Papers and
Envelopes
Passport Photos
kinko's copies
5706 University Boulevard
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
Dr. HELEN        1
CALDICOTT
"STOPTHE NUCLEAR
MADNESS"
MON., NOV. 26
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
UBC • 8 P.M.
STUDENTS, SENIORS $5.00
GEN. ADMIT. $6.00
(Plus $1.00 CBO Charge)
Childcare Provided
Tickets: All VTC/CBO Outlets;
Lower Mainland Eaton's
& Woodward's;
AMS Ticket Office/UBC
Info: 280-4411
DINNER DELIVERED?
Call Candia Taverna
Traditional Greco-Roman Cuisine
4510 West 10th Avenue
Open Sunday through Thursday 5:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
Friday and Saturday 5:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.
For reservations and delivery: 228-9512 - 228-9513
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Women's Canada West tournament all morning,
final at 2:30 p.m., War Memorial gym.
MONDAY
AMS ART GALLERY
B.F.A. fourth, yea show, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., AMS
art gallery.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Stop the Nuclear Madness talk, 8 p.m., UBC
War Memorial gym.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of classes, $2 drop-in fee, alt day, SUB
207/209.
NOTICE OF
ELECTION
The election of students to the committee to advise the president on the selection of a new Dean of Sciences is being
rerun on November 28 due to irregularities. Polling will be
outside CHEM 250 from 9:30 to 15:00. Science undergrads
and graduates associated with science are eligible to vote.
BRING YOUR CURRENT AMS CARD!
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines. .60c. Commercial
1 day $4.50; additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .66c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room266. SUB., UBC, Van., B.C   V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977
3 lines.
5 - COMING EVENTS
20 - HOUSING
A.M.S. Art Gallery
S.U.B.
Mon. to Fri. 10-4
B.F.A. Fourth Yr. Show
Nov. 26 - Dec. 7
UBC Pottery Club
Dec. 10 - Dec. 21
CLEAN COMFORTABLE single rm in quiet,
pleasant home. Shared bathrm, kitchen
privileges. Ideal for n/s grad stud.
References. $250. Dec. 1 738-5889.
25 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT. GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS
Try Candia Taverna's carefully prepared Greek dishes, from such standards
as Mousaka, Souvtakias grilled carefully to your tastes, Greek Salads
smothered with Feta Cheeses, to specially prepared Kalamaria brought to
your table piping hot and delicious. Sample the large selection of Greek and
Italian appetizers: Kotosoupa, Tzanziki, Homus, Italian Salad rich with Moz-
zarella. Candia Style sauces prepared fdr the Lasagna, Spaghetti and
Tortellini are great favourites, as are the wide varieties of pizzas. The chef
lovingly creates daily specials such as spinach pizza and BBQ Chicken for
your appreciation. A friendly staff member welcomes each customer at the
door and insures that a visit at Candia Taverna is a memorable one. And to
the delight of the customers, each Friday and Saturday'evening dencers
perform their Dance Oriental.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
DR. BERNARD CRICK
Politics
University of London
THE OTHER ORWELL:
GETTING AWAY
FROM 1984
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Bldg.
Saturday, Nov. 24 at 8:15 p.m.
SEX THERAPIST. We are exploring the
possibility of having sexual problems
answered in a live radio or T.V. format. We
would like to interview sex therapists or
psychologists between ages 22 & 42 who
have a lively & youthful manner 8- a strong
psychology bkgd. Please send resume c/o
The Ubyssey, Box 2000, Sub, Campus
Mail.
KEG CEASARS is hiring mature, energetic &
enthusiastic individuals to fill day & night
P/T positions in hostessing, bussing. No
experience nee. Apply in person Tuesday
Nov. 27 1-3:00 p.m. 581 Hornby St. No
telephone calls please.
P/T WORK (weekends, stat. holidays).
Monitoring station operator. $4/hr. ph.
731-8204.
SAHPER - FIZZ ED
last 'PARTY HARDY' before the*
old 'STUDY HARDY' for exams
night at
-BRANDY'S NIGHT CLUB-
595 Hornby St.
Shooters 99c, Hi-balls & beer $1.50
TICKETS $3.50 (inc. free drink)
avail. AMS Box Office & from
wild & crazy
SAHPER - PEUS students
EVERYONE WELCOME
PHYSICAL EDUCATION PRESENTS
Fizz-Ed Dance
Sat. Nov. 24
SUB Ballroom
Happy Hour 7:30 - 9:00
Special Bar Prices
Tickets $3.00
avail. AMS Box Office
& WMG
10 — FOR SALE - Commercial
SHIP-IN-A-BOTTLE KITS
A   do-it-yourself   project   to   be
displayed with pride of accomplishment & ownership
$29.99
77?e perfect Christmas Gift
for that perfect man.
Info 885-7910 eves.   	
11 - FOR SALE - Private
TORONTO FOR XMAS7 Wardair ticket Iv.
Dec. 22, rtn. Dec. 28 $360 obo. Telephone
Joy 748-3979 Andrew 224-9072.
THE BOATHOUSE
RESTAURANT and KEG
PRIME RIB
are looking for outgoing, enthusiastic and
caring students who are able to commit
themselves to school as well as a pan-
time job which offers flexible hours and
lots of opportunity for growth and
development. We are looking for people
to start between now and the New Year
but would like to talk to you a.s.a.p.
Please come in and see us.
WEDNESDAY AT 2:00 P.M.
Please do not call
P. S. Girls and Guys
566   Cardero   St.    (next   to   Westin
Bayshore Inn)
35 - LOST
LOST Nov. 7-8 Bet. Woodward Library and
C-lot: Cross pen - black with gold tips.
Great sentimental value. Reward. Rick
278-6366.
HELPI We lost our cat, Duke. He's huge,
35 lbs., grey tabby w/white paws &
stomach. Call 732-7720, 734-5039.
40 - MESSAGES
IF THERE ARE ANY WITNESSES to the car
accident on Sept. 25 (at the registration
building) who would like to see justice done
please call Mike at 435-8550.
BOOKS
FOR
INDIA
• social science
• planning
• architecture
• commerce
• site design
• journal reports
are requested of you for mailing to
the centre for environment & planning technology, Ahmedabad. Please
deposit in Rm 120 West Mall Annex
before Nov. 29, 1984 or call
228-3039, 228-2779 (messages).
50 - RENTALS
SKI MT. WASHINGTON, Vancouver Is. I
Condominium on ski hill for occassional
rent. Sleeps 6, Sauna. Ph. 24 hr. answering
service 112-286-3112 or Box 410, Place
Vanier, UBC.
50 - RENTALS
OUTDOOR   EQUIPMENT   RENTALS   on
campus. You can rent tents and other
backpacking equipment, mountain bikes
and kayaks, all at great daily, weekly and
weekend rates from REC UBC. Call
228-4244 for info, or drop by the cage in
Osborne, Unit 2 at lunch time or from
3:30-5:00 p.m., Mon.-Fri.
60 - RIDES
SPACE AVAIL, on eastbound 114 ton truck.
Lv. Dec. 15. For info call 228-6146 or
734-0819 day & 875-6726 eves. Cheap rate.
66 - SCANDALS
DESPERATE PLEDGES need dates for
pledge party. If interested call D Phi E
room. Ask for Andrea, Lisa, Karen, Jenny.
70 - SERVICES
AEROBICS & STRETCH
ST. JAMES CHURCH
3214 W. 10th Ave.
Info: 733-6786
Mon.-Fri. 5:304:30 p.m.
Sat. 11:00-12:00 a.m.
$3.00 par class or $30 par month
1 Fraa Class (1st time only) with this ad
Expires Dec. 15/84
85 - TYPING
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG (DS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   All
jobs, year around student rates, on King
Edward route. 879-5108.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail, ph
Jeeva 876-5333.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Typing
essays & resumes. Spelling corrected
733-3676.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING. Essays.
Theses, reports, letters, resumes. Days,
evgs/wknds. Quick turnaround, student
rates. 731-1252.
TYPING — Fast, accurate. Reasonable rates.
734-8451.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Error guarantee. Pick-up & delivery
available. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING by Adina. Dicount
for all student work. 10th & Discovery.
Phone 222-2122.
EXPERT TYPING from legible work. Essays,
theses. Spelling, grammar corrected.
738-6829 10 am-9 pm King Ed. Rte.
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reasonable rates for students for term papers,
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
90 - WANTED
GOOD USED PRINTER compatible with
an Atari 800. Preferably under $200. Call
after 5, 224-0494. Bruce. Friday, November 23,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
HcVL£6
Vancouver East Cinema (7th Ave. & Commercial, 253-5455): Diva/Koyaanisquatsi,
Nov. 23-25, 7:30/9:40 p.m.; Roma/Satyricon,
Nov. 26-27, 7:15/9:30 p.m., Fellini double bill;
Black Orpheus/Pixote, Nov. 28-29, 7:30/9:30
p.m., Brazilian double bill.
SUB Films (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697): The
Dresser, Nov. 22-25, Fri. & Sat. 7 & 9:30
p.m., Sunday 7 p.m.; Merry Christmas, Mister Lawrence, Nov. 29-Dec. 2, Fri. & Sat. 7 &
9:30 p.m., Thurs. & Sun., 7 p.m.
Cinematheque Pacifique (1155 West
Georgia, 732-6119): Yorkton Festival winners,
Nov. 23, 7:30 p.m., at Robson Square
Cinema, 800 Robson; Chick Strand — guest
filmmaker, Nov. 27, 7:30 p.m., (Georgia); Dirty, Mean and Nasty, Nov. 28, 7:30 p.m.,
(Georgia); Le Bonheur, Nov. 29, 7:30 p.m.,
(Georgia).
Ridge Theatre (3131 Arbutus St., 738-6311):
Choose Me, 7:15 & 9:30 p.m.; Les Comperes,
7:30 & 9:30 p.m. Phone for dates.
Studio Cinema (919 Granville St., 681-3847):
Walls, phone for dates and showtimes.
Vancouver East Cultural Centre (1895 Ven-
ables,   254-9578):   Movies  for   Kids:   Snow
White, Nov. 24, 1 p.m., pay what you can.
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697 or
228-3698): Mirage, Nov. 26, 6:30 & 8:30 p.m.
Directed by Edward Dmytryk.
The Real Talking People Show: opens
Tamahnous Theatre's '84-'85 season on Friday, Nov. 2, at the Vancouver East Cultural
Centre. Every line is guaranteed overheard —
as meaningful and obscure as the unknown
people who daily pass by.
Terra Nova Playhouse: starting Nov. 2. Antarctic explorer despairs while freezing to
death. Understandable.
Ain't Misbehaving: another great musical at
the Arts Club Revue Theatre, 8:30 p.m.
Extremities: a play about rape, Nov. 9 at the
Firehall Theatre.
Passion: Peter Nicholas Canadian premiere,
Arts Club Granville Island, 8:30 p.m.
Overnight Exposure: Vancouver's late night
live talk show, Friday nights at 11:00 p.m..
Arts Club Revue Theatre, Granville Island,
687-5313.
Faust: Theatre Space production of Goethe's
Faust opens Oct. 25, The New York Theatre,
681-0872.
Too Foolish To Talk About: original Newfoundland comedy at City Stage, 8:30 p.m.
Mon.-Fri., 6 and 9 p.m., until Dec. 1.
Knuckles: by David Hare is a psychological
who-dun-it directed by Claire Brown, until
Nov. 25, Studio 58, 8 p.m., 324-5227.
Candleford: A mid-winter's day in Dorcas
Lane's Post Office and General Smithy with
seasonal songs and an original score, Nov.
22-24, Nov. 29-Dec. 1, 8 p.m., at Capilano
College.
I'm Getting My Act Together and Taking
It on the Road: a musical starring Ann Mortifee, opens Nov. 19 at 8:30 p.m. at the Arts
Club Theatre Granville Island, until Dec. 22
Pipe Dreams: also a musical, by Magee
(Wongski's old alma mater) Theatre at Magee
school auditorium of course, Nov. 26-30, 8
p.m., 263-2321.
SFU Dancers in Concert: new works choreographed by faculty showing Nov. 29-Dec. 1
8 p.m. at the SFU theatre in Burnaby,
291-3514.
Anna Wyman Dance Theatre: collaborating
with Axis Mime Theatre, Nov. 30-Dec. 1, popular spirited works for the whole family, pets
welcome, North Van. Centennial Theatre, 8
p.m.
Suicide in B b: a new wave/film noir comedy
abut a crime that may not have happened,
SFU Theatre Oct. 30, 12:30, free, Oct.
31-Nov. 3 and Nov. 7-10 at 8:00 p.m. $2,
students $1.
The Pied Piper, Carousel Theatre: 10th anniversary production, a musical morality adventure. From Nov. 10 to Dec. 29, 688-5306.
50th Anniversary Concert: New Westminster symphony society is celebrating with preludes, movements and operatic arias, Nov. 25,
2 p.m. at the Vincent Massey auditorium.
Belshazzar's Feast: the feast at which the
appearance of the writing on the wall forecast
the ruin of the city and its king, Vancouver
Bach Choir, Nov. 30, 8:30 p.m. at the Or-
pheum.
Ermin Nurcanli: Greek, Turkish, Spanish &
Russian music, Nov. 28, The Classical Joint,
689-0667.
Cassation Group: focus on text/sound combinations, performances of original and fake
compositions; panel of new music performers, critics and pundits look at experimental
music in Vancouver, do ask questions, Nov.
27, Western Front, 8:30 p.m.
Tom Hajdu: composer/percussionist, the
works performed will explore the relationships
of physical space and the trajectories of sound
sources, Western Front, 8:30 p.m., 876-9343.
Bachman-Turner Overdrive: one more time
together at the Plazazz, Nov. 21, 8 & 10:30
p.m.
Nancy Nash: with Coleman, Keenlyside, La-
france, Newcombe, Van Berkel, Buckingham,
and Hendriks, Nov. 28-Dec. 1 Landmark Jazz-
Bar.
Parachute Club: pops into the Commodore
Ballroom Tuesday, Nov. 27 with Bolera Lava.
The Spoons: tell no lies, Nov. 21, also at the
Commodore, Gospel Night with The Sounds
of Joy, Nov. 25, 8 p.m., African.
Dance with "Did": Nov. 30, 9:30 p.m. at the
Good Neighbour Jazz Cafe.
Stu Loseby 6- Sheila Davis: modern jazz
Mondays, Nov. 26, Hot Jazz, 873-4131.
CHECKED
+p TIME V
vwvww
Monday Thru Saturday
Complimentary
hot & spicy munchies
4 P.M. - 7 P.M.
682-1831
V
overlooking English Bay^
£* the r^m.. of DenmanasSSS-^
ExUbifc
Ann Nelson: paintings, Nov. 9-Dec. 11, Theatre Gallery of the Surrey Arts Centre.
The Warehouse Show: that's right, a warehouse filled with art stuff, an event t hat is cur-'
ated and juried. More than 200 local visual artists, scheduled concerts, performance art,
video tapes and films, panel discussion and
lectures, Nov. 3-30, 12-8 p.m./W'Xl.-Sun.,
522 Beatty St., 732-6783.
Drawing and Sculpture: Linday Gammon,
Greg Murdock, and Colette Urban, Nov.
2-Dec. 2, 13750-88th Ave., Surrey, S95-1515.
Photoperspectives '84: a national, juried
photography exhibition, 106 works by 22 photographers, Nov. 9-Dec. 2, Presentation
House, 333 Chesterfield Ave., 986-1351.
New Paintings: by L.J. Neville, Carnegie
Centre, Main and Hastings.
Jack Shadbolt: act of painting, mjlti-panel
works, opens Nov. 9, at the Vancouver Art
Gallery.
2611 W. 4th Ave.
8 oz. iSaTgen
734-7460
only $4.75
only $3.50
Dahfj: in   <Pi£a
'Zfoxtzlllni &   ^sttucins m-m-good    Only $5.50
BARBARA FISHER
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DISCOUNT ON FEATURE IMPORTS
2183 WEST FOURTH AVENUE    734-0582
OPEN LUNCH-BRUNCH-DINNER
Schniing
After you 've gone down the slopes for the last time in the day, remember
the sensation of the snow-filled wind in your face with Hiram Walker Schnapps.
Its cool, minty flavour is as refreshing as a spray of snow.
HIRAM WALKER SCHNAPPS.
WHAT A DIFFERENCE A NAME MAKES. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, November 23,1984
Lawyer defines porn
By JEAN FITZGERALD
Catherine MacKinnon, one of the
most influential and dynamic experts in the field of law and pornography, visited Vancouver two weeks
ago. I had both the pleasure and
honor of hearing her speak on three
occasions, and of interviewing her.
The subject of pornography is an
extremely emotional issue and is the
topic of many heated debates. One
rather macabre measure of MacKinnon's impact and success in this
field is that she must live "under-
offender is liable in damages.
Under MacKinnon's bylaw, women who were coerced into making
the pornography could sue the por-
nographer, as could women who
are victims of sex crimes as a result
of pornography (for example, a
woman who is told "I'm going to
'Deep-Throat' you" by a sexual assailant). Women who are forced to
watch pornography, for example by
their husbands or boyfriends, can
take action against the person who
forces them.
ground" for fear of her life. MacKinnon says because she and her coworkers have received death
threats, she has had to move thousands of miles away from her office, and neither her secretary nor
even her parents know where she
lives.
It is ironic that she is being threatened for exercising her freedom of
expression, while those who threaten her scream "freedom" of expression" when their "right" to
produce and traffic in pornography
is questioned.
One of the most promising areas
in which MacKinnon, a U.S. lawyer
who has taught at Harvard and
Yale, is working is in defining pornography as a civil rather than a
criminal offense. She and her associates have drafted a bylaw to deal
with pornography. It has been passed (in modified form) in Indianapolis, but is being challenged by the
American Civil Liberties Union. It
was passed in its entirety in Minneapolis twice, but was vetoed both
times by the mayor.
The definition of pornography in
the bylaw is: "graphic, sexually explicit subordination of women by
pictures or words, which also includes one of the following: (a) women dehumanized as sex objects or
things, (b) women enjoying rape,
(c) women enjoying pain or humiliation, (d) women penetrated by objects or animals, (e) women as
whores by nature, (0 women being
tortured, cut, etc., (g) display of
women's body parts such that women are reduced to those parts, (h)
women in poses of submissiveness,
servility or display, (i) women
shown in situations of degradation,
humiliation or filth in a sexual context."
This definition is broad enough
to include all the genres of pornography without restricting legitimate
literature, art or photography. But
by far the most important aspect of
this law is that it is a civil law, not a
criminal law. That is to say, it does
not prohibit the production, distribution or consuming of each materials. There is no question of censorship of any kind of material.
Rather, it makes the pornog-
rapher liable at civil law for damages if the pornography hurts someone. One obvious parallel is the law
of defamation. The law protects
your freedom of speech until you
harm someone through libel or
slander. In the same way, the law
does not protect freedom of speech
which involves hate propaganda
against groups such as blacks or
gays and lesbians. In such cases the
The class of plaintiff that has
most dramatic implications is the
woman who can take action against
a pornographer because the pornography harms her status as a woman. The rationale behind this action is that pornography adversely
affects the status of women by encouraging and reinforcing the treatment of women as objects who enjoy humiliation and servility and
who are available for use by men.
Again, the advantage of this law
is that it does not involve censorship
— the pornographer still has freedom of expression. However, it
hurts the pornographer financially.
As well, the enforcement of the law
is in the hands of the victims of the
pornography, rather than the state.
Although some may argue damages
for injury suffered as a result of
pornography may be difficult to
quantify, the courts have been
quantifying equally difficult damages for years in areas of law such
as defamation and personal injury.
Few men realize that pornography hurts them, too. As long as
men continue to see women in the
way that pornography presents
them, the possibility of having a
healthy, fulfilling relationship with
their female co-workers, daughters,
girlfriends and wives is greatly diminished.
We are all victims of pornography.
Jean Fitzgerald is a second year
law student who managed to speak
to Catherine MacKinnon on her
whirlwind speaking tour of Vancouver. Perspectives 'is a column
open to the university community.
Dr. HELEN
CALDICOTT
"STOP THE NUCLEAR
MADNESS"
MON., NOV. 26
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
UBC • 8 P.M.
STUDENTS, SENIORS $5.00
GEN. ADMIT. $6.00
(Plus $1.00 CBO Charge)
Childcare Provided
Tickets: All VTC/CBO Outlets;
Lower Mainland Eaton's
& Woodward's;
AMS Ticket Office/UBC
Info: 280-4411
GET TANKED
Telephone: 738-6211
.^U ITUDSllT RATES
THE BODHl TREE
FLOTATION TANKS
FRASER ARMS HOTEL
1460 S. W. MARINE DR.
WE JUST MIGHT
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PERSON COMPLETELY FILLED
OUT AND ON DEC. 8, WE COULD
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NOW WOULDN'T THAT MAKE
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McLean & McLean Nov. 28
at Frams. Adv. Tkts. $7.00
At the Door $8.00
WEDNESDAYS WE
HAVE OUR GREAT
L.P. SYNC CONTEST.
COMPETE AGAINST VANCOUVER'S   CYNDI    LAUPERS.
ROD    STEWARTS    AND    BOY
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THURSDAYS CHASERS GREAT
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MOTHER PROUD, IT S A LOT
BETTER THAN STUDYING
AND A HECK OF A LOT MORE
FUN!
Rum flavoured.
Wine dipped
Crack a pack of Colts
along with the cards.

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