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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1971

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Array Human government
loses — exec to go
By DAVID SCHMIDT and SANDY KASS
In one of the largest voter turnouts in UBC history,
students voted no confidence in the Alma Mater Society
human government executive Wednesday.
The final tally was 4020 against the human
government and 2704 in favor of it. Fifty-eight students
spoiled their ballots.
"We're sad but we're happy," AMS president Steve
Garrod said after the results were announced.
"We're happy so many people voted. It indicates
that people on a super-apolitical campus are beginning to
consider political issues."
Garrod said the human government would carry on
until a new executive is elected. The election procedures
will be decided at the AMS council meeting next
Wednesday night.
"The new executive should be ready to take over in
about five weeks," he said.
The present executive does not intend to run again,
although AMS secretary Evert Hoogers told The
Ubyssey: "I think we would win if we were to run
again."
Vol. LIU, No. 19        VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1971       °^^>48     228-2301
The human government has also decided not to
sponsor a different slate for the executive.
"People on campus are mainly from the middle class
and will join it when they leave the university. Therefore
they don't realize the oppression in their lives and don't
have the same interests as those people calling for radical
change in university and society," Garrod said.
The human government council reps, however, will
not resign.
"They will stay on to haunt the people that
defeated us and our program," said AMS treasurer David
Mole, in his best Hallowe'en style.
Almost all polls were opposed to the human
government. Only the Buchanan building poll, which
voted 385 to 306 in support of the human government,
and SUB 1, which voted 378 to 354 in support, favored
the confidence motion.
Most human government members were relieved at
the results.
"Thank God it's, over. They've saved us," said AMS
co-ordinator Sue Kennedy in a moment of comic relief.
SEE candidates
sweep election
The Society for Environmental Education slate won
all four student positions on senate Wednesday.
SEE candidate Leo Fox defeated human
government-sponsored Lynn Smith 2981 to 2440 to gain
the 18-month term on senate.
The three 2-year term seats were won by Perry York,
3165 votes, Darryl Anderson, 3050, and John Sydor,
2765.
The three human government candidates contesting
the 2-year seats were Jim Green, 2139 votes, Svend,
Robinson, 1974, and Piers Bursill-Hall, 1833.
York told The Ubyssey he thought the election
proved "the intelligence and responsibility of the
students.
"Even though I was subjected to a terrific smear
campaign, students showed they were not prepared to put
up with radical tactics,"Tie said.
The senate elections also pointed up students'
ignorance of the candidates and their platforms.
There were 6,801 ballots given to students. Of these,
424 18-month senate ballots were not placed in the boxes
and 950 were spoiled. In the 2-year senate voting, 445
ballots did not find their way to the boxes and 1,060 were
spoiled.
This contrasted dramatically with the referendum
results. There were only 58 spoils in the human
government voting and 78 in the SUB referendum.
SUB expansion
thwarted by vote
By BERTON WOODWARD
There will be no expansion of the SUB basement
this year.
Students Wednesday voted 62.7 per cent in favor of
developing area 18-D of SUB basement to include
restaurant and beer facilities. But because it was a
money referendum, the vote needed a two-thirds
majority to pass.
The vote was 4,260 in favor to 2,453 against. There
were 78 spoiled ballots.
Alma Mater Society co-ordinator Sue Kennedy said
she thought the referendum failed because too few
people trusted the human government.
"Some people were wary of the plan because what
we showed them were conceptual plans," she said.
"They thought we were being devious and not
presenting all the facts."
She said some people also thought there was not
enough discussion of the question.
"It's a case of whether or not you are going to
spend all your time thinking," she said.
"We were sure of ourselves and wanted to get out
and do it."
Kennedy said that now she doesn't think the
expansion will happen for some time.
"It's too expensive for one thing," she said. "Paying
for all the things necessary to get the development
started again will make people reluctant to try."
She said she regards the results of the referendum as
a second vote of non-confidence in the human
government.
—kini mcdonald photos
ACTIVE AND PENSIVE moods of human government council members were displayed at Wednesday night council
meeting.   Below,  president  Steve  Garrod  reads  passage  from   Marat/Sade; above, supporter Daphne  Kelgard and
councillors Colin Portnuff, Garrod, Gillies Malnarich and David Mole brood on eve of referendum defeat.
Grads' brief refutes Belshaw
It is expected that the brief will be something of a
bombshell in the department, for it brings out into the
open, in full detail, questions that have been circulating
through the department since Belshaw voted against
Speierand Silvers two weeks ago.
The inconsistencies of departmental procedures
revealed by the brief also refute anthrosoc head Belshaw's
repeated bland assurances (see letters, today's Ubyssey)
that everything is in order.
It is believed that faculty members will be unable to
ignore the briefs solid argumentation and heavily factual
presentation.
Behind the measured prose and deferential politeness
of the brief, one can sense the anger at the apparent cases
of injustice that moved the grad students to action.
See page 2: BRIEF
Why did assistant sociology prof George Gray get
recommended for tenure? Why were assistant profs Matt
Speier and Ron Silvers turned down by
anthropology-sociology head Cyril Belshaw, even though
they received narrowly favorable recommendations from
the department's promotion and tenure committee?
How did Gray get tenure recommendations and not
Speier or Silvers when the latter have better publishing
and teaching records (the two main criteria for tenure)
than Gray?
Why did the prof who assessed the teaching of both
Gray and Silvers in a report to the promo and tenure
committee carefully examine the papers and exams of
Gray's students, but ignore those of Silvers?
These are some of the many puzzles raised by the
brief issued Wednesday night by the anthrosoc graduate
student tenure committee. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 28, 1971
Brief examines profs
From page 1
Anthrosoc grad students will meet this
afternoon to discuss the brief and vote on
ratification of it.
A department learn-in scheduled for Friday
noon in Henry Angus 110 is expected to draw a
large audience and will no doubt raise the issues
again.
The brief is a long, careful — even scholarly —
examination of the rules that are set down for
deciding on whether or not to give a person tenure,
with specific applications of these rules to the cases
in question.
One thing that puzzled the students was why
Gray, with one obscure publication, was felt to be
doing better work than Speier and Silvers, who both
have numerous and more respectable publications to
their credit?
The brief examines Belshaw's claim that Silvers'
work showed a "decline in quality". It is noted that
a Silvers' paper Belshaw objected to was
co-authored with Bob Ratner, a prof who got a clear
recommendation for tenure and was not chided on
the   quality   of  his   work.
Students were also puzzled by the claim that
Silvers "experiment in unstructured teaching had
failed" when they examined the comparative
student responses to courses taught by Silvers, Gray,
and Speier.
Sixty-six per cent of the students in Gray's
sociology 250 course reported that the organization
of lectures was "unsatisfactory or unfollowable",
while sixty-three per cent of the students found
Speier satisfactory or Jetter in the same regard, and
Silvers    received   consistent    seventy    per    cent
favorable ratings.
Although leaving it to the reader to draw
her/his own conclusions, evidence in the brief
indicates that the appointment of Silvers' assessor
was inconsistent with faculty rules, and the fact that
this assessor also reported favorably on Gray raises
further questions. It is generally known in the
department that this assessor belongs to the same
faction in the department as Gray, and it is
admitted, in this assessor's report, which is available
in the brief, that he didn't know much about
Silvers' field.
The assessor's report on Silvers' teaching was
extremely brief, made little use of evidence and
suggests that the assessor was unfamiliar with
Silvers' theoretical paper on teaching, "Letting Go
In The Classroom," which was presented to a
Canadian professional conference this summer.
Similar mysteries surround the head's negative
vote on Speier. Speier got a very favorable
assessment for teaching and "active and productive"
scholarship. Quoting from the faculty of arts
guidelines that the general practice of the faculty
"has been to consider published scholarship as the
main evidence of scholarly accomplishment", the
student brief says, "When this is done, the criticisms
of Speier voiced by senior members of the
department, including the head, appear puzzling."
Grad students are hoping, apparently, that
publication of the brief, will activate a
reconsideration in tHe department of the Silvers and
Speiers cases.
Scabs and security guards
attack U de Montreal strikers
MONTREAL (CUPI) - The three-week-old
strike at the Universite de Montreal has erupted into
violence and has resulted in the arrest of 35 strikers.
Strong-arm men working in collusion with the
university's security guards attacked strikers and
their student supporters twice last Friday.
The first violent incident broke out at about
1:30 a.m. According to Normand Rheaume, a
spokesman for Local 1244 of the Canadian Union
of Public Employees, several carloads of picketers
drove onto the campus to ensure that no
strikebreakers had entered during the night.
Strikers have been using such car patrols since
Oct. 19.
The strikers were met near the main building by
about 50 helmeted non-uniformed strong arm men
armed with sticks. The strike breakers attacked the
picketers and smashed the windows of their vehicle.
Some of the strikers and students were injured.
One student was severely beaten about the head and
required 25 stitches to treat a torn ear.
Rheaume says that the Phillips security guards
called the police only when they realized that they
had lost control of the attackers and that someone
might be critically injured. He also points out that
none of the members of the car patrol even had a
chance to escape the car before it was attacked.
The police talked to the guards and the strong-
arm men briefly and then arrested 35 strikers and
students. All those arrested were released within 36
hours but have subsequently been charged with
vandalism and disturbing the peace.
Later Friday, six carloads of strongarm men
circulated on the U de M campus hurling insults and
rocks at the picketers and attacking them with fists
and sticks. The strikers were forced to flee the
picket lines.
It is now virtually impossible to enter the
campus. Entrances have been sealed off with
concrete blocks by security guards.
Strikers went back on the picket lines Monday
in high spirits despite the violent clash. The
picketers, including one man with a heavily
bandaged head, left strike headquarters singing as
they went back to their posts.
The workers are striking for parity in wages and
working conditions with other Quebec universities,
job security and a clear classification of jobs.
No normal university activities or classes have
operated since Oct. 4 when the office workers and
lab technicians went out on strike.
Speakeasy
There seem to be many landlord-tenant hassles
happening.
For some helpful information, we are including
excerpts from the Landlord and Tenant Act and the
booklet Tenant Rights, published by the Vancouver
Tenants' Council.
Termination of Tenancy Agreement
Notice by a landlord to a tenant is not
enforceable unless in writing. A tenant may give
verbal or written notice.
Notice time for tenancies: weekly, one week;
monthly, one month; yearly, 60 days.
Notice is to be given at the end of one rental
period for the end of the next rental period, unless
otherwise agreed upon.
Rent Increases
Rents cannot be increased within the first year
of a tenancy. Tenants must receive three months'
notice of a rent increase in writing.
Privacy
Under normal conditions, the landlord cannot
enter the rented premises unless he gives 24-hour
written notice to the tenant specifying time of entry
(between 8 a.m. and 9 p.m. only).
More information
Pick up a more detailed copy of all this from
the Speakeasy offices, or write to the Queen's
Printer, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, and send 20
cents for a copy of the new Landlord and Tenant
Act.
Things to do
For delicious, real cappuccino coffee (15 cents)
and free cookies, go to the third floor of the
Lasserre building where an architecture student has
set up an espresso bar.
The fine arts gallery in the basement of the
library always has something interesting happening.
Right now it's the Image Bank, a fantastic collection
of postcards, on until Saturday.
Have you browsed in the co-op bookstore in
the basement of SUB yet?
Speakeasy is open Monday-Thursday, 9:30
a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Friday 9:30 a.m.-3 ajn.; Saturday,
noon-3 a.m. Closed Sunday.
tWllloacr
£fjoe sfjoppes
FAKERS
verything is genuine but
the laces,
Side zipper - Crepe Sole
Available in Dark Brown
and Black Leather
only $33.00
542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
776 Granville — Adams Apple Boutique
* "Design and word Trade marks in Canada of the
Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd."
Open Thursday and Friday nites.
C.O.D. orders accepted. Credit and Chargex cards honored.
BRB/erSHOBS POHfHB
jfniOST<VIUJGBRHjOCXrtOHf Thursday, October 28, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Sadistk meeting passes budget
By LESLEY KRUEGER
The 1971-72 Alma Mater Society budget was finally
approved Wednesday night.
The budget, in its fourth reading, was passed by a
vote of 24-3 after a compromise was reached between
the AMS executive and the clubs and intramural
representatives.
Only three changes were made in the basic outline
of the budget.
The Ubyssey's budget was cut $500 to $36,500, and
the AMS office staff budget was cut $1,000 to $48,840.
The $1,500 made available this way was allocated to
intramural sports.
The   breakthrough   came   when   law   rep   Grant
Burnyeat suggested each side make two concessions in
its major points.
Accordingly, the unofficial clubs — intramurals
coalition lowered the amount it was asking for
intramurals from $7,000 to $5,000 and said it would
wait for the January margin for extra university clubs
committee funds.
The human government executive then proposed
cuts in The Ubyssey and office staff budgets.
"You realize these concessions are hitting in an area
very dear to the human government's collective heart,"
said AMS president Steve Garrod.
Treasurer David Mole said the funding of intramural
sports was also high on the human government priority
list.
"We   can  see   the  difficulties  involved,
satisfied with the new budget," Burnyeat said.
and are
The meeting was marked with speeches and songs
from the play Marat/Sade by human government
members.
In other business, a motion was passed unanimously
at the meeting to support demonstrations against the
Amchitka nuclear test scheduled for Nov. 4.
Authorization was given for the AMS to send a
letter to the The Ubyssey protesting the action.
The meeting closed with the singing of Solidarity
Forever. Many students then adjourned to the SUB art
gallery to watch the counting of the ballots in
Wednesday's senate elections and referenda.
—kini mcdonald photo
STYROFOAM BOAT, one of several found floating in library and Brock pools, floats in serenity as world passes by in oblivion. Boat seems
unaware of Amchitka blast scheduled for Nov. 4.
Ed 'counselling' sparks complaint
The committee on research involving
human subjects has received a complaint
about the ethics of interviews conducted by
Education 561 students.
Anthropology and sociology grad student
Barbara Errington sent a letter Monday to
committee chairman Dr. W. S. Hoar saying
there is "no protection from a possible
inappropriate or disturbing encounter" with a
student conducting interviews for the course.
The course, described in the calendar as a
"laboratory practicum," apparently involves
students finding their own subjects to
"counsel".
Errington, in the letter to Hoar, said she
was recently approached by an education grad
student asking her to be counsellee.
She said she discovered it is standard
procedure for students to find their own
subjects and administer an "unstructured"
-interview that would focus on personal
problems and feelings without the supervision
of a qualified person.
"It seems to me that unsupervised
interviews of this nature not only are totally
inadequate learning experiences but also offer
no protection from a possible inappropriate or
disturbing encounter for the person being
interviewed, regardless of the good intentions
of the student involved," Errington said.
Committee chairman Hoar is in Ottawa
until Monday.
The committee, which approves all
research conducted on human subjects at
UBC, is the one that recently ordered health
services psychiatrist Dr. Conrad Schwarz to
revise the preamble to his drug questionnaire
so students would know it contained highly
personal questions.
Errington said "all students in psychology,
social work, medicine, teacher training and
psychiatry do their field work or receive their
practical experience with carefully selected
and supervised subjects for these reasons."
Ex-prof
sues UBC
By SANDI SHREVE
Dr. W. D. Groves, former
chemical engineering lecturer at
UBC is suing the university and
Dr. F. E. Murray, head of the
chemical engineering department.
A writ was filed Monday at the
B.C. Supreme Court by Groves'
lawyer, W. M. Trotter, claiming
damages for salary still owed to
Groves by the university.
Groves is charging the
university for wrongfully
dismissing him prior to the end of
his term as stated in his contract,
or alternately for wrongfully
dismissing him without cause, or
alternately for dismissing him
with cause but failing to inform
him of the cause.
He is suing Murray for damages
of slander, resulting in loss of
employment.
"I haven't personally been
informed of the matter, I only
know what I read in the paper
(Vancouver Sun, Tuesday),"
Murray said Wednesday.
Murray told The Ubyssey that
Groves had been appointed for a
two-year term - 1969 to 1971 -
and had stayed for the full time.
"At this time I don't feel in a
position to discuss why Groves
was not reappointed," said
Murray.
President Walter Gage refused
to comment on the situation
"because such a matter is in the
hands of our solicitors."
Groves is presently working as
research consultant to chemical
engineering professor James
Forsythe who is on a one-year
sabbatical leave but still working
on the UBC campus.
Ceiling placed on teachers' pay
By SANDY KASS
Provincial Socred education minister Donald
Brothers has struck another blow to the B.C. school
system.
It is directed at B.C. public school teachers and
reduces their chances of future wage increases.
In an announcement Tuesday, Brothers placed a 6.5
per cent ceiling on teachers' salary increases which are
paid jointly by the provincial government and district
school boards.
In effect this will mean that any school board
agreeing to higher pay boosts for teachers this year will
have to finance the boosts with increased school taxes.
Brothers cut the standard education budget by two
per cent Oct. 4.
Vancouver school board chairman Fritz Bowers said
Wednesday B.C. teachers deserve to share in areas of
prosperity.
"We don't like the degree of present inflation any
more than anyone else, but it is unfair to pick on any
one group like teachers, to suffer harsher consequences,"
Bowers said.
Under a current scheme, Vancouver teachers would
receive an 8.9 per cent wage hike at the end of this year.
Bowers said his board would fight the salary
cut-back in arbitration.
"Our provincial government feels it can change the
laws any time it likes," Bowers said.
"Brothers has predicted February legislation will fix
the two per cent budget cut permanently. How he can
know for sure four months in advance is beyond me," he
added.
B.C. Teachers' Federation president Adam
Robertson said Wednesday the wage cut will hurt some
districts more than others.
"Districts in the Fraser Valley have a policy of
keeping   their   teachers'   salaries   in   line   with  other
worker's wages in the area," Robertson said.
"Now that policy will be impossible."
He added the cut will not affect salaries of those
teachers who would normally receive an increase due to
boost in status.
"It will only affect how great an increase teachers
can bargain for," he said.
Education students' association president Kerry
Bysouth said Wednesday anything coming, out Brothers'
office is utterly "assinine."
"He really seems to have it in for education,"
Bysouth said.
He said the move will detrimentally affect education
students' morale, because, "now students not only have
to worry about getting a job, but have to worry about
getting paid." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
/
An important referendum
has been held and the human
government executive has
been voted out of office.
Our position was and still
is that the human
government is the best AMS
executive UBC has seen to
date.
But it's not a matter of
personalities. They come and
go. It's the program that
counts.
Right now we're waiting
to see what will become of
that program and what
proposals a new AMS
executive will have to offer
students.
However, the results of
this referendum leave us
wondering just what students
want from a student
government.
Are clubs and intramural
sports the first priorities for
students? Do students want
to return to government run
by aspiring Liberal party
hotshots? Do students want
to revert to the even bleaker
The reason why
days of the grey flannel
plague?
We suspect not.
Rather, it seems to us,
students have come to the
point where they'll protest
Amchitka, pollution, the
Viet Nam war.
But when it comes down
to being involved in real
change in the university and
society, there the
participation stops.
But why?
The answer is really quite
Simple.
I Most of us know exactly
what we're doing at
university: we're putting in
time to get a degree, which
we believe will be the
passport to a job and a secure
life.
In the face of economic
reality, this notion is fading
fast. But we insist on clinging
to it.
Any threat to this notion,
creates     in     us    a    rather
frightening identity crisis.
'We believe in change,
but. . .'
This is our attitude
The human government —
its analysis of the university
and society, and the program
it developed out of this
analysis — posed this threat.
It became easier to believe
the rumors, easier to stay
uninvolved and, in the cases
of   about   4,000   students,
easier to cast a vote against
human government than to
do anything about the
realities of this campus and
its social setting.
We understand the reasons
for this, and we remain
optimistic. But we find this
student attitude disturbing
and will continue to fight to
change it.
And, like The Ubyssey,
human government shows no
signs of ambling off into the
Thursday, October -28, 1971
sunset, carpet bags in hand.
Its members will remain-
on campus, conduct new
elections and then continue
to work as before on the
issues that concern all of us,
whether we care to admit it
or not: quality of education,
the role of the Canadian
university in the community
and the economy,
unionization and tenure, an
end to secretive procedures
that bar democracy from the
university.
In   short,   the   fight   to
control our own lives.
Vaincrons!
The Unanswer
Take a look at anthrosoc head Cyril Belshaw's letter a
couple of columns over. It's the ponderous Unanswer to the
questions we asked about why Matt Speier and Ron Silvers
aren't getting tenure.
The real answers are contained in the anthrosoc grad
students' brief.
The question is: how were the criteria of publishing
and teaching applied to Speier and Silvers?
The answer, according to the grad student brief is:
unfairly, irregularly and mysteriously.
The question is: isn't it true that Speier and Silvers
have a better record than some of those being recommended
for tenure?
The answer is: Yes, definitely.
So the new questions are: why are Silvers and Speier
not being recommended for tenure and is the promo and
tenure committee going to reconsider the cases?
We'd like an answer, a real answer.
Letters
Rights
I would like to disassociate
myself from and go on record as
being completely opposed to the
actions of those who stole the
campus copies of Tuesday's
Ubyssey.
I have not agreed with the
support The Ubyssey has given to
'human government' editorially,
nor have I been satisfied that its
reporting of student council
meetings and news has been
completely objective. But the
thefts Tuesday represent to me an
intolerable infringment upon the
rights  of newspaper staffers (as
members of the press) to publish
without fear oFsuch low-handed
censorship.
Freedom of the press has been
guaranteed by our bill of rights
and by countless court decisions,
and the action of those who felt
that their feelings should trample
this basic right should be
condemned by all thinking UBC
students.
I would also like to point out
that my approval was not given
before my position as AMS law
rep was attached in support to a
pamphlet which was published
alleging that human government
had given $12,000 to.UCWIC and
THE U8YSSH
OCTOBER 28, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university yeai
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
thpse of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
EDITOR:  LESLIE PLOMMER
It was a bunch of individuals who did it. No, it was a collective. The
collective did it. You bet. A garbage collective. No, a people's collective.
What were their names? Look it up in a history book. In a hysterical book.
Look it up in the sky. Why don't you try? Just once. We're the mast. We're
tied to the mast. We took the wax out of our ears and heard the song of
the Sirens. No, they were a collective too. Not a crummy individual among
them. A chorus.
loaned   $5,000   to   the   Georgia
Straight.
I knew both of these
allegations to be untrue and
would not have given permission
for my position to be used on the
pamphlet had I been consulted in
advance.
Grant Burnyeat,
I^aw 2,
LSA external v-pres.
and AMS council rep.
Feminine
The article "What Is
Feminine?" in the Oct. 21
Ubyssey had several interesting
points to make, and I would like
to add a few comments to it, with
regard to women in the
(predominantly male) professions.
Though it may have been true
10 years ago, a woman who
wishes to succeed in the
professional world does not now
have to be "masculine and
aggressive". She simply has to be
self-reliant, strongly motivated
and believe in herself. It also helps
if she has a sense of humor, for
she will no doubt be subjected to
some teasing by her peers.
Out of about 20 young women
I have met in such professions as
medicine, law, chemistry, physics
and computer science, not one has
seemed unfeminine or harsh. They
have all been intelligent, aware,
healthy human beings. They also
•had the ability to smile.
Many professional fields have
begun to attract new members
who are socially concerned, and as
a result have taken a more human
standpoint. To be a good engineer
these days requires far more than
technical know-how; it requires a
broad understanding of how
technological systems affect
people, and very careful
consideration of the user's needs
is essential in system design.
Would engineering not be
enhanced by women who have all
the necessary ability,
qualifications, willingness to work
hard, and in addition the human
understanding?
There is a place for truly
interested, qualified women in
engineering, medicine, law, etc.,
and most employers are more
concerned with the quality of the
work than who does it. I would
like to personally encourage any
woman who is thinking seriously
of going into a professional line of
work but may have self-doubts. It
means long years of training,
difficult course loads, and some
moments of exasperation.
It also means aitaining a
particular kind of self-confidence
and self-respect — especially in
beneficial work - which is very
strong and transcends all the
definitions and stereotypes that
psychologists could invent.
Ann Koritz,
Grad studies 7,
Electrical engineering
More
Your editorial of Oct. 19 at
last raises questions regarding
tenure which have some
significance, and sets aside the
silly charges which were first
raised (although your reporter in
the same issue doesn't seem to
have heard the message, since he
or she repeats the charges).
I happen to know that you
know my detailed response to
your questions, since I had an
hour and a half with you and Art
Smolensky nearly two weeks ago.
However, since your readers have
not been informed, I shall answer
both your direct questions, and
those which are buried by
implication in the remainder of
your editorial.
"What criteria were used to
decide whether or not to grant
tenure?"
As laid out in the faculty
handbook, and in departmental
policy, information was gathered
on teaching (undergraduate and
graduate) and scholarly activities
including     publication     and Thursday, October 28, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
research. Other contributions to
the university and the community
were considered, but did not carry
the same force.
An assessment committee of
two, one selected by the
candidate, was appointed for each
person in the spring, and prepared
a facutal report with some
evaluation of quality, read and
initialled by the candidate. The
promotions and tenure
committee, consisting of all full
and associate professors in the
departmental, examined this
material, and debated its
significance and quality.
In doing so, members of the
committee exchanged views, and
were consistently challenged to
support general statement by
reference to fact. The underlying
question might be phrased in the
following way: "Has the
candidate demonstrated, through
his four-plus years at this
university, qualities of teaching
and scholarship which are of a
standard expected in the
department at this time in its
history, and which give us
reasonable grounds to believe that
he is likely to continue to be a
scholar and teacher of the
required quality during the
remainder of his career, that is to
retirement at age 65."
If a candidate meets the
standards as teacher alone, he may
be considered for senior
instructor. If he meets them as
researcher alone, he cannot be
considered, since unfortunately
there is no provision for
specialized research professors or
fellows in this department at the
present time. Tenure in
professorial ranks requires quality
in both teaching and scholarship,
though not necessarily
outstanding merit in the two.
"Were the critieria publishing
and teaching (in that order)?"
Answer, no, not in that order.
"If those were the criteria,
then how were they applied to the
cases of Speier and Silvers? Isn't it
true that Speier and Silvers both
have better publishing and
teaching records than at least two
of the people recommended for
tenure?"
If the answer to the second
question were in the affirmative,
in the opinion of myself and the
members of the committee
expressed in discussion and vote,
the decision would either have
been wrong, or, where positive,
not expressed strongly enough.
After decisions had been reached
on each candidate, the committee
examined all of them
comparatively, and there was an
opportunity for vote changes as a
result (some did change). The
answer, then, is that appropriate
comparisons were made.
You chide me for giving you
generalities, not specifics. By
specifics, I presume you mean,
was such and such a paper good or
bad? Is so and so running a
popularity contest in his teaching,
or is he well organized and
stimulating? Does his graduate
advising help people to produce
excellent theses, or does he
muddle his advice so that his
students get into trouble? Is his
research, though not yet
complete, well-established and
capable? Does he write trivial
nonsense? And so on and on.
You know better than to make
this point of attack. As head of
this department, it is distinctly
not my duty to spread the
weaknesses of individual
department members over the
pages of The Ubyssey. What
would you think of me if I sent
the juicy details of students
caught plagiarizing, or, more
painfully, exposed to your
fascinated gaze the details of some
student's second-class essay,
showing in detail why it was not
first class?
You know very well that there
is a world of difference between
cloak and dagger secrecy, and the
expected and necessary
confidentiality of discussions on
personnel matters. You are
hypocritical when you aver that
you do not wish to make tenure
martyrs — and then do so,
through your manoeuvred
publicity; that you do not wish to
hurt individuals — and then
compound the undeniable hurts
through publicity which affects
the reputation people have in
other parts of Canada.
Which brings me to the next
point. The truth, you want, the
truth. I have given it to you as
best I can, as frankly as I can,
with as much detail as I can - not
for you, but for your readers
whom otherwise you mislead.
In an earlier editorial, you paid
me the compliment of calling me
a "proper" department head. Let
me tell you what "proper" means
in the Shorter Oxford English
Dictionary   . . .   "To   which   the
THIS COUPON WORTH
"ONE DOLLAR"
WHEN APPLIED TO A HAIRSTYLE AT
'1.00
Corky's Mens Hair Styling
"LONG HAIR OUR SPECIALTY" '
Valid any day except Saturday 'til Nov. 30, 1971
FREE APPOINTMENT SERVICE - 731-4717
3644 West 4th Avenue
1.00 CLIP THIS COUPON AND SAVF! 1.00
name accurately belongs: . . .
genuine, real: normal . . . Such a
thing of the kind should be:
excellent, admirable, of high
quality . . . fitting, befitting, esp.
appropriate to the circumstances
... In conformity with the
demands or usages of society:
decent, decorous, respectable,
'correct'". Oh, dear, how
embarrassing, I didn't know I was
all that.
May I suggest that a "proper"
department head doesn't lie.
Either you believe that, and must
accept my word, or you don't
believe I am a "proper"
department head. I can assure you
that no amount of personal abuse,
on real or imagined data, will lead
me to defend decisions or actions
by revealing negative cases, with
publicity, against individuals.
You also allege that I don't
discuss tenure, because I like it.
Again, you know better than that,
because I spoke to you at length
about my views on tenure. I don't
like the present form of tenure,
and I don't like the way it works.
And I think your alternative is
insensitive and unintelligent: it
would lead almost immediately to
political control of the university
and its transformation into either
a political academy or a glorified
m
THE
TOWN
PUMP
THE BEST DINING
AND
ENTERTAINMENT
DEAL IN GASTOWN
.Full facilities
7 days a week
Dancing to the 'Now
Sound' of the Town
Pumpers — Mon. thru
Sat. from 9 p.m.
Old-Time Piano from 5
p.m. Daily (4 p.m. to 10
p.m. Sundays)
8 of 9 Entree Items
$2.50 or Less
GROUP PARTIES CAN BE
ARRANGED SUN.-THUR.
CALL 683-6695
high school, depending on who
obtained the power. There are
several possible alternatives which
I will set out when I get my leave
to write my next book. The
alternatives must provide for (a)
protection against discrimination
for political or other opinions,
from the first day of
appointment, (b) reasonable job
security, with protection against
arbitrary dismissal, (c) protection
against improper interference with
teaching and research by the laity
(or colleagues, for that matter),
(d) and a condition that
employment is dependent upon
the continuation of adequate
university functions.
I will forego correcting the
numerous mis-statements in your
recent news stories, but must
make one final point. My personal
feelings about the present form of
tenure are beside the point. I am
charged with administering that
form, and I believe that it has
been appropriately sanctioned
under the influence of the opinion
that it is the only effective way of
putting a stop to the McCarthyism
which was rife in the late forties.
To be specific, present tenure
regulations are a quasi-legal
arrangement agreed to by the
university administration and the
faculty association, the latter
acting in a manner which is not
very different from the union
proposed by the "radical social
scientists". Furthermore, although
it is true that graduate students
are not represented in the actual
decision process, the criteria and
procedures at present in force in
the department of anthropology
and sociology were worked out by
a committee in which students
fully participated. It is not for me
to abrogate these procedures
under Ubyssey pressure.
This letter may be published,
but only in full. It is not to be
published in excerpt. If for
reasons of space, or for other
reasons, you cannot or do not
wish to publish it, I would be
grateful if, nevertheless, you
publicly record in the columns of
The Ubyssey that you have
received it. Cyril S. Belshaw,
Professor and head,
Anthropology-sociology.
Creeps
I want to publicly thank all the
fucking assholes who didn't give
me a ride this hiorning when I was
hitchhiking to campus. I was
probably better off without your
company. j. Nolan    Arts 7
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by J. M. Synge
NOVEMBER 5-17 8:00 p.m.
Directed by STANLEY WEESE
Costumes and Settings by RICHARD KENT WILCOX
Lighting Designed by BRIAN PARKER
Student Ticket Price: $1.00
BOX OFFICE • FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE • ROOM 207
" Support Your Campus Theatre ZLZZ Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
THURSDAY
CUS
Rockballet,      12:30      p.m.,      SUB
ballroom.
EL CIRCULO
Comedy   records,    12:30   p.m.,   IH
402.
BLACK CROSS
Organizational meeting, 12:30 p.m.,
secret headquarters.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Film,   12:30  and   7:30  p.m.,   Buch
100 and Buch 204.
VOC
Equipment sale in SUB 205.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
God, 12:30 p.m., SUB 111.
'Tween classes
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Experimental College money crisis,
12:30 p.m., SUB 1058.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Plato and Aristotle, 3:30 p.m., SUB
111.
AUCM
Beliefs    that    matter,    12:30   p.m.,
SUB 215.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Theatre workshops, 7:30 p.m., SUB
art gallery.
BAHA'I CLUB
The    Seven    Valleys,    12:30    p.m.,
Buch 230.
NEWMAN CLUB
General   meeting,   12:30   p.m.,  St.
Mark's.
ABORTSOC
Film,   12:30  and   7:30  p.m.,   Buch
106.
VCF
Exposition   on   Amos,   12:30  p.m.,
SUB ballroom.
Illlllll
Anti-war week
coming vp
The Vietnam Action
Committee is still at it.
The committee has declared
the first week in November
Anti-War Week and plans to have
speakers, delegations and
moratoriums throughout the
week, culminating in the annual
mass march Saturday.
Next Monday is the day
VAC hopes to present American
activist lawyer William Kunstler,
although a spokesman
characterized their chances
Thursday as "doubtful".
Tuesday a delegation will
appear before Vancouver city
council to ask council to ask
Trudeau to ask Parliament to stop
Canadian complicity. The
delegation with then travel to
Seattle to ask its council to ask
the federal government to
withdraw its troops from
Indochina.
Wednesday moratorium will be
held in Vancouver and district
high schools. Campus teach-ins are
also planned.
Thursday a lunch-hour
moratorium is planned downtown
with street theatre and discussions
to be held on the courthouse
steps.
Friday an anti-war play. The
Birth, will be presented in the
auditorium of the Vancouver City
IMIIIJIIIMIIIIIIlilllltliltlllllHl
Hot flashes
Organise
College Langara campus.
Finally, on Saturday the march
we have all come to know and
love, It will assemble at 1 p.m. at
the foot of Main and
demonstrators will march through
Gastown to the Federal building
at Granville and Hastings.
In conjunction with VAC's
antiwar week, the UBC Anti-War
committee is sponsoring two days
of films based around the
Vietnam war.
Films to be shown Nov. 4 and
5 include No Vietnamese Ever
Called Me Nigger, Only the
Beginning, Vietnam North, The
79 Springs of Ho Chi Minh and
Tele-Communications Station Six.
Films will be shown at noon in
SUB 125 for 35 cents.
Snorter hours
The administration bookstore
has returned to shorter business
hours pending resolution of a
management-labor dispute.
Assistant manager Bob Smith
said Wednesday the store will
close at 5 p.m. Monday to Friday
until a grievance by the Canadian
Union of Public Employees, Local
116, is resolved.
The store had been closing at 9
p.m. Monday to Thursday and 5
p.m. Fridays since the beginning
of the term.
Smith said the union claims the
extension of business hours
violates the contract between the
union and the university.
The Vancouver Inner-City
Service Project is offering a free
course on community organizing
from Nov. 1 to Dec. 3 at 1895
Venables St., Vancouver.
The course, to be held
Mondays, and Wednesdays, "will
enable representatives from
community self-help groups to
develop new techniques for
organizing people, to become
aware of the nature and structure
of various government
bureaucracies and departments"
and to challenge basic ideas about
traditional organizing methods,
Peter Dent, Inner-City staff
member said Wednesday.
Community groups or
individuals wishing to participate
on the course should contact
Peter Dent or Sharon Yandle at
254-7166.
PONTECORVO
FIRST...
"BATTLE OF ALGIERS"
MARLON BRANDO
BURNf
A Film by
GILLO PONTECORVO
Friday 29 & Saturday 30
7:00 & 9:30
Sunday - 7:00
a SUB Film SOC presentation
50?
SUB theatre
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
General   meeting,  12:30 p.m., SUB
224.
SKYDIVERS
General   meeting, 12:30 p.m., SUB
211.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
SUB 207, 12:30 p.m.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
Coffee   house,   7   p.m.,   Arts   One
building.
Thursday, October 28, 1971
FRIDAY
MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Special   meeting,   12:30   p.m.,  SUB
105B.
JAPAN SUMMER EXCHANGE
Slides, 12:30 p.m., SUB 205.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Guest   speaker,    12:30   p.m.,   SUB
105A.
SKYDIVING CLUB
Wine and cheese party, 8 p.m., SUB
party room.
SATURDAY
NVC
Halloween  party, 8 p.m., SUB 215.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Costume    party,    8:30    p.m.,   SUB
207.
CLASSIFIED
Rotes: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
fines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Ogee, Room 241 S.U.B-, UBC, Van. «, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
11
Dances	
HALLOWEEN DANCE — SAT. 8
p.m. at Flame Supper Club. ?u
couple. Canada Way & Boundary.
Sponsored by Escorts Car Club.
Greetings 12
Lost & Found
13
LOST MONDAY, OCT. 25—NAVY
purse around Brock or Library,
reward.   Phone   922-7681.
LOST:   BROWN   BRIEFCASE   SAT.
night, Oct. 16 around Faculty Club.
Valuable   music   inside.   Cash   re-
ward.   Phone   Lome  876-0345.
LOST: SLIDE El'LE, HUTCHING TO
campus   from    4th    &   Vine,    Mon.
9:30    a.m.    Please    call    Christine,
738-0185'.
Rides & Car Pools'
14
Special Notices
15
THE GRIN BIN HAS THE LAR-
gest selection in Canada of posters and pop art. Also Jokes. Gifts
and 24"x36" photo blowups from
your own prints and negatives.
Enquiries welcome at the Grin Bin,
3209 W. Broadway across from the
Liquor Store.  Call 738-2311.	
IN CONCERT "A DAY .IN OUR
Lives"—Rock Ballet and Light
Show, Thursday, Nov. 4. 12:30,
SUB Ballroom,  50c per person.
WIN SET OF GREAT BOOKS AND
earn $123.00 week minimum doing
it. 687-8872.	
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IS OPEN
Mon.-Sat. See Dino or Rick at
5736   University   Boulevard    (near
Campus).	
SKI   WHISTLER
OR
MOUNT   BAKER
Six  week ski course at above areas,
only    $32.00    includes     return    bus
transportation   and   1%   hour  lesson.
Further information from:
Canadian Youth Hostels Association,
1406   West   Broadway,   Vancouver  9,
738-3128.	
CYPRESS LODGE, YOUTH
HOSTEL
WHISTLER   MOUNTAIN
Open Dec. 1st until Apr.  30th.  1972.
Special  Midweek  Package:   5  nights
accommodation with   3  meals a day
$22.00
Further information from: Canadian
Youth    Hostels    Assn..    1406    West
Broadway, Vancouver 9, 738-3128.
SPEAKEASY   'WE'Rls   ALL   EAR'"
Drop-in     Room     100A.     Phone-in
228-3700 / 228-4557.    Hrs.    Monday -
Thurs.   9:30   a.m.-9:30  p.m.   Friday
9:30  a.m.-3  a.m.   Sat.  12:30-3  a.m.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1962 RAMBLER 4-DOOR. CHEAP,
good condition, easy on gas. 521-
5749.	
1963 DODGE DART. STD. 6-CYL.
good condition and tires, call 228-
9371. 	
'68  DATSUN   2000,  150  H.P.   5-SPD.
New paint, tires, quick sale please.
266-8727.	
'65 ANGLIA 4-SPD. FLOOR SHIFT.
2   door.   Excellent mileage.  Offers.
Phone 521-1514, 1-4 p.m.
1964 MGB. GOOD QONDITION.
Many   extras,   922-3182.	
1968 DATSUN 2000 SPORTS. EXC.
cond. 5 speed, Solex carbs. Miche-
lin 'X' tires, luggage rack. One
owner.   736-5159.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
If you own a British Car
we  can  offer:
* Low  Labour  Rates
* Below   Retail   Parts
* Repairs and Modifications
* Personalized   Attention
* Guaranteed  Work •
BRITISH CARS ONLY
1906 W. 43rd        266-7703
(rear) at Cypress
Automobiles—Repairs Cont'd
VW SPECIAL—REBUILT MOTORS
and trans, exchange service, also
repairs. Brakes relining, 525. King
and link pins. S30. 683-8078 — 760
Denman St. (rearh	
25
Motorcycles
Art Services
31
Babysitting & Day Care
Duplicating & Copying
32
34
Photography
35
utlje Hen* anb Sautter
\V(j       Camera*
3010 W.  BDWY.  736-7833
also  at  Denman   Place
HIKING TRIPODS
$6.67 with case
other   sturdy   tripods   to  $18.10
PHOTOSOC   MEMBERS
Tired   of  a   dirty  drier?
Get your own  Premier  Drier
starting  from   $15.15
Rip-offs   NOT   our  Specialty!
INFORMAL PORTRAITS BY
Carol Gordon. May be taken outdoors. Ideal Xmas gifts. 733-0715
or 736-4923.
Scandals
37
Sewing & Alterations
38
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
40
TYPING—KSSAYS, THESIS. Assignments, Research Papers, Fast
Service Near 41st & Marine Drive.
266-5053.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING —
my home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate   work.   Reasonable   rates.
 Phone 263-5317.	
ESSAYS, ""
iiuickly
Phone
ETC. TYPED NEATLY',
and efficiently, 35c page.
124-0385   after   5   p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
REUAHLE     WAITRESS! NEEDED
to work  in  Pizza Hut part  or fuil
time.     No    experience necessary.
Phone 434-3313. 	
Tutors—Wanted 64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE 71
ONE PAIR LANGE-PRO BOOTS
size 8N. Rossignol Stratos 200cm,
Rossignol Alais Majors 210cm,
Kastle CPM70 205cm, Kastle
205cm   $35.   Phone   732-0160.	
U.B.C. SCIENCE JACKET SIZE 38
as new g!5. 926-1860 evenings.
COPPER CHROME  TABLE AND fi
 chairs.   ($45.)  688-2852 after 5 p.m.
GUITAR FOR SALE—NEW "VAL-
dez". Urgent. Best offer accepted.
Phone: Linda 738-8673.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SLEEPING ROOM FOR GIRL K.P.
Near beach—Spanish Banks I"1/,
blk.)    $45.00   per   mo.   224-9386.
BASEMENT SUITE. SHARE FA-
cilities. Private entrance. Kerrisdale. $60. Phone 261-7739 evenings.
Room & Board
82
MEAL PASSES AVAILABLE AT
the DKE House, 5765 Agronomy,
224-9691. Enjoy excellent home-
cooked meals on campus at prices
you can afford.	
BEST FOOD ON CAMPUS! ROOM
and board at Delta Upsilon Frat.
House.   Phone   224-9841.
Furn. Aprs.
83
SELF - CONTAINED BASEMENT
suite available November first.
Accommodate one or two. South
Granville.   $80.00.   Phone   266-6568.
"HOUSEKEEPING SUITE 2% RMS.
$110 month two persons. $100 one
person.   266-0381. 	
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
The Handiest Book on Campus -
BIRD  CALLS
The UBC Student Telephone Directory
NOW ON SALE   - 75c Thursday, October 28, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC dominates
rugby scene
All five rugby teams won their
games on the weekend.
The Thunderbirds swept by the
Georgians 20-4, the Braves beat
the Georgians 20-6, the Totems
won over the Georgians 74, the
Tomahawks walloped the Rowing
Club 36-0, and the UBC Frosh
stomped on BCIT 22-0.
In the 'Bird game, there was a
hard battle in the front row, but
UBC managed to win most of the
scrums. The backs checked closely
and used well-placed kicks to the
wingers to advance.
After a sloppy start, which
nevertheless kept the ball in the
Intramurals
CYCLE DRAG takes place
today at noon on the John Owen
Track.
HOCKEY exhibition games are
on for tonight. League play starts
on November 4. Check your
playing times outside the
intramural office.
SOCCER preliminary games
start on November 1.
FOOTBALL finals are today at
noon. Beta and Fiji scrap it out
for the championship of division
I. The Engineers battle Kappa
Sigma in division II, and Carey
Hall takes on the Engineers in
division III.
Georgian half, UBC opened the
scoring with a good display of fast
passing which allowed winger
John Mitchell to use an overlap
and score in the corner. Late in
the first half, the forwards slipped
the ball 25 yards to Captain Eric
McAvity who scored the try. Ray
Banks kicked the convert.
The half time score was 10-0
for UBC.
In the second half UBC won a
Georgian scrum. The ball was
flipped to centre Doug Schick
who kicked a 35 yard drop goal.
The Georgians only try came
on a bad scrum on the UBC 5
yard line and Georgian scrum-half
Scofield, fell on the ball in the
UBC end zone.
The final UBC scoring came on
a 40 yard run by Banks who
passed by Schick for the try.
Banks kicked a 40 yard penalty to
end the scoring, UBC
20-Georgians 4.
The 'Birds tackle the Seattle
Rugby Club on Saturday at 2:30
p.m. at Thunderbird Park, in a
Vancouver rugby league first
division game.
Tfcnsar
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w 4th. avenue
Gestalt
Workshop
October 29, 30
SUB 213
David Berg
Tom Sandborn
To Register Call
987-8895 or 876-7831
BIRDCALLS-
The Handiest Book on Campus
The University of  ||j
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
BUY YOURS TODAY 7C
UBC BOOKSTORE AND SUB #   W
Basketball 'Birds
warm up for season
The 1971 version of the basketball 'Birds is being readied for the
upcoming season. With the first game, the Grad Reunion game on
November 5, only one week off, Coach Peter Mullins has had plenty of
time to look over the 14 players he has going out for the 11 spots on
the team.
Among the 14 there are six new faces. These are transfers Doug
Kineer, Bob Philips, Pat Lee and Mike Ireland along with Doug Kripps
and Tom Allison, up from last year's Jayvees. Kineer and Philips are
from Vancouver City College, Lee is from Trinity Jr. College in
Langley, and Ireland is in retreat from Simon Fraser.
Of the six, Kineer is the big man. At 6'6" he is faced with the
problem of stepping into the job left vacant by last year's "captain,
Terry MacKay, who has graduated. From what he showed last season at
City College and in high school play at Winston Churchill he very
likely can fill the job.
The returnees are led by Ron Thorsen who sets a new record with
every point he scores.
Because of Thorsen the rest of the players are often overlooked.
But watch out for John Mills, Bob Mathieson, and Stan Callegari, all of
whom are known as steady players and who should all receive
considerably more floor time this season. The other returnees are Jack
Hoy, Peter Herd, Daryll Gjernes and Bob Dickson.
Last year, the 'Birds, as defending Canadian champions, were
beaten by Manitoba in both league and playoff games and wound up in
second spot. This year, in new divisional play with the universities of
Alberta, Calgary, Lethbridge and Victoria, they won't play Manitoba
unless it is in the playoffs. But they would love to beat them and regain
the crown that they lost last year.
Mullins is planning some changes in his offence for this season.
"Without MacKay" he said, "We no longer have the one big man, so
we'll run out of a double post instead of the single post we used last
year." This is going to mean that considerable pressure will be put on
Kineer, Gjernes and Herd who will probably be sharing the double post
duties.
However, Mullins has no plans to slow down the game. "We'll still
run the fast break," he said.
This should be good news to the fans as the fast break makes the
'Birds. When properly executed, it makes the UBC squad the most
exciting in the country.
Mullins' immediate problem is to decide just who is going to play
for the 'Birds this season, and then, to make a winner out of them.
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FPR UBC 41 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 28, 1971
Girls cook, boys run
Boys do and girls are.
This is how boys and girls are
generally portrayed in children's
books, UBC psychology student
Linda Harth told the women's
studies meeting Tuesday night.
"Generally little girls in picture
books are passive and subdued.
They walk, read and dream but
they do not climb on fences and
ride bicycles," said Harth to the
more than 600 participants in the
Canadian Woman: Our Story
program.
"Girls have emotions: they get
angry, they disagree, they smile,
they want to please.
"But they do not act," she said
in her discussion of children's
media.
"A little girl would not be
misreading if she concluded that it
seems that boys do most of the
recognized childhood activities in
books.
"Girls are encouraged to forego
the accepted childhood abandon
and zest, to be quiet and demure,
to cultivate the charms and wiles
that will later catch them a good
husband," said Harth.
She said a song sung on the
television children's program
Sesame Street makes this
difference fairly clear.
Girls help mother cook and
sew, play with dolls, wear bows in
their hair and can be beautiful.
Boys run and jump and never
fall, throw a ball, grow six feet
from The Button Boat
• tall,   make   mud   pies   and   get
covered with mess.
"Women have internalized the
standards of femininity that have
been unquestionally lauded for
centuries, as a result they are
^_ often as guilty, if not more so, as
men of male chauvinism.
"In Women - A Journal of
Liberation, Leah Heyn notes that
many of the writers of children's
books are women with families,
who, in addition to their domestic
roles, must also take their roles as
writers or artists seriously," said
Harth.
"Yet their feminine characters
aie overwhelmingly portrayed in
domestic and maternal roles."
m- Harth said that by looking at
books recommended by local
libraries, one discovers that male
figures outnumber females at least
three to one.
LIttU
Miss Muffet
FiqbTsBAck
^
#■
V
iv»'v
^ : 1    W
She said there are two separate
patterns to fairy tales, fantasies
and folk tales.
"One trend is exemplified by
such stories as Cinderella, Sleeping
Beauty, Snow White; in all these
tales the main female character is
of unmatched beauty and
impeccable virtue.
"Because of these qualities, she
is singled out for a special fate —
discovery by some high-placed
male and marriage to him.
"Men in these stories are never
misogynists, only women are the
enemies of the heroine. The
concept of community and
friendship among women is
completely lacking," said Harth.
She said the second pattern is
basically the same as the first; the
heroines are good and beautiful
but also bold and daring.
"The inspiration of their trials,
quest and adventures is some
prince who has been bewitched by
an evil woman, is returned to
natural life by the girl and is
dependent upon her as proof of
love.
"Goodness and virtue in fairy
tale women boil down to a
tremendous capacity for
self-sacrifice and martyrdom."
Harth then talked about school
books, using a report prepared by
a group of Vancouver teachers.
She said readers for the first
two grades concentrated on the
family and family activities of
what a mother is and does and
what a father is and does.
Mother is usually pictured in
the home, available if the children
need her, unless of.course they
want her to play with them, said
Harth.
"Father on the other hand is
always seen playing with the
children    or    taking    them    on
outings,   while  mother  stays at
home.
"This image of the father has
been foisted up on us by Dr.
Spock and other so called
child-rearing experts in the past
30 years.
"They emphasized paternal
participation in the child's
socialization, but somehow this
was not conceived in terms of, nor
did it take the form of, diaper
wishing, toilet training or
discipline.
"Instead, fathers became
weekend pals or bantam baseball
coaches."
Harth said Sesame Street again
exaggerated the dichotomy of sex
roles to an almost absurd degree.
"Gordon and Susan are a
married couple living on Sesame
Street. Susan is cheerful and
almost always bustling around the
kitchen    making    things    'for
from Pippi Longstocking
Gordon', carrying out the trash,
going to the store and addressing
all and sundry as 'dear'."
In contrast, Gordon does not
appear to have a job, rather, he is
usually seen sitting in a chair or
on the steps, reading a newspaper,
talking with children, telling them
stories and demonstrating new
concepts," said Harth.
She concluded her lecture with
a discussion of alternatives to
sexist literature.
"To begin with, pressure must
be put on school boards to scrap
the insulting readers and texts
now in use and adopt those which
show females in a more favorable
and realistic light."
Bibliographies such as the one
handed out at the lecture, Miss
Muffett Fights Back, must be
made known to teachers,
librarians and parents, said Harth.
"The most important remedy
for the state of children's
literature is to begin writing new
books and books by Canadians for
Canadians in particular.
She talked about a group called
the     Children's    Liberation
from jellybeans for Breakfast
These illustrations are from the non-sexist bibliography Little
Miss Muffet Fights Back compiled by the Feminists on Children's
Media, a collective of people interested in upgrading the portrayal
of girls and women in children's literature. It is available in the
women's studies office, SUB 218.
Workshop which operates out of
New York.
It is a group of women who are
already producing their own
books that "reflect the values that
are needed to create a communal
society."
"Books from other countries
like China may serve as a model,
although some are quite martial.
They present girls and boys
interacting on an equal basis.
"The last solution that I have
considered is allowing children to
write their own books, select
them and make their own
judgments for them," said Harth.
She cited several examples of
books of this nature. One, The
Boronian War, is a trilogy by a
nine-year-old boy, William
Robson, who typed, bound and
illustrated his books himself.
"Considering the state of
affairs we have seen created by
adult writers of children's books, I
am convinced that letting ctiiidren
have a try could do nothing but
improve the situation."
New head
The geology department has a
new head.
The appointment of Robert
Wynde-Edwards who is currently
geology department head at
Queen's University in Kingston,
Ont., takes effect on July 1, 1972,
He will succeed acting
department head James Murray
who took over when former head
William   Matthews  resigned.
Wynne-Edwards, who has
taught since receiving his Ph.D. in
1959, has published more than 40
articles.
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