UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 15, 1966

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0128148.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128148.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0128148-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0128148-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0128148-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0128148-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0128148-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0128148-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0128148-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0128148.ris

Full Text

Array ® THE UBYSSEY s...
Vol. XLVIII, No. 49
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15,  1966
CA 4-3916
— powell hargrave photo
LITTLE LARRY SYMONS
. also to be evicted from Wesbrook Place
DEMOLISHED
FOR  HEALTH  CENTRE
They cant go home again
By CAROL WILSON
Little Pauline Sigurgeirson
and her brother Steven have
had to cope with the insecurity
of changing schools once this
year, and thanks to UBC's
housing administration, they
may have to do it again.
Pauline, 9, and Steven, 7,
started going to University
Hill Elementary school in January when their parents moved into one of the married
residences on Wesbrook Place.
But now, the Sigurgeirsons
will have to leave their home
by  May   15  because  10  huts
on Wesbrook Place will be
torn down this year to make
room for the new health center.
Housing czar Malcolm McGregor is not peturbed at the
prospect of moving the married students.
"Everything will go perfectly smoothly. If the huts
are removed, the people will
be looked after. We're not
quite sure what we will do,
but   we'll   do  something."
But the Sigurgeirsons don't
want to move.
Missing CNIB sign brings
dark days for caf operator
The CNIB sign is still nowhere in sight.
The five-foot high sign disappeared from its shelf-top
rack at the Canadian Institute for the Blind coffee shop in
the education building two weeks ago.
No one has seen it since, which creates special problems for shop operator Smitty Currie-Smit, who is blind
and depends on the sign to warn customers to announce
themselves.
The sign, which bears the letters CNIB, is valued at
$20.
"It's probably hanging among the panties in some
fraternity." CurrienSnut said.
"We are quite happy here,"
said Mlrs. William Sigurgei-
son. "We used to live in North
Surrey, and if we hadn't moved, Bill may have had to drop
the year. It was just costing
us too much for gas and rent."
"The move here was the
best thing we could have
done. University Hill school
is one of the best in Vancouver, and the children have improved greatly in their school-
work.
"We've been lucky in that
some friends of ours are going to England for the summer, and we will be able to
sublet their place. But we will
have to find somewhere to
live for the next two years,"
Mrs.   Sigurgeirson  said.
"The housing situation in
Vancouver is just terrible.
You can live outside the gat<$s
for $150 per month, if you
can find a place taking four
children."
The average rent on Wesbrook Place is $60 per month,
with about  $20  utilities.
The Sigurgeirsons are not
the only residents who are upset about their homes being
torn down.
(Continued on Page 2)
SEE: HOMELESS
No fee
if divisib
equitable
President John Macdonald said Monday there will be
no fee increase for UBC students next year — if division of
the increased provincial operating grant is "equitable."
"An equitable division should
UBC  Grits  get
national  prize
ensure no increase in tuition
fees next year," Macdonald
said.
"But until the $25 million
total operating grant is divided
among the three public universities it isn't possible to fix the
final effect on UBC finances."
In his budget speech in Victoria Friday Premier W. A. C.
Bennett announced a $25 million operating grant for B.C.'s
three universities.
INCREASED GRANT
Last year's operating grant
was $18.5 million.
The government's capital
grant for the three universities
remains at $8 million.
"The government has recognized by its one-third increase
in the operating grant that universities need substantial increases every year to meet rising costs of growth and development as well as increased
enrolments," Macdonald said.
DIVIDED
UBC's share of last year's
operating grant was $13 million.
Capital grant share was $4.2
million.
The grants will be divided
among UBC, Simon Fraser, and
Victoria College by the government's university financial
advisory board, chaired by
Dean F. N. C*>ant.
TELL SOON
The board announced its division of last year's grant April
11, but this year's announcement is expected sooner.
. UBC received $800 per student under last year's division.
Per capita grant for the other
universities  was   $1,000.
OTTAWA (UNS) — UBC's
Liberal club has been named
the best in Canada.
The award was made Sunday at the annual meeting of
the Canadian University
Liberal Federation.
The UBC club was cited for
"impact and effectiveness"
Universities were awarded
trophies and autographed
photos of Prime Minister
Lester Pearson.
Term break
gives harried
Pubsters rest
Over-wrought Ubyssey staffers are taking a holiday this
week along with the rest of
the campus.
The Ubyssey will not be published Thursday or Friday because of the mid-term break,
but, as a bonus, Canada's greatest will appear Wednesday.
For students who still haven't found where to pick up the
paper, here are the drop-off
points with the number delivered at each point:
Gym, 500; library, 80; Brock,
1,800; Buchanan upstairs, 1,000;
faculty club, 200; graduate students centre, 100; the quad,
500; engineering, 500; bus stop,
1,500; and Pondorosa, 1,000.
Education, 1,200; electrical
engineering, 300; Angus, 1,000;
Wesbrook, 500; General hospital, 100.
Council decides
"no thanks' Mac
By CAROL-ANNE BAKER
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Council Monday night turned down an opportunity to
thank UBC president John Macdonald for appearing at the
student forum last Tuesday.
AMS treasurer-elect Lome
Husdon asked if one of the
councillors could introduce a
motion to thank Macdonald for
coming to talk to the students.
Hudson is not officially a
council member yet and cannot
introduce motions.
"I'll do that," said engineering undergraduate society president Art Stevenson.
"I don't see why we should
thank him,", said AMS treasur
er Mike Sommers. "I think he
was lax for not doing it before."
"OK let's not use that motion," said AMS vice-president
Bob Cruise from the chair.
(AMS president Byron Hender <was in Montreal.)
"Have you got one less obsequious?"
No one had any _nore suggestions so the motion was
dropped and the meeting was
adjourned. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 15,  1966
— powell hargrave photo
PHRATERES SWEETHEART candidate Christine Currie, arts
II, was one of nine pretty Queen contestants taking part
in all-Phi fashion show Friday in Brock.
HOMELESS
(Continued from Page 1)
Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Tung
have lived in their home since
June. At that time, they were
told the huts would not be
torn down for at least two
years.
"We spent over $50 on materials and got paint from
housing to fix it up" Mrs.
Tung said, "and now we're
going to have to move out."
"We have no place to move
unless housing finds us a
place. Our name is on the
waiting list, but we haven't
heard anything." They have
one child.
Another family has lived
on campus for three and a
half years, one and a half of
them in their home on Wesbrook Place.
They were not told of the
possibility of having to move
when they moved in, but got
a notice from housing two
months ago, saying they must
move out by May 15. They
have three pre-school children.
If you're a swinger and
love fun and frolic, you
can join the
KEY CLUB
coming to the Campus.
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
•& TRADES
* RENTALS
* TERMS
•Ct REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
Dominion Securities
CORPORATION  LIMITED
A national investment dealer
will interview on the campus
February 22 - 25
for those interested in a career in the
financial business.
Province students brief
presented to Socreds
By ANNE BISHOP
Victoria College students,
although tired from their finally ended fee strike, haven't
given up.
A Victoria College delegation
led by AMS vice-president
John Thies, presented a brief
on university finances to a
Social Credit party meeting
Friday at the provincial legislature.
The delegation spoke to
about 15 Socred MLA's as the
party would not allow them
to meet a full caucus.
The brief was endorsed by
UBC's AMS council and student councils at Simon Fraser
and Notre Dame.
The brief urged:
A government study of motivational, social and environmental factors leading students
to seek higher education;
That universities to given
their requested operating
grants;
That the government provide
an equalizing grant for out-of-
town students, and;
That it consider financing
universities on a five-year plan.
Thies said the brief was well
received by the Socreds as being a more responsible approach to the situation than
protest marches or refusal to
pay fees.
"That's only natural," Thies
said. "A brief doesn't draw
the public attention the way a
march  does."
Because many of the Socreds present were from outlying areas, they were receptive to the point on grants for
out-of-town students Thies said.
But some felt granting universities all they request would
lead to outlandish demands, he
said.
Bert Price, MLA for Vancouver Burrard asked Thies
who had his small group represented and what right it
had in presenting the brief.
"Price was shot down when
we told him we were the democratically elected representatives of 3,000 students at Victoria and had the backing of
Shakespearian
comedy  coming
An all-UBC student cast
will present William Shakespeare's Love's Labor's Lost
Feb. 22 to 28.
The comedy will be played
in the Frederic Wood Theatre at 8:00 p.m. daily.
Tickets are available at
the Frederic Wood Theatre
office, room 207 at $1.75 for
adults and 75 cents for students.
Those thinking of attending the play are asked to
note the early curtain and to
remember that there will be
no performance Feb. 27
which is Sunday.
councils at UBC, SF and Notre
Dame — all the university students in B.C.
The AMS at Victoria College
is encouraging students to
speak to their MLAs and find
out what they intend to do
about the fee problem.
The Victoria delegation also
spoke to Liberal and New Democratic Party caucusses. The
NDP backed all the proposals,
advocating free tuition as well.
The Liberal reception was less
warm, Thies said, bdt agreed
with the brief in principal.
New
Shipment
of
Bod Boy
UNCREASABIE
LEG COVERS
Sharp looking,
stove cut $12.95
Also some in Bad Boy Blun-
derbus cut — (Guaranteed
even in bed).
Bad Boys Ragge Shoppe
315 SEYMOUR
Spring Formal Specials
Complete Outfit
Tuxedos Colored Tail*.
$6.50 Jackets $8.50
$7.50
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 Howe (Downstairs)      MU 3-2457
Exciting Music Happens When the
and the Boston Pops
Recorded "live" at Tanglewood
-the musical meeting of
America's foremost interpreter of popular classics
with the man who created so
many of them. In this new
album, Arthur Fiedler and
Duke Ellington play 12 of
the Duke's tunes, arranged
to make the most of the
combined talents of the
Boston Pops, the Duke's own
sidemen on bass and drums,
with the Duke himself at the
piano. Here's a new "big band
sound" that really takes off.
Included in this swinging
study of essential Ellingtonia
are "Caravan," "Mood Indigo," "Sophisticated Lady"
and "Satin Doll," with liner
notes by the Duke himself.
You'll love it madly.
RCA Victor A
WffThe most trusted name in sound     ^*> Tuesday, February 15, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
IT'S NOTHING NEW
Bell tolls old tale
of campus unrest
Campus unrest is nothing new, a newspaper owner told
a Vancouver Institute audience Saturday.
Max   Bell,   owner   of   eight i ■_________________________________-___________■_____
— norm betts photos
HIGH SCHOOL CO-EDS find point of interest during campus tour conducted Friday by
fourth-year chemical engineer Mike Robertson. Jackie Bennett (left) from Gladstone,
and Diane Watson from J. Lloyd Crowe in Trail, attended two-day high school
conference.
AMS election committee
decides to count votes
All the ballots in the first
vioe-presidential election will
be recounted under student
court supervision today.
The recount, which will include the previously disqualified cafeteria and education
polls, was authorized at the
student council meeting Monday night.
The two polls, which have
been kept sealed since the Wednesday election, were disqualified because campaign posters
had been left up in the vicinity
during voting.
Council also approved an
elections committee decision to
rescind returning officer James
Taylor's ruling that candidate
Charlie Boylan be disqualified
for handling in late the state
ment of his campaign expenditures.
The decision to recount was
made after a hectic meeting
Friday afternoon which saw
more complications added to
the already confused AMS second sla<e election.
When the candidates Boylan, Bill Grant, and Jim Taylor, arrived at the meeting they
heard committee chairman
Joan Curtis hand down a decision, made at an in-camera
meeting at noon, which disqualified all three on the basis
of election infractions concerning the display of posters.
The committee called for a
new election before March 31
and said candidates could challenge its decision by appealing
to student court.
The decision did not mention
Boylan's infraction or disqualification.
Boylan's representative, third
year law student Greg Morley
said the committee had not
given him a chance to state
Boylan's case and called for the
committee to reconsider its decision.
The election committee retired to an in-camera meeting
after an hour of discussion
with the candidates.
They returned after 90 minutes with the new decision.
In the first ballot of the election Boylan polled 1,442, Taylor   1,063,  and  Grant  1,044.
If a candidate wishes to challenge the result of the new
count, he must do so through
student court.
owner
Canadian daily newspapers including   the   Vancouver   Sun,
said dissent has been emanating from college campuses for
centuries.
Bell told 250 persons in
Freddy Wood Theatre the business community is concerned
with university development
problems.
"Businessmen are sympathetic to the needs of universities," he said.
However, off-campus comment is often rejected because
people outside the university
are looked on as "squares beneath contempt," he said.
Bell said professors seem
over-sensitive to outside criticism.
"Whenever a univerity is referred to as a knowledge factory, immediately a storm of
invective comes from students
and lecturers alike that the
whole system is being dehumanized."
Bell said businessmen are
very interested in the Bladen
report's recommendations of
increased aid to higher education.
At the same time, however,
universities ought to take
pains to reduce their operating
costs,  he said.
He pointed out that the
semester system, widely used
in the United States, is repor-
ed to save students $1,800 by
reducing time for a degree to
less than three years.
Three bleed
lots to shame
Engineer  wins
Athlone  award
A one-year fellowship is
taking a UBC engineering
graduate to Middlesex.
Randolph Young has been
asigned to Hoover Limited's
Perivale factory in Middlesex, England, on an Athlone
Fellowship.
The scheme offers awards
for study at a British university or in a British firm
to Canadian engineering
rraduates.
CONSENSUS AGREES  TO PREVIEW
Hender lifts arts hold
pale
rivals
Ii
By CAROL WILSON
The AMS suspension of all
arts undergraduate society
publications was lifted Firday
afternoon by AMS president
Byron Hender and co-ordinator Graeme Vance.
The suspension was lifted
when the AUS executive and
the editors of Consensus agreed
to terms laid down by the
AMS.
"We have agreed to send all
our copy to AMS lawyer Ben
Trevino and a lawyer of our
choice, Sid Simons, for a legal
opinion on the content before
it is published," said Nancy
Corbett, one of the editors of
the magazine.
The suspension was placed
on the AUS publications
Thursday night by Vance.
"There was some doubt of the
legality of the last articles,"
said new AUS president Ian
McDougall.
A recent article on board of
Arts program revampers
ask student articulation
Revamping UBC's arts program will be discussed at
4 p.m., Thursday in Bu. 205.
Walter P. Young and William J. Dusin, assistants to
arts dean Dennis Healy have invited all students to attend
the discussion the first day of the mid-term break.
"We hope for active student participation," Healy said.
The meetings are part of an attempt to answer student
questions about the new curriculum.
"We would like to meet the students and see what
they have to say," said Dusing.
governors member Einar Gunderson in the magazine caused
the resignation of arts president Chuck Campbell and the
firing and rehiring of editors
Cameron and Mrs. Corbett.
Vance said he suspended
publication after the confusion
following Campbell's resignation as president of AUS.
- "The Arts people were suspended in publication and all
other activities because at that
moment, fThusday, no one
knew just who was responsible
for the AUS," Vance said Monday.
"There was a president who
had allegedly resigned, a vice-
president who was allegedly a
president, and so on. No one
informed us of the situation.
"The whole thing wa_ a mess
so we put a stop to all activities
until they determined who was
responsible for the actions of
the AUS, and notified us accordingly."
The next issue of Consensus
will come out Feb. 22 Mrs.
Corbett said.
Three faculties have reached
morn than 100 per cent of their
quota in the current blood
drive.
The eight members of the
faculty of dentistry are in the
lead with 333 per cent of their
quota. The aggies follow with
188 per cent and applied
science has 106 per cent.
Law and grad studies are
bringing up the rear with 16
per cent and 15 per cent of
their  quotas   respectively.
The quotas are set at 20 per
cent of each faculty.
Acadia has the most bleeders
in residences with 203 per cent
of their quota, closely followed
by Fort Camp with 195 per
cent. Totem has 91 per cent,
nnd Lower Mall is lagging behind with 53 per cent.
The overall total reached by
Monday night was 63 per cent
of the quota.
The drive will continue on
Thursday and Friday of the
mid-term break.
Great say, senate
LONDON (CUP) — The
senate of the University of
Western Ontario should have
a greater say in policy and
should have a majority of its
members elected by and from
the faculty, says UWO's
faculty association.
ft
\J*'
HEART FUND campaigners
Billee Cohen, Bev Clarridge,
Norma Scott and Viki Hild-
reth — all of Alpha Phi sorority — will be after your
contributions on campus
Wednesday. mnnstY
Published Tuesday, Thursday* and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and for payment of postage In cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1966
"The responsibility ot the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,  1986
£__&«&«-$_**-t*t
. -.4. £«-*&_J. v _ ,_ ,,&k-J>»&A*4S^W---i
Relevance
That the Canadian native Indian, due to his environment, has been largely unable to take a meaningful place in Canadian society is a truism of the first
rank.
So when a group stops repeating the trite phrases
which compose the usual assessment of the situation, and
begin to do something concrete about it, the action
certainly deserves praise.
And this is especially true in the context of Canada's
universities, which so few of the native Indian popular
tion have been able to find the money or the educational
background to attend.
Ed Lavalle's Canadian Union of Students UBC committee is currently working on a co-op home project to
assist Indian girls to make the adjustment into the Big
Town.
Neither the scope of the operation (8 or 10 girls at a
time) nor the nature of the inhabitants (non-university
goers) at first sight suggests the project is relevant to
either the Indian problem or the university.
But of course, in both cases there is indeed something
important represented by the home.
For the girls, albeit they are few in number, the
center should provide the temporary stability they need
to find their way better through their new world.
As far as the university is concerned, the project
represents just one way in which CUS has began moving
out of tfieir Brock Hall offices into some relevance to
young Canada.
But CUS this year has done more than spark social
action off campus. Under Pat Kenniff and his Ottawa
action crew, the student union which after the pullout of
our French confreres was considered a dead duck has
come through squawking healthily.
On most campuses across the nation, student gov-
vernment elections are being fought on the issues of
student action and social action, which were originally
laid out at the CUS national convention last fall at
Lennoxville, Que.
The results, believe it or not have even showed here.
On considering the recent AMS campaigns, we can't
help by being struck by the differences between last
year's "more communication with the students" noise,
and this year's wide variety of rather more significant
issues such as fees, and participation in the university
community.
Much of the guidance and presentation of this new
relevance for student government has been done through
the efforts of Mr. Lavalle's committee in both providing
material and ideas, and by setting a good example.
Our hats are off to them.
IN  THE  EAR
BY IAN CAMERON
Ian just loves kids, too!
While   walking   along   the
other day I saw a little kid
looking  very despondent.
Now, I am not known for my
'kind   heart,
but    I    like
kids,   so   I
stopped to see
^'what     the
•   trouble was.
It   was   a
very      sad
I    story.
Cameron He had just
moved into the neighbourhood
and didn't know anyone, and
his father had bought him a
kite, and then his father had
gone somewhere and the kid
got the kite caught in a tree.
At this tale of woe, I broke
down and joined the kid in his
state of unhappiness.
Being in a new neighbourhood is tough enough without having an old man who
tries to help by buying a kite
for  you.
Buying a kite, for God's
sake! What kind of father
would buy a kite for his kid?
If I had asked my old man to
buy me a kite, he would have
laughed from here to next
year.
And then his old man
doesn't know that when you
move into a new neighbourhood the only thing to give
a kid that's any use is boxing
lessons.
Because the only thing to
do is to fight anyone who
wants to take you on, and
then you have a place in your
Oh,  really?   department
MIAMI, Fla. (AP) — Two
Canadian girls sentenced to
120 days in prison for dancing
on a rooftop and throwing
cherry bombs will get a new
trial today.
Municipal Judge Gerald
Tobin agreed Tuesday to hold
the trial in his hospital room.
Tobin ordered a new trial
last week after  lawyers for
the girls—Susanne and Moni-
que Bison of Montreal— said
they did not know the seriousness of the offence.
On the way to court Monday, where the new trial was
to be held, Tobin was hurt in
an auto accident.
— The Province,
Feb. 9, 1966
LETTERS  TO THE   EDITOR
A  'thank you   from   Mardi Gras  types
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
On behalf of the Mardi Gras
committee of the Greek Letters Society of the University
of British Columbia, I would
very much like to extend to
extend our sincere thanks for
your help in making the
special Mardi Gras edition
possible.
We appreciate the time and
energy spent by your staff in
aiding us to put together the
final product, which was most
successful.
Thank you again.
BUZ KNOTT
NEVER'
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir:
When will you stop referring to the University of Victoria as Victoria College?
SUSAN SCOTT
Class of '64
Ed. note: Never.
'ARITHMETIC PROBLEM'
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I hate to point out a rather
serious error in the arithmetic
of Kris Emmott.
In her article entitled "Coke
soak no joke", she sites the
result of a calculation in
which she multiplies 2.2 cents
by 50,000 as $11,000. She
states further that this amount
goes unjustifiably for food
services each year.
My arithmetic gives $1,100.
This is an excusable mistake
but one that must be corrected.
There is another point which
if. perhaps more obscure.
In this case, if $1,100 (corrected value) is being unjustifiably gotten from students
this does not mean that anyone makes $1,100 profit extra. This seems like a paradox
but I bet Kris can resolve it
with a bit of headbone exercise.
TONY MacPHEE
Grad Studies
new society. But buying a
kite.
And besides, this isn't the
time for kites anyway.
Kites don't come for
another month yet. Right now,
you play marbles. The ground
is just right for drawing a
circle  for  marbles.
And if you don't want to
play marbles, you could find
some guy who had a tobacco
can with a hole punched in
the top and if you dropped
a marble through the hole you
got ten marbles, if you dropped a marble through.
If you didn't, which was
always, he kept the marbles.
And this kid was flying a
kite, in an alley, with wires
all over the place.
"Go play marbles', I said
'I don't have any', he replied.
After I recovered from this
shock, I went back to my
apartment and get some marbles for him, and left him
looking for some other kid
to play  marbles with.
Meanwhile, excuse me. I
have to buy a bottle of Seagram's so I can give him a
marble bag.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
Newt  Ron Riter
Associate      ..  _ Georgs Reamsbottom
Cify Al Donald
Photo    Norm Baits
Sports -_    .  Ed Clark
Ass't News Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City       Danny Stoffman
Page Friday John Kelsey
Managing Ian Cameron
Features        Mike Bolton
CUP     . __ __ Don Hull
Besides indispensible Marilyn
Hill who types out those tween
classes on the back page only five
intrepid reporters were intrepid
enough to brave the sunshine and
show up Monday noon. The fearless five were Ann Bishop, Carol
Wilson, Inge Mueller, Val Zuker,
and Howie White. Carol-Anne
Baker and Doug Halveson recorded the fumblings in Brock later
on in the evening. But we still
love those who didn't come and
there's a party with all manner
of diversion Thursday night at
the   bureau.
According to the command of
our beloved editor, we are putting
out a paper on Wednesday. Tfii's
means TUESDAY IS A PRESS
DAY. Your press-ence (pun) is
required. Come down in cheering
eager throngs. Tuesday, February 15, 1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
(IftvLova    ®
CKdwermres eg*
pttY) A ^RV?
MJk
,J)MO,
NO  WORK
SECRET^ uil ^
CHinNFV-TOT, PAINT-POT;CHAMBER,ANDSTEV^ALL BUT ffl£VOT'S GOODFCR^U:
SUBJECf TO   mUlKMTWNS, DISTORT! ON jTTCAyOBKOME A MZmOE TO i
OF 77/V_F ^yg 5/^ AND F^TAiffi.'/ wtoD!^^^S^?T
la&eilbd innED/4]£&)
■atoothpaste tube cap full of sperh could re-populate the ea-rth—juobo sizf.or regular?
JEWRY
GOOFED
Jesus, come back to old fold
By THOMAS BEN  MOSHE     was to point out that the rules he started out and where but
The time has come for     laid   down  by   Moses   in   the for  a   few   of his   friends  he
the  jews to take back  Jesus,   wilderness weren't necessarily would have remained.
For   a   couple   of   thousand   applicable in the good  seden- As for Jewry, it is obvious
years,   the   great   message   of  tary life of Palestine the tribes jt has been following the pro-
this prophet has been distorted   were now enjoying. phet's teachings for quite some
and   misused  by berserk   and      And the elders felt then that time,
hysterical refugees  from  Jud-  JesuS was corrupting the stern •      •      •
aism-                                                 message  of  Moses.  They  pro-
*      *      *                   bably felt he had to be got rid A11 during the church-promp-
Which,   except   for   the   in-   of as there was a need t() keep i ed   progroms   of   the   Middle
herent moral evils perpetrated  their  young resolved to  fight ASes>    riSht    UP    to    Hitler's
in the prophet's name was pro-  the Romans, just as Arabs are wholesale slaughter, the tenet
the main villains. The youth of the faithful has been meek-
are kept hopped-up to fight to- ness — as Christ would have
day. wished.
-k      -k      k Only the Zionists, with their
As    for    Saint    Peter,    the prompting   of  the   1948   Holy
"rock" of the church:  he and War —  strangely reminiscent
for Jewry  to  formally  accept   simiiar  glory-hounds  managed of the Crusades — have been
the teachings of their greatest  to  begin   to  weigh  down the altering   the   basic    Christian
latter-day prophet.                        simple statements of the Jewish tenet of love which has been
Jesus   of   Nazareth,   as   an  reformer   with   hidden   mean- followed so well,
historical figure, was  indispu-  ings and to create a complete Todav with the new ..Fisht
tably Jewish. All his teaching   new system of worship based j^?^*^^^
system  then   prevalent. there is a vital need to reabsorb
Paganizing was the last step the   basic   Christian   humanity
in the perversion of the Jesus' of the faith which as so clearly
Jewish  reform   movement.   G. distinguised  it from the fana-
the  teachings  of this  prophet B" ShaW haS Said: "When y0U tica1' warlike> "Christian" and
 ,,   ,      ,__,   ,                        Christianize a savage you sav- Muslim cults.
agize Christianity", and his re- -_-•*•-_-
mark  sums  up  only  too  well
what happened. If Jewry  is  to  continue  to
Christmas took over the win- contribute  something  to man,
umu^uu.^,,   uu.   .«_.._»-          vear.death   festlva,   Fa„ter it must continue to contribute
understandings,    Saint    Peter,  ter  year-death   festival   taster ovam.      ..    _,      ..    ,,_,
___. /_.__._ __, ,___ _.__._•_.'  the pagan spring rites, and one lts example of love — the truly
by    one   the    pagan    customs Christian tenet,
snuck into the church.
•      •      •
bably in the order of things.
But in light of recent developments — in both Christianity and Judaism, it is becoming increasingly obvious
that  there is  a real  necessity
of Reform Judaism, such as is
now prevalant throughout
North America.
•      •      •
Except for a  quirk  of fate,
would have led to no more
ramifications than an early
version of the present orthodox-reform split.
Unfortunately,   due   to  mis-
and a paganizing of his teach- *he Pagan spring rites, and one
ings, a strange hybrid cult was
formed called Christianity.
And since this cult as it was
first created is now nearly ex- But why is today so import-net, the time is ripe for Jewry tant for the re-absorbtion of
to welcome home the errant the original, clear Christian
teachings of one of its foremost doctrine into the Jewish faith?
sons. Well, for one thing because
Misunderstandings      arose the new Christian athiests —
about  Jesus'   message because including much of tht "proges-
in  part his  teachings   contra- sive"   clergy   —   seem   to be
dieted   the   teachings   of   the denying the divinity of Christ,
earlier prophet Moses. And that puts him back in_
All Jesus was trying to do to   the   prophet  status,  where
Creeping leisure
kills societies
By STU GRAY
A primitive tribe that has known only stone tools is
suddenly given modern mechanized farm equipment.
Work is done quickly,
fields are tilled by few
men with a few machines
while the others stand
around and watch.
The watchers grow more
and more restless; begin to
feel  useless  and distrustful.
They must now change
their tribal rites, streamline
their moral codes and social
customs, or risk disintegration as a society.
This analogy by Russel
Lynes describes the situation
of the western world today
as it faces creeping leisure.
Few of us are yet aware of
leisure as a problem, let
alone a social crisis.
Yet corporate use of leisure has been said to have
the power to build or destroy
a nation's culture, moral
worth,   and  destiny.
Our affluent society —
with labor-saving devices in
all phases of life and with
the onset of automation —
is fast becoming a new society of leisure.
Dr. Robert Lee, in The
Problem of Leisure, says
leisure threatens to replace
work as the basis of culture.
Like other sociologists,
Lee feels the problem of
leisure is the problems of
meaning and emptiness
which haunt modern man as
he is swept around a materialist eddy.
The failure to cope with
leisure brings an increase in
boredom.
Rudyard Kipling once
wrote: "The curse of America
is sheer, hopeless, well ordered boredom; and that is
going someday to be the
curse  of the world."
Anxiety, boredom, alienation, meaningless, all have
been named as forming the
social  sickness of our time,.
Even in a university, with
its inherently stimulating atmosphere, these qualities
may readily be  observed.
The proliferation of engineering and science stunts,
couple   -   crowded    resident
Two guys for every girl
and two girls for every
guy. Impossible, not in the
KEY CLUB
coming to the Campus.
lounges and cafes are at
tempts to combat creeping
leisure.
Lee and others maintain leisure time will make
life meaningless or pointless.
They say that leisure today may be a challenge or
a threat, hazard or opportunity, vice or virtue, bane,
or blessing.
It is our choice.
Church  isolated
from  evil  world
The devastating split between church and state such
as happened in Nazi Germany is repeating itself today, a UBC history professor
said  Monday.
Dr. John Conway said a
fear of mixing church and
politics, plus wasted church
effort in debates on less vital
matters — like sex — has
made the modern church irrelevant.
"Following the establishment of the Nazi German
Republic, pastors soon supported extremely nationalistic parties, not rejecting
their anti Semitic policies for
fear of involvement," he
said.
"Today   people  are  being
murdered   in   Vietnam,   but
how many of you are asking
the Church to intervene?" he
asked the audience.
"I can only that if the
clergy were united in protest
of Hitler, the Nazi story
would have been greatly dif
ferent," he said.
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents . . .
Shakespeare's Romantic Frolic
LOVES LABORS LOST
AN ALL STUDENT PRODUCTION
Directed by John Brockington.
Designed by Aristides Gazetas
Feb. 22 -*28. Curtain 8:00 p.m.
Students 75c. (Adults $1.75)
NOTE — Univeristy  students are advised to  secure
tickets early as High School group bookings
are already coming in.
BOX OFFICE - ROOM 207 - FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
•
DON'T
BELIEVE
RUMORS
•
The Vancouver School Board
does hire many teachers
directly from university
SO
when  you   are
applying for an
elementary or secondary
teaching  position,
remember to   apply  to  the
Vancouver
School Board
1595  West 10th Avenue
For an interview
call RE 1-1131 Page 6
THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 15, 1966
— powell hargrave photo
BEARING UP BRAVELY, Elva-Mario Holler, takes needle calmly to give blood to
Red Cross drive in armory. Drive, which ends Friday, is short of quota and badly needs
brave bleeders.
THIS   IS  THE  ONLY
SUIT THAT WILL
OUTWEAR SOME
OF THE SUITS FROM
CLINTON'S . .
Clinton's quality clothing keeps its
fashionable good looks long after
ordinary clothes have become
shapeless and discarded. Enjoy the
exclusive style features and better
quality combined with personalized
service as offered by the leader in fine
clothing and accessories for men.
Clinton's
MEN'S WEAR
742 Granville
MU  1-5625
SHAKEY'S
PIZZA  PARLOUR
1026   GRANVILLE  ST.
The Jjrtih /ZctferJ
FEB.  7-19
UBC girls cut fine
figures for 3rd win
UBC figure skaters won their third straight Women's)
Western Canadian Intercollegiate title Saturday in Saska'
toon.
Carlings cap
fermenting
soccer Birds
UBC Thunderbirds soccer
team failed to snap Columbus
Carlings' win streak Saturday
by losing 3-1 in a Pacific Coast
League game at Varsity Stadium.
It was the eighth straight
win for the Italian club and
the first loss in three games for
the Birds.
Columbus' goals were scored
by Steve Djoric (on a penalty
kick), George Zambrano, and
Sergio Berti.
Paul Beckow scored the
Birds only goal, late in the
second half.
The Birds more than held
their own in midfield play but
could not pierce Columbus'
stacked defence.
The game was rough with
several mixups between players and fans.
The win moved Columbus
into a second place tie with
the Birds. The Italians, however, have two games in hand
over UBC.
In junior action the Tomahawks fought to a scoreless
tie with Firemen and ended up
in third place in league standings.
You saw "Hef's Pad" in
the last issue of Playboy,
but just wait til you get a
load of the
KEY CLUB
coming to the Campus.
10% Discount Given to
All U.B.C. Students on
Corsages
Vogue Rower Shop
2197 W.  Broadway 7M-7344
UBC finished first with 97
points while the hosting University of Saskatchewan followed with 62. University of
Alberta (Edmonton) was third
with 32.
In the singles competition,
UBC's Sheila McConnachy
and Louis Lind captured the
junior and senior titles while
Clare Newall and Sandy Guest
won the junior dance.
Peg Cunning and Miss McConnachy captured top honors
in  the  senior  competition.
In the WCIAA gymnastic
championships, UBC lost to
Edmonton   130-115.
/£/te?Me'<£}$<&&&
DIAMOND      RINGS
SYMMETRY
FROM $100
FIRBANKS
599   Seymour  -   Brentwood
and Park Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
What's the
lowest-priced
sports car
you can own?
You're looking at it!
It's the Austin-Healey Sprite. And it's got everything that makes it a true sports car. Twin-carb,
1100 cc. engine with four-speed gear box. Disc
brakes and rack-and-pinion steering, too. Bucket
seats, of course. And a tremendous world-wide
competition record. A true sports car.
And here's the best part. You just can't pay
less, and still get a true sports car. So get the
new Austin-Healey Sprite, and you'll agree . . .
nobody puts more into car-making than BMC.
The British Motor Corporation of Canada Ltd.
AUSTIN   •   MG   •   AUSTIN-HEALEY
AUSTIN IS NOW AT
PLIMLEY  FOURTH  AVENUE
2211  W. 4th AVE.
AUSTIN - MORRIS - M6B
RE 1-3141
10th AND
ALMA
GORDON BROS.
AUSTIN, MG DEALERS
1555 MARINE
NORTH VANCOUVER
FRED   DEELEY   LTD.
CANADA'S OLDEST AND LARGEST AUSTIN DEALER
FRED   DEELEY   LTD.
Serving British Columbia for Over Half a Century
907 W. BROADWAY
RE 8-2171 Tuesday, February 15, 1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
BIRDS VS  HISTORY
Bears hold Hamber/ still
By JOHN RODENHIZER
UBC's Hockey Thunderbirds lost the
Hamber Cup to the University of Alberta
Golden Bears on the weekend for the fourteenth time in the sixteen year history of
the competition.
The birds came out on the short end of
the 14-0 score in the two game total-goal
series Friday and Saturday night at the
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre before
nearly two thousand fans.
The bigger, stronger Albertans took a
commanding lead by winning the first game
5-0, getting a three goal performance from
speedy winger Darrel Leblanc.
The Bears were forced to go with two
lines after three of their players were
ejected from the game. Even with this
advantage, UBC could not get on the scoreboard.
After the first period Saturday night,
the Bears were leading 4-0 and appeared
to be walking away with the trophy.
The Birds finally came to life and
scored three unanswered goals by Dan
Cummings, Glen Richards, and Jack Littler.
But it was too late.
JOCKEY  BRIEFS:
Bears defenceman Ralph Jorstad was
awarded a penalty shot when Len Bouquet
pulled him down from behind, but goalie
Ken Broderick smothered his wrist shot on
the pads; Broderick, suffering noticeably
from a leg injury, played both games for
UBC; Bears split their goaltending duties
between Bob Wolfe and Hugh Waddle.
Ron Morris scored the Birds final goal;
Birds power play again was almost nonexistent; Golden Bears' Hugh Twa was
banished Friday night for fighting with the
referee.
Rugby squad primed
for California trip
By DOUG MOSER
UBC's rugby Braves whipped
Victoria College Saturday in
the capital city.
The Braves' powerful scrum
and speedy backs proved too
much for Victoria — winning
16-5.
Gerry Allan and Danny Mclntyre stood out in a heavy, but
highly mobile scrum that work-
well   as  a  unit  to  give  their
backs a monopoly of the ball.
UBC opened the scoring
when Dean McKinnon used his
great speed to flash away from
his own half.
Vic College stopped him just
short of the goal line, but Dave
Austin snapped the ball up to
score. McKinnon converted.
Braves   were   soon   on   the
Crack U.S. colleges
test our track squad
UBC's track and field squad
meets top U.S. colleges in its
first major competition of the
year at the PNE Agrodome this
weekend.
Fielding strong teams in the
men's mile and two-mile relays,
UBC is hoping for a strong
showing against formidable
west coast teams in this important Canadian National Indoor Championships meet.
Meet director and former
UBC track star, Dr. Douglas
Clement, has already received
entries from Washington State
and Universities of Washington
and Oregon — all  top track
schools.
They will provide UBC with
valuable experience before the
intercollegiate championships
in Winnipeg Feb. 26.
Coach Lionel Pugh has
drawn his teams on the basis
of time-trial performances on a
newly finished rubber-asphalt
track near the Thunderbird
Sports Arena.
This $50,000 all - weather
wonder was designed by Pugh
to incorporate both training
practices and top-flight competition. It is particularly well-
suited to handling a variety of
field events at the same time.
move again as the scrum heeled
well for Halloway to get his
tacks moving.
Vic College closed ranks
quickly but Gary Rowles
brushed aside two would-be
tacklers to score a magnificent
try under the posts.
Dean McKinnon failed to
muster enough energy to get
the conversion over the crossbar.
In the second half McKinnon
made up for his first-half lapse
by blasting a great penalty
goal and then took a pass from
Allan to streak away for fifty
yards, finishing with a spectacular dive into the corner.
In a preliminary game Vic
College IPs outplayed UBC
Hawks to win 16-0 and at
Royal Roads UBC Totems
maintained their winning ways
by stopping the tri-service club
17-3.
In Bellingham, the Birds defeated the spirited defense-
minded Western Washington
Vikings 16-5.
The Birds leave Wednesday
for a three game tour of California. Two of the games are
part of the four game series
known as the World Cup.
The last two games for the
World Cup will be played at
UBC March 24 and 26.
ARTS   UNDERGRADUATE   SOCIETY
ELECTIONS 1966
Nominations open Wednesday, February 9th
Nominations close Wednesday, February 16th 4 p.m.
President - A.M.S. eligibility required
Vice-president — Open to all members in good
Treasurer -
Secretary -
standing  of  A.U.S.
Speeches Mon., Feb. 21st, Bu. 106, noon
FURTHER INFORMATION BUCH. 182
WINS  CONTINUE
Meadows reaped
by hockey team
The Thunderbird field hockey team continued its winning ways Saturday, blanking Pitt Meadows 2-0 while
playing the second half a man short.
It was the fifth shutout in
a row for goaltender Brian
Rattray.
The Birds are currently embarked on one of the longest
unbeaten streaks in UBC's athletic history.
On Feb. 22 this streak will
have extended through two
years for a total of 33 games.
The UBC club which is generally recognized the best club
side in Canada, has provided
the backbone for all recent Provincial, National, and Olympic
teams.
At the moment, six members
of the team are training with
the National squad in preparation for the next Olympic and
Pan-American games.
The Braves, most of whom
are future Thunderbirds, are
currently dominating the third
division.
On Saturday they registered
a 2-1 victory over Vancouver
"B" while Tomahawks went
down to a 3-1 defeat at the
hands of Jokers Too.
In women's field hockey action Saturday, UBC blanked
North Vancouver 5-0 to move
into first place in the second
division.
Varsity lost 4-8 to North Van
but defeated Kits 4-2 Sunday.
More fun than Science
Smokers—and it is morality squad proof.  That's Ihe
KEY CLUB
coming to the Campus
soon.
BRIAN RATTRAY
. . . fifth shutout
BAY
THE
LIST OF ADRIAN
MESSENGER
G. C. Scott, Dana Wyntar
plus SURPRISE GUESTS and
THE LUCK OF GINGER
COFFEY
R. Shaw, Mary Ore — Students 75c
DELTA
FEBRUARY 18 and 19
ADVANCE TO THE REAR
Glenn Ford - Stella Stevens
plus
ROCK-A-BYE BABY
Jerry Lewis
(jetting H\IUtme4?
Yours for the Asking . . . Our FREE
"Take Home" Invitation Album — mailed
to you or call at our store
Another Feature: only the finest papers
and "the very latest styles, all thermo-
graved in just 12 days.
™b card shop
Corner Robson and Burrard
MU 4-4011
Let's Talk Travel
HAGEN'S TRAVEL SERVICE suggests you use the Mid-
Term break to talk about travel. We offer a complete
travel service to anywhere. We also have one of two
specialties:
• STUDENT TRAVEL:
Our Earnest Bartlett spent several years in London
doing nothing but arranging student travel. We think
he probably knows more about European facilities
for student travel, accommodation and study than any
other agent in Vancouver.
• U.S.S.R. and EAST EUROPE:
We are official agents in B.C. for the Government
tourist offices of the USSR, Poland, Hungary, Rumania,
Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and East Germany. Although travel to these countries is easier than
it was, it still needs careful preparation, and we've
been doing this for several years now.
• FIRST HAND KNOWLEDGE
We believe in seeing the places to which you wish to
go. Actually, as far as Europe goes, all three of us
lived there.
Hagen's Travel Service
Open 9:00 - 5:00 including Saturdays
2996 W   Broadway (at Carnarvon) RE 6-5651 Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 15, 1966
TWEEN CLASSES
Royal chanters here
Les Petits Chanteurs du
Mont-Royal. Gregorian chant
and Renaissance masterworks
sung by a 40 voice boys' choir
noon in Aud.
CHORAL SOC
Choir picture Wednesday
noon in Bu. 104. White shirts
and blouses. Rehearsal at 6
p.m.
CUS
Noon Brock, Rae Murphy,
editor Scan Magazine — eye
witness to Viet Nam.
UBC SQUIRES SOC
Watch for first annual Pacific Norwestern Invitational
Squires Championship next
week.
PHYSICS SOC
Trip to SFU Physics Dept.
Feb. 25. Sign up in Henn. 204
now.
ONTOLOGICAL SOC
Finding yourself — revealed
by Dr. Bill Bahan Wednesday
noon in Bu. 221.
VIET NAM DAY COMMITTEE
Dr. Wm. Willmott speaks
Wednesday noon in Bu. 102.
All welcome.
BADMINTON CLUB
Any member wishing to participate in this years tournament sign up this week. Tournament starts Feb. 22.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Noon Bagged place revisited
in the round — an incident in
an environment by Ian Wallace and Co.
SPECIAL EVENTS
LAST MINUTE TICKETS
available for Vancouver Opera
Association's production of
Verdi's II Trovatore for $1.
Rm. 255, B.E. for details.
IL CAFFE
Italian speaking day in IH
Wednesday.
EL CIRCULO
Spanish speaking day today
at IH. Coffee available.
AQUA SOC
Important mid-term dive
meeting noon in clubroom.
JAZZ SOC
General meeting noon in
Bu. 216. Planning concert. All
members please attend.
SUS
Nominations for executive
positions open until Feb. 23.
Elections March 2. For details
and forms enqiure at Hut 0-8.
WEDNESDAY NOON
HOUR CONCERTS
Tomorrow in Bu. 106 cellist
Audrey Piggott, and pianist
Robert Rogers perform.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Meeting noon today in Bu.
204. Speaker — Dr. Middaugh.
Everyone welcome.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Rev. T. Nilson speaks Wednesday noon in Ed. 204.
ADVANCE   FOOTBALL
CAMP
Feb. 21 -Mar. 4 daily at 4:30.
Equipment handed out at Wolfson Field today and tomorrow
from 3:30-5:00. Football experience  not  necessary.
An exclusive
KEY CLUB
is coming to the campus
soon. Only key-carrying
members will be allowed
in.
CLASSIFIED
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
Rates: 3 lines. 1 day. $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost k Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publication! office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST—IN VOC CABIN AT WHIS-
ler, a pair of Greozig set skis.
Return   to  Kathie,   AM. 6-4325.
LOST — KEYS ON CHAIN IN
black plastic case. $5 reward at
Chemistry   Office
LOST—MAN'S OVERCOAT, GREY
check. Phone L,. Hunter, 7-10
p.m.   at   224-7776.
FOUND — BLACK RIMMED
glasses, last Thursday, near Ponderosa.      Phone   228-2763. '
LOST—MATH AND ECONOMICS
notebooks from, the Bookstore
last Wed. Please phone Lorne,
FA   1-8993   after   5:30.     Urgent,
LOST — BLACK ALLIGATOR
wallet, money and all identification. Call Mark at 224-3924.
Reward. 	
LOST—PARKER 51 FEN IN YEL-
low case, left by telephone in
Reserve Library Thurs. Contact
Williams,   3051   W.   8th   Avenue,
TAKEN — BROWN BRIEPCASE
initials C.P.N.) from Totem Park.
Contents rather urgegntly needed. Please return notes, at
least,   to   same   place.	
FOUND — SMALL PURSE IN
Ponderosa on Sat., phone AM
1-0947    after   6   p.m.
LOST—MAN'S BLACK WALLET.
Phone 277-0224. Lost on Campus. ^_	
FOUND — RING ON MAIN MALL,
latin    insignia,    Phone   266-6398.
Greetings
12
DEAR      X.       WE       DRINK      THIS
week.     Love   Y.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, REG HAND-
FORD, exalted leader of the
Rolison    Red bloods.
DEAREST JOHN D: EVEN
though you think I'm a trollop,
I crave your bawd. Happy Valentine's Day! Stag-ingly yours,
Gail.
Special Notices
13
WHT PAY HIGH AUTO INSU.R-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.   Phone  Ted  Elliott,  224-6X07.
ROCK TO THE ACCENTS IN TJIE
Lower Mall Ballroom, Wed. 9-1,
Feb. 16th. Just before mid-term
break. I guess so, eh?!! '
ARTS-A-GO-GO-GO; ARTS U.S.
elections nomlnaUons close Feb. 16.
See Bu. 182.
NEWMAN CENTRE — MONDAY
to Friday, 12:30-1:30 p.m. and
10:00-11:00 p.m. Sandwiches and
hamburgers.     Free   coffee.	
CRASH IN, COMMERCE TYPES,
Crash dance, Thursday, February 17th, at the Johann Stauss.
Tickets at depression prices $3.00
cple. On sale now till Wednesday in H.A. Lobby and AMS office.
REWARD — FOR INFORMATION
leading to the recovery of a
Nova Tech "Pilot II" transistorized portable aircraft radio "removed from Room 102, Metallurgy Bldg. Thurs. morning,
Feb.   3.
KENNY BURNETT — HAPPY
Valentine's Day — I love you —
Brian   Davis.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED TO TOD (KAM-
loops) during mid-term break. 2
girls.   Phone   WA    2-2525'.	
RIDE WANTED URGENTLY
from N. Vane, Capilano Mt.
Royal vicinity, Monday through
Friday, 8:30 a.m. and 5:30 R,m.
Tel.   987-4237 after 6  p.m.
RIDE      WANTED!      1ST      AND
Arbutus.   733-0581.   8:30  classes.
Wanted
15
WANTED. HELP ! NEED BOOK
The Origins and Development" of
the English Language. Pyles.
Please   phone   733-9542.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
HILLMAN MANUALMATIC 1958.
4-dr., top condition, 1965 re-built
motor, one owner, new tires. Terms
to be discussed. Call 224-7374 or
522-1924 after 5 p.m.
'61 TRIUMPH HERALD. GOOD
running cond. TR 4-7236, Walter,
after 5:30.
'57 CHEV. REBUILT MOTOR.
New paint job. Excelelnt condition,   921-7589.
'54 METEOR NIAGARA, 4-DOOR
sedan, radio and heater. Very
clean. Mechanically sound. 738-
4679.
1954 PONTIAC LAURENT1AN
sedan, with all extras including
radio and snow tires. Immaculate condition both inside and
out. Only $200. Phone Ken, HE
4-4326.
1960 AUSTIN 850, NICE CONDI-
tion. New license. See anytime at
4650  W.   4th,   $325.   Phone   224-6513
BEST OFFER 1954 MORRIS CON-
vert. Motor gone. Good for parts.
FA   7-5840   after   10   p.m.
Scandals
39-A
ELAINE, HAVE FORSAKEN ALL
others. Belated Valentines Greetings.  Love,  Mike. 	
GEE WHIZ, CRAIG, I DIDN'T
even know we had a king ! Love,
Queen  of the  Polacks.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Sewing & Alterations -40
GRADUATION GOWNS; SHEATH
dresses; separates. Custom designed and made by European designer. Reasonable prices. 731-Z003
evenings.
Typewriters fc Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, |M
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
SO percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th ami Granville,  263-4530.
TYPING: 25c PAGE OR $1.95 HR.
West End, 685-5539 eves. Campus
pick-up & dellverey 224-6341 (John)
leave tel. no.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
SI
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and West Van.
PS:   New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C. 	
AMS PUBLICATIONS OFFICE RE-
quires experienced clerk-typist for
eight months employment per year,
Sept.-April. Due to this fact, the
campus location, and the work involved the job is especially suitable
for a lady married to a senior student or a staff member. No children. Applicants must be available
for at least the next two years. For
further information call Manager
of Student Publications,  224-3242.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
TUTOR FOR RUSSIAN, POLISH,
Serbocroation. Phone 738-4933 after
7 p.m.
CHEM 101: COMPLETE GUIDES TO
Chem 101 Labs available now at
the College Shop,  Brock extension.
• Complete with data, procedure,
calculations       and       discussions.
• Helps you to obtain a better
perspective and understanding of
your labs. • If you would like the
rewarding thrill that Chem Labs
can bring, drop into The College
Shop, Brock Extension, for your
new "Complete Guide to Chem'lOl
Labs",   $2.50.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
FOR SALE. ZEISS WINKEL Microscope, oil immersion lens to
1,200 power. New condition, $200.
May be seen at room 306, Electrical   Bldg.,   Mr.   Loney.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
BED SITTING ROOM. SHARE KIT-
chen and other home privileges.
Faculty or senior student preferred
(female). References exchanged.
CA 4-4282.
ROOM FOR RENT. PRIVATE
entrance and shower. 4524 West
11th.   CA   8-8568.
FOR   MALE   STUDENT —  LARGE
bedroom    —     kitchen privileges.
Car    pool    available, $37.50    per
month.   RE   6-4058.
ROOM-MATE WANTED (MALE)
preferably senior years, to share
expenses of fully furnished two
bedroom apartment. Phone RE
3-7805",    (reasonable   rent,   $25).
Room k Board
•2
ROOM AND BOARD (OPTIONAL).
Near gates, 1st & 2nd yr. male students. Excellent study facilities.
224-1631.
ON CAMPUS ROOM AND BOARD.
PSI. Upsilon Fraternity. Phone
224-9790.
Apartments
83
SELF CONTAINED    SUITE.    NEAR
gates,  phone 224-3695 after 6 p.m.
YORK UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Applications are now being accepted for admission
to Bachelor and Master Degree programmes.
Students with two years of General Arts are eligible
for admission to the third year programme in Business Administration.
For complete information please write:
The Registrar.
York University,
Toronto   12. Ontario.
Civil
Engineers
1966 GRADUATES
Several vacancies are available for structural engineers in the Vancouver office of H. A. Simons
(International)  Ltd.
Recent graduates are invited to arrange for employment Interviews through the Placement Office
of Student Services on the West Mall.
Mr. D. J. Watts will be available on Campus to
interview applicants on
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21 si, 1966
H, A. Simons (International) Ltd.
Consulting Engineers to the Pulp and Paper Industry
16 E. Hastings
Vancouver, B.C.
685-3411
TODAY AT NOON
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
Les Petits Chanteurs
Du Mont-Royal
^#^##4$-.$
_
in a program drawn from Gregorian Chants and
Masterworks of the Rennaisance Age. A very unusual
boys  choir  performing   in  a  very  unusual   concert.
TUES., FEB. 15-12:30 p.m.
35c
COMING FEBRUARY 24
THE VANCOUVER SYMPHONY
February 25 KIMEO - ETO - Blind Japanese Koto Player

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0128148/manifest

Comment

Related Items