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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1987

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Array the Ubyssey
UW^Sf®**--.-    ;
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& '0?f^mw^7*%
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JUST SITTIN' ON the dock of the bay, wastin' the time away..
*^**- *,
dan andrews photo
Bill 19 faces first fight
UBC instructors struggle to form union
By Jennifer Lyall
UBC's English Language Institute instructors are being
forced to battle the university administration and the new Industrial Relations Council in their
attempt to form a collective bargaining unit, according to an instructor at the institute.
The instructors want to form
the English Language Institute
Sessional Instructors Association,
an affiliate of the College-Institute
Educators Association, so they can
negotiate higher pay and better
working conditions.
According to spokesperson
Lorie Lee McArthur, the instruc
tors, all hired on temporary contracts, are paid about half the
"industry standard" and don't receive medical or dental benefits.
ELISIA's application for certification is the first to come before
the council created by Bill 19 to
oversee B.C.'s unions.
And BC Federation of Labor
president Ken Georgetti has
called for the resignation of IRC
vice-chair Bryan Williams for his
"incompetent" handling of the instructors' application for union
certification.
At the certification hearing
Thursday Williams cancelled a
poll that was to be held Friday at
the institute, and ordered instead
a mail ballot be conducted to determine the instructors' support for
the organization.
McArthur said the right to an
on-site poll within ten days of an
application for certification is the
only "pro-labor" provision of Bill
19. She thinks Williams' decision
was intended to stall the issue.
"In the middle of a postal dispute they called a mail-in vote...it
could drag on and on, and our
contracts will expire, and well be
out of jobs," said McArthur. Most
of the instructors at the institute
have contracts of only twelve
weeks.
The mail ballot will go out to
about 100 people, most of whom
McArthur said are no longer employees of the institute or never
have been.
"Twenty four names on that
list are people who don't even
teach English at the English Language Institute; they teach French
or Italian (through the continuing
education department, which
administers the ELI)" and many
others were once employees but
have since left, she said.
The list of names was provided by the UBC administration,
said McArthur. She thinks the
administration doesn't want another union on campus and wants
to make it difficult for the vote to
pass.
At least half the people on the
list must vote in favor of the association before it is approved.
McArthur thinks that is unlikely,
even though the present employees are strongly in favor of organ
izing. "There are 28 instructors
and we had 24 out of 28 signed up
(with ELISIA)? she said.
McArthur said if working
conditions are not improved the
institution will not be able to
maintain its reputation for excellence, and that will mean lost revenue for the university.
"All our programs are cost-
recovering (not subsidized by the
government or university) and are
very successful," she said. "We
make a lot of money for the university and they use (the profit) zo
subsidize less successful programs."
She said registration is increasing but "if UBC doesn't maintain the standards of its program
people will go elsewhere?
James Dybikowski, UBC vice-
president faculty relations, would
not comment on the case while it is
under review.
Hospital floor plans
faulty, says University
College president
UBC
SOCCER WOMEN'S crash course in heading
-**t^#
By Patrick Kirk wood
Vancouver General
Hospital's design plans for a new
computer wing are riddled with
"glaring errors" which prove the
hospital is not serious about reconstruction, said the president of
College University last Friday.
The design plans were submitted to the provincial court during a court battle this summer
which resulted in the eviction of
College University from the top
floor of VGH three weeks ago.
"(The plans) are an obvious
attempt to placate the judge? said
Raymond Rogers. He said it appeared the architect had never
seen the area he was redesigning.
The university had been renting space proposed for the computer centre and ten currently
dormant classrooms located in the
basement.
"At the time we took possession of the facilities I asked for a
year's notice to be given if we were
to be moved out? said Rogers.
"However, official notice came in
February of this year giving us
until May 31 to leave."
The court ruled in favour of
VGH after being presented with
design plans for the computer
center. At these hearings VGH
administration justified its move
by accusing University College of
abusing the charitable donation of
rent free space that the hospital
now needs.
But Rogers points to flaws in
the design plan as proof that the
hospital is not planning to build
the computer centre.
Rogers said the first defect in
the plans for the computer train
ing centre is the designation of two
currently functional washrooms
as "coffee areas." A restructuring
of the area would require the
complete demolition of the room
and its solid concrete floors.
Two additional washrooms
were slated to take up one third of
an already existing classroom.
Rogers also criticized the installation of a corridor the length
of the floor which wculd make
classrooms ten feet v _de.
The designer's ignorance of
the building layout is the biggest
indicator of the hospital's hasty
approach, said Rogers. In the design the machine room is incorrectly shown to exist a floor below
its location.
Vancouver General Hospital
administrators refused to comment on the charges.
Volume 70, Number 9
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday October 6,1987 HOT
FLASHES
UBC NDP CLUB
Bon voyage party for Vanessa Geary, past vice-
president for UBC-NDP
and hopeful world
traveller.RSVP 253-1755
After 6pm.
GAYS AND
LESBIANS OF
U.B.C.
are running a counselling
workshop to train people to
person their office. Anyone
interested come to SUB
237-B or phone 228-4638.
Men and women welcome.
Starts late October.
PARTY FOR
VANESSA
GEARY,
past vice-president NDP
club, Oct 9 RSVP 253-1755
after 6:00 pm.
TWELFTH
ANNUAL DR.
JOHN F.
Mccreary
LECTURE
Lester Breslow, M.D.,
M.P.H., is Professor of Public Health and Director of
Health Services Research
in the Division of Cancer
Control, University of California/Los Angeles. He will
be speaking on the topic of
"Health Promotion" in
health sciences practice
settings, the workplace,
and schools. What does
"health promotion" really
mean? What are its scientific bases?   How can vou
help it happen? October 8,
12:30 - 2:00 p.m., IRC Building Lecture Hall #2.
LATIN AMERICA
EDUCATIONAL
SOCIETY
We're a local group now
seeking Club status at
U.B.C. Among other things
we're publishing Latin
America Connexions, an activist bimonthly — the only
one of its kind in Canada —
featuring news, insights,
and research articles on this
complex and fascinating
region. Interested in helping out with this or other
projects? Contact Adam at
732-5932.
OMBUDSOFFICE
NEEDS
BUSINESS
The AMS Ombudsoffice is
open for business—and our
business is helping you. We
are located in SUB 100 A
(beside Speakeasy). Tha
office is staffed with student
volunteers who are ready to
help you with any aspect of
the University. For more
information phone 228-
4846.
WALK-A-THON
'87
Project Literacy is organizing a Walk-A-Thon on Saturday October 24 commencing at 10:00am. The distance is from Second Beach
to Lumberman's Arch. Volunteers and those wishing
to pick up pledge sheets
please call 594-0664.
OPPORTUNITY
KNOCKS
Get involved in the most
dynamic women's organization in Vancouver and make
a difference in someone's
life. Share your talents and
expertise and davelop new
skills. Information Sessions
for volunteers will be held
Wednesday, October 7 at
1:00 pm or 5:15 pm at the
Vancouver YMCA, 580 Burrard or call 683-2531 for
more information.
ATTENTION
CLUBS,
UNDERGRAD
SOCIETIES AND
SPORTS TEAMS
A fundraising opportunity
by selling BC Lions football
tickets. Regular cost $20,
but you sell them for $10 and
retain $3.50 per ticket sold.
This offer is only valid for
the next three games (Oct.
11/17/Nov. 8). Sign out tickets in the AMS Business
office on the second floor of
SUB. For more information
contact TIM BIRD at 228-
3961.
UNIVERSITY
SENATE NEWS
FOR EVERY
STUDENT ON
CAMPUS
Effective this year, the UBC
course withdrawl policy has
been altered. For a one term
course the withdrawl deadline has been extended from
two to six weeks. For full
term courses the deadline
has been extended from six
to twelve weeks. Students
with validated medical or
personal excuses may withdraw after the deadline with
Dean of the Faculty approval. A letter grade of "W"
will be given for these instances and will not effect
the grade average. Unsanctioned withdrawls will result in an "F" letter grade on
the transcript.
Talk to the world
Hamsoc offers opportunites for all
The UBC Amateur
Radio Club offers a wide
range of activities related to
modern communications
that will be of interest to
faculty, staff and students
in all disciplines. We routinely talk to other amateurs across North America
and around the world, including SOVIET, JAPANESE, AUSTRALIAN and
EUROPEAN Amateurs.
Our members include
undergraduates and graduate students from many different faculties including
Law, Medicine, Arts, Science, and Engineering.
Whether you are a technically experienced individual
who has finally decided to
"get licensed" or someone
who is entirely new to radio,
joining the UBC Amateur
Radio Club is the best way to
get involved in a truly fascinating hobby.
UBC radio amateurs
are active in virtually all
aspects of this exciting
hobby, including HF radio,
shortwave listening, packet
radio, amateur satellites
and VHF/UHF radio.
Many members of our
club actively participate in
public service activities
such as providing communications for many UBC intramural events (Arts 20 this
Thursday). We assisted the
Red Cross following the recent tornado disaster in
Edmonton by providing a
message service via shortwave radio until normal
telephone service was restored.
With the acquisition of
a new tower and several
new HF beam antennas
covering 10 through 40
metres and a brand new top
of the line ICOM 761 HF
transceiver, our members
interested in talking with
talk to each other on handheld radios from anywhere
in Greater Vancouver.
Tuesday nights this
term our evening speakers
program is related to digital
radio. Our next speaker,
Peter McConnell from Mobile Data International
(MDI), will give a presentation on Commercial Packet
Radio Systems on October
13 at 7:00 p.m.
Persons completely
new to amateur radio can
attend our amateur certificate licensing course at the
club room Thursday nights
at 7:00 p.m. Our first class
was last Thursday and approximately 30 students
signed up. Come soon!
amateurs around the world
have a reliable twenty-four
hour a day opportunity to
DX.
Another area that
many of our members are
involved in is shortwave listening, SWL. Listening to
international news straight
from the country involved is
easy and reliable using our
new top of the line general
coverage ICOM 71-A short
wave receiver.
When club members
can not get to the club room
we use our club's VHF repeater station on top of Gage
Tower which allows us to
Every Tuesday, this space
is offered to AMS clubs and
constituencies to inform
students about clubs and
constituencies. It includes
notice of coming events,
reports of past events,
graphics and photos.
Please take advantage of
this opportunity and submit your material to Tim
Bird, Director of Administration, SUB room 254.
Please note that all submissions must be recieved one
week in advance.
UBC Amateur Radio Club;
VE7UBC
Brock Hall Annex, Rm 358;
Phone: 228-2325; Repeater:
145.27 Mhz
BETWEEN
CLASSES
TODAY
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
A Lecture on orthopaedic surgery by
Dr. MacNcil, 12:30-1:30 p.m., IRC
Building Wood #1.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER
CLUB
A Commodore meeting, Noon, Hebb
10.
IBM meeting: Xoon, SUB 212.
AMIGA meeting: Xoon, Sub 111.
ATARI meeting: Noon, Scarfe 1021.
First meeting! Everyone come out.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF
U.B.C.
Speaker: Gary Kinsman, author of
The Regulation of Desire: Sexuality
in Canada.  12:30 p.m., SUB 205.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
TRINITY
Informal worship and communion.
All welcome. Lutheran Campus
Centre, noon.
UBC AQUATIC CENTRE
Underwater Hockey: shallowed
game, beginners welcome.  7 p.m.
WOMEN'S CENTRE
Weekly Collective Meeting. New
members welcome. 12:30pm SUB
130
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
MINISTRY
Informal worship. All welcome.
Noon at the Lutheran Campus
Centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Co-op supper 6pm Richard Ceam-
merer speaking at 8pm
UBC SAILING CLUB
Annual General Meeting/Elections/
Movies SUB 205 7pm
WEDNESDAY
GAYS & LESBIANS OF U.B.C.
Gallery Night. 3:30 p.m., Gallery
Lounge.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENT
ASSOCIATION
A workshop on "Instead of martial
arts, try logical self-defense!" Buch.
D 340 12:30-1:30pm
JEWISH STUDENTS*
ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Hot Mexican lunch 12:30-2:00pm
Hillel House.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Philosophic conversations:"Should
we value the right to equality of
access to higher education?" 7-10pm
Grad Centre Upstairs Lounge.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General Meeting Buch.B 212 12:30
pm
TOASTMASTERS    INTERNATIONAL
Public   speaking   and   leadership
meeting. Public welcome. SUB 215
7:30-9:30pm
UBC MARXIST-LENINIST
STUDY GROUP
"The Canadian Government's foreign policy"5:30 pm Buch.D 202
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS
MINISTRY
All welcome to fellowship and discussion: "Parables in Life".     Lutheran Campus Centre 7pm.
"Table Talk" is a feminist ehtic the
answer? Noon SUB 212A
MUSSOC
General meeting for those who
signed up at Clubs' Days to help out
in the production of "MERRILY WE
ROLL ALONG" 12:30 Buch.D 310
All Welcome.
UBC STUDENT LIBERAL
CLUB
General Meeting 12-1:30pm SUB
212
THURSDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER
CLUB
Apple meeting: Noon SUB 215.
IBM meeting: 11:30-12:30SUB 111.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS*
COMMITTEE ELECTIONS
To all freshes: bring your student
I.D. and vote! 12:30-1:30, SUB 216.
SIKH STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General membership meeting,
12:30 p.m., BUCH B232.
PACIFIC RDM CLUB
An inspiring lecture on "Culture,
Careers, Commerce" by Dr. Jan
Walls & Wilf Wakely. 12:30-2:00
p.m., Asian Centre Auditorium.
JOHN F. McCREARY
LECTURE
"Health Promotion in Health Sciences Practice Settings, the
Workplace and Schools." 12:30-2:00
p.m., Lecture Hall #2, IRC Building.
See "Hot Flashes" for further details.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Field trip to Children's Hospital,
12:30-2:15 p.m. Meet at IRC Building, G-30.
UBC STAMP CLUB
Trading Night. 7:00 p.m., International House Boardroom.
UNIVERSITY CRISTIAN
MINISTRIES
Special topic:    Intimacy with God
SUB 205 12:30pm
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Guest speaker: David Bentol Chem.
250 12:30pm
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Lecturer Richard Ceammerer at
Vancouver School of Theology
(Epiphany Chapel) 11:30am.
UBC COMPUTING CENTRE
Open house-Self guided tours will be
ofTered 12:30-3:30pm in SUB 100
(Reception area)
FRIDAY
UBC-JAPAN EXCHANGE
Sushi and zake welcome party. 7:30
pm SUB Party Room
UBC STUDENT LIBERAL
CLUB
5TH Annual Political Club Boat
Races/BeerGardens in SUB 207/209
4:30-8:00pm
NATIVE INDIAN STUDENT
UNION
Beer Garden at Scarfe Lounge 4:00-
9:00pm Scarfe Ixmnge
UNIQUE... ANY WAY YOU SERVE IT
October 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 2 "If the world does not get away from
the mode where private and national
gain is the main motivation there is no
way to the future."
A question of
priority
By Jennifer Lyall
If society emphasized justice for all instead of the profit of the individual we
would all be better off, said a prominent Canadian scientist, feminist and peace
activist at a UBC seminar Saturday.
Ursula Franklin came to UBC to discuss the values shared by the peace, environmental and feminist movements. Franklin, a Quaker, is senior research scientist at the Ontario Research Foundation, and recently retired from the University
of Toronto's faculty of engineering.
Because our society is profit-oriented and "pushes people to maximize their
personal gains? she said, general issues affecting all of society are devalued, and
what should be considered social problems are "privatized."
"One of the trends of society that is a control technique is not to let people get
together but to look at problems and solutions as individual concerns?
For example, said Franklin, many people in Ontario are forced to find private
solutions to the acid rain problem and buy bottled water, because the issue has
not been adequately addressed at the public level.
"These are not personal problems? and people should not have to find
personal solutions, she said. But "the approach to solving (the acid rain problem)
at root cost has been politically shunted?
Franklin said the issues are neglected because "everything is economic? and
the government is motivated by profit, not justice. So, she said, the Stein will be
logged to buoy the economy even though it will have a serious negative effect on
the environment.
"If one were to have a government in the sense that western democracies
define governments, its prime concern would be the pursuit of justice and the prevention of injustice? Instead, she said, our government tries "to optimize gain
rather than trying to optimize justice."
"We are not governed, we are managed? Franklin said. "The difference is that
government...has to mitigate the various interest groups...and see there is not one
that dominates the picture to the detriment of others. That I think we have
essentially lost; the neo-conservatives run a government as if it were a large
corporation...The difficulty with that is that there is no legal and rightful obligation to be interested in anybody."
Franklin said the fight for social justice "can only be done on a level that is
neither personal nor profit-oriented? and parliament, motivated by money, no
longer provides that forum.
"Whether it's the Stein Valley, equal pay, or nuclear submarines, each is a
manifestation of a process that isn't working. That process is the parliamentary
process."
Franklin said the government discourages progressive and innovative
solutions and maintains the status quo by portraying issues according to what she
calls "the football game model? with two sides and an inevitable 'winner. But
"most of life's activities are not that zero sum accounting where somebody gains
and somebody loses? she said. "It is not black and white; it is not good guys and
bad guys?
Because our society evaluates issues on the football model we are constantly
forced to choose between "false alternatives? rejecting one benefit in favor of
another, said Franklin. For example, ecologists are pitted against economists, and
the environment becomes something that can be protected only through the
sacrifice of jobs.
She said the belief is dangerous because it is not usually necessary to sacrifice
one thing for another.
By fostering conflict, the government "produces tension between members of a
community that ought to work together? and that is in the politicians' economic
interest.
This state of "permanent belligerence" is particularly important to the
economics of military research and arms production, areas in which large amounts
of money are committed over long periods of time, said Franklin.
"There is a need for a permanent enemy to keep the technological machine
going...to assure the legitimacy of (military) spending? she said; if there is no
perceived threat, there is no need for weapons. "Somebody has to guarantee that
at the end of it (military production or research) there is a market."
Military-related spending, which Franklin estimated at a
quarter of the total Canadian budget, is "utterly and totally unjustified and immoral? she said.
"How is the population conned into thinking that one quarter of
our national wealth ought to go into making us and others more
insecure?"
She said the government continues to spend money on defence
not because it is needed but because of the huge investment that has
already been made and its importance to the economy. But she
thinks the money and the talent we are "wasting" could be put to
better use and still boost the economy.
"The engineering knowledge (presently contributing to military
research) could produce very useful things but we don't do it." She
suggested that since "nuclear power was a technological dead end,"
Canadians should apply their expertise in the area to preventing
accidents by dismantling reactors.
"No-one has yet safely dismantled a nuclear reactor. The people
who built them have the best knowledge...let's use the knowledge?
Or we could divert money from the arms race to environmental
protection: "I would much rather see Canada excel in this world in
high-tech, sophisticated anti-pollution equipment than leave that to
Sweden and West Germany."
It is time for us to reevaluate our priorities, said Franklin, for
the world will not see peace until we learn to value not money but
justice.
"If you want peace, work for justice and equality. Peace is not so
much the absence of war as it is the absence of fear...fear means
being afraid of things that one has no power to change. An equal society is one in which people have control over their lives."
But human avarice and belligerence obstruct that vision, says
Franklin. "One of the great barriers to achieving justice and equality
is the inappropriate use of our natural, fiscal, technical and human
resources, which is more often than not related to international
threat systems."
"We know that every measure that is presented to us as assuring the future or assuring peace, which involves making others fearful, is a measure towards war and is a step toward self-destruction."
Feminism may offer a solution.
"If the world does not get away from the mode where private
and national gain is the main motivation and adopt the strategy of
the woman's world, which is mostly aimed to minimize disaster,
there is no way to the future."
October 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 Freestyle
The AMS has a
gun to our heads
By Rick Hiebert
The AMS executive is letting
UBC's service organizations raid
our pockets without our consent.
In our name, they are assuming
that we all necessarily support the
aims and objectives of each student service group when we emphatically do not, as illustrated by
Gord Hohensee's Ubyssey letter
on GLUBC funding. In order to
restore student democracy and
student control over AMS spending, UBC should make student
funding of service organizations
voluntary.
If a "service organization" can
show that it serves "UBC students", the AMS is usually extremely likely to fork over some
cash, even if not many students
would voluntary  donate  to the
group. This isn't fair. I can think of
at least one organization on campus that I would not voluntarily
fund. Most students would rather
not fund one group or another, but
the AMS, in its pontifical wisdom,
knows what we want to spend
money on, better than we ourselves do.
It's fairly easy for service organizations to get AMS funds. As
an example, let us discuss how
GLUBC gets student funding.
GLUBC representatives go cap in
hand to the AMS budget committee and submit a budget, requesting student funding. The budget
committee advises GLUBC to
raise fundraising here, trim the
budget there, and passes the
budget along to the AMS who vote
thumbs up (or thumbs down) on
the budget. Fifty odd people have
just decided in our name that
GLUBC should be funded by all
students.
The AMS is effectively putting a gun to our heads and saying
"We favour the aims, objectives
and activities of this or that organization. Guess what? You do
too. Pay up."
This is too authoritarian for
my taste. UBC should adopt what
is commonly referred to as an
"Opt-in" proviso in relation to
service organization funding.
An "Opt-in" proviso regarding
service organizations would work
something like this: on every registration form, after basic student
fees are added, the form would say
"Student Service organization X
has requested y dollars from the
student body this year. Your share
comes to z dollars. Do you agree to
adding this to your basic student
fee?" The student would select either the box marked "yes" or the
one marked "no" and add each
approved service organization
request to her or his fee.
The idea would allow each
student to support only those organizations she or he believes are
good for all students.
Instead of trying to play on influence with the AMS and private
** rs>*-*^
11 - FOR SALE PRIVATE
1973 BLUE VW BUG, stereo, snows,
$1200. Phone 736-3274.
15 - FOUND
RED JACKET from Mountain Equip.
Co-op. Ladies'. Found at gate B-Lot.
Call Christian 228-3206.
20 - HOUSING
1 BR SUITE, S/C, FP, bright, avail.
now$350/mo. Util.incl. Call 263-9204
(H), 261-7275 (W) - Jeanette.
TWO ROOMS AVAIL, in lrge. hse.
Dec. 1, $325 + util. E. 25th, nr. bus
route, TV w/conv. No anal-retent. 877-
0133.
UBC CAMPUS - 2 bd. bright and spacious apt. to share. Modern furnishings, California style living. Ideal for
clean, active, friendly, resp. non-
smoker. Available Nov. 1, $375. Darryl 228-1867.
30 - JOBS
LOVING CAREGIVER needed part-
time for 1 child, 2-3 days per week, 8-
5 p.m., your home. Point Grey area.
228-0185.
30 - JOBS
40 - MESSAGES
MONEYMART, Canada's fastest
growing cheque cashing center, is
accepting resumes for P/T teller positions. Eves/Wknds and some day
openings. Resumes to 345 E. Broadway, V5T 1W5.
EXP. NANNY HOUSEKEEPER req.
for 1 day or 2 afternoons/wk. by UBC
gates. Call 224-3820.
35 - LOST
SEIKO WATCH lost between pool and
B-Lot, black with velcro band. Reward. Call Doug 266-6743.
SEIKO DIGITAL WATCH, silver
coloured, by Osbome Field, Wed. Sept.
23. Sentimental value. Pis. call Dave
929-7733 or 929-1911.
40 - MESSAGES
ALPHA PHI PLEDGES are the best
they can be!! Have a blast ladies! Love,
The Actives.
WOMAN IN PINK SWEATER collecting leaves at Parkade last Friday,
please call 734-4701.
50 - RENTALS
ACCESS COMPUTER RENTALS -
255-7342. We rent IBM, PC and compatibles. All types of printers, daily,
weekly, or montly rentals.
70 - SERVICES
TEAMS! CLUBS! INDIVIDUALS!
SAY IT IN STITCHES!
Monikers Custom Computerized
Embroidery puts logos, names,
and initials onto Sportswear,
Athletic bags, umbrellas ... and
more. Close to UBC.
MONIKERS
2615 WEST 16TH AVE. (1 block
east of MacDonald)
736-4515
M-F 10-5:30 SAT 10-4:00
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1987 AUTUMN LECTURES
SIR OWEN CHADWICK, O.M.
Recently retired Regius Professor of Modern History, Master of Selwyn College,
Cambridge, and President of th-eBritish Academy, Sir Owen Chadwick is one of
Britian's most distinguished historians, especially of church and society during the last
three   centuries. Currently, he is Chancellor of the University of East Anglia.
THE MIND OF THE EVANGELICAL MOVEMENT
Tuesday, October 6 At University Chapel, 5375 University Blvd. at 1:00 PM
(A Regent College Lecture)
THE DEVELOPMENT OF THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION
Wednescay, October 7 Epiphany Chapel, Vancouver School of Theology, at7:00 PM
MUSSOLINI AND THE POPE DURING WORLD WAR II
Thursday, October 8 In Room A-100, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 PM
RELIGION AND SOCIETY IN HISTORY AND TODAY
Saturday, October 10 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre, at 8:15 PM
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE - PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
lobbying, each service organization, under an "opt-in" proposal
would have to publicly defend itself and its objectives in order to
persuade students to fund it.
Also, service organizations
would become less cliquish, as the
service groups would be forced to
be fully responsive to students and
their input. Any service organization seeing its funding getting
ing to fear from this proposal. Only
those   organizations   that   get
money primarily due to lobbying
ability,   not   student   support,
should be scared.
The "opt-in" idea would give
students more control over how
their money is spent and more
influence over how the organzia-
tions are run. It's our money. It's
about time we decided on exactly
what it should be spent.
The AMS is effectively putting a gun to our heads and
saying "We favour the aims, objectives and activities
of this or that organization. Guess what? You do too.
Pay up."
axed because students don't like
what it does would quickly change
its ways.
I'm likely to get a lot of flak
from service organization types
for advocating this idea, but any
service organization that really
tries to devote itself to serving the
UBC community will have noth-
Rick Hiebert, Ubyssey staffer,
sticks up for unjustly maligned
aging debutantes and says he's the
reincarnation of Johnny Kidd, but
looks stupid wearing an eyepatch
and his singing voice is best defined as an instrument of torture.
Freestyles are opinion or comment pieces written by Ubyssey staff
writers that occasionally appear in the Ubyssey. Opinions expressed
are those of the writer and not necessarily those of The Ubyssey.
5 - WANTED
IAIR IS HAIR DESIGN requires
nodels for hairstyling colour, perm
vorkshops (Hair must be in good
cond.) Please call Rebecca 879-5435.
10 HEALTHY Caucasian Male (20-45
years) Smokers needed for a Pharmacokinetic study involving drug intake
and blood sampling. An honorarium of
$210 will be paid for the complete
study. For detailed info contact Grace
Chan, tel. 228-6772.
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HOT BAND "OGRE"
Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
October 6,1987 Belafonte boosts
UNICEF child aid
By Deanne Fisher
Harry Belafonte has never
felt more optimistic than since he
was appointed Goodwill Ambassador for the United Nations
Children's Fund.
The calypso singer and human rights statesman, met with
media Monday morning to discuss
UNICEF's projects and progress
in third world nations.
Today, 40,000 children will
die from curable diseases but by
1990, Belafonte and UNICEF plan
to meet their realistic goal of
global immunization.
"Artists...play an enourmous
role in Africa," because oral communication is often the only way to
educate the people, said Belafonte, who is also spokesperson
for the musician's humanitarian
group USA for Africa.
Belafonte recently visited
Dakar, Senegal and saw "first
hand how the immunization program is being applied." Mothers
are becoming concerned with
health care and diet in general as
a result of UNICEF health education programs, he said.
The immunization  program
has had "an important impact on
the psyche of women? said Belafonte. They feel "a great sense of
urgency of controlling their own
destiny," he said. In some areas,
women have begun farming commercially and are establishing
banking systems in their villages.
The success of the Senegal
projects has led to further progress
in other areas.
"UNICEF has the power to
stop wars," said Belafonte. In
Lebanon and El Salvador, "all
warring factions came to a
ceasefire to permit UNICEF and
its people to go into hostile areas
and immunize children."
UNICEF is one of the most
involved organizations in AIDS
experimentation in Africa and has
set up areas of quarantine in order
to isolate and study those affected
with the syndrome.
Belafonte was welcomed by
Vancouver Mayor Gordon
Campbell who declared October
UNICEF month in Vancouver,
and by Paddington Bear, National
Chairbear for UNICEF's
Hallowe'en campaign which hopes
to raise $225,000.
SINGER HARRY BELAFONTE, goodwill ambassador for UNICEF,
promotes global Immunizations
Study criticizes
students for lack
of critical thinking
BURNABY (CUP) — Students are not thinking critically
enough, but it may be the fault of
poorly trained instructors, according to a study by Simon Fraser
University researchers.
Lack of critical thinking
among first-year science students
is one problem with the transition
from high school to university,
according to a 1984 study by SFU
associate professor F. Wideen and
Ph.D student Abour Cherif.
But there are more problems.
The study also cited "lack of
experience among (first-year) students in working effectively on
their own; difficulty in handling
new found freedom, university as
a new environment for most first-
year students, cultural differences
between high school and university, and the need for self-discipline for university success."
Although lack of critical
thinking was seen as a problem by
both professors and high school
teachers who participated in the
study, "both denied their responsibility of teaching this skill to the
student."
Professors also complained
about students' "poor communication skills...they cannot read,
write, or speak adequately; thus,
they cannot express their ideas
effectively?
The study noted "although
students know they have to study
more, they somehow cannot accept the reality of actually doing
so." Professors believe that "it
sometimes takes students a year
or more to overcome this problem."
The professors also insisted
that it is hard for first-year students to get used to the university
grading system.
Another problem some professors mentioned was the fact "many
university professors have virtually no educational training and
they do not know how to teach
effectively."
The most frequent complaint
made by first-year university students was that some of the professors are disorganized. And they
believe it would help if, at the
beginning of each lecture, the professor informed the students of the
lecture's goals.
Space to fill is like time to kill; what better way of killing space and time than to rant on and on about the generalities of talking about nothing in particular and everything in general, addinglittle cosmopolitan touches such as the word 'Souffle' or "Waffle- Iron' and taking great pride in the fact thatthese words
express so much in so little space. What, for example, is the philosophy behind the use of the waffle iron? Does it reflect a psychotic tendency — wait - this
is sort of psychological, but it doesn't really matter anyway, since this little box is of so little importance anyway — to want to compress things into little
squares and to have all the little squares uniform in size just so that the sirup flowing from the long necked sensuous plastic bottle doesn't have to discriminate between what hole to fill and what hole to leave empty, and what hole to give a little bit of its sweetness, and what hole to endow with great gobs of
glutinous liquid. But what about social responsibility? What about the need to educate the masses through the media? What about Principles? Fuck 'em.
We know that
a cheap calculator am
cost you blood, sweat
and time.
Investing in a
Hewlett-Packard calculator, on the other
hand, can save you
time and again.
HP calculators not
only have better
functions. They function better. Without
sticking keys and bad
connections.
Through October
31, you can get the
cream of the calculators at a non-fat price.
We're cutting $15
off the HP-12C. That
buys you more built-
in functions than
anyone else's financial calculator.
And we're giving
away a free Advantage
Module, a $84.95
value, with every HP-41
Advanced Scientific
calculator you buy.
This 12K-byte plug-
in, menu-driven ROM
was designed specially
for students.
So drop by your
campus bookstore or
local dealer and compare HP calculators
with the rest. By midterm, you'll see what
a deal this is.
nm
EWLETT
PACK A FID
The
'Chronicles'
FranK Knew the slightest noise
irnqht trigger the. restless herd*
October 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 ...like writers, photographers,
layout people and like graphic
artists eh and...and data
processors...ha, ha, ha, (sound a
lot better than typists) and
people who like to have fun - no
don't write that, that sounds
stupid...okay anyone who wants
to hang out in the office and help
out and learn how a newspaper
works...okay now put this in big
letters JOIN    THE
UBYSSEY, SUB 241k-
and make it bold...great! These
computers are so ...uh...neat.
Hey! you weren't copying this
word for word were you?!?
• LOW LOW PRICES
• SUPER COPIES
NO EXTRA CHARGE FOR
• automatic collating
• 3 hole paper
• standard coloured paper
2nd Floor, 2174 Western Parkway
(at University Village)
Vancouver, B.C. Tel: 224-6225
Mon-Th8-9, Fri8-6, Sat-Sunll-6
The
old Freddy Wood theatre became a heap of smouldering ashes and
singed memories last Saturday morning as
flames claimed the beat-up boards which
came to be known as "Hut M24".
The beginning of the end came as a
young arsonist set fire to the Hut last
month. The destruction was not complete,
but it was enough to make the Hut unusable. The fire department decided to put
the pained building down to relieve it of its
misery, and practice putting out fires.
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
October 6,1987 The Hut was located on University Boulevard opposite
Ponderosa, and was used as rehearsal space as well as housing
Theatre 200 courses. photos by dan andrews
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FEATURING MEG SOPER
TOMORROW - WEDNESDAY OCT 7 - 12:30 pm
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DUNGAREES
Denims for men and women from:
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Marcel Dachet - Australia
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As an introductory offer for our newest
department, we will purchase any pair of
your old denims for $20.00 towards the
purchase of a new pair in our store. We
extend this offer until Nov. 15, 1987 at which
time we will donate your old jeans to charity.
^4/arkJames
Broadway & Bayswater 734-2381
OPEN SUNDAYS
Something New Is
Happening at UBC
A NEW TOUCHTONE PHONE SYSTEM which is being installed in stages
from Sept. to Dec. 18th 1987. The new phone system is a state of the art
Touchtone direct dial system (SL-1) which is replacing the old, out-of-
date, rotary, Centrex system.
HOW IT WILL AFFECT YOU:
TEMPORARY DIALING PLAN:
Effective: September 19th, 1987.
Centrex phone calling SL-1 phone or
SL-1 phone calling Centrex phone
Dial 82 = 4 digit local or
Dial 9 = 22X-XXXX
There is a limited number or 82 - tie trunks available
If you are in doubt when calling someone, dial 9 + 7 digits. On
December 19th, 1987 the dialing will revert to 4 digit locals.
Some buildings have already been changed over to the new system.
Some are in the process of change. Here is a list of the change-overs for
October:
OCT. 3     -    AMS-
STUDENT UNION BLDG (NOT FOOD SVC)
OCT. 9     -    McDONALD BLDG - DENTISTRY
OCT. 17   -    CHEMISTRY
OCT. 23   -    G.S.A.B. - AWARDS & FINANCIAL AID
FINANCE
GRADUATE STUDIES
INTERNAL AUDIT
REGISTRAR'S OFFICE
MAIL ROOM
OCT. 31   -    LIBRARY PROCESSING CENTER
LIBRARY - TECHNICAL PROCESSES
AND SYSTEMS
FOREST ECONOMIES AND POLICY
HUMAN SETTLEMENTS
MEDIA SERVICES
UBC ACCESS
Sponsored by Communications Department
University of British Columbia
October 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 Getting Tired Of Watching Re-Runs Of Vanna White Doing Her Stuff, and stuffing your chubby little face with all sorts of Foul
Horrible Chemicals? Or Watching Vacant Smiles on Empty-Headed Poli ticians.Proclaiming Empty Things, and realizing that those
images are being dissembled into tiny particles and being hurled into Outer Space to Bounce off a piece of Hanging Metal? You're
still here, eh. Itshows that you'veGot Conscience. Get up and Fight. Starta Revolution! Ifyou really want to be somebody, go around
and Find A Cause. Like discovering who's Responsible. Go into the Streets and Demand an Answer. Make the little Rodents give
you an answer. Get out there and scream and rant and rave, spewing little flecks of spittle on those close to yoo, and Demand to Know
just What The Hell Is Going On and Who The Hell Is Responsible!!! Find the Swine. He's out there somewhere, with a smug little
grin on his face, caviar and peanut butter sandwich in left hand, cellular phone in right hand, Giving Orders which some little shit
is going to obey just because the dude with the sandwich told himso. You think it's the telephone that gives him Authority? Dammit,
haven't you been Listening? Grab that caviar and peanut butter sandwich from his hand! That's the secret to his Power. Take the
King's Sandwich-Sceptre! Crush it between your fingers soit oozes out, caviar and peanut butter mixing violently, soppy white bread
dissolving back into its component chemicals and Eat It.
The Ubyssey, the last Vestige of Reason in this Third World Province, needs Help in Fighting That Man. We Want hia Picture.
We Need PHOTOGRAPHERS!
The Next Step, naturally, is to have Speakes with Him. Make him Face the MasBes Without His Sandwich, as it were. Grill
him with Questions. Make him Answer, You Have The Power—This is You crushing that Sandwich! Remember that. He'satyour
mercy. Loosely translated, the preceding means that we need WRITERS.
Ifyou don't Do either of the above, if it's Not Your Style, that's cool. We Still Need You. Before we can Grab that Sandwich-
Spectre, we need a solid Foundation. An infrastructure, ifyou will, Ifyou can walk, talk, and handle a Pair of Scwsore, You're Hired.
Where can you do all this and still find time for school7
Free Work   The Ubyssey   Room
241K   SUB
mm nm
SiMchAiToRAh
Thursday
October 15
at 6 p.m.
Lubavitch Centre
5750 Oak St., Vancouver
Phone
266-1313	
Chabad Lubavitch invites you
to bring your family and join us for
food, rChayim, singing and more on
this most joyous day.
AN UNCOMMON
WEALTH OF WOMEN
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15,1987
9:30 -10:30 MAUREEN McTEER
• LAWYER AND AUTHOR
"The Political Reality: Conscience and
Consequence"
International House Lounge
11:00 - 12:00 OPEN FORUM WITH ROSEMARY BROWN
• FORMER PROVINCIAL MLA
"U.N. Forward Looking Strategies: Where
are we?"
International House Lounge
(in cooperation with Women's Programs,
Office of the Secretary of State)
12:30 - 1:30 DAME NITA BARROW
• UN AMBASSADOR
• MEMBER, COMMONWEALTH MISSION TO SOUTH AFRICA
"After Nairobi: Women on the Move?"
Buchanan A 100
2:00 - 3:00 ANN MEDINA
• CBC TELEVISION JOURNALIST AND FOREIGN CORRESPONDENT
"Women and Power: A Reporter's
Perspective"
International House Lounge
3:30 - 4:30 LOUISE ROSE IN CONCERT
• JAZZ ARTIST AND SINGER
"Songs for and about Women"
International House Lounge
• ADMISSION FREE
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 228-5153
SPONSORED BY THE U.B.C. OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS WITH THE ASSISTANCE
OF THE LEON AND THEA KOERNER FOUNDATION
- ->x».iimiii_»n>i*»^_
UBC FIELD HOCKEY woman defending peace, Justice, and the
Thunderbirds' winning ways
Hockey women
climb to second
By Gloria Loree
UBC women's field hockey
team stacked up three wins and a
tie at the second Canada West
tournament hosted by UBC on the
weekend.
Wins over the University of
Calgary,the University of Manitoba, the University of Alberta,
and a tie with the University of
Victoria moved the 'Birds up to
second place in the overall Canada
West standings.
On Saturday UBC played two
teams to whom they had lost at the
first Canada West tournament.
In the first game against
Calgary the "Birds emerged with a
1-0 victory. The lone goal came
from a penalty corner that Leonie
Plunkett drove in from the top of
the circle.
"We were very aggressive and
showed them that we are a very
different team from the one they
defeated two weeks ago? Plunkett
said.
The afternoon game against
UVic was a very physical one.
Both teams were up for the rival
Soccer 'Birds
roll on prairies
match and each played strong
defensive games. The scoreless tie
displayed the parity between the
two teams.
Sunday's victory over Manitoba was a tougher game than the
3-0 score would indicate. No team
dominated the play, but it was
UBC who capitalized on their
opportunities.
The game's first goal was
scored in free play by Sarah Lilly-
white. The second goal was scored
by Laura Farres and Jennifer
Vanstone rounded out the scoring.
Sunday's final game was a
frustrating one in which the team
could not penetrate the University
ofAlberta'scircle. The game's only
goal was finally scored off of a
penalty corner by Penny Cooper.
"We had a problem scoring
this weekend? Cooper said. "We
seem to lose some of our punch
when we hit the circle."
With this weekend's victories
the team is now in a prime position
to claim the Canada West title,
which will be decided at the final
tournament in Victoria on October
17th and 18th.
By Angie Mclldoon
The UBC women's soccer
team emerged victorious in the
first half of a Canada West eight
game round robin
championship in Saskatoon last
weekend.
The Birds defeated the University of Saskatchewan Huskies 3-1
Friday morning, the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs 2-0 Friday afternoon, the University of Lethbridge Pronghorns 2-0 on Saturday,
and tied the University of Alberta
0-0 on Sunday.
As four time Canada West
champions the 'Birds were again
the team to beat. UBC finsihed
with seven out of a possible eight
points.
In the first game against Saskatchewan the 'Birds took charge
early, and despite losing a starting
defender in the first few minutes
to an injury, managed to control
the game.
UBC's first goal was scored by
midfielder Wendy Brown, who
beat the Huskies' offside trap and
tucked away a well-placed shot.
The Huskies' offside trap
proved to be their undoing, as
UBC striker Nancy Sutherland
drew the Saskatchewan goaltender towards her before dumping
the ball in the empty corner of the
net.
UBC's third and final goal was
scored by striker Colleen Koch,
from a free kick taken by defender
Linda Therrien.
Game two for the 'Birds was
Friday afternoon against the University of Calgary. Although the
Calgary squad was fresh, and
UBC had already played one game
that day, the 'Birds triumphed
again
Nancy Sutherland tallied for
the "Birds, as did team captain
Mitch Ring, to make the score 2-0
for UBC.
Sunday's match was against
the University of Lethbridge and
UBC's Wendy Brown scored yet
another goal while midfielder
Zabeen Janmohamed notched her
first of the tournament to make it
2-0 for the 'Birds.
UBC's final game was Sunday
against arch-rival University of
Alberta. High winds had picked
up overnight, turning playing
conditions into a nightmare. Neither team could settle the ball
down in the high winds and they
played to a scoreless draw.
UBC's tenacious defense only
allowed one goal in during four
games, giving them the leading
goals-against average of all four
teams.
The second half of the Canada
West championship will be held at
UBC's Todd Fields on October 23,
24, and 25.
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
October 6,1987 China provincials smash volleybirds
By Jeremy Fraser
A well disciplined Chinese
team, from the Zhe-Chiang province in China, crushed the UBC
men's volleyball team 15-6, 15-9,
and 15-10 on Saturday in War
Memorial Gym.
The scrounging defence of
Rob Hill and the power hitting of
Greg Williscroft were not enough
to counter China's awesome hitting talent.
Although UBC played well,
and improved upon their first
match with the Chinese at Langara, the more experienced provincial Zhe-Chiang team dominated the match with precision
spiking and consistent serving.
The Chinese team is more
experienced? said UBC head
coach Dale Ohman. "Their
average age of 24 to 25 was defi
nitely an advantage?
UBC failed to take advantage
of a match peppered with side
outs.
The 'Birds suffered from a
lack of consistent serving, losing a
number of serves needlessly. In
the second game, UBC even lost a
serve due to being out of rotation.
UBC used several timeouts
during the match, while the cool
Chinese team used only one. "The
Chinese set a quick pace and applied a lot of pressure? said
Ohman.
The Chinese drew on the hitting skill of Yu Yue Min and the
steady serving of Ye Chun Fu to
grind away at the UBC defences.
The Zhe-Chiang team also
took advantage of UBC's lack of
preperation by tipping on the sec-
SOME PLAYERS WERE crushed more than others In UBC's loss to China's Zhe-Chiang provincial team
stev# dUM photo
Top tenz
an informal survey of jock culture
Nicknames
1. Ozone Twins
2. Phlegm
3. Peanut
4. Snake
5. Geoff's brother
6. Bambi
7. Smack
8. The Hill
9. Di animal Dian
10. Skippy
Graham Day/Malcom McNeight,
varsity track & field (high jump)
Ken Lucks, varsity track & field
Christine Anne Pinette, varsity soccer
J.D. Jackson, varsity basketball
Derek Hanson, varsity track & field
Kristen Madsen, varsity track & field
Sue Macpherson, varsity basketball
Mike Mosher, varsity soccer
Linda Diano, varsity track & field
Teresa DeBou, varsity basketball
ond hit.
The UBC team managed only
once to gain a lead in the third
game, but lost it quickly due to the
accurate hitting of the Chinese
team.
Volleyball fans can look forward to an exciting match on October 19 at 7:30 p.m., when UBC
plays a visiting UCLA at War
Memorial Gym.
Grid
'Birds
win
By Michael J. Bryant
The UBC Thunderbirds football team extended their school-
record winning streak on Friday
night to 14 games by defeating the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
24-19 at Calgary.
Following the pattern they've
set this season, the 'Birds relied on
a passing game, with UBC gaining
236 yards in the air.
"We really couldn't run the
ball so we had to go more to an air
attack? UBC receiver Todd Wickman told The Vancouver Sun.
'Birds quarterback Jordan
Gagner connected with Wickman
five times for 96 yards and two
touchdowns. Calgary passed for
only 146 yards, but penetrated the
UBC front line for 280 yards on the
ground.
The two teams had played
earlier in the season, with UBC
passing for 323 yards and thumping Calgary 34-16 at UBC in their
season opener.
The win keeps UBC undefeated in the Western Intercollegiate Football League at 5-0. The
'Birds face Alberta at UBC next
Saturday for their first home game
since August 29.
T-Bird Rugby romps again
By Donald Jow
The UBC Thunderbird rugby
team continued their winning
ways this weekend but began to
show signs of slowing.
The "Birds beat the Surrey
Beavers 44-6 in Cloverdale on
Saturday, extending their record
to 5 and 0.
Roy Radu opened the scoring
for the 'Birds with a try in the fifth
minute. Bruce Jordan added the
convert but combined with Scott
Stewart to miss seven of UBC's
eleven kicks at goal on the day.
As the first forward to the
breakdown, Radu set up the next
UBC score by peeling the ball out
of the ruck and flipping it to the
backs. Evan Scholnick finished off
the drive.
The 'Birds then fell into one of
their two long lapses of the day;
had Surrey been better equipped
to take advantage the outcome
may have been different.
Strong forward work set up
UBC's next try. Hard rucking by
Ian Scholnick and Terry Sedgewick kept the ball in UBC hands
and drew in the Beaver defenders
until a quick thrust by Evan
Scholnick broke through for the
score.
The 'Birds scored three times
in the last six minutes of the first
half. Jordan came into the backs
on a fullback hook and dished off to
Bruce Gray for the try. Dave
Usher scored on a tap from a UBC
lineout one yard from the Beaver
goal line. Pierre Duey finished the
half with an opportunistic try arising from a broken play in the
backs.
With the halftime score at 28-0,
the 'Birds started the second half
slowly.
UBC's fitness edge showed in
the last twenty minutes as they
finished the game with three more
tries. Mark Smith scored a
forward's try, Matt Fahey picked
off and ran in an errant Surrey
pass from 30 metres out, and Evan
Scholnick turned the corner on the
Surrey defenders to complete his
hat trick of tries.
The second division UBC
Braves and third division UBC
Totems completed the Surrey
sweep, winning 26-3 and 20-3 respectively. The three UBC teams
lead their divisions in the Vancouver Rugby Union.
Last Wednesday the 'Birds
beat the Trojan RFC 37-7, while
the Braves and Totems lost to the
Ex-Brits after thrashing them
only 10 days earlier. The UBC
Frosh lost 15-9 to the Rowers.
WORDS TO
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For further information call Nancy
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Phone 875-4830
Vancouver General Hospital
October 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 Bucks for sucks
In the high schools they call it "bucks for
sucks."
Bill Vander Zalm calls it a "passport to
education."
The nifty pamphlets will be introduced
this year to encourage high school kids to
pursue an advanced education by recording
academic achievement; those with enough
stamps in their passports at the end of the
year will be rewarded with cheap tuition at
BC post-secondary institutions.
It seems the passport gimmick was
pretty popular at Expo, and Vander Zalm
knows a good public relations stunt when he
sees one. There's no way anybody can avoid
noticing what is in fact a very small increase
in education funding.
It is nice to see the government putting
more money into student aid. Maybe if they
didn't spend so much on the accompanying
fanfare and glitter they could afford to provide even more.
Maybe they could even afford to get to the
root of B.C.'s education crisis and provide
more money to the institutions themselves.
After all, no student aid increase will bring
participation levels up if the colleges and
universities have to keep turning students
away.
Bible's authority
presents infinite
argument
Not one of the recent letters regarding
homosexuality addresses the root of the
problem - the question of the Bible's authority.
Neither side can influence the other if
one believes the Bible contains the infallible word of God, while the other either
discounts it entirely or considers it what
author John Updike has called "a badly-
edited anthology".
Unless this question can be settled, the
former group will continue to condemn
homosexuality, and the latter will continue to condemn them for it. The argument isn't going anywhere.
THE UBYSSEY
October 6,1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater
society of the University of IBritish Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of lthe staff and lnot necessarily those of the university administration, or of the
sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member ogf Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k of
the Student Union Building. Editorial Department,
phone 228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
This masthead may never have come to be because of the gorgeous October weather. Corinne
Bjorge sat in the Ubyssey office feeling lost and
rejected . Victor Wong and Rick Hiebert had abandoned her for a frolicking day at Wreck Beach with
Laura Busheikin, Jennifer Lyall, and Deanne
Fisher. Others playing hooky, namely Barry Davis,
Dan Andrews, Ross McLaren, Chris Klaasen, Pat
Kirkwood and Golnar Rastar, spent their time doubting the existence of blue smarties. Cathy Lu, Steve
Chan and Jeremy Fraser helped by calculating the
candies' wave function. Earlier this morning, a football smashed the Dean's window but Adam Jones,
Gloria Loree, Micheal J. Bryant left the scene of the
crime in a hot pink '57 Chevy. Angie Mclldoon and
Jody Woodland took all the blame. Poor Corinne gave
up and joined everyone on the beach. Grace Aquino
sat on the cliffs surveying all that was happening and
saw that it was good.
LETTERS
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on
any issue. Letters should be as
short as possible and may be edited for brevity as well as for sexism, racism and homophobia.
Bring them in person with your
ID to the Ubyssey Office, SUB
241k.
Athletic fields
pose a threat
I would like to complain
about the sorry shape of the
athletic fields available for
general student use. The
recent preliminary round
robin for intramural soccer
emphasized that they must
be kept in better condition.
Due to the numerous ruts,
holes and barren dirt
patches, the number of
ankle, foot and knee injuries
was appalling. I was unfortunately one of the victims,
but I also noticed at least 5
other players requiring assistance due to injuries.
Surely, the damage
that would be incurred by
the rugby fields in the soccer
tournament would be minimal. Students pay through
the nose to fund athletic
teams and facilities. We
shouldn't have to play on
substandard fields in outright dangerous conditions.
For an intramural program that prides itself as
the best in the country, this
weekend's tournament
shows that many problems
still exist. The good fields on
this campus should notbe a
luxury only a few students
can enjoy.
John Crowley
Unclassified
Speaking of
condoms
This   letter   does   not
contain the word "condom".
Martin Dawes
music 4
P.S. Hint: this is a hint.
Freedom lovers
loath to listen
As a member of the
public to which Hai Le refers (It's Not Right for Canada to Stay White, 9/29/87),
I did not find His Honour
Judge CLyne's remarks "irresponsible", "profoundly
disturbing", "extremely
lamentable, and an indication of his loss of ethical
sense? However, I cannot
say the same about Hai.
Judging Hai on his comments, as he has the
Honourable Judge, one
might come to several possibly erroneous conclusions
about Hai Le.
For example, based
solely on the reading of one
letter published in the
Ubyssey, one might conclude that Hai was attracted
to Science instead of Arts
because his/her English
skills are questionable. Or,
turning Hai's own words
against him, one may suspect that Hai is perhaps a
racist, and that Hai "may
have secretly and falsely
succumbed to the seemingly
true notion" that all white
Canadians believe "that
non-white immigrants by
nature are inferior, and are
likely to become dependent
on welfare?
Likewise, one may conclude that Hai Le is naive if
(s)he believes 1) that after
attending sixteen days of
classes at UBC an analogy
from astrophysics lends
credibility to the argument,
or 2)   that any evidence is
S US PGNQEP
AN I MAT/OrV
"irrefutable" in the hands of
an expert politicial, least of
all pathetic generalizations
and stereotypes of any ethnic group.
Does all this suggest
that I am defending His
Honour Judge Clyne's remark or that I am myself a
racist? Possibly. But have
you ever noticed that those
exercising their right to
freedom of expression are
loathe to extend the same
freedom to those who say
anything that they don't
want to hear?
Ron Parks
Law 3
Canada acts as
nuclear buffer
Re: article entitled
"Canada's submarines' purpose questioned?
....Wallace doesn't consider a different option: that
of Canada exerting its sovereignty into its Arctic waters, not as an American
puppet, but as a sovereign
nation. If we chose this
path, the effect of construc-
ing these submarines
would actually be one of
stabilization. Neither the
U.S. nor the Soviet Union
could send their submarine
forces in a forewarning the
other side. On the same
note, we would act as a
buffer between these superpowers and thus reduce the
chance of nuclear war
through friction between
the two.
Tim Pettit
arts 4
Gord guards
"proverbial"
record
I would just like to say
something for the "proverbial" record. I do not hate or
fear homosexuals, nor did I
write my letter with some
contrived vengeful attitude.
I am proud and firm of what
I stand for: I am a Christian
and I accept the Bible as the
Word of God. It is from this
omni-authoritative text that
I base and form my values,
and I am not ashamed of it.
Hence, I will not apologize or
compromise for my strong
stand against homosexuality.
The impression I received from respondents letters was that they thought
my article was written with
gay-bashing intent. Well, it
wasn't. I wanted to inform
other students of something
which I feel is very wrong:
namely, the funding of the
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
with our AMS student fees. I
do not want to financially
support an organization
which promotes homosexuality and its acceptance in
our society. From a Biblical
point of view, I believe it is a
sin; from a humanistic perspective, I believe homosexuality is an unacceptable
perversion.
If some students choose
to be gay and form a homosexual club, that is their
right, their privilege, and
their own business, but don't
expect me and the entire
student body to monetarily
support it! Let's get tough
with our AMS government
and get them to stop funding the Gays and Lesbians!
Gord Hohensee
arts 2
Gay basher
basher, bashed
Hatred, bigotry and
bitter invectiveness, says
Peter MacDougall. Well, I
read the article three times
and I have yet to see evidence for such harsh condemnatory accusations. I
do agree Gord Hohensee
does express a strong point
of view. But, it is out of line
to equate holding such a
view with hatred and bigotry.
As to reference to
Gord's 'absolutist thinking'
and his "right to pass judgement'; if there is no passing
of judgement, we are as it
were, free agents in a society that has no line of standard.
The premise in the Biblical record is that there is a
norm, a maxim, that balances the scales in favour of
a wholesome lifestyle.
Surely to goodness Peter, reason dictates, that in
a society such as ours
where the handwriting is
on the wall regarding our
deviate and abstract lifestyles, we are once again
challenged to reconsider
our behavioral conduct.
Douglas Johnston
Dean/Chaplain
Carey Hall Baptist Coll.
Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
October 6* 1987 Free trade free-for-all
Free trade designed for capitalists
By Ross McLaren
Wait for it. Wait for the
wheels of commerce to start turning in the U.S. I can see them now,
like a steam fired locomotive's
wheels, slowly picking up speed as
the boilers catch fire. The wheels
are singing, 'freeee trade'... 'freeee
trade'... and on it goes, the same
tune. Canada is open for business.
Investment Canada is gutted.
American money accepted no
questions asked. It's one big free-
for-all; one big free trade: 'U.S.
money for Canadian jobs', 'U.S.
money for Canadian jobs'.
And jobs there will be, lots of
them. Every single resource company in this country will be bought
and sold by Americans ten times
over, will explore for that golden
vein all across the country, and
will ready themselves for the next
oil cartel.
Ontario will suffer, but them's
the breaks. Americans don't want
manufactured goods. They want
raw materials: lumber and rocks;
B.C. in a nutshell. Things look
good for this province.
And what about those profits
that flow to the south? What about
them? They would have remained
in the ground without our good
neighbour's money, or so the argument goes.
But let's not characterize free
trade as a give away. It wasn't
designed to help the working class.
Free trade was designed for capitalists who control resource based
companies and who donate heavily to the Conservative party. Free
trade helps those who help Brian
Mulroney.
Politics is money, influence
peddling, and political debts. It's
always been that way. Mulroney
can promise anything to the electorate but he has to pay the people
who fund him. That is reality.
*-**-_Kv:-*-'y> _ _
U N DER THE NATIONAL POLICY
\\\      WHCKC ARE ALL MY OLD FBICNOS THC MECHANICS! /
..,■%_.       T-WHOU   CAH I tILL-r PHOOUCI HOW.    ^V
r a Free Trade
OR   REVENUE TARIFF.
-__***_._.       J-A   '
HAS CANADA CHANGED?   Poster published in 1891 by the Industrial
League titled 'Under the National Policy'
Freedom is here
By Stuart Derdeyn
C'mon Canada! Get up, get
down, get on your feet, and head to
work with that Free Trade beat.
Everywhere across the nation
downtrodden P. C's are walking
proud and talking loud, because at
the twilight's last gleaming they
pulled off the negotiations they
had hung their credibility on.
Canada has now officially joined
the North American mercantile
melting pot to the benefit of us all.
Don't you feel good? I feel good.
Across the nation's airwaves
Monday morning eager ears were
treated to Brian Mulroney's first
dose of grandiose self-congratulations, as he addressed the House of
Commons pulling all the stops.
Canada, we were told, had made
history by setting the example of
how nations of the free world could
establish trade negotions to the
mutual benefit of one and all. Yes,
in the dawn's early light a new era
of co-operation had been entered
into. It will be a hard road for
Canadians, but being a nation
founded in the spirit of pioneering,
comprised of rugged explorers
ready to kick ass, we will weather
the challenge. Inspiring stuff, sure
to be quoted by media adventur-
eres setting sail for uncharted
polls.
Brian's speech even inspired
John Turner. Quoting from the
morning press releases from the
U.S. goverment, Turner was in
rare  form  as he lambasted  the
agreement by inferring that anything the Clayton Yeutter said the
U.S. had achieved was at the expense of Canadians. We can thank
God that the Liberals are watching out for us, because the Conservatives have given away Canada's
energy rights, international trading rights, agricultural rights, and
more. And that just isn't right!
Turner has his eyes on that much
coveted NDP popularity rating,
and it appears he sees a chance to
get it with this issue. Keep your
eyes peeled for his picture in the
news.
Ed Broadbent followed
Turner's unusually awake critis-
cisms with further conclusions
drawn from the U.S. release.
Broadbent was far more relaxed
than Turner, concertrating on
specific cases such as the Auto
Pact, the fate of the Wheat Marketing Board, and cultural
sovreignty.
As a finishing comment Ed
suggested an election, quite aware
Freestyle
that his party could see a shift in
it's popularity in the near future.
All in all, a whole of politicking considering that it wasn't even
nine a.m. When the actual text of
the agreement is delivered sometime later this week ( when the
negotiators can figure out exactly
what they agreed to perhaps?) and
PANGO PANGO (UNS) Hairy
puce blorgs on this tiny island
kingdom salivated at the celibate
celebrat-ory celebrations for the
celebrated celestial virgin Pecker
Nevermounted's silver orgasmic
aneurism. "I'm so miserable to be
here? said Nevermounted. "I
have yet to be bonked in front of
Freestyle
Everybody, the media, business leaders, Canadians, is hypnotized by the singing of those
wheels: freeeee trade', 'freeeee
trade', freeeee trade', but life is
about power, naked power that
stinks of sweat and smoke in hotel
rooms and bureaucrats' offices.
Some people play the game,
sometimes winning, sometimes
losing. These people get stuck in
the locomotive. They are called
leaders, pillars of society, great
people, and so on.
But jobs or no jobs, free trade
deals or not, it makes no difference. Each person gets by, one day
at a time. We all drink, make love,
and die.
Kurtz, in Joseph Conrad's
Heart of Darkness, had it wrong.
Life is not "the horror" but "the
hype", "the hype".
Mulroney's free trade deal is
one more political deal made for all
the wrong reasons.
Ross Mclaren is a slightly psychotic Ubyssey staffer with scary
eyes, a weird smile and indeterminate sexual habits.
the people of Canada are allowed
some insight into the conditions,
there is no doubt that the parties
that be v.. _R have ^ots to say on the
subject. This negotion could wind
up being the "issue" for a 1 ong time,
so prepare yourself by purchasing
issues of silly periodicals, and
studying the T.V.guide for alternatives to the newspapers and the
Journal.
Presently, anyone in their
right mind with money to invest
should maintain an allnight vigil
by their telephones, so they can be
the first to drop their life's savings
into their broker's lap. The market
bullfight that will accompany this
agreement shouldn't be missed.
Europeans who have been praying
for a precedent that can free them
from the dictatorship of the Common Market can start planning for
the future, and all those GATT
bureaucrats can start looking for a
new line of work after the upcoming trade talks. The North, strong
and free, knows how to do business
on its' own, and everywhere the
sprit of unimpeded entrepre-
neurship guided only by the invisible hand of market forces will
thrive.
Canada, sit back and prepare
for the deluge. We have built our
ark, now we can sail it out into real
enterprise.
Yeah, I'm happy to know my worth
as a part of this agreement, I feel
good, even better, I feel free!
Stuart Derdeyn is a brand new
Ubyssey staffer, still in his right
mind and feeling good.
5,000 people," she squeaked.
Meanwhile, back at Bile's bash,
the slobby bachelor beckoned
lewdly to Lotsa Boobs-shakin' and
they danced past dawn, while
other black and white blorgs reconciled themselves to lives of vicarious satisfaction.
Notice to all First Year
Students:
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
ELECTION will be held on Thurs., Oct. 8
in Rm 216 between 12:30 and 1:30.
Come out and Vote!
(Please bring your student I.D.)
HOUR
*/>
13b
c
a
SOFT CONTACT
LENS SERVICE
(Soft contact lenses in about one hour for most
prescriptions - Specialty lenses excluded)
■ FREE initial fittings
■ FREE start-up solutions (
■ FREE consultation
■ FREE follow-up visits
for one year
• Student Rates:
20%  Off CONTACT LENSES
(THIS STORE ONLY)
10th at Alma
*-^-
I—"-
0)
CL
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CONTACT LENS CENTRE^^HV
3665 West 10th Avenue • Phone 736-5669
RICHMOND
4940 -- No. 3 Rd
(At Aldcrbridge)
273-0371
COQUITLAM/
NEW WEST
403 North RA
(Next to P J.s All Star Cafe)
936-1422
VANCOUVER/
BURNABY
3328 Kingsway
(Kingsway Joyce)
438-6122
VANCOUVER
815 W.Hastings
(Howe & Hastings)
681-9488
COQUITLAM/
PT. COQUITLAM
3025 Lougheed Hwy.
(Nest to Safeway Superstore)
942-1642
NORTH/WEST
VANCOUVER
1242 Marine Dr.
(Next to Save On Foods)
984-3434
VANCOUVER
(2576 Granville St.
Granville Broadway)
738-1511
U.B.C.
BOOKSTORE
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October 6,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 HOW CAN Yi
TRAIN TICKET?
□ Bring your own
chair.
□ Offer to entertain
^passengers with selected
/readings from your poetry.
Show your student
card.
The train's definitely the smart way to
travel. Even smarter these days with VIA's student
fares. Just show us your student card and you're
on your way, 1/3 richer. Have a relaxing ride. Meet
some new friends. And let the good trains roll!
For more information and reservations,
call your Travel Agent or VIA Rail. VLA's student
fares are available to full time students. Some
conditions apply regarding times and dates of travel.
Ask for details.
Next time,
choose VIA.
cyS
v
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
\
^t*-S^^a\-\**>"-•**•■ *$■•*:"- ***a~_ -"   -
A retrospective
When South African police left
anti-apartheid activist Stephen
Biko to die after brutally beating him,
they thought they had successfully
silenced him.
The South African government should have realized that Biko's influence would not die with him.
On the tenth anniversary of his death, Biko lives
on as a symbol of Black resistance.
"Symbols don't die, they become martyrs. And
martyrs live forever," according to P.C. Jones, a
black activist who was arrested along with Biko in
August 1977.
Biko was arrested on August 18,1977 by the
South African security forces because his anti-
apartheid activism and widespread influence were
a threat to the apartheid regime. The police beat
him severely, causing massive head injuries,
chained him to the floor of a jeep and transported
him 740 miles to a prison hospital.
The 31-year-old activist died of brain damage
on Sepetember 12.
Biko was a charismatic figure, an intellectual
exceptionally able to spur others to action with his
vision of a liberated South Africa. He played a
large part in the development of Black Consciousness, a movement which stressed Black pride and
unity and spurned any involvement with white, liberal anti-apartheid activists.
The senseless killing of one of South Africa's
most brilliant and articulate activists left a legacy
of bitterness and mistrust among the nation's
youth. But the vision he imparted to students like
Gerald Phokobye, the political coordinator of the
African and Carribean Students' Association at the
University of Toronto, has had more far-reaching
effects.
Phokobye is a South African who lived in exile
in Botswana for six years before coming to Canada.
His political views were greatly influenced by
Biko's writings on Black Consciousness.
"Steve was the embodiment of Black Consciousness. He trained us politically. Through his
own example and practical work, he taught us to
organize, taught us how to talk to people and relate
to each other as activists. He also helped us to gain
a better understanding of Black Consciousness
through his writings," Phokobye said.
Black Consciousness began as a movement in
the late 1960s. Many black university students had
become disenchanted with the National Union of
African Students (NUSAS) and in 1968, they broke
away to form the South African Students' Organization (SASO) with Stephen Biko as its first
president.
"Blacks are being killed by blacks...
Groups like the ANC... do not have the
courage to denounce what they are
seeing"
Biko criticized the white liberals for dominating NUSAS.
"They made all the decisions for us. We needed
time to look at our own problems and not leave
them to people without experience of the terrible
conditions in the black townships or the system of
Bantu education (the inferior education systems for
blacks)? Biko wrote.
After his third year, Biko was expelled froVn
university for his political activities. That year, he
helped to form the Black People's Convention, an
umbrella political organization for groups sharing
the beliefs of Black Consciousness.
P.C. Jones, Biko's friend and fellow activist,
spoke of the influence Biko had on his peers in the
struggle against apartheid.
"Biko left us with an idea and a movement
which are inspiring blacks and whites on all university campuses. He came from a generation of
black students who were asking themselves the
question, 'What is our calling as Black students
and what is our historic role to fulfill?'
"The answer is that the interests of the black
student are no different from the interests of the
community from which he or she comes.
^%-
-5  <*■*
^s*\*.
"Today, Biko is a symbol of hope, having been
able to show in practical, non-sensational terms,
that it is possible to live an independent life
outside the intentions of the government? said
Jones.
Jones said there was no political movement
prior to Black Consciousness that could effectively
address the historic division between different segments of the Black community. When the Black
Consciousness Movement was banned by the South
African government in October 1977, the effect on
the Black community was devastating.
"The movement that was most able to lead and
unify Blacks was destroyed in one brutal movement. Today we see 99 per cent of conflict contained within Black areas. Violence is inverted
violence. Blacks are being killed by other Blacks.
This is due to a large extent to cowardly behaviour
on the political level by groups like the African
National Congress, who do not have the moral
depth to denounce what they are seeing? said
Jones.
During his lifetime, Biko advocated nonviolence in the struggle against apartheid. Today,
the Black Consciousness movement is split on the
issue of using violence to effect change. The BCM
"If you allow me to respond, I'm certainly going to respond. And I'm afraid
you may have to kill mein the process..."
within South Africa does not advocate violence but
Phokobye said the external wing of the BCM advocates the use of revolutionary warfare against the
apartheid regime.
Robert Fatton, the author of Black Consciousness in South Africa, like many Black Consciousness political theorists, sees violence as inevitable.
"Apartheid, like slavery, cannot be reformed,
only abolished? said Fatton.
Biko saw the importance of mental as well as
political liberation for black South Africans..
"From the beginning, the Black Consciousness
Movement attempted to instill an ideology of hope
brought about by Black unity and the renaissance
of the Black mind, from which a new black culture
would spring."
As it developed, the Black Consciousness
Movement's ideology became more radical. The
emphasis shifted from cultural and psychological
concerns to questions of class and economics.
"There is now a focus on racial oppression and
class expectations within the Black Consciousness
Movement? Gerald Phokobye said.
"Therefore the black working class is seen as
the leading force for change."
Stephen Biko has greatly influenced many
musicians, writers and artists, in addition to the
academics and activists that follow his political example.
Sonia Sanchez, a poet and professor at Temple
University in Philadelphia, studies racism in literature and popular culture.
"(Biko) inspires us all to do similar work and
have similar visions. He reminds us all not just to
be writers, but writers who spread the word about
how people should live and walk as upright human
beings? Sanchez said.
Norman "Otis" Richmond, president of the
Black Association of Toroto, feels that music can
have a powerful effect in motivating people to
respond to political issues.
"The whole African music experience is a response. African music is such that you have to be
part of it. Musicians carry a message, and even if
you're just telling people to party and forget their
troubles, it's a political position? said Richmond.
Biko's courage to oppose his white oppressors is
evident in his words to the South African police:
"Listen, if you guys want to do this your way,
you have to handcuff me and bind my feet together,
so that I can't respond. If you allow me to respond,
I'm certainly going to respond. And I'm afraid you
may have to kill me in the process..."
The police took him quite literally.
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
October 6,1987

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