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The Ubyssey Sep 11, 1973

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Array Persky quits AMS post
By KENT SPENCER
Alma Mater Society secretary
^tan   Persky   resigned   Sept.   4
saying "personal and economic"
natters   make   him   unable   to
ontinue on the executive.
Internal  affairs  officer   Diane
atta also resigned   Sept. 1, ad
dressing her letter of resignation to
Persky.
Persky and Latta were members
of the Democratic Students
Caucus. The DSC took four seats
last spring on the seven-member
AMS   execitive.   The   Students
Coalition has three members
sitting on the executive.
"There's very little to say,"
Persky said in an interview
Monday. "My reasons are
essentially personal."
He said he is taking one year's
leave of absence from graduate
WE UBYSSEY
studies in the philosophy department to work with the mental
patients association.
"It turned out that I had an
opening for a job in an area that
I'm interested in, so I took it,"
Persky said.
MPA is a group of self-help
people concerned about the
facilities and conditions in the
mental health area. It says it opposes the psychiatric establishment.
Persky was also teaching in the
philosophy department last year.
Latta cited disillusionment with
the AMS bureaucracy as the
reason for quitting.
"I am unconvinced that students
are benefitting or will benefit in the
future from the AMS," she said.
AMS president Brian Loomes
said he has mixed feelings about
Persky's resignation.
"Stan has provided political
leadership on campus for many
years, but the important thing is
that the rest of us continue to
develop serious political discussion
amongst students," said Loomes.
AMS treasurer John Wilson was
unavailable for comment.
Vice-president Gordon
Blankstein said he was "disappointed" with Persky for
resigning.
"Stan had a lot of good-and-
different reasons," he said. "I wish
he'd try them out on the students."
Byelections for the two positions
will be held Oct. 5. Nominations
open Monday.
Nomination forms are available
in the AMS business office on the
second floor of SUB.
Teresa Deveson and Tom Mc-
Neney, arts undergraduate society
representatives on AMS council,
said they agreed with Persky's
reasons for quitting.
"It's a question of where peoole
are in their lives. In some instances you have to overthrow
your commitment," said Mc-
Neney.
Neither slate has made any plans
to run candidates in the up-coming
elections. The DSC is drafting a
statement regarding the
resignations and Blankstein said
he has "several people in mind" he
would like to see run.
The two slates are expected to
oppose each other in the election.
The campus, however, ^hasn't
seen the last of Persky.
He'll be on campus Friday at 10
a.m. at SUB talking to American
newsmen from KING-TV in Seattle
about the penetration of American
culture into Canada and how
Canadians feel about it.
Loomes and one-time UBC
student senator Art Smolensky are
also expected to participate in the
discussion.
Enrolment
WEST END? NOPE. This is the campus, viewed from the room of one of those lucky people who happened to get into Acadia Towers —
probably by putting her name on the housing list in November 1947. Ubyssey photographer Kini McDonald caught this shot of all those
spanking new high-rise^ rearing their ugly heads over the used-to-be flat UBC landscape. Ah, well, at least they're invisible on foggy days.
Wf3rt ■»"/»* ; >^"
Beach may be wrecked
By STEVE MORRIS
Despite parkboard chairman Art .Cowie's
assurance a road will not be built through
Wreck Beach, civic machinery is rumbling
towards the beach's destruction.
Cowie gave his assurance before 200 persons Friday in Cecil Green Park in a public
meeting devoted to proposals to halt cliff
erosion in the Point Grey region.
The concern of beach conservationists'
centres on the Swan Wooster plan to fill in
3,700 feet of beach with gravel and sand to a
level of three feet above high tide, and extending 30 to 80 feet wide.
The park board opened sealed tenders for
the Wooster proposal Monday and if construction is not stopped, Vancouver will lose
■iie beach area extending from foreshore park
to within 150 feet of Spanish Banks.
Bob Hamilton, spokesman for the committee for the preservation of Wreck Beach,
said Monday the committee is fighting the
Wooster plan on three points.
"The plan will certainly ruin the beach.
Secondly, it will also ruin one of the last
natural   areas   in   the   Vancouver   region.
Thirdly, it incurs an expense to taxpayers
vhich may not be justified," he said.
The construction is- to be financed by the
provincial   government   on   a   budget   of
$350,000.
Hamilton said Wooster engineers gave no
assurance at the public meeting that their
plan would work.
"The gravel base and sand topping will be
built three feet above the maximum high tide
at an angle which supposedly will resist wash
away.
"However, we feel in time wave action
during winter will eat it away," he said.
Hamilton said the fill in will not stop
eventual collapse of the Cecil Green building,
now housing the alumni association, or any
other ones.
Permanent access trails should be built to
cut down the human erosion of the cliffs.
Furthermore, drainage must be regulated.
"The construction of the new Sedgewick
library precipitated a sharp rise in seepage,"
he said.
Hamilton said nothing was said about
maintenance.
"The provincial budget is $350,000 and
that's all. The sand may last only one winter,
and if it is washed away, it may not be
replenished."
Dennis  Gray-Grant,   chairman  of  the
Jericho park committee, said there is no need
for the fill to extend so long.
"Areas which are not eroding seriously,
such as the Foreshore park area, will be
needlessly destroyed by the gravel," he said.
Grant said the city is dreaming of a scenic
road extending around Vancouver.
"A gravel bed would be a preliminary step
for an extension of the Point Grey road. Then
the beach area would develop into another
Spanish Banks, and the stigma of a nude
beach would be erased," he said.
Hamilton said the road may then gradually
develop into an artery servicing Burrard to a
new six-lane highway to a new airport bridge.
The Journal of Commerce quoted the
engineering consultants of Swan Wooster as
saying the erosion control plan "cleared the
way" for the new Museum of Man being built
by UBC near the cliffs.
The museum will only add to the present
rate of seepage. Changing the building site
would be favorable, but so far the administration has not made any such proposal.
People interested in the situation can
contact the following organizations:
Free beach defence fund, 254-4685.
Save the beach people, 738-3083.
•?   ■ >■■/■-      -*&$■ .
up 1.5%
overall
Winter session enrolment is up
this year at UBC, the assistant
registrar said Monday.
Ken Young said the total for 1973-
74 is expected to reach 19,800.
This is up 300 from last year.
This reverses the trend started in
1971-72 when enrolment started
declining at the university, he said.
Undergraduate enrolment is
expected to reach 17,400 and
graduate enrolment is expected to
reach 2,400 when registration is
finished, he said.
This increase in enrolment is
about 1.5 per cent over last year
but is still down considerably from
the 20,940 who enrolled in 1970-71.
The most significant increase in
enrolment was in the education
faculty where 200 students more
than last year enrolled.
Young could offer no explanation
for the increase in total enrolment.
However, he noted a significant
increase in enrolment for the
first-year teaching training
program.
He suggested this increase was
due to increased funds allocated to
school boards resulting in smaller
classroom sizes. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,  197
Anthrosoc head quits
but stays on as prof
Cyril Belshaw, anthropology and
sociology department chairman,
has resigned from that position
effective June 30, 1974.
But Belshaw will retain his
professorship.
Belshaw became head in 1968
after having been acting head
twice before, in the 1959-60 and
1967-68 sessions.
Belshaw said he had seen his
stated primary goal as department
chairman achieved with the
beginning of construction on the
new Museum of Man this past
winter.
He inherited this interest in
having UBC's vast collection of
West Coast Indian artifacts housed
in a permanent location from his
predecessor as Anthrosoc chairman, Harry Hawthorne who accumulated most of the collection.
During his period as head,
Belshaw was a central figure in a
spirited and bitter intra-
departmental dispute in the 1971-72
session over the concept of faculty
tenure, specifically that of then
anthrosoc profs Ron Silvers and
Matthew Speier.
The anthrosoc undergraduate
society, the graduate students
association and The Ubyssey
disputed the refusal of tenure to
Silver and Speier, feeling the two
were good teachers and had
published adequately and sufficiently, the two usual standards
by which tenure is decided.
The AUS, GSA and The Ubyssey
wanted to know why Silver and
Speier had been fired. Belshaw
refused to say, stating the importance of details remaining in
the confidence of faculty members
on the tenure committee for a truly
unbiased decision to be made.
Belshaw, 51, a native of New
Zealand, completed a master's
degree there in economics, before
going on to doctoral work in social
anthropology at the London School
of Economics.
He served in the New Zealand
armed forces during the second
world  war  and   later  taught   at
1. Elections  committee
returning officer.
universities there before coming to
UBC as an assistant professor in
1953. He became a full professor in
1961.
Belshaw served on the UBC
Senate from 1963-72 and tabled the
Belshaw report to senate in
November, 1969 concerned with the
long-range objectives of the
university. Senate rejected the
report, which recommended
decentralizing UBC.
Belshaw was out of town and
unavailable for comment on his
resignation.
COMMITTEE
VACANCIES
Four  vacancies  plus one
UBC Bowling Club
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
Wed. Sept. 12, 12:30 p.m. Buch. 106   t
Bowling will commence on Mon., Sept. 17. It is a "handicap"
league, with new bowlers welcome.
For further information call Walter (the secretary) at 228-8225.
(Bowling is in S.U.B. Lanes)
SCHOOL'S A
2. Board of Governors Advisory committee to select
candidates for the position of U.B.C. President —
One vacancy.
3. President's Ad Hoc Committee on Student
Counselling and Placement — One vacancy.
4. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre Management
Committee observers with intention of
becoming members next year.
Please apply in writing to the AMS President, room 256,
S.U.B. by 12:30 Tuesday, Sept. 18. Elections
committee members required as soon as possible.
FIGHT SCHOOL BLUES WITH
DENIM BLAZERS, OLD FASHION
PLAID SHIRTS AND A PAIR
OF BAG CORDS.
PUT   Pl'Mll
4431 W. 10th
Royal Centre
XeJejpJuni£~
B.C. Hydro
COLLECTIONS
Reg.
1.79
SCOPE'
Family Size
1.29
CLAIROL
Herbal
Essence
Shampoo
12oz. Reg. 2.49
1.69
AQUA MANDA
Herbal
Soap
Reg.
.85
.69
1 oz. Spray
Reg.
2.40
1.89
UNIVERSITY
PHARMACY LTD.
5754 University Blvd.
224-3201
NY*
(located 1 block east of the gym in the Village)
*\*
A LORNE ATKINSON
10-SPEED BIKE
Guess the amount of money in
the jar - see window display.
FREE
DELIVERY
7
f
BIC CLIC
Super pac
value to 1.47
69c
BRING IN THIS ENTRY FORM
Name	
Address   	
Phone 	
i     My guess is	
1
CONSOLATION
PRIZES
Draw to be held
Sept. 21, 1973
**
CHARGEX
Student Headquarters for school
supplies, toiletries, sundries, tobacco.
We also stock tennis balls, face cloths, locks,
clocks, pipes, Penguin books, UBC umbrellas and
other student needs.
DUOTANGS
EXTRA
SPECIAL
10c ea.
The first 200 persons to
bring in this coupon will
receive a
FREE        ■
TOOTHBRUSH
during our back to uni
versity sale.
UNIVERSITY t
PHARMACY ►
/t\     5754 University Blvd. I
%__ cf
Loose Leaf
Refills
99c
Reg.
1.30
Ask about your
FREE
ASHTRAY Tuesday, September  11,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
?t4te&&  ^
WOP BOP A LOO BOP A WOP BAM BOM! Teen Angel can you hear me? Well, you can
do anything you want but lay offa dem blue suede shoes. And get outta that bed and
rattle those pots and pans. Hey, turn that thing off and let's go down to the   malt
Grad students vote
—marc hamilton photos
shoppe and cop some burgers and see who's hangin out. Va va voom. Ooh lala. Yay
State. James Dean can you hear me? One thousand people in SUB were calling you
Friday.
Knox loses faith of unwashed
By KEN DODD
The graduate student association
membership passed a motion of
non-confidence in their executive
at a chaotic GSA general meeting
Monday.
While the motion's passing
doesn't mean the executive must
resign it doe* show a large split
amongst GSA membership on the
issue.
The dispute arose concerning the
executive's handling of the issue of
the $29 AMS student fee being
levied on graduate students for the
first time this year.
GSA vice-president Paul Knox
later expressed surprise at the
hostile reaction to the AMS fee levy'
the grad students presented.
"I thought that issue had
generally been accepted as
irreversible whether it be fair or
unfair," said Knox. "We came to
the meeting prepared to discuss
how the $26 grad fee could be pared
instead."
"The GSA is basically powerless
to change the AMS ruling. We tried
to negotiate the issue with them
many times but got nowhere,"
Knox said. "The AMS needs the fee
because of its highly bureau-
cratized, top-heavy structure
which should have been changed
years ago. But the GSA can't
change that," he said.
Three other motions were also
passed at the meeting, with the
provision they be brought to
referendum before the GSA
membership as soon as constitutionally possible, which should
be in two to three weeks.
The motions were: whether grad
students want to pay the AMS fee;
whether grad students want to be
members of the AMS; and instructing the GSA executive to hire
legal council to investigate their
status within the AMS, the consequences of leaving and the
legality of the March 16 general
meeting of the AMS that passed the
fee allocation in question.
Gunther Eigendorf, a leader of
the opposition to the executive at
the Monday meeting said graduate
students are angry with their
executive because they haven't yet
called a referendum on the AMS
levy issue as they were directed by
their membership in March.
Eigendorf accused Knox and to a
lesser extent, another GSA
executive member Heather Wagg
of being pro-AMS and leading the
GSA to represent views far
removed from those of grad
students as a whole.
Eigendorf expressed
dissatisfaction with the GSA
negotiations with the AMS.
"We probably won't get any
changes in the fee this year," he
said. "But we should at least try
and fight, to strongly register our
protest and to exhaust all possible
means of doing this. This I think
was the thrust of the motions
passed at the meeting."
Exposure^
By ARTSMOLENSKY
It's that time of year again when students are
asked to lay out a lot of hard-earned cash for a few
pounds of printed paper often known as textbooks.
One of the most aggravating things about buying
texts is finding a book with a UBC price sticker for
$10 hiding a section of the book cover which states
the price as $7.50. Or the other instance of a book
like Cheshire and Fifoot's Law of Contract which
the bookstore sells for $12.60 while it sells in
England for 3.60 pounds or about $9 — a 40-percent difference.
Before you run over and shoot bookstore
manager Bob Smith it should be said a large
number of these latter price discrepancies are not
the fault of the bookstore.
They come from the prices set by the importing
agent who usually holds monopoly rights on a
particular book.
What can you do about it? Right now you are at
the mercy of the price the importing agent sets,
but a letter or two to UBC area MP Bill Clarke,
house of commons, Ottawa wouldn't hurt.
And if you are really incensed about it you
should drop a note to education professor and MP
Mark Rose who has spoken on this topic several
times in parliament.
*      *      *
Going to class may be dangerous to your health
— literally.
According to standard A(2)   of  the  national
building code, classrooms with non-fixed seats
should have 20 square feet of space a person.
Since about 1960, UBC has adopted this code as
its own but because of overcrowding it's
questionable if it has ever been followed completely.
Stretching the code a little may be all right but
in the case of East Mall annex rooms 101 and 102,
up to 60 students are being packed into 607 square
feet. This translates into one student for every 10.1
square feet or almost half of what the code considers safe.
This of course is just one example.
There is no doubt that if a fire broke out in one of
UBC's overcrowded classrooms that someone
would be seriously hurt or killed.
The    fact   that   no    municipality    or    other
regulatory body is here to enforce these standards
on the university is regrettable since the worst the
university can do is to slap its own wrists.
*      *      *
Word has come to The Ubyssey that the administration's newspaper UBC Reports, our
friendly campus competition, has run out of
support money (probably due to lack of readership). Evidence of this is that Jim "f-stop"
Banham, editor of their rag, no longer just has the
duties of writing all propaganda, taping senate
meetings, and emptying their overflowing garbage cans but has become star (and sole)
photographer as well.
Eigendorf said he does favour "There is no reason from the
grad students paying the basic $14 amount of money the AMS collects
AMS fee, but not paying the ad- that a profit can't be made," he
ditional building fee also. said.
Like Knox, he was also critical of The GSA Will release a policy
AMS spending. statement on Wednesday.
Rail strike means
books still to come
Students may have to wait two weeks for textbooks because of the
rail strike, bookstore manager Bob Smith said Monday.
Smith estimated between 400 and 500 cartons of books are stuffed in
boxcars between Vancouver and Toronto.
Smith said he doesn't know what books are on their way.
He said he also doesn't know what book supplies will be short until
current supplies run out.
He said unexpected  increased enrolment has taxed  the  book
shortage. Extra books will be ordered, he said.
He said efforts to truck books on to campus have failed because
trucking companies are overloaded with freight.
Smith said air shipment would be too costly and would increase the
already high cost of books at the bookstore.
He said it normally takes seven days to ship a book here from
Toronto.
When the books arrive they will be individually priced and shelved
at the bookstore.
The armory is usually used for the first week of book sales.
Smith said students with half-year courses will be hit hardest
because it could take until October before some books arrive.
White vacates post
A committee has been formed to recommend a successor to commerce dean Philip White.
White, faculty head since 1966, resigned to head up a new European
real estate development company to be based in London, England.
A leading Canadian authority on urban land economics White came
to UBC in 1958 from the University of London. He served as a member of
the UBC senate for eight years.
Two students, commerce undergrad society president Gary
Powroznik and commerce grad society president Jean Pierre Gabille,
are included in the 10-member committee, responsible for selecting
White's successor.
Colin Gourlay, assistant commerce dean in charge of undergrads
has been named acting dean for this academic year.
However, the commerce faculty should have a new dean by next
September, committee president L. G. Mitten said Monday.
ita»Huu!iwre«y^Avwr.Afevvro^ Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  11,  1973
Welcome!
Welcome to UBC.
Assuming you have made it through the collective
horrors of registration, parking, fee payment and finding a
place to live (which is to say, assuming you aren't a member
of the bored of governors) you should be ready for the first
week of classes.
We herein provide some tips for the uniniated, gleaned
from several years of collective experience:
* Keep in mind that many things about this place are
designed to scare away as many people as possible. Also
keep in mind that as long as you look enthusiastic and pay
your fees you'll be able to keep going to UBC as long as you
like, possibly forever.
* Ignore all that bureaucratic crap heaped on you
during registration week.
* If you can't afford fees or anything else, borrow
money from the government. Almost anyone willing to put
on a convincingly pathetic act can get money out of these
buggers and it's interest free. You should have no qualms
about freeloading — they don't hesitate to rip you off if
they get half a chance. Do onto others as you've found they
do onto you, we always say.
* For chris sakes find something to do out here other
than coming to classes. This place will start getting on you
about the same times as the November rains if it doesn't
hold some attraction other than Biogeology 675. Join a
club, an athletic team, a sewing circle, or, (plug, plug) your
favorite campus newspaper. You might even start liking the
place.
* When switiching classes, go see the professor of the
course you want, not some department flack. Look helpless
and explain how interested you've always been in his
course. Be a suck.
* Do not under any circumstances buy any books the
first weeks you are out here. The textbook racket at this
place is an incredible rip-off. Most professors would have
you buy books like they were penny matches and many
don't tell you they can be easily obtained at the library. If
you don't wait until the last minute you can use the library
or it worst comes, buy it at the Alma Mater Society
co-operative bookstore in SUB.
* Bring your lunch unless you can eat at the faculty
club.
* There is no legal basis for UBC traffic department
tickets, or for that matter the quasi-cops who patrol in
those funny little trucks. They derive their authority from
the bored of governors and cannot pursue you off campus
or legally compel you to pay their fines. They can, however
tow your car away should they ever catch it out here again.
* Assholes who steal libray books or keep them out
past due dates should be strung up. If you don't believe us,
wait until you have an essay due within 24 hours and you
can't find that oh-so-essential book.
* No matter how adamant, there is practically no such
thing as a professor who won't grant extensions.
* Take a long.second look at that 8:30 a.m. class, you
fool. No course is that interesting.
* Finally, we really don't have any pat advice on how
to find a place to live. Some of us are living in cold water
walk-ups that would shame even the UBC housing
administration. We can tell you, as you already know that
off-campus rents are ludicrous and on-campus housing is
over-priced, over-crowded and booked solidly until way into
the next century. All we can say is keep looking, and avoid
rental agencies — they-do nothing but take your $20.
Oh yeah; try to have fun.
Remember, your university years are the best time of
your life. (Heh, heh).
M UBYSSEY
September 11,1973
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: Vaughn Palmer, Michael Sasges.
These worked: Vaughn Palmer, Michael Sasges, Berton Woodward, Kini
Mcdonald, Ken Dodd, Lesley Krueger, Marise Savaria, Steve Brown, Art
Smolensky, Dru Spencer, Kent Spencer, Alan Doree, Denise Massey, Steve
Morris, Fraser Field, Kathy Boll, Ryon Guedes, Kevin Grace, Robin Burgess,
Ron Konkin, Mark Hamilton, Dirk Visser. Sorry, no more space.
U/AArT££> /
Pathotc
8a&
Aoao
10
SikccBSS
P^m*y73
Goodbye
And so we learn two Democratic
Students' Caucus members have resigned
their Alma Mater Society executive
positions, weary from hinted fights with
their pocket-books and the AMS
bureaucracy.
Off to one side steps former secretary
Stan Persky, filling his empty wallet with
meagre earnings from the mental patients
association. To the other skips former
internal affairs officer Diane Latta to pursue
her studies — after being frustrated by AMS
bureaucracy.
It's certainly less than we should have
expected from either of them.
Neither Persky nor Latta walked into
the job blindfolded. Persky must have
known he would have to face another year
of relative penury, Latta that frustrations are
part and parcel of the job. And the fact that
they put themselves forward for nomination
shows they were prepared to take all the job
slung at them.
But not only should they have been
prepared to take it, Persky and Latta should
have worked to eliminate the cause of the
own troubles.
And the root of these problems lies in
the nature of the bureaucracy that so
easily — too easily — defeated Latta.
Right now most of the AMS budget —
collected from students and supposedly
meant to help students enjoy and benefit
from their years at university — goes to run
the organization.
And it will continue to be mis-directed
until some effort is made to restructure the
AMS — to decentralize it and bring the
money to groups like undergraduate
societies. Decentralization would mean
capable and enthusiastic people like Latta
would be able to work with little frustration.
And it would mean that equally capable
people like Persky wouldn't have to spend
18 hours a day signing forms and writing
unimportant memos. They could hold part
time jobs to support themselves — and
possibly even take some courses out here as
well.
So we need the restructuring to keep
otherwise capable people like Latta and
Persky in the society — and to keep the
money out of it and in the hands of
students, where it belongs.
Right now opposition „ Students'
Coalition must be giggling. Not only do
these resignations give them a majority on
the executive, but it ensures that the
organization they thrive on continues.
They, their predecessors and those
coming after them all do well in the present
bureaucratic structure. They learn it inside
out, they cater -to it, they build it and they
eventually go to some similar body — the
Liberal Party for instance.
And although well-meaning, they just
tie up the students' money in unnecessary
bureaucracy and blather.
So things will continue to go until the
pattern is broken.
Persky and Latta might have done so.
It's too bad they didn't try.
—Lesley Krueger
Help
The Ubyssey needs help.
Specifically, we're looking for reporters,
photographers, writers and other people
interested in various aspects of newspaper
production.
The paper is operated collectively with all
major decisions made at regular staff
meetings. The style, content and make-up of
The Ubyssey are determined largely by the
people most willing to devote time to
working on it.
Besides newswriting there are opportunities for columnists, reviewers and feature
and sports writers.
And we'd like photographers — the paper
has a fully equipped darkroom and supplies
film. Bring your own camera.
For the writing chores no experience is
necessary; we have a full-fledged on-the-job
training program that is the envy of Canada
Manpower.
If you'd like to contribute, show up
noon, Monday, Wednesday or Thursday at
The Ubyssey office, in the northwest corner
of SUB, room 241K. Tuesday, September  11,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  5
Letters
Prison
At the present time, I am incarcerated at the California institution of men in Chino,
California.
My home is Vancouver and upon
my "release, I will be returning
there. My reason for writing is I
feel that you will be able to assist
me with the problem that I have.
Since my incarceration in June,
1968, I have virtually had no
contact with the outside. I have no
family nor close friends by which
to share a communication with.
Needless to say this is a situation
which is both depressing and alien
to me.
If I may ask, I would appreciate
it if you could print my letter in The
Ubyssey. Perhaps one of the
readers would have some free time
in which to correspond with me.
I am 29 years of age, single and
pretty well independent in my
needs. I am an Architectural and
Structural draftsman by major
trade and for a minor, I work with
the Cancer Research program. I
last worked with the program in
Denver, Colorado.
I have many interests; I am a
writer and an artist. I deal very
much  with  reality,   humanity,
nature and some surrealism. I
have just finished a collection of
prose titled; "FOR NOW" which is
soon to be published. If you wish, I
could supply you with an unedited
draft of my works.
Basically, I am just myself and I
desire very much to have some
communication with someone
outside. If you could see your way
clear to assist me with my request,
I would be very grateful. Please
reply and let me know of your
situation. Thank you.
Donald Roy Hunter
B-28484
Box 441,
Chimo, Calif.
Jollies
Could it be I wondered that the
"Stones" were playing the UBC
administration building? Or
perhaps, thank God, perhaps that
long awaited student activism so
prevalent on American campuses
during the 60's finally made it
through customs. Had the silent
majority finally organized a
sleeping bag protest over that
monster Registration Week?
Alas, no, no and no again. What
one encountered in the wee small
hours of last Tuesday morning
around the administration building
was no more than this years
version of how the housing administration gets its jollies. Indeed, it was the housing director's
early preview of Halloween on
campus where hundreds of
students get to dress up in their old
clothes complete with sleeping
bags and play trick or treat for
anywhere from three days to eight
10 hours. Unfortunately the
housing administration had only so
much candy so that about 200
people having waited at least eight
hours in line were denied even the
meagre threat of sharing a double
See page 6
Wise man who runs, fool who sits
By RYON GUEDES
The following article is an excert
from Seminar with Don Jually, a forthcoming book on the ancient ways of
academic mysticism. Its author, Carlos
Castanets, a former junior executive,
turned virtually overnight five years ago
into an assistant professor of parapsychology at the University of Aluminum
Patio Awning, one of the newer, Berkley-
spawned institutes of higher learning on
the West Coast.
Castenets insists the booh, describing
his encounter with an aged [albeit senile}
educator, Don Jually was written with a
purely alegorical intent.
Monday, Sept. 25, 1967
Today Don Jually chose to expound on
the pursuit of education. We squatted on
the simulated adobe-tiled floor of the
UAPA faculty club cocktail lounge.
He appeared to be reading from the
back of a bar menu:
"A man embarks on an academic
career in much the same manner as he
registers for first year Arts: with dread
apprehension, two sharp pencils and a
peculiar wet feeling in his trousers.
Usually embarking on such a career is
unsanitary and produces unpleasant
symptoms.
"How does one avoid these difficulties?"
By resigning oneself to one's true
capacity: not to confront, but to evade. It
is a wise man who runs away from a
rabid doberman pinscher, and a fool who
continues to sit on the dog's nose.
Similarly* one who contrives to sit on
knowledge or truth will not only be bitter,
but may also develop a serious case of
hemorrhoids."
He then proceeded to describe to me
the various 'spirits' he had discovered
years ago. (He had now dropped the bar
menu and was reading from the elastic
waistband of his boxer shorts).
Tuesday, Sept. 26, 1967
Don Jually told me this morning he had
been reading from the wrong pair of
boxer shorts but now the right shorts
were back from die laundry and he was
ready to continue the lesson:
"The spirits I am speaking of are
entities aiding the academic man's
avoidance of the learning process and
honest work and channeling his time into
more constructive pursuits, such as
developing a more pleasant style of
handwriting or finding a restaurant that
serves decent cordon bleu.
"They are El Esccptio the nasty. El
Rinoceronto the insensitive. El Mur-
cielago, the blind and La Pa Lata the
bland.
"El Esceptico is the god of bile. In the
good grace of El Esceptico, a man can .
for example walk up to a ragged double-
amputee selling pencils on the sidewalk
and call him bourgeois.
"El Rinoceronte is the patron of the
thick-skinned. Those under his protection
are often seen wearing tiger-skin suits to
Sierra Club functions, eating non-union
process cheese and yelling 'your mother
wears army shoes,' at women's activist
group meetings.
"El Murcielago is the guardian angel
of the near-sighted and narrow-minded
— patron saint of department heads.
"Finally La Patata gives the gift of
invisibility. Followers of this spirit have
been known to disembowel themselves at
crowded faeulty club meetings and
remain unnoticed."
"Are these four the only spiritual alHes
a man has in his escape from truth, Dim
Jually?"
"The only ones worth a tinker's damn,
if you'll excuse my French."
"What about Fimo del Toro, the god of
hyperbole?"
"That's bullshit," he said, and dropped
the subject. I tried to continue but he
insisted the rest of his thoughts were
written on the lining of his blue serge
suit.    ,,   .       Wednesday, Sept. 27,1967
Don Jually spoke to me in his blue
serge suit t<>day.
'Tell me,' Don Jually, how does the
academic man use fee spirits to his
benefit?"
"Well, two or three shots of Chivas
Regal in the morning helps start the day
out nicely."
"' I was referring, Don Jually to the four
spirits you described yesterday."
"One must basically remember when
to use them, and to take them with a
grain of 30 per cent Dacron."
"Also remember this is not a machine
washable garment..."
"I am afraid you've lost me," I interjected.
"For best results, hand wash in
lukewarm water and hang to dry."
I gave up and rose to leave, remarking
we could continue once his corduroy
jacket with the leather patches was
clean.
"I hope I've been of some double knit to
you," he said. "You're very woolen."
The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH
Your Canada Student Loan Center on Campus
We have an entirely separate department with excellent trained personnel
who will be pleased to help you with all your Canada Student Loan needs.
• PROMPT SERVICE      • EXPERT ADVICE
CONVENIENCE
JUST A
REAAINDER-
To students who already have a Canada Student Loan, and are not
obtaining a new loan at this time, you must provide the bank with
a Schedule 2 each Term, in order to continue your interest   free
status. Forms are available at the Student Union Building Branch.
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH — TED HOSKINSON,
CANADA STUDENT LOANS MANAGER Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 11,  1973
Letters
in Totem Park, and moreover were
so tired that they couldn't think of
any tricks to play. Wearily they
trudged back to their milk and
cookies and sleeping bags ready
for a rerun next year.
The fellow who runs this last
ditch housing program surely must
be an advocate of Darwinian
theory — although one wonders
whether "natural selection" is the
appropriate term. The idea of
"survival of the fittest" is
definitely in there somewhere!
Undoubtedly the present method
utilized by the housing people is
most certainly the most efficient,
the most fair; a method of
distributing residence rooms open
because of cancellations which
inconveniences as few as possible
as little as possible. No doubt
something must be blatantly out of
order with the idea of doing the
entire thing by mail and waiting
lists. It would be foolish indeed to
expect the game to be called differently. The idea of handing out
numbers to all those lining up in
order of their arrival and also
making it clear how many rooms
are available so that those too far
down the list could leave early
instead of waiting around for 10
hours is to say the least, farfetched !
More fun could ensue next year
luckily since alternate methods
may be tried. The kids from PE
have suggested having everyone
run a two-mile circuit with the 250
fastest times getting accommodation. Another good one
might be to have everyone throw
the shotput or perhaps write
"residence exams"! It could be
another good time!
Graham Burns
arts 4
God
As Almight GOD, I greet you.
These past 15 years, My Heart
has known contentment in these
Letters which I have dictated
through My Son, Personally, to
you.
We have almost 3,000 Editors
and Publishers - over the world - on
Our mailing list. It would have
been almost a physical impossibility for My Son to write
personal Letters, individually, to
each Editor and Publisher. Hence,
We send these Form Letters which
are Personal indeed.
Each and every Letter, dictated
by Me, your Living GOD, has a
Living, Loving message to its
intended, graceful personage.
Those who believe in Me, shall be
rewarded in Heaven — after their
long sojourn on earth has ended.
No need to say a word to those who
disbelieve — they will find solace,
peace and contentment in hell, but
alas, to no avail!
But Love is for the living who will
not relinquish their self-esteemed
right to Love Me, their Loving
Creator. I Am not Alive to be put
aside in some dusty, musty old
Bible. I Am Alive to fill contentment in every living, blessed
heart, here, on earth.
My Loving Son will blow you a
kiss as My Loving Voice trails in
the distance. Never, will My Holy
Name be written on paper. My
humble Son will sign this Blessed
Letter so that Faith and Hope will
accomplish Virtue.
Eugen Changey,
18416 Mapleboro Avenue,
Maple Heights, Ohio
Academic
It has come to may attention that
your paper has been ignoring the
more relevant aspects of everyday
life. I am speaking of course about
your not having even mentioned
the recent death of Professor T. C.
Bean, whose name is in into
household use just about
everywhere.
His next two months were spent
in ward five L'hopital de Nice,
where he sipped tea and slept. As
soon as his blood caffeine count
was below 0.08 he was released and
put on a flight back to his home
town of Vancouver, where he as
given a coffee bean welcome.
Unknown to him the Tish Tea Co.
had planned something special. As
he passed beside the Tish Tea
building in his open brown Cadillac
a gift of 200 pounds of coffee was
given to him. Poor Bean was lost
for words. Why hadn't they just
handed it to him instead of dropping it from the roof?
And so ended Bean, crushed
between a sack of coffee and a lap
full of LIP application forms. His
life had come and been. We will all
miss him so.
A. C. Birch
science 3
The story of his beginning is well
known. Working with a small LIP
grant of $40,000, in the basement of
his 10-storey apartment block, he
developed the widely used back-
perc mechanism, now used on all
late model coffee percolators.
Back-perc, at one time, affected
one out of every two percolators,
with the inevitable result of gritty
coffee.
For Bean this was only the
beginning. From his summer home
on the French Riviera, he immediately applied for, and
recieved by return mail, a LIP
grant for a further $50,000. The fact
that he was 72-years-old was
casually overlooked. He set to
work on solving a problem that
plagues man and woman kind, that
is, how to dispose of used coffee
grounds. He soon came up with a
recipe using these grounds as a
meat replacement in ground-
round.
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
The following SENATE and
AMS Executive positions are
now vacant.
Secretary
Internal Affairs
Three Senators At Large
One Arts Senator
One Applied Science Senator
One Education Senator
NOMINATIONS for the SENATE positions will be received from 12:30
p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 12 until 12:30 p.m., Wednesday, Sept. 26.
NOMINATIONS for the EXECUTIVE positions will be received from 9:00
a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19 until 12:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 27.
Nomination and eligibility forms can be obtained from and shall be
returned to the office of the AMS Executive Secretary, room 246, S.U.B.
The election will be held on Wed.. Oct. 3.
ART GALLERY
COMMITTEE
People interested in organizing the usage of the SUB Art
Gallery, including art shows, poetry readings, discussion
groups etc. please contact
Joanne Lindsay
AMS Coordinator
AMS Office, SUB
Phone: 228-3961
FOR NEW & USED
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• TEXTBOOKS
• PAPERBACKS
• MAGAZINES
• MONARCH NOTES
• SCHAUMS OUTLINES
• COLES NOTES
• LARGEST SELECTION OF
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B.C.
*   WE TRADE USED
POCKETBOOKS
CASH PAID FOR TEXTS, ETC.
better BUY BOOKS
4393 West 10th Ave.
(near Varsity Theatre)
224-4144 Open 11 a.m.-8 p.m.
| ^^hREDERT( WOOD THEATRE ^™
THE WILD DUCK
by Henrik Ibsen
SEPTEMBER 14-22
(Previews Sept. 12 and 13)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by Stanley Weese
Settings by Richard Kent Wilcox
Costumes by David Lovett
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $3.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 12-22 -THE WILD DUCK by Ibsen
Oct. 31-Nov. 10 - THE ALCHEMIST by Jonson
Jan. 16-26 - THE MISANTHROPE by Moliere
March 6-16 - THE THREEPENNY OPERA by Brecht & Weill
BOX OFFICE   •   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   *   ROOM 207
Sunnnrt Your Campus Theatre sssssss^sssssssssssss Tuesday, September  11,   1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Education plan
'useless' — Loomes
The provincial government's
education commission is a
"political smokescreen," Brian
Loomes, Alma "Mater Society
president, said Monday.
Loomes said the commission
headed by John Bremer will "give
students the illusion that they have
a say in making changes in the
province's   educational   system
"The main fallacy is the idea
that there are endless committees
for students to participate and that
they will make real changes in the
way things are now done," Loomes
said in an interview.
He cited the food services
committee, which he said
discusses rising food costs, but
nothing about the causes of inflation or what to do about it, as one
example.
He said last week's issue of UBC
Reports, the administration's
weekly newspaper, carried a long
list of price increases which do
little more than encourage smart
shopping as prices continue to rise.
Loomes calls Bremer's proposed
"inter-body" finance committee
"totally useless".
Education minister Eileen Dailly
announced in February Bremer,
46, would head a provincial
government commission which
would investigate B.C.'s education
system.
Bremer, a native of Great
Britain, created the Parkway
Program, the original school
without walls, in Philadelphia in
1968.
"Bremer talks about an interbody as a financial overseer to
ensure the university's money is
well spent," said Loomes.
The provincial government
currently grants B.C.'s three
universities their operating
budgets. The total for the three this
year is more than $100 million.
Bremer has said he believes a
government body should be
established to see that the
universities spend their money
"with some kind of public accountability."
This body would also "preserve"
the freedom of the universities to
carry out research and programs.
Loomes said he is concerned
with      the      university       ad-
Ecologists get grants
The National Research Council
granted more than $300,000 during
the summer to enable UBC
scientists to carry out ecology
research programs.
The grant, spread over a three-
year period, will be used to support
six related projects on the behavior
*"     of disturbed  ecological systems.
The NRC will provide a
maximum of $364,000 to support
scientists associated with UBC's
institute of animal resource
ecology.
Five of the projects will involve
extensive field studies in the areas
of aquatic ecology and animal and
insect populations.
The sixth project is a synthesis of
the data obtained in the five field
projects.
*' Two of the studies involve lakes
in UBC's research forest in  the
Fraser Valley near Haney.
Zoology professor J.D. McPhail
will study the disturbance of the
ecological   system   in   the   well-
studied lake by introducing
stickleback fish into its population.
Forestry professor T.G. Nor-
thcote and zoology professor Carl
Walters will study plankton
behavior in Marion Lake
The researchers will introduce
trout into two lakes which now
contain no fish to study the
response of the plankton
populations which inhabit the
lakes.
B.D. Frazer of the federal
agriculture department station at
UBC and Neil Gilbert with the
institute of animal resource
ecology will study aphid
populations.
W.G. Wellington and J.H. Myers
of the plant science department
will study populations of moths,
earwigs and craneflies.
CS. Holling, institute of animal
resource ecology director, will
make a detailed analysis with
computer modelling of the five
field projects.
HILLEL HILLEL HILLEL HILLEL HILLEL HILLEL HILL
z_ Hillel welcomes you to the
m
r
x
Free Jewish
University
The following classes meet at Hillel House at 12:30 starting
September 17.
Mon., Sept. 17: Judaism and Christianity — Phyllis Solomon
Tues., Sept. 19: Philosophies of Judaism — Rabbi W. Solomon
Wed., Sept. 20: Essays of Rav Soloveitchik - Rabbi Hier
Thurs., Sept. 21: Hasidism: Prayer and Practice - Rabbi Levitan
Fri.,  Sept.  22:   Contemporary  Jewish   Identity  — Prof. Stephen
Wexler
UJ
_l
-I
X
_l
IXI
_l
_l
I
_l
UJ
_l
_J
X
-i
HI
_J
-J
X
_i
ill
—I      The following classes will meet Sept. 19 at 7:30 p.m. in the
Z-      Beth Israel Synagogue.
LU
111
The Jews in English Literature — Prof. R. IMemser
Jewish History in the Christian Middle Ages — Aaron Brietbart
To Be A Jew — Laws and Customs — Pinchos Bak
Conversational Hebrew — Prof. A. Rosenberg
$>     -J
m
|-
X
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\—
m
\—
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r~
m
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m
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X
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Anyone is welcome to register. The $10 fee covers as many courses
to be taken as you wish. For more information contact Hillel House       l~
behind Brock. ~~
ministration's increasing interest
in "co-option of student struggles".
He said the administration,
which has reluctantly given into
student demands' for representation on various university
boards, now is prepared to accept
student representation.
Loomes said he and many other
students are rethinking their
position on students' rights.
"We are seeing students
representation in a different
light," he said. "Student
representation was once the issue
with little understanding of what it
meant."
He said he believes Bremer's
commission, which has been
divided into various task forces, is
partly responsible for the administration's new attitude toward
student rights.
"They're running a little bit
scared," said Loomes. "The administration is not too sure which
way Bremer will go, but they know
he is talking about more student
say."
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Mon. thru Sat.: 7 a.m. - 12 midnight
Sun.: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Pjage 8 THE      UrBysSEY Tuesday, September 11, 1975
The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montreal
WELCOME TO UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The two "Campus Branches" of the Bank of Montreal take great pleasure
in welcoming new and returning students to U.B.C.
We figure it this way: if we can
be of help to you while you're a
student, you'll stick with us after
graduation—when we can be of even
greater assistance.
So, come see us for advice on
handling money. We can show you
a few things that Economics 201
doesn't cover: how to save with a True
Savings Account, how to cheque
with a True Chequing Account, how
to budget to make the most of your
money, how to avoid running short.
And we can discuss loans too.
There's a Bank of Montreal nearby. Drop in, anytime. We want you
  to get you r money's worth.
Start with
the bank
you'll stay with.
Two branches on campus
to serve you better
STUDENT UNION BUILDING BRANCH - GERRY FREEMAN, MANAGER
ADMINISTRATION BUILDING BRANCH - GEORGE PEIRSON, MANAGER Tuesday, September 11,  197:?
trii ~   U%'Y S S E V
Page 9
Beaver Foods, one answer to CIC
By ART MOSES
Canadian University Press
Beaver Food Service Associates
Ltd. of London, Ont., is the food
catering business' answer to the
Committee for an Independent
Canada.
It's the only Canadian-owned
company of any significance
operating food services on the
nation's campuses. But it's a
private company which does not
release full official information to
the public.
In a telephone interview, a
Beaver official said the company
holds food service contracts at
Dalhousie University, Mt. St.
Bernard College at St. Francis
Xavier University, the University
of New Brunswick. St. John
campus, Loyola College, Queen's
University, Trent University,
Glendon College, University of
Windsor, University of Winnipeg,
Brandon University and the
University of Saskatchewan's
Saskatoon and Regina campuses.
It offers food services to institutions in educational, health
care and industrial markets.
Beaver was actually formed by
several dissatisfied executives
working for one of the firms which
later merged to form Versafoods.
Versafoods is controlled by ARA
Services Ltd., an American
cororate giant which changed its
name from Automatic Retailers of
America Inc. in 1969.
ARA owns 85 per cent of Ver-
safood shares.
Current Beaver directors A.R.
Mcintosh and J.O. O'Rourke were
both working for Industrial Food
Services, a division of Canadian
Food Products Sales Ltd., in the
late 1950s.
Another former Canadian Food
Products executive, Roy Mitchell,
had left the firm about the same
time as Mcintosh and O'Rourke,
and rejoined his colleagues in late
1964. He became president of
Beaver in late 1970.
The fourth member of the four-
Niore buildings
The board of governors approved construction projects valued at
about $5.4 million during the summer.
A.R. Grimwood Construction has been given a $2.5 million contract
to build a new law building on the East Mall.
There will be $2.9 million worth of additions and alterations made to
the Henry Angus Building by Frank Stanzl Construction Ltd.
The commerce and business administration faculty is located in
Angus now.
The work in the Angus building will include more than $300,000 of
office renovations and an $85,000 extension to the UBC central telephone
exchange.
The new law facilities will permit the students to make use of a law
library, classroom block, seminar rooms, and a moot courtroom.
The board has also authorized the preliminary drawings for a new
building for the civil and mechanical engineering departments.
man Beaver board of directors is
Ernest John Spence, who was
president of Canadian Food
Products Ltd. from 1951 to 1959.
Spence joined the Beaver board in
1969 and serves the company in an
advisory capacity, general
manager W.R.  Carmichael said.
Spence is a professor of business
at York University, besides being
chairman of Arvak Corp., and
director of Bovis Corp. Ltd., Reed
Paper Group Canada Ltd., and
First Toronto Corp. Ltd.
Carmichael said Beaver has "17
or 18 people in senior management
positions" who were once Versafoods employees.
He estimated Beaver's total
revenue for the last fiscal year at
between $25 and $30 million, with
profits of about $350,000. But he
said the company did not keep
precise figures because as a
private firm it is not required to
provide financial information to
the government.
Carmichael agreed Versafoods,
Saga and Beaver are the "big
three" food catering companies
operating on Canadian college and
university campuses. He indicated
resentment toward the American
interests attempting to dominate
the  Canadian   market.
American control of Canadian
campus eating facilities is even
more pronounced in Saga Food
Service of Canada Ltd., a firm
carving itself an ever-increasing
share of the Canadian college and
university market.
Carmichael said Saga, which
until recently, had no Canadian
board of directors, was attempting
to establish a separately incorporated Canadian subsidiary to
run its Canadian operations..
Another catering firm recently
lost   its   last   Canadian   campus
contract when Saga outbid it for
the food service at Brock
University. Canteen of Canada, a
wholly-owned subsidiary of
Canteen Corp. of America, was
involved in a labor dispute with its
Brock workers about three years
ago. Students supported an attempt to block the firm from using
strikebreakers against its workers,
and the union won many of its
demands.
The Canteen Corp. in turn, is
owned by International Telephone
and Telegraph. An anti-trust suit
has led to an order for ITT to divest
itself of several holdings, including
Canteen Corp. But the
conglomerate intends to appeal the
order in the courts and the case
will probably be tied up for years.
Students aren't powerless to
improve food service on their
campuses and undermine control
of the catering giants. At Simon
Fraser University, students have
established an alternate lunch
counter serving food prepared on
the spot. The alternate counter
offers lower prices than those at
the privately-catered campus
cafeteria.
During recent contract talks,
alternate counter workers offered
to stop work if the cafeteria
workers went on strike. The show
of strength worked, and the caterer
agreed to many of the union's
demands including a stipulation
that the cafeteria stock union-
made products whenever possible
and support boycotts.
If people on campuses are to
have direct control over the food
they eat, they will have to consider
these directions. Despite the
claims of so-called "representative
food service committees", few
campus kitchens will respond to
consumer demand unless the users
themselves prepare the broth.
That can't happen if the means of
nutrition are controlled by faraway corporations, especially if
they bear the stamp "Made in the
USA".
Bindery closed
The UBC book bindery is closed because of a space shortage and a
lack of capital for up-to-date equipment head -librarian Basil Stuart-
Stubbs said Monday.
He said the eight to 10 per cent salary increase demanded by the
International Brotherhood of Bookbinders was partly responsible for
cost increases.
In addition, an estimated $70,000 to $80,000 is required to automate
the bindery, said Stubbs.
With rising costs the bindery could no longer be competitive,
commercial firms offer lower prices, he said.
The UBC bindery functioned for journal binding which met only half
of the university binding requirements. Only head binder Percy Fryer
remains.
Fryer has been kept on to recondition equipment and repair rare
books
Escape Into The Underwater World With
AQUA VENTURE LTD.
THE EXCITING ALTERNATIVE IN DIVING INSTRUCTION
We offer a complete range in diving instruction for
anyone interested in learning the basics or continuing on
into a special aspect of this rapidly growing recreation.
SPECIALTY COURSES
Designed to provide continuing education and participation in diving after you have learned the basics.
— Marine Identification
— Professional Diving Orientation
— Underwater Hunting
— Search and Recovery and many others are currently
being taught.
COME AND SEE US AT
BASIC SKIN & SCUBA COURSE
Taught in many areas of the Lower Mainland and Fraser
Valley year round, with summer courses at various
points in the interior.
— all equipment supplied for pool
— six pool and lecture sessions
— three open water dives
ADVANCED DIVER TRAINING COURSE
For the diver who wants to keep building up his
experience and become involved with other enthusiastic
divers. Touches on many points including Night Diving,
Decompression Diving, Marine Identification, First Aid,
Search and Recovery, and Underwater Photography.
REFRESHER COURSES
For the diver who has been out of touch with the
undersea environment or for the beginning diver who
wishes extra dives with experienced instructors.
CERTIFICATION
Certification for all of our courses is through the
National Association of Underwater Instructors. NAUI is
the only non-profit educational organization of professional underwater instructors devoted solely to safe
diving instruction.
» If you think the world up here is "something else", — let
us introduce you to the "undersea world". It could be
the best thing you have ever done.
COURSES START SEPT. 10, 16, 19
The Diving Locker
1398 Main St. - North Vancouver (just off Second Narrows Bridge). Phone: 985-1616 Page   10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September   11,   1973
. . . and then there was one
week ago Monday, when
several hundred people
waited in line outside the
administration building
hoping for a chance to get
one of the few remaining
residence rooms. Eighty of
the first in line got lucky,
and the others left to search
out the few university area
flea holes left unrented.
photos by dirk visser
A\y&vr»v Tuesday, September  11,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
Culcha
UBC style
w By STEVE MORRIS
The dowager of the Vancouver cultural
scene steps into her 58th season this week.
In harvesting the fruits of many years
hard labor, UBC now offers a repertoire
that promises to arouse and ensnare the
most passive observer.
Since its inception in 1915, UBC has
gradually developed and grown- into what it
is today: a veritable industry of entertainment and extravaganza.
Walter Gorge, longtime president of UBC,
^ is pleased to present several new attractions
this season in addition to his veteran performers.
"Take a look at the Sedgewick library for
instance. Although it was in operation last
year for our closing, 1973-74 will be its first
full year with us. And I'm sure it's going to
be a great one," Gorge said.
Gorge said he envisions UBC as the
ultimate cultural entertainment centre in
Vancouver in the future.
"We've got it, yes sir, we've got it all.
«■  From "A" to "Z" and back to "A". And
what we don't have now, we'll get later," he
said.
There is some truth to what Gorge says.
UBC is a package of pastiche and panache
difficult to find anywhere else. From "A" to
"Z", patrons can choose what suits them
best in a field ranging from anthropology to
zodiacs.
The Alma Mater Society uses its funds for
financing several cultural events at UBC
throughout the year. Not all money goes
0 towards red tape. SUB film society runs
relatively recent movies (two to three years
old) in the SUB auditorium. Movie nights
are Thursday to Sunday, and each week is a
new show. They're inexpensive, not always
enlightening, but usually entertaining.
Patrons are advised to stay away from
movies shown in Hebb theatre. You won't
get your money's worth because the
acoustics are terrible.
Cinema 16 will whet the critical film buff's
appetite. It is a series of avante-garde films
shown during one or two weeks. Watch for it.
*r The dean of women's office will be
presenting another noon hour film series.
Last year patrons were treated to Kenneth
Clark's Civilization. This year the series is
entitled The Glory that Remains, which
examines eastern civilization.
Entertainment and extravaganza can
both be found in UBC's theatreical
productions.
The UBC musical theatre society
(Mussoc) delivers whatits name implies. It
isn't always opera, but it will never be
Christmas carols.
»* Previously, patrons have been treated to
productions of Tommy, Fiddler on the Roof
and an adaptation of Macbeth, to name a
few. Your ears may be assaulted, but your
intelligence never insulted. With several
thousand watts of power and casts almost as
large, Mussoc's amplifiers and talent will
disappoint no one.
Neither will the UBC dramatic presentations.
"The Frederic Wood Theatre has been
with us nearly 10 years. We've had them all
** here:  comedies, classics, tragedies;   you
name it — we've had it," Gorge said.
This year UBC patrons will receive a taste
of all three.
The Frederic Wood will present four plays
We ain't got it —
You don't want it
this year. Ibsen's The Wild Duck is a 19th
century tragicomedy. It will be followed by
Jonson's The Alchemist. The second half of
the season will be opened with Moliere's
classic The Misanthrope, and the final
presentation will be The Threepenny Opera
by Brecht and Weill.
Gorge says his theatre has always gone
"one step beyond the apron".
"We've been experimental, innovative
and at times downright ingenious. Take a
look at last season's Tartuffe for instance.
We gave the play a little kick in the end
which the audience never expected. Yes sir,
you name it, we've tried it.
"And don't forget Freddy Wood's sister,
Dorothy Somerset Studio. She's little, but
she is no poor relation. The studio handles
M.A. thesis productions, and our regular
customers tell me she's doing just swell.
"Dorothy and Fred share the same
building. It's all one big happy, happy,
family," he said.
UBC is also a haven for music lovers.
Noon hour recitals presented by the music
faculty in the music building are held on the
average once a week. Eating is not so
serious a problem if done discreetly.
String quartets, chamber music or Bach
organ fugues will be there to divert and
digest.
UBC frequently presents live poetry
readings during the season. Published or
nearly published poets bare their souls to
the world during a lunch hour or two. It is
courteous to refrain from eating during the
reading, but a growl from a rumbling
hungry stomach is equally discourteous.
Prepare ahead. Eat before you seat.
Gorge says that all previously mentioned
events will be part of UBC's cultural
package this season.
"However all that is only half of what we
have to offer our clients. For instance, we
have a do-it-yourself enculturation program
which nobody can beat.
"I call it a do-it-yourself plan because our
customers can take their own time to do
their own thing. In fact, some of the projects
are run by UBC patrons themselves.
"I tell you, if you can't do it here, you can't
anywhere. Where else could you attend an
ontological society meeting one hour, then
drop in for a Christian crusade meeting the
next," he said.
Any do-it-yourself plan must start with the
UBC libraries. There are 1-1/2 million
volumes to choose from, covering almost
every conceivable subject. On those shelves
Voltaire is waiting to ridicule, Joyce to
baffle or Shakespeare perform. Catch up on
your languages and read Kafka untranslated.
"Don't forget our fine arts division. We
have all the world's masterpieces, in color
too. If it's painted and if it's great, we have
it. Come in and browse around our collection
of impressionists, or take a look at our
Picassos or Titians.
"Oils, frescos, sketches ... we have it ...
somewhere," Gorge said.
Patrons won't have to search high and low
for some paintings in the flesh however. The
art gallery in SUB exhibits art work and
experimental artistic presentations
throughout the season. There won't be too
many Picassos or Titians, but so what? -
If 'Rachmaninoff's rhapsodies or
Gregorian's chants are what you want out of
life, UBC patrons can plug themselves into
the Wilson recordings collection in
sedgewick library. There are 80 earphones
available to listen to your favorite
Beethoven symphony or Vivaldi concerto.
"And this is only the beginning. Have you
a yen for learning Karate or kung-fu? We
have them. How about dance? You like
dance? We have genres like the contemporary dance workshop or the international folk dancing club. And talking
about cultural things! Have we got clubs for
you! Alpha omega, smegma, Chinese
varsity and eckanar ... whatever that is,"
said Gorge.
UBC patrons are urged to explore the
anthropology museum, and examine the
artifacts of cultures which are quickly, if not
already, disappearing. Although it houses
approximately 10 per cent of UBC's $10
million collection, it will be a rewarding
journey.
A visit to International House will be
similarly rewarding. There will be patrons
who travelled overseas for this year's
season to meet, and international cuisine to
sample.
"Face it. UBC will try anything for our
patrons. Yes sir, we try our best. We'll bend
over backwards in trying to please our
customers. They wanted a gay liberation
club,, so we have a gay liberation club,"
Gorge said.
Hare Rama Hare Rama
Rama Rama Hare Hare
Hare Krishna Hare Krishna
Krishna Krishna Hare Hare
Undoubtedly, the best bargain in UBC's
cultural package this season is people.
Nearly 18,000 of them. From every walk of
life and every background imaginable. Go
out and talk to them. They're here for much
the same reasons you are. Discover how the
other halves live. And love. And laugh. It is
worth the effort.
All UBC customers will receive the triweekly publication The Ubyssey, free of
charge. Talk about culture. You ain't seen
nothin' yet.
Tickets for this year's season start at $457.
The ticket is valid for one year Gorge says.
"Remember, it's like I said. Come on out
here and sign yourself in. Don't forget, if you
can't do it or find it here, you won't
anywhere!" Page   12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  11,   1973
GRADS!
TAC
WELCOMES YOU BACK!
You're invited to be
our guest
after classes
EVERY THURSDAY
8 p.m. - 12:30 a.m.
EVERY FRIDAY
4 p.m. - 1 a.m.
LIVE BAND ON FRIDAYS
AT CECIL GREEN PARK
6251 N.W. MARINE DRIVE
A gathering place
for senior DBC
students, alumni,
and students who
are graduating in
1973/74.
Yearly membership —
$4.00 at the door for
those eligible above.
SEPT. 14
OPENING DAY
YAC/ yac/ n. (f. Tibetan gyac) a
long-haired, lumpy, bleary-eyed,
snorting, wild ox-like creature
found only on the northwestern
slopes of Point Grey in British
Columbia. Both males and
females are noted for their
friendliness. Lives off malt brew
and a small animal called the
Hot Dog.
YAC once again welcomes winter session students. The club — pub or "non-club", as we are not the
traditional UBC idea of a "CLUB" provides an easy social atmosphere in which to unwind, get
together with friends, and meet new friends. If you haven't been to or even heard of Cecil Green Park,
which houses the Alumni Association, drop in and enjoy the Campus mansion and lounge in luxury.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
AN ALUMNI ASSOCIATION PROGRAM Tuesday, September  11,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 13
Union drive on
By MARISE SAVARIA
The Association of University
and College Employees at UBC is
holding a membership drive of
clerical and library workers to
obtain legal certification from the
labor relations board of B.C.
A membership of 50 per cent
plus one in any department,
academic or physical, is needed for
certification.
Last year only 35 per cent
membership was obtained.
This year the union wants to
reach standards obtained by other
workers on campus.
Emphasis will be placed on
raising lower pay positions, work
grievances and daycare facilities,
AUCE organizer Dick Martin said
Monday.
Other goals for this year's
bargaining include job
reclassifications, increased job
flexibility for men and women and
more flexibly working hours.
Library workers believe more
flexible working hours are important so that they may attend
classes, said Martin.
Another AUCE goal is to bring
their annual vacation standards up
to par with Simon Fraser
University.
Clerical and library staff at
UBC get two weeks yacation after
one year. Staff at SFU get three
weeks after one year, said Martin.
AUCE wants a six-month
probation period for both new
workers and regular employees
receiving promotion lowered to
three months.
He said workers who receive
promotions must now undergo a
six-month probation at their new
position.
Martin said he wants the
probation period reduced to three
months.
An organizational meeting and
membership drive will be held at
5:15 p.m. today in the garden room
of the graduate student centre.
BoG gives go-ahead
The board of governors approved a $5 student fee during the
summer for a new covered pool at
UBC.
Gordon Blankstein, Alma
Mater Society vice-president, said
Monday he expects the pool to be
finished in two years.
He said the pool, to cost about
$2.8 million, will take one year to
build after plans have been
developed.
The student fee will supply
about one-third of the cost, said
Blankstein.
The federal and provincial
governments and the alumni
association will be approached to
pay the remaining construction
costs, he said.
More than 4,100 students voted
last fall in a referendum to pay the
fee, but only 67.3 per cent of those
students voted for the fee.
The AMS constitution requires
66 per cent majority for any money
referendum to pass.
UBC currently has only one
pool — Empire Pool — built in 1954
for the British Empire Games.
TRUCKIN" W BuufcS /vwfty.'
'DECORATE WITH PRINTS'
The
grin bin
3209 W. Broadway
738-2311
|(Opp. Liquor Store and Super Valu)^
Art Reproductions
Art Nouveau
Largest Selection
of Posters in B.C.
Photo Blowups
from Negs& Prints
Jokes- Gifts, etc.
[DECORATE WITH POSTERS I
IMS
3=33 FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE S5S
THE WILD DUCK
by Henrik Ibsen
SEPTEMBER 14-22
(Previews Sept. 12 and 13)
8:00 p.m.
Directed by Stanley Weese
Settings by Richard Kent Wilcox
Costumes by David Lovett
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS (4 Plays for $3.00)
AVAILABLE FOR ALL PERFORMANCES
Sept. 12-22 - THE WILD DUCK by Ibsen
Oct. 31 -Nov. 10 - THE ALCHEMIST by Jonson
Jan. 16-26 - THE MISANTHROPE by Moliere
March 6-16 -THE THREEPENNY OPERA by Brecht & Weill
BOX OFFICE   *   FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE   *   ROOM 207
-Sunnnrt Your Campus Theatre s
ROYAL BANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
• CANADA STUDENT LOANS
• NEW LOANS   • DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS
• TRANSFER ACCOUNTS FOR CONVENIENCE
• SAVINGS WITH CHEQUEING PRIVILEGES
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Dave  Stewart,   Manager     —     Terry   Cotton,  Loans
10th at Sasamat
224-4348 Page   14
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  11,   1973
Hot flashes
New heads
appointed
Two new department heads
were appointed over the summer
to the medicine faculty.
Dr. Stephen Drance, known for
his discovery of some causes of
glaucoma, has been appointed
opthalmology department head.
He succeeds Dr. A. J. Elliot.
Dr. C. J. G. Mackenzie is new
head of health care and epidemiology. He has been acting head
since December 1969.
Dr. Mackenzie is chairman of
the B.C. Royal Commission on
uses of pesticides and herbicides,
cides.
Dr. Drance has been Department director of opthalmology glaucoma since 1963.
Meditation
Do you dig meditation?
If so, you're needed to
meditate twice daily for
20-minute periods in an
experiment which will start in
October at UBC.
Psychology professor John
Yuille needs 140 volunteers. He
and Lynn Serede, an educational
psychology graduate student, will
teach volunteers the ways to reach
self-induced meditation and
relaxation.
Concrete
Student guides at Simon Fraser
University will offer free guided
tours of the Burnaby campus
Saturdays, Sundays and most
public holidays during the fall
semester.
The weekend tour? will be
given every hour on the half-hour
from 10:30 a.m. through 5:30
p.m.
Tours start from the north
entrance fo the administration
building.
Free    parking    is    offered    in
parking area during the weekends
and on public holidays.
Groups interested in special
tours during the week or on
weekends should call the
university news service at
291-4323.
Hospital
UBC's psychiatric hospital
needs volunteers to help with
occupational therapy programs,
outings and entertainment.
Volunteers working directly or
indirectly with patients help them
to readjust to home life when
they leave hospital.
Interested       persons      please
GET THE
FOURTH
DAY FREE
when you run your classified
ad for three consecutive days.
contact volunteer director Mary
Nadeau, at 228-3036 from 9
a.m.-1 p.m.
Ecology
The Conservative Party caucus
environmental committee will
hold hearings 7 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursday at the Holiday Inn,
1110 Howe. Vancouver South MP
John Fraser said the hearings will
try to acquaint MPs with B.C.
environmental problems.
Interested groups or individuals
should contact David Savelieff in
Room 336, West Block, House of
Commons, Ottawa or telephone
613-992-3026.
Tween classes
TODAY
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Rally with Mosh McDowell, noon, SUB plaza, 7:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
W€DN£S0AY
UBC BOWLING CLUB
Meeting, noon, Buchanan 106.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 215.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m., E gym winter sports centre.
KUNG-FU
Demonstration, noon, SU B ballroom.
ONTOLOGY CLUB
Dale Maranda speaking on "Earth, a space oddity",
noon, Buchanan 216.
THURSDAY
UBC KARATE CLUB
First practice, 7:30 p.m. gym E.
SHITORYU KARATE CLUB
Demonstration, noon, SUB ballroom.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
"An introduction to the Young Socialist Club",
noon, SUB 211.
FRIDAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
"The NDP, one year in office —a socialist view"
8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
The
Farmer's Harvest
Natural Foods Store
wishes you a good year
SUCCESS AND HEALTH
GO HAND IN HAND
Visit us at
4464 W. 10th Ave.
Open Daily (except Sunday) 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
i^
Fresh as a Flower - in Just 1 Hour
TOMORROW IS
$1.49 DAY
SPECIALS ON
MANY ITEMS
"YOUR UNIVERSITY AREA
DRY CLEANERS"
Offering a Complete Dry Cleaning Service
SHIRTS - LAUNDRY - BULK CLEANING - ALTERATIONS & REPAIRS
OKE HOUR
UNJVERS/TYl mmWng
the most in dry cleaning
2146 Western Parkway
Mon. - Fri. — 8-6
(in the Village — Near the Chevron Station)
228-9414 Sat. 9 - 5:30
1974 GRADUATES
Free Color Portrait
We have been the U.B.C. grad photographers for the past 6 years.
All you have to do to get your grad photos taken is phone for an
appointment. You'll get a color graduation portrait of yourself
free, and with no obligation. So phone today.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
St. Anselm's and University Hill Churches
ON UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
Ministers: Rev. Luis O. Curran & Dr. W. S. Taylor
SUNDAY SERVICES:
8 a.m. Holy Communion at St. Anselm's Anglican
11 a.m. Holy Communion and Church School at both
St. Anselm's Anglican & University Hill United
INVITATION TO UBC STUDENTS - To an informal lunch
meeting Sept. 16 after the 11 a.m. Services at both churches.
Lunch held in University Hill Church.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, PHONE: 224-7011 or 224-1410
THS CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c;
additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the dav before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Special Notices
15
MINOLTA CAMERA SYSTEM:
SET—-101 with 55 mm. fl.7 and
2S mm. f2.5 Rokker Lenses, 8o-
210 mm. 200M lens, assorted filters, electronic flash, all items
in excellent condition. Phone
George 736-0311 day. 733-9630
eves. ^_	
DISCOUNT STEREO EXAMPLE:
AM-FM Stereo receiver. 2 speakers, turntable, base, cover and
cartridge, l:st $200. Your cost
$125. 2-year parts guarantee.
Call   325-0366   for   savings.
Special Events
15A
OPEN HOUSE SEPT. 10-SEPT. 14.
Film Society, Rm. 24 7. STJB.
New members welcome, or drop
by  anytime.	
WELCOME TO UNIVERSITY
SUTDENTS!! You are invited to
join us for a sandwich-lunch in
the lounge at University Hill
Chuch on University Blvd. after
the Sunday ser.vices held at 11
a.m. in St. Anselm's Anglican
and Univers'tv Hill United. First
meeting on  SEPTEMBER  16!!
Wanied—Information
17
WANTED: KENDO INSTRUCTOR
willing to work-out once a week
with small group of beginners
for the joy of it. Contact D.
Sheldon or R. Hagler. School of
Librarianship,   228-2404.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SMALL RESEARCH ORGANIZA-
tion located on campus requires
girl Friday secretary. Must be
good tvpist (IBM Selectric). Ph.
22S-9081.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
PIANO LESSONS BY GRADUATE
of Juilliard School of Music. All
grade   levels   welcome.    731-0601.
Special Classes
62
"POT" AT POTTER'S CENTRE.
Wheel-work instruction at all
levels starting Sept. 17. Limited
enrollment. Phone G. Alfred 261-
4764.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THREE SPEED BIKE FOR SALE.
English make, good condition.
$55.00 or best offer. Phone Uri
at 224-9986 or come and see at
2280   Wesbrook  Crescent.
Use Ubyssey
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Tuesday, September  11,  1973
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  15
Intramurals kick off this week,
SPORTS
f  . .*;,
KEEP IN SHAPE
run
Thunderbirds romp
to easy 30-0 win
over Kingston
t      UEiC Thunderbirds won a surprisingly easy victory Saturday over
Royal Military College of Kingston in exhibition football.
UEIC scored 30 unanswered points before 1,000 spectators at
Thunderbird Stadium and were able to go with their second string
during the fourth quarter.
A brutal training schedule by coach Norm Thomas seems to be
paying off for the Birds. Team spirit and overall performance are much
improved over recent seasons.
The team travels to Calgary this weekend for their first league
game of the season.
►      First home league game is Sept. 22 against the University of Alberta
Golden     Bears.
something for all
By RON KONKIN
The intramural program moves
into full swing next week with
touch football, slow-pitch softball
and a swim meet.
Unit managers are reminded the
entry deadline for all three sports
is 3 p.m. Friday.
Referees are still needed for
touch football, so if you're interested in making a little beer
money come to room 308 in the
gym and sign up.
This year two new sports have
been added to the intramural
program.
One is the 'contract' mile, where
the contestant predicts how long it
will take him to run, walk, or crawl
to the finish line.
The other new event is the 'river
run', which is an eight mile air
mattress and inner tube race down
the Vedder River.
Both events will take place in
October.
Non-contact, non-competitive
sports enthusiasts are encouraged
to join the co-recreational
program.
Most of the events are social with
a bit of exercise thrown in.
The program this year will be
Rowing
meeting
Friday
The UBC rowing team is holding
an introductory general meeting
noon Monday in SUB 209 to explain
the 1973-74 program, view films
and answer questions.
UBC will host the Western Intercollegiate Rowing Championships at Burnaby Lake next
May and the team is interested in
new members.
Head coach Alan Roaf, coach of
the 1972 Canadian Olympic rowing
team, said rowers are needed for
one, two, four and eight-man shells
as well as coxswains, who must be
under 115 pounds.
He said no experience or prior
conditioning is required but interested persons must be willing to
work.
Persons interested in training for
the women's rowing team at
Vancouver Yacht Club are also
invited to the meeting.
The history of the UBC rowing
team dates from the 1930's and has
a long record of achievement in
national and international competition.
UBC oarsmen captured four gold
medals and one silver at the
Canada Summer Games in August.
They also won the four's title at
the Canadian Championships and
pair's and four's at the Canadian
Henley Competitions.
THOCKIM' ON DOWN
■xne Liwe-
bigger and better than ever, so sign
up early or you'll be a spectator.
The following is a partial
schedule of men's intramural
programs. The deadline for
enrolment is 3 p.m. Friday:
BOWLING
Sept. 27 to Oct. 20 in the evening
in SUB games room.
BADMINTON
Oct.  1  to Nov.  10 in  the war
memorial gym.
TURKEY TROT
A 3.5-mile cross-country run Oct.
1.
BASKETBALL
Oct. 11 to Dec. 1 in war memorial
gym.
HOCKEY
Oct.   11  to  Dec.   1   in  Thunderbird winter centre.
CYCLE DRAG
Oct. 14 John Owen pavilion field.
FLOOR HOCKEY
Oct. 11 to Nov. 3 in the multipurpose gym.
TUG O' WAR
Oct. 10 in war memorial gym or
SUB.
ARTS 20 RACE
Oct.   20,   Vancouver   general
hospital to UBC.
CURLING
Oct. 27, 28 in Thunderbird winter
sports centre.
CROSS-COUNTRY CYCLE RACE
Oct. 21 around UBC campus.
SOCCER
Oct. 24 to Nov. 30 on the JOP
fields.
RIVER RUN
Oct. 28, eight-mile air mattress
inner tube race down the Vedder
River.
CONTRACT MILE
Oct. 25, JOP track.
Some events continue next term.
A list of women's intramurals was
unavailable.
~0|L RATES TO U.B.C. flfe.
* Typewriter Town  Ts
The RIGHT PLACE for the RIGHT SERVICE
Reasonable Prices Quality Workmanship
Fully Guaranteed
8914 Oak St.
at S.W. Marine Dr.
263-8121
SUB FILM SOC PRESENTS
THE  CLASSIC
l^*""*^
©1
in
DUCK SOUP
SEPT. 13-16
SUB AUDITORIUM
HARPO • GROUCHO • CHICO
£TI5j
BROTHERS
Thurs. 7:00
Fri. 7:00 & 9:30
Sat. 7:00 & 9:30
Sun. 7:00 Page  16
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  11,  1973
UBC-AMS SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE PRESENTS
IN CONCERT
nwawamt
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13-8:00 P.M.
UBC WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
^m
He consistently manages to paint masterpieces of
emotional, physical and philosophical
communication.
The PROVINCE
26 Sept. '70
Yes, indeed, a magical evening, the kind of concert
you keep remembering and talking about for many
months and years.
-The SUN
14 February 70
Eric Clapton, Mich Taylor, Peter Green, Mick
Fleetwood, Harvey Mandel, Johnny Almond and
Keef Hartley — just a few of the many great
musicians who have graduated from John Mayall's
college of musical knowledge. Obviously, when John
Mayall puts a band together he USES the best
sidemen in the business.
UBC will see the third performance in North America
of John's latest line-up. From here they go to Los
Angeles for what is being called "the long awaited
return of the legendary 'Sire of the 'Sire of the
Supergroups'."
Get in on the action when John Mayall comes to UBC
with Freddy Robinson, Victor Gaskin, Blue Mitchel,
Red Holloway and Keef Hartley. You'll be glad you
did!
... a re-discovery of the power of subtlety, musical
communication on a colourful, highly articulate level
of discourse, without any affronts to the ear.
-The SUN
3 Apr. '71
$3.00 advance in SUB-AMS Business Office-Rm. 266
$5.00 at the door (so get them now!)

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