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The Ubyssey Sep 15, 1987

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 the Ubyssey
Birds
win
again,
page 8
A Trojan Special
Free condoms for all
By KINGA KRISTON
The Trojan horse came to the
AMS barbeque Friday but it was
filled with condoms, not soldiers.
As part of a publicity stunt to
promote AIDS awareness, several
students dressed as gladiators
threw 10,000 condoms and AIDS
pamphlets from a truck built into a
huge horse.
"Not everyone is going to go to
a lecture about safe sex but a lot of
people go to a barbeque, so this is a
good way to get to any unaware
people," said AMS director of
administration Tim Bird, one of
the horse's masterminds.
The condoms, not surprisingly, were Trojans: "Only the best
for UBC students? said Bird.
Most of the students at the
barbeque reacted favorably to the
stunt, agreeing with Bird that it
was a funny and clever way to
bring safe sex into the open.
But not all barbeque participants were amused.
"They are insulting these
peole's intelligence...I think everyone here is aware of the disease,"
said one woman who wanted to be
identified as Patricia. "Everyone
knows where to buy them if they
really want them," she said.
The awareness exercise cost
$1,450 of AMS funds.
"We tried to get a donation
from companies but they refused?
said finance director Don Isaak,
another of the horse's creators.
But Bird said the stunt was
not too expensive. "We got the next
best deal on condoms at fourteen
cents each instead of the nineteen
cents wholesale."
"It's hard to put a price on an
awareness stunt. Many people
entering the university are often
uneducated and sheltered about
safe sex and it's the responsibility
of older students to educate them,"
Bird said.
"You have to approach different people in different ways, and
many of the people at the barbeq ue
appreciated the humor. The
people who would have negative
views about this are not the people
we were trying to reach."
"If even one out of twenty
people read the literature then
it will have been worth it," said
Bird.
K.D. LANG HAS that twang
steva chan photo
TIM BIRD IN past life as Greek warrior
J. lyaN photo
Conference draws fire from students
By ROSS McLAREN
The anti-apartheid group at
UBC has withdrawn their endorsement of the Parallel Commonwealth Conference and other
student anti-apartheid groups
may follow.
The UBC Students for a Free
Southern Africa objects that the
African National Congress and
the South West Africa Peoples
Organization were the only African liberation movements invited
to speak at the National Conference closing meeting.
Other liberation movements,
including the Pan Africanist Congress, the Black Consciousness
Movement, and the South West
African   National   Union,     were
Vol. 70, No. 3
denied that privilege.
"The decision to invite the
ANC and SWAPO was a racist one
because it gives the impression
that South Africans support one
liberation movement," said Michael Moeti, UBC SFSA member.
"It undermines the right of
people to decide freely what sort of
government they want in S.A.,"
Moeti said.
But John Graham of Oxfam
disagrees. "It is clear that the
ANC and SWAPO are legitimate
representatives. Only people from
rival groups (in South Africa) do
not see that," he said.
"Some groups are working
with Michael (Moeti) against the
conference  but  it  will   have  no
impact."
"These guys don't represent
broad groups of people. These
groups formed themselves to
speak" for the individuals, said
Graham.
Although the UBC SFSA will
not boycott the conference, other
student anti-apartheid groups
will decide in the coming weeks
whether or not to participate.
Bethuel Mujetenga, president of the B.C. Student Coalition
Against Apartheid, said that "several anti-apartheid groups are
prepared to take serious action —
either by boycotting the conference or protesting at the conference itself."
Mujetenga refused to identify
these groups but said they had
approached the B.C. SCAA to boycott the conference and he said
that the B.C. SCAA would decide
on a course of action September 22.
The student anti-apartheid
groups are angry at the Canadian
Council for International Cooperation because it was their
decision, later approved by the
Anti-Apartheid Network, to invite
only the ANC and SWAPO. Although the AAN co-sponsors the
conference, the CCIC contributed
$100,000 and had exclusive control over the National
Conference's program.
According to John Weir, B.C.
Federation of Labor representative on the AAN, "the one who pays
the shot has more to say."
But Moeti said that the conference is illegal because a nonprofit agency organized a partisan
conference with government
money.
"If I decided to take legal action against the CCIC, I have no
doubt I'd win because the CCIC
has violated the spirit of their
constitution," said Moeti.
The conference is to be amajor
media event to promote the anti-
apartheid movement in Canada.
Speakers at the conference will
include Kenneth Kaunda, president of the Organization of African
Unity, Alan Boesak, chair United
Democratic Front, and Robert
Mugabe, president of Zimbabwe.
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, Septembr 15,1987 BETWEEN
CLASSES
TODAY
CITR-UBC RADIO
Orientation meeting for new
members, we need volunteers who
want to get in the way, drop by and
find out what we're about, sign up
and be misled anytime between 3
and 5 p.m., Tuesday, SUB 207/209.
United Church Campus Ministry
"Welcome Back Social" - potluck
dinner, all welcome, 6:00 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
Informal worship and discussion at
noon, all welcome, regardless of
denomination.
DISABLED STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General Meeting, 12:30 p.m.,SUB
212.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Co-op Supper, 6 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre, 5885 University
Blvd.
THE UBYSSEY
Photography Meeting - Learn how
to take photos for the vilest rag,
3:30 p.m., SUB 247K.
CITR-UBC RADIO
Beer Garden & Cider Oasis,
experience the wild sounds oflocal
rock bands - Oversoul Seven, Roots
Roundup, and Screaming Siren,
come and enjoy the lush
surroundings, well even sign-up
and mislead new members, 3:00-
6:00 p.m., SUB 207/209.
UNDERGRADUATE HOCKEY
Drop-in game, beginners' clinic,
7:00 p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre
WEDNESDAY
UBC NEW DEMOCRATS
Organizational meeting for Club
Days, 12:30 p.m., SUB 249F.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN
RESEARCH
Scminar-"Singapore's Political
Leadership in the Post Lee-Kuan
Yew Fra" by Dr. SHEE Poon-Kim,
Senior Lecturer, Department of
Political Science, Singapore
National University, 12:30-1:30
p.m., Seminar room 604, Asian
Centre.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General Meeting, 12:30 p.m., Chem
150
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN
CLUB
Home Bible Study, 7:00 p.m., 1868
Knox Road.
FILM SOCIETY
Film Showing: Alain Renais*
STAVISKY, 7:00 and 9:30, SUB
Theatre.
THE UBYSSEY
Staff meeting - all welcome, 3:30
p.m.,SUB241K.
THURSDAY
CANADIAN CROSSROADS
INTERNATIONAL (C.C.I.)
Information Night - all welcome!
7:45 p.m.in the Boardroom at
International House.  >
We were wrong when we reported Sept.9th that the used
book store accepts returns
until Oct. 9. The store is in fact
open from Oct. 2 to Oct. 9 exclusively to allow students to retrieve their unsold books. The
reporter who wrote the story
has been returned to the Harlequin Romance section.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION
CLUB
Public Lecture: Life in South
Africa As It Really Is - with South
African guest speaker: Michael
Boon, noon, Buchanan Block B,
Rm 226.
UBC STAMP CLUB
Canada at Face Pre Strike Sale,
visitors welcome, noon at UBC
International House, Boardroom.
FRIDAY
Lutheran Student movement
T.G.I.F., 4:30 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Organizational meeting- speaker
Carol Everett, former director of
four abortion clinics, 12:30 p.m.,
SUB 211.
HOT
FLASHES
Volunteer to Beat Mental
Illness
Volunteers are needed by
the Vancouver-Burnaby
branch of the Canadian
Mental Health Association
to work on a one-to-one basis
with adults who have had
treatment for a mental illness. Those volunteering
meet with the clients two to
five hours a week and assist
them in developing everyday skills through social,
recreational, or educational
activities. A preliminary
training course is provided.
Please call the Volunteer
Coordinator at 734-2344.
Long Term Care Patients
Need Help
The Vancouver Health Department is recruiting volunteers for the Long Term
Care Program. For two
hours a week, volunteers
will   work   in   conjunction
THE CLASSIFIEDS
Rates: AMS Card Holders-3
lines, $3.00, additional lines,
600. Commercial - 3 lines,
$5.00, additional lines, 750.
(10% DISCOUNT ON 25
ISSUES OR MORE)
Classified ads are payable in advance.
Deadline is 10:00 a.m. on the day before
publication. Publications Room 266,
S.U.B., UBC, Van., B. C. V6T2A7
5-COMING EVENTS
TOUR TIME
at Main & Sedgewick
LIBRARIES
Every Day This Week
10:30 am & 12:30 pm
Meet in Main Library Entrance
11 - FOR SALE - PRIVATE
PONTIAC ASTRE 1976, 2 dr. hateh,
automatic, full instrumentation. 2 new
snows & 1 add. tire & other parts. 62,000
km. $850. Contact Anna 228-4711 local
210 Days.
1976 ALFA ROMEO ALFETTA, 5 SPD.,
Sunroof, Pirellis, lOw miles, runs perfect,
Asking $2975 Ph. 731-7545.
FOR SALE Brand new queen size deluxe
futon, never been used, new $185. Asking
$140 obo Call 299-3613.
TYPEWRITER FOR SALE. Electric,
erase function etc. Like new. $200.00
o.b.o. Call 688-3242 after 5 P.M..
76 FORD TORINO EXC. COND. 4 door,
low mileage, reliable, power brakes. Only
$000 obo. Call 731-4026.
77 TOYOTA HATCHBACK for tho price
of a buspass Engine good, body needs
some work. 224-6429 eves.
1976 COLT (MITSUBISHI) 5 SPD. Manual trans. /FM. New radials. 4'dr. exc.
cond. $1350. 281-0013.
15- FOUND
FOUND AT AMS BarBQ. Key chain with
zodiac sign. Phone Greg 732-4185.
20-HOUSING
AFFORDABLE, ON CAMPUS Housing
Full time cook, large common area,, pay
TV - Room and board -$1400 per term-
some singles avail, -call 224-9866 Fred or
Rusty.
1 BR- S/C bsmt. suite for mature female
student, N/S $200/mo in exchange for
some after school/eves companionship for
13 yr. old girl. Phone 263-9182 Kerrisdale.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS BY Judy Alexander.
Grad of Julliard School of Music & member of B. C. Reg. Music Teachers Assoc.
321-4809 Oakridge.
30-JOBS
FUNK NIGHTCLUB downtown requires
exp. waiter/esses, buspeople. Apply Wed
or Thurs 9-11 pm. 871 Beatty.
NORTH VAN, M/F companion, twice
weekly for 28 yr. old young lady severely
handicapped with M.S. in Evergreen
House adjacent to LGH, minimum wage
980-2161 mornings only.
BABYSITTER WANTED, 7-9AM, 3 4
mornings per wk. for 3 1/2 yr. old boy $4/
hr. & breakfast. Call Susan 737-8310 own
child OK. 4th/Alma area.
EINSTEIN'S THE SCIENCE CENTRE
Hiring now, need P/T help must have science & education background-mail resume to 4424 Dunbar St.
MONITORING STATION OPERATOR
Work any shift or combo, of Mon.-Fri 6-9
a.m. or 10 p.m.-l a.m.; Sat. & Sun. 7 a.m.-
3 p.m. or 3 p.m.-l 1 p.m. Exc. English &
phone manner. Call Donna 731-8204.
FOAM CORE FUTON AND SOFABED    35 - LOST
for sale, like new $145. Call After 5:30    	
733-6994 Elizabeth.
ASSORTMENT  OF  MATTRESSES   Sc
single box spring 321-0150 or 263-0765.
VERY VALUABLE - GOLD ST. Christophers medallion and chain. Lost Friday
nite somewhere around the SUB. Sentimental value-Steve 222-4741.
70 - SERVICES
United and Presbyterian.
A Christian Community of Faith representing the Reformed & Evangelical traditions
INVITES YOU TO JOIN US IN WORSHIP
IN TI IE CHAPEL OF THE EPIPHANY
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF THEOLOGY
6050 CHANCELLOR BLVD
SUNDAYS -10:30 a.m.
MINISTER: REV. ALAN REYNOLDS
CHURCH OFFICE PHONE: 224-7011
SHOPPING HEADS STOP WASTING
cents. Join the dancing carrots at Agora
Food Co-op. Dunbar _ 17th.
FUND RAISER WITH expertise in Indian Act & Canadian Granting Agencies
etc. can obtain commissioned freelance
Assoc, with a native group. Call McCoy,
580-3484.
75-WANTED
RINGETTE COACHES
& REFS REQUIRED
For Kits & Riley Park
Arena Teams
(Players 5-12 yrs. of age)
274-5982 - Peter
85 - TYPING
WORDPROCESSING, essays & thesis
by exp. wordprocessor & spcllchecked.
521-8055.
TYPEWRITING-MINIMUM   NOTICE.
SERVICE essays _ resumes scripts, Proof
reading, writing/research help. 327-0425
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: student
discounts. Laser _ letter quality printers.
10th & Discovery 222-2122
JUDITH   FILTNESS,   3206   W.   38TH
AVE  263-0351   experienced  &  accurate
student rates available.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 YRS exp.
word proc. _ IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson 228-8346
ACCURATE REPORTS.
Broadway & Granville.
732-4426. Student rates available.
with the Activities Coordinators to organize programs
for Seniors, help with outings, parties, etc. and work
on a one to one basis in a
Community Centre setting.
Please contact Chris at 734-
1221.
Volunteers Wanted for
Festival
Urbanarium Festival '87
needs volunteers to work: at
info booths in shopping
malls; as hosts/hostesses at
the Festival; and model
builders to w6rk on a city
model. This festive exhibition of art, architecture and
urban planning runs from
October 2-17, in Vancouver.
Call 684-9932.
Be a Rhodes Scholar
For information and application for one of the eleven
Rhodes Scholarships to be
awarded to Canadian students this fall, contact Peter
D. Fairey at 669-2611.
Deadline: Oct. 23, 1987.
Sisters Needed
Women aged 20 and over
with 5 hours a week to share
in a 1-1 frienship with a
Little Sister age 7-17. One
year commitment. Call Big
Sisters of B.C. at 873-4525.
im:
m
APPLICATIONS
are now being accepted
for
5 positions on the
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
and 1 position
for
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR
OF FINANCE
Applications and further information can be
obtained in the Administrative Assistant's office,
SUB Room 238.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED NO
LATER THAN 4:00 p.m. FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER
25,1987 TO SUB ROOM 238.
THE
• l •
BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIALS
LOOSE LEAF PAPER
300 SHEET REFILL
SPECIAL    ^S,!
400 SHEET REFILL
SPECIAL    'O
1 INCH
VINYL
BINDER
$189
SPECIAL
COLOURFUL, PICTURESQUE
CALENDARS
20% OFF
REGULAR PRICES
THE ONE-OF-A-KIND ON-CAMPUS STUDENT STORE
COLLECT
THUNDERBUCKS
YOU CAN SAVE UP TO
20% OFF YOUR PURCHASES
Lower Level
Student Union
Building, UBC
*19° <"*'
S100
$190
THE   THUNDERBIRD  SHOP
FEATURING
UBC CRESTED
-Shirts,
 Sweatshirts,
PGnmons   & Sweatpants
224-1911
Monday - Friday
8:00 am - 6:00 pm
Sat. 10 am - 5 pm
Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
September 15,1987 Applications for Ten Positions on the 1987/88
AMS SUB
SECURITY TEAM
Are Now Being Accepted
The Security Team works Friday, Saturday, and
other designated days in the Student IJnion
Building. The Team is responsible for assisting the
Proctor in protecting SUB from vandalism, aiding
security teams hired for any SUB function and
implementing SAC policy in SUB.
Application forms are now available in the AMS
Executive secretary's office , SUB room 238.
These positions are open to male and female
U.B.C. students.
APPLICATIONS MUST BE RETURNED
BY
4P.M. Friday September 18 1987
TIRED OF WAITING IN LINE
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This year use
a calculator
you can
count on.
A cheap calculator can cost you plenty. But a
Hewlett-Packard pays. Time and again. Engineers,
scientists and business students know HP calculators
have the built-in power they need to cut calculating
time. Start the school year off right. Get a calculator
you can depend on - and, next time, breeze.
__!
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SPECIAL BACK-TO-SCHOOL SALE PRICES!
In addition to our special prices,
H. P. will give you:
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- Free Advantage Module on an HP41CV or 41CX.
PRICES VALID UNTIL OCT. 31/87.
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299-5794 ™™
Two makes one
By MICHAEL SMART
The AMS Students' Council
resolved last week to "express concern" over current proposals to
divide Point Grey riding in two.
Although the motion did not
mention political parties, AMS
External Affairs Coordinator
Caroline Rigg said that it is directed at the recommendations of
the local Social Credit riding association, which would lump UBC
residence students with voters in
the affluent Dunbar and Kerrisdale neighbourhoods, and separate them from other students living in the Kitsilano area.
Rigg supports instead the
proposal of Point Grey New Democrats, which would include the
UBC residences with voters in
Kitsilano and the northern half of
the present riding.
"The NDP proposal makes
most sense to me," Rigg said. "We
assume there are a lot of students
living in Kits — those people
should be voting for the same
candidates as students at UBC."
The two party's proposals
were presented to the Royal
Commission on Election Bounda*
ries during August. The commission has been mandated by the
provincial government to split in
two Point Grey and all other dual-
member ridings in British Columbia.
Council member Byron Berry,
who seconded the motion in council, expressed pessimism about influencing the final decision on
Point Grey's boundaries.
He suggested the royal
commission, which isa quasi-judicial body autonomous from the
government, will likely be biased
toward the governing Socred
party, and would therefore draw
the boundaries to undermine the
electoral voice of students.
"The commission is not what
you would call independent,"
Berry said. "The Socreds lost a
seat in Point Grey in the last election, and they'll do whatever it can
to get it back."
Rigg said the AMS would attempt to influence the decision by
lobbying Point Grey's two sitting
MLAs, Socred Kim Campbell and
New Democrat Darlene Marzari.
She is also considering submitting
a brief to the royal commission,
she said.
T-BIRDS WIN another one (see story page 8)
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Next time your mouth
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GREAT COPIES GREAT PEOPLE
5706 University Blvd.
222-1688
MTH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
The UBYSSEY Presents
NO FUN
Live In Concert-
In the UBYSSEY office
SUB 241k
3:30-7:30 p.m.
Friday September
18th
"Come On Kids
write like us"
Cheap Bzzr
September 15,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 Come hear
-Rice Broocks-
• Speaks to NFL & NBA teams
• Author
• T.V. show co-host
• Popular campus speaker
September 22,23,24, & 25
in
Woodward 4 at 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by the Maranatha Christian Club    Phone 228-8554
NOW OPEN
Volunteer connections
is here to help YOU find
exciting and challenging
volunteer opportunities.
Call 228-3811 or come to
Room 200, Brock Hall
No'Band Aid' needed
U.B.C.
BOOKSTORE
ByMARY McALISTER
Three delegates to last month's
YWCA World Council meeting
presented their views on "development with justice" at a reception
held at the Vancouver YWCA
Thursday night.
"We don't want what is called
Band Aid, we want aid that will
help solve the root cause of the
problems? said Kate Parks, Council delegate from Ghana.
Some of the most serious of
these problems were described by
a delegate from South Africa who
will be called Margaret. Her real
name cannot be used for fear of
government recriminations upon
her return.
The YWCA in her township
decided to take action against the
number of children who are being
detained in South Africa. "Our
estimate is 25,000 children. We
embarked on a campaign called
'Free the Children'" she said.
They produced t-shirts and
stickers and began educating
people in the townships. "But then
the government banned the t-
shirts so that they couldn't be
worn" she said.
The campaign and the money
invested in it was lost after the
government prohibited discussion
of the detention of children.
. Margaret herself is in danger of
being detained when she returns.
"The State of Emergency means
you can be taken at any time if the
government suspects you of being
an activist. They will take you and
keep you in detention for maybe
four or six months without a lawyer or an explanation" she said.
Margaret brought a strong recommendation to the Council to
support international sanctions
against South Africa.
"We become very bitter at countries like Britain and the United
States who have a lot of invest
ment in South Africa (and don't
want to divest)," she said. "We are
not going to suffer from sanctions
and disinvestment from South
Africa. We are already dead so you
can't kill a dead person."
Margaret endorsed sanctions
as the only peaceful way to promote change in South Africa, but
she sugested that young blacks in
South Africa no longer have the
patience for these methods.
"The youth are prepared to die
and they are using stones to fight
against the guns," she said.
All three women were optimistic about the outcome of the Council Meeting.
Pauline Mackay, a delegate
from New Zealand, said Networking was the most beneficial part of
the Council.
She described how a Native
Canadian delegate and an indigenous woman from New Zealand,
met at the Council and   shared
many concerns that they di-
covered they had in common.
"The big myth in New Zealand
is that they have the greatest race
relations in the world," said
Mackay.
Her local YWCA is part of a
movement to encourage a closer
analysis of New Zealand's colonial
history.
Elate Parks described how the
five priorities at the conference -
health, environment, peace, human rights, and refugees - are all
linked together with economic
development.
"In Ghana, our development is
linked up with the whole world,"
said Parks. The price of cocoa,
Ghana's main product, is determined by the world market so the
economic impact is out of the
hands of the Ghanians.
"We cannot run away from the
fact that economic development is
tied up with personal development," Parks said. 	
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SEPT. 30,1987
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
By-laws pass
at AMS Bar-B-Q
ByELYNN RICHTER ing a vote at a party) has potential
By ELYNN RICHTER
Inebriated students enthusiasti-
• cally amended their student society code and bylaws between
bands during last Friday's BarBQ.
AMS vice president Jody Woodland said the vote had to be held in
conjunction with the barbecue
because ten per cent of the active
members of the society must be
present in order to amend the
constitution.
"If I held a Special General Meeting by itself nobody would come,"
said Woodland.
The changes were "basically innocuous and dull," said Woodland.
"The only significant amendment
was one that I hope no one would,
argue with - that was enshrining
the AMS student bursary fund in
the constitution and by-laws."
"I suppose (the practice of hold
ing a vote at a party) has potential
for abuse - certainly I could have
been more thorough in advertising
it," said Woodland.
But he thinks the vote was fair.
"There was notice of the meeting
given and there was enough time
for those interested to read the
posted amendments" since they
were posted at the end of August,
he said.
When asked why the amendments were not read aloud before
the vote, Woodland said, "it would
have taken 12-15 minutes to read
the six pages of amendments and
it would have turned into a joke,
illiciting boos and hisses (from the
students)."
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HAPPY YOUNGSTER ABOUT to go home to experiment with new toy
GMAT     LSAT      GRE
(Graduate Management
Admission Test)
(Law School Admission Test)
(Graduate Record Exam)
WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
University of British Columbia
Next courses October 2,3,4
• Includes Sexton text book, lectures and
• One year personalized services.
_ • Instructors hold PhD, MBA or LLB. -
(Sexton Educational Centers .J0
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION        \^)
CALL
222-8272
UBC BOOKSTORE
RETURN POLICY
COURSEBOOKS
Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by the original receipt)
for full refund any time up to the following session deadlines:
FALL SESSION
OCTOBER 2,1987
WINTER SESSION    JANUARY 29,1987
SPRING SESSION     MAY 14,1987
SUMMER SESSION  JULY 16,1987
After the respective deadline all course books will be non-returnable.
Books must be unmarked and saleable-as-new condition.
NON-COURSE BOOKS, MERCHANDISE & SUPPLIES
Rulums will normally be accepted up to 10 days from date of purchase, when
accompanied by SALES REO-IIT.
NO RETURNS on sale items, special orders, electronic and computer goods,
lined shorts, bathing suits and swimming accessories.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR RECEIPT
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND
NO EXCEPTIONS
£Ct& BOOKSTORE
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION /
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BEST WISHES FOR A GREAT YEAR!
We Are Happy To Announce
The Appointment of Our New
Executive Director
DR. MORDEHAI WOSK
Please Drop In and Say Hello
(We're Right Behind Brock Hall)
This year, we look forward to serving you with:
* HOME COOKED LUNCHES
* SOCIAL AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS
' A COUNSELLING SERVICE
* AND MUCH MORE
Stay Tuned for Dates
For more information, phone 224-2512
SORORITIES OF UBC
MAKE THE MOST OUT
OF U.B.C. THIS YEAR!
- Meet new people
- Enjoy the parties
- Exchanges with fraternities
- Participate  in charity fundraising  &
volunteer in community
- Intramural sports and activities
- Develop and exercise leadership skills
- But most of all in a sorority you will
form special friendships that will last a
lifetime
Come see what we're all about:
Sunday tours: Sept. 20th 10 am
at International House
For more information call:
Carey    - 266-2169
Cynthia - 986-2540
Janice   - 732-0471
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Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
September 15,1987 September 15,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 editorial
{■^mffi :m v/m>r:Jr 4®&m«r®°? cm rVoTfkl
Motives pure but
methods faulty
wu^isir%w^^ ^^-^^
On Friday the AMS invited us to a great party.
We danced a lot, drank a lot, and had a rollicking
good time.
But a lot of people left the party muttering
about having voted for some amendments they
knew nothing about.
It's too bad the AMS didn't take more time to
think about it because the idea was really rather
good.
It was one of the few ways to reach quorum on
minor constitutional changes. No student would
turn out to vote on the rewording of bylaw 999.75.
And the constitution did need some cleaning. The
motions that passed will make the constitution
more readable and therefore more accessible to
students.
And those who claim that democracy was further battered by not having the motions read aloud
are kidding themselves. To expect people to vote
knowledgeably on motions yelled over a microphone for 15 minutes is ludicrous. More likely Jody
Woodland would have been yanked off the stage.
The motives behind the AMS actions were
probably pure, but their method weren't.
A minimum of poorly distributed posters and
miserable advertisingleft the AMS open to charges
of undemocratic action. Few people at the concrt
knew there was going to be a vote, and few noticed
the lists of resolutions tacked inconspicuously to
the fence.
It looked a lot like Council was trying to pull
a fast one on the students without anyone noticing.
As it turned out, the resolutions dealt with
fairly insignificant "housekeeping" motions, making small changes to the wording of some of the bylaws.
But for all anyone knew the motion was to
impeach the entire council.
It's a scary idea.
THE UBYSSEY
September 15,1987
A
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma
Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and not necassarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is
a member of Canadian University Press. The
editorial office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union
Building. Editorial Department phone 228-
2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Sarah X, Corinne Bjorge, Jeremy
Fraser, Jennefer Lyall, Kivan Kennedy, Greg
Davis, Paula Poikonen, Deanne Mould, George
Oliver, Victor Wong, Alexandra Johnson, Roger
Kanno, Laura Busheikin, Tom Bode, Michail
Smart, Ross McLaren, Mary McAlister, Peter
McDougal, Kathy Chung, David Young.
The University of British Columbia
Frederic Wood Theatre
Presents
A Doll's House
by Henrik Ibsen
Directed by Charles McFarland
September 16-26
Special Previews - Sept. 16 & 17
2 for the price of 1 regular admission
Curtain: 8pm
Matinees :   Sat. 19th & Sat 26th - 2pm
Thurs 24th - 12:30 pm
Student Season Tickets - 4 Plays for $15
A Doll's House                                              Juno and Ihe Paycock
Ibsen September 16-26                            O'Casey January 13-23
The Collected Works of Billy the Kid            A Flea In Her Ear
**-                                                                                                                          J
Box Office • Frederic Wood Theatre • Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre
SALE
OF UNCLAIMED
LOST & FOUND ARTICLES
Wed. Sept. 16
11:00 am. to 1:00 p.m,
BROCK HALL
ROOM 208
CAN YOU ENROL FOR A McGILL CA?
You can, if you have an undergraduate degree in any discipline.
You can start in May, September, or January on a full-time or
part-time basis.
COME TO OUR INFORMATION SESSION
TUESDAY, 15 SEPTEMBER 1987
2:00 P.M. - 4:00 P.M.
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
BROCK HALL - ROOM 110
or please write to or telephone: (514) 398 - 6154
McGill University
Chartered Accountancy Department
Centre for Continuing Education
3461 McTavish Street
Montreal, Quebec
H3A1Y1
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YOU CAN ORDER ANY TWO ITEMS FROM
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222-0001
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Fri. - Sat. 4:00 p.m: - 2:00 a.m.
PIZZA • PASTA • BBQ RIBS & CHICKEN
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
September 15,1987 1.
2.
3.
UBC GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING
Friday, Sept 18,1987 - 4 p.m. -
Graduate Student Centre Dining Room
AGENDA
Report of Council.
Introduction of executive.
Motions: Special resolutions (these require a 75% vote in favour and quorum).
I. CONSTITUTIONAL CHANGE TO QUALIFY FOR SPECIAL TAX STATUS:
i) To amend section #2 of the Constitution of the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre
Society so as to read as follows: "The purposes of the Society are:
a) to promote & serve the academic, social, intellectual, cultural & recreational interests of its
members, the University of B.C. and persons associated therewith, and without restricting
the generality of the foregoing, in particular, to promote inter-departmental activities within
the University.
b) to promote the principle and practice of graduate student representation at all levels of
decision making at the University of B.C. and at all agencies or other bodies which deliberate on the affairs of graduate students,
c) to provide, maintain and operate the Thea Koerner House Graduate Student Centre as a
centre for the recreation and convenience of members of the Society and their guests,
d) to do everything incidental and necessary to promote and attain the foregoing purposes,
"and
e) to carry out the foregoing without purpose of gain for its members, and
f) to use any and all profits or accretions to the Society for the promotion and attainment of the
foregoing p urposes."
II. FEE RESOLUTION
To amend Bylaw 2.9 (a) to read: "Fees for ordinary members may be set from time to time by
ordinary resolution of the ordinary members through referendum and subject to the approval of
the Board of Governors of the University.
DI. EXTERNAL AFFAIRS DIRECTOR
To amend the Bylaws to add as Bylaw 6.6 (g), "The external Affairs Director shall:
i) be the chairperson of the External Affairs Committee,
ii) be responsible for the representation of the Society to external organizations,
iii) develop and maintain contacts with organizations that deliberate on the affairs of graduate
students, and
iv) perform such other duties as directed by the council or members.
AND to add to the list of officers in Bylaw 6: Officers
g) External Affairs Director
IV. FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES REPS.
a) "To amend the Bylaws to add the following as voting members of the Council"
5.2 a) v) the graduate student representatives in the Faculty of Graduate Studies".
V. HOUSE COMMITTEE AMENDMENTS:
"To amend the Constitution and Bylaws to add the following items to Bylaw 7, House Committee
#2 to read:  "the House Committee shall:
e) have primary responsibility and authority for capital improvements to the building subject to
Council Approval".
0   have responsibility for hiring of permanent staff subject to council Approval".
RECEPTION FOLLOWING WITH
COMPLIMENTARY BAR
THIS PARTY
COULD CHANGE
YOUR LIFE
If you are in third or fourth year and you're looking for a
career in the business world, come see us. We're Chartered
Accountants from firms downtown and in the Lower Mainland
and we'll be on campus September 15 to talk about career
possibilities in one of the most stable professions - chartered
accountancy.
There are jobs available in chartered accountancy for
non-Commerce grads from all disciplines. Chartered
Accountants come from all backgrounds, bringing new skills
and diversity to this growing, dynamic profession.
Chartered Accountants set the standard for accounting
and auditing in Canada and, because of their education and
training, are in demand by business around the world.
Here is an opportunity to talk to CAs on an informal
basis and explore opportunities. You may be an ideal
candidate for Canada's fastest-growing profession.
You're invited to:
Music Room
UBC Faculty Club
Tuesday, September 15
5- 7 p.m.
For more information contact Jan Arnold at 681-3264,
The Institute of Chartered Accountants of British Columbia
PA
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
of British Columbia
familiar with Eliot, Hamlet, and
Lennon.
The roles are all competently
performed and believable. One
weakness in the work is Skateboard, who was less well defined
than the other characters. Also,
there were enough instances when
the house was totally dark that in
the final blackout, the audience
didn't know the play had ended.
These two points aside, Eliot
in Purgatory is worthy of a viewing.
DELIGHTFUL PURGATORY
By KATHY CHUNG
A bureaucratic doctor and a
cop chase after John Lennon
for writing graffitti on the walls of
a subway. Meanwhile, T.S. Eliot
trades insults with Hamlet, whom
he had once criticized in an essay.
They engage in a duel with swords.
Later on, they are joined by John
Lennon, who challenges Eliot to a
poetry contest. A young woman
called Skateboard is enlisted to
help Hamlet judge the poems.
Are we in purgatory or underground in a post-nuclear Vancouver? Who will win the poetry contest? Will our four intrepid friends
triumph over the forces of authority and find an exit from this
strange netherland?
This is Eliot in Purgatory, a
play which is a mixture of comedy
and commentary. Playful jabs and
pokes are aimed at: nuclear arms,
popular music (and a certain popular musical), the mindlessness of
bureaucracy and famous persons.
It is fun and delightful; alkthe
more so because most of us, especially students, are emminently
To fringe
or not
to fringe
AUGUST 19
TUITION WAIVERS -
A FESTERING SORE
Calling tuition waivers for faculty
offspring "grossly unfair," graduate representative Kurt Prein-
spurg urged fellow council members to voice their protest during
the council meeting of August 19.
Council voted to circulate a petition during the month of September which called for faculty and
administration to "reconsider the
issue of tuition waivers for faculty
offspring."
Tuition waivers were part of a
wage agreement package passed
this summer.
THE BOTTOMLESS
POCKET
Director of finance Don Isaak
was authorized to spend another
$10,000 on a PMT camera "to
augment the current Desk Top
Publishing equipment." Isaak
said the switch-over to in-house
publishing equipment will save
the AMS over $60,000 this year.
Running tally of money spent to
date: $46,000.
EQUITY
In an effort to bring honoraria
levels at UBC in line with those at
other colleges and universities
across the country, council directed budget committee to under
take a review of all levels of honoraria and present their findings as
part of their budget proposal at the
jnext council meeting.
SEPTEMBER 9
'COUNCIL JAMS OUT
Council decided to "voice its concern" rather than take positive
action on a motion which might
divide the university vote.
A motion forwarded by UBC
student Freyja Bergthorson which
suggested alternative boundaries
for the Point Grey riding was
toned down to read "that Students
Council voice its concern with the
Point Grey riding with regards to
the proposed division and its apparent splitting up of the student
electorate."
Graduate representative Phil
Bennet said the division of
boundaries was dividing the vote
of people with "student-like" concerns, but council wanted more
information before supporting the
motion wholeheartedly.
MORE JOBS
UBC may soon become part of a
national student employment network if the federal government
commits funding to a computer
system at the University of Saskatchewan. Last week the University of Saskatchewan asked
Council to include UBC on a list of
schools interested in a system
which could match up students
and employers across the country
and help battle regional isolation.
Start-up costs are being sought
from the government and
operation costs would be paid by
participating colleges and universities.
DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Don isaak
QUOTE OF THE WEEK
"If I could find 10,000 (rubbers) I
would be a happy man."
- director of finance Don Isaak
on the difficulty of obtaining condoms to be distributed as part of an
AIDS awareness stunt.
WANT TO HELP?
VOLUNTEER
AT
SPEAKEASY
PEER COUNSELING AND INFORMATION
SUB 100B (MAIN CONCOURSE) ph: 228-3777
"STUDENTS HELPING STUDENTS"
September 15,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 Birds win bowl
BC university football supremecy belongs to UBC
SFU LINEMAN DINES on turf while
runs for the roses
quarterback Jordan Gagner (15)
steve chan photo
By VICTOR CHEW WONG
Saturday evening's Shrum
Bowl crowd of 7287 atBurnaby's
Swangard Stadium witnessed
the marriage of tactical brilliance
to an emotional drive that powered the 'Birds past SFU 14-0.
Ballyhooed to be a running
game because of the U.S.
ruleslfour downs), the first
Shrum Bowl in five years was
anything but that for an air-inclined UBC team.
Both teams opened their offensive sets with a series of running plays that were stalled by
each respective defense. The
change in tactics that ultimately
decided the game came half way
through the first half when head
coach Frank Smith shelved the
running plays in favor of the pass.
"We tried to establish a running game, but we were forced to
go to the air more than planned,"
said the game's most valuable
player, Mike Bellafontaine.
And go to the air they did.
Quarterback Jordan Gagner
fired passes with a marksman's
preci si on to his trio of wide receivers, Bellafontaine, Todd Wickman, and Craig Keller. Gagner
threw inside routes, outside
routes, and the long ball to accumulate 215 passing yards - a total
that would have been significantly higher were it not for several catches called back after
holding infractions and several
catchable passes that were
dropped.
The first UBC touchdown
came late in the second quarter
when running back Mark Petros,
the human bulldozer, ploughed
through two SFU linemen to
score.
The touchdown, in combination with superlative first half
defence, gave the 'Birds the emotional fire required to carry them
through the second half.
The second major came at
ON THE BOULEVARD
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5784 University Blvd  224-9116
UBC Village 224-1922
FOR DELICIOUS
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SOUP
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PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
HP-DAY
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 18th
10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m.
MEET OUR HEWLETT-PACKARD REPRESENTATIVE AND FACTORY EXPERT FROM THE U.S.!
Get a FREE Demonstration on any of our HP products! We're giving away HP Souvenirs on this day
only. Take the HP Advantage and find out more about HP-12C Rebate Offer and Free HP-41 Modules!
BOOKSTORE
228-4741
U.B.C.
BOOKSTORE
20°/o OFF CALCULATORS
H P-18C THE BUSINESS CONSULTAN
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MENUS AND SOFT KEYS
FORMULA SOLVER
BUILT-IN FUNCTIONS: Time value of money,
statistics and forecasting, cash flow analysis,
percentage changes, markups, clock & calendar,
appointment sitting, running number totals.
BATTERY POWER
REG. $311.00
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SALE ENDS SEPTEMBER 30,1987.
HP DAY - FRI., SEPT. 18
CTIS BOOKSTORE
228-4741
4:27 of the fourth quarter on a
similar play when Petros again
finished the drive.
Although it was the offence
who scored all the points, the
UBC defence must be credited for
their stingy performance.
The Thunderbird defensive
line gave up a meagre 38 yards to
Orviile Lee and the highly touted
Simon Fraser rushing game. Ron
Huryn, alone, penetrated the
Simon Frazer front line numerous times and registered a game
high of three quarterback sacks.
And when SFU quarterback
Darrvn Trainor did get any lofting ambitions there were the
likes of defensive backs Jordan
Leith and Terry Ai nge to deny the
passes.
The UBC defence limited
SFU to a total offence of only 137
yards.
The win puts the Thunderbirds at 3 - 0 for the season, and
extends their club winning streak
to a record 11 consecutive wins.
HORSE
DIES
BY TOM KAWESKI
UBC fans' expectations
were dashed by the forced dismantling of the fabled Trojan
Horse Saturday at the Shrum
Bowl.
"The police were worried
that it might cause a riot," said
Tim Bird, AMS director of administration and co-creator of
the quadriped.
The Horse, which first appeared at the AMS barbecue
distributing free condoms,
was brought to Swangard
Stadium to excite spectators.
"We had really big plans of
going in with this big Trojan
Horse...and driving (it)
around the stadium," said
Bird.
Bird and his partner Don
Isaak, AIMS director of finance, arrived at the gate with
their creation only to be met by
unenthused police, who ordered it destroyed. The RCMP
were afraid that the presence
of the Horse, standing 30 feet
tall, might so inflame the SFU
fans that they "would come
running from the stands to try
to tear it down" said Bird.
Bird protested that they
brought it only to get school
spirit off the ground for the
coming year.
Isaak and Bird spent the
next hour and a half dismantling their creation which took
them a week and a half of
twelve-hour days to erect.
"We didn't even get to
watch the game till the last
few minutes? said Bird.
GRAND OPENING
COPY SALE
COPIES
■ 8 1/2x11 20 lb. white or standard colors
• Sale ends September 27th
Hours: Manday-Tfcuridly t-t
Friday «•«
Safcirdiy-9undiy 11-6
2nd Floor, 2'.74 Western P»kway [a! U B C. aaoss from Crwron),
VancOUWr.BC  224-6225
September 15,1987

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