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The Ubyssey Mar 2, 1967

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Array CONSERVATIVE, MARXIST DEBATE TO TIE
By DAVE CURSONS
Tie game was the result in
a Conservative-Marxist clash
of ideologies in Brock Hall
Wednesday noon.
Alvin Hamilton, Conservative MP, met Charlie Boylan,
Marxist AMS vice-president in
a debate on "creeping con-
tinentalism", before more than
500 students.
Boylan acknowledged Hamilton as the only conservative
whom he had heard "really
explain conservatism" and
Hamilton in turn acknowledged
the importance of radical socialist thought in Canadian politics.
"But we have no socialist
party in Canada. The present
NDP party has repudiated both
the Stalinist line and the con-
ALVIN HAMILTON
. . . Conservative
cept   of   centralized   control"
said Hamilton.
"Socialism is a dead concept.
Tommy Douglas knows that it's
dead. The Russians know it is
dead and the Chinese know it
is dead.
"Bay Street still controls the
Conservative party. The Conservative party represents the
interests of Bay Street and even
the radicals within the Conservative party are subject to
contradiction," said Boylan.
Hamilton, a former agriculture minister, attributed to narrow nationalism the failure of
a proposal to direct prairie
petroleum through the U.S. to
southern Ontario.
"The real Canadian in 1967
is the one who will push to
build Canada faster and give
CHARLIE BOYLAN
. . . Marxist
us the best commercial advantage," he said.
Boylan said that such things
as "ultra-continentalist elements" and "pin-pot local dynasties" are barriers to the Conservative party leading Canada
to any positive continentalism.
"One point upon which both
Hamilton and myself will agree
is 51 per cent Canadian ownership in Canadian industry," he
said.
Hamilton reiterated a previous public statement in which
he said to the U.S.: "Don't push
us around. We're not Guatemala."
"I don't want to see Canada
slip into continentalism without putting up a squeal," he
said.
Vol. XLVII, No. 53
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER,  B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH  2,  1967
Psychologist hits
- I. ^
Schwarz report
£   L!BR^
^
BRITISH
cov"
/
OTTAWA (CUP) — A psychologist here
has dismissed the recently released Schwarz
report on Canadian campus health and psychiatric facilities as "confusing, misleading
and inaccurate".
Dr. Ronald Trites, psychologist at St.
Patrick's College, says it author, Dr. Conrad
Schwarz otUBC has misinterpreted statistics,
confused roles of psychologist, social worker
and psychiatrist and ill-defined his topic.
The Schwarz report, published toy Canadian Union of Students, found only one Canadian post-secondary institution — Dalhousie
University — offers health and psychiatric
facilities on a par with United States standards.
"In this report, mental health and mental
illness are consistently confused," Trites said
in an interview. "Schwarz equates them."
Trites said "having an identification problem is not like having a toothache. One
cannot conceptualize student mental health
in a disease framework.
"Mental health ranges all the way from
satsifying interpersonal relations to the serious problems of personality."
The psychologist claims Schwarz implied
that mental health is synonymous with mental illness and therefore is the sole respon
sibility of psychiatrists.
He also criticizes Schwarz for failing
to look at the role played by social workers
in solving student mental health problems,
and also casts doubt on the report's statistical findings.
"The confusing and misleading text of
this report, and the inaccuracy of the statistical tables, is clearly alarming. From the
glaring omissions, doubt is cast on the accuracy of the whole report."
Trites named St. Patrick's College and
University of Ottawa as having "model programs competently directed by psychologists
in which a full range of diagnostic and psy-
choltherapeutic services are offered."
The Schwarz report found health facilities almost totally lacking at both institutions.
"Schwarz should not be accountable for
the full responsibility for this report," he
said. "The CUS officials who commissioned
this report should have the awareness that
many experts should have been consulted.
"How many responsible public officials
in our highly complex society would even
think of entrusting the full responsibility for
the development of any major program to
one individual?"
Committee probes failure
— dermis gans photo
OPEN HOUSE'S POLE set up on Main Mall, adds color and
interest to a scene usually dreary this time of year. Open
House officials are expecting 150,000 visitors to view
their  Friday and Saturday  spectacle.
A student-faculty liaison committee
established in the science faculty met for the
first time Thursday.
Consisting of six students appointed by
science undergraduate president Frank
Flynn and seven faculty members chosen
by science dean V. T. Okulitch, the committee discussed failure rates in science
courses.
Okulitch felt the overall failure rate of
17 per cent in science was too high.
The committee decided that for sufficient
"weeding out" in first and second year the
failure rates were not too high.
However they felt some third year
courses, especially mathematics, had failure
rates much too high.
The committee recommended the dean
investigate the high rates.
In future the committee will discuss stu
dent workloads, teaching standards and
other immediate problems in the science
faculty.
MacKenzie speaks
Former UBC president and a man who
reputedly holds very controversial views on
the Canadian centennial will give the theme
address for Open House today.
Senator N.  A.  MacKenzie  will  air his
views for the first time this year on what
he thinks of centennial and the state of the
nation.
MacKenzie is at present president of the
Canadian centennial council and director of
the Canadian centennial commission.
He speaks at 12:30 in Brock lounge. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 23,   1967
UVic profs
buck firing
VICTORIA (CUP) — Two
of the three University of
Victoria instructors whose
contracts were terminated recently by the faculty review
committee have filed appeals.
Both Dr. Charles Tarlton,
assistant professor in political science, and English lecturer Joseph Schwartz have
appealed to the presidential
review committee — a body
established to handle grievances in such matters.
Alan Mackenzie, an English
instructor now on leave of
absence at the University of
Aberdeen in Scotland where
he is studying for his doctorate, is also expected to appeal
the decision.
The three-man appeal committee will advise university
president Dr. Malcolm Taylor
whether the faculty review
committee "considered all
available evidence and followed the appropriate procedure in, reaching its decision."
Tarlton has aso appealed to
the Canadian Association of
University Teachers to clear
his professional reputation.
—kurt hilger photo
REDSHIRTS PUT THEIR painting skills, acquired during
the recent engineering week, to good use as they paint
banners for UBC's Open House celebrations
MUST LEAD'
Sullivan questions
symposia, finances
By MURRAY McMILLAN
Ubyssey Managing Editor
The AMS must  exercise  a  leadership  function,   says
president-elect Shaun Sullivan.
"At   present,   students   are
apathetic; they don't care, they
don't identify with the AMS.
They won't come to us to bitch
or give ideas, so we have to
go to them,"  he said.
"Student councillors should
be prepared to go up in front
of a group of students at any
time, to defend AMS policies,"
Sullivan said in an interview.
Sullivan agrees with the
idea of holding AMS meetings
in different areas of the campus to spark interest.
He also feels strongly about
the position of the academic
activities committee.
"We have to try and make
academic activities a program
which will attract more students. This year, two symposia
were held — they involved
approximately 300 people, and
cost the AMS $1,600.
"I'm not against symposia,
but they must be planned so
they involve more people," he
said.
He was questioned on his
campaign promise to end alleged "political domination"
of the special events committee.
"The only way to end this
is by being particularly careful in the appointment. If the
committee is going to embark
on a program of political
speakers, lets take in the
whole spectrum."
Present financial problems
of the AMS are also bothering
him. In his campaign, Sullivan promised more money for
the undergraduate societies.
"Now that the fee increase
has gone down, we will be
faced with financial difficulties. Obviously cuts will have
to be made somewhere. We
will be encouraging the undergraduate societies to stage
more reveniu'e producing
events."
During the campaign, he
also set student senators as
one of his goals.
"There should be at least
five students on the senate.
The senate sets curricula, and
therefore students are directly
affected by it."
Sullivan said he hoped to
do this via UBC president
John Macdonald.
University finance also concerns the sophomore commerce
student.
"We must further our demands for an independent
grants commission. At present
the committee is weighted by
government appointees and no
consideration is given to UBC
as the province's graduate
study center.
"Also, we must push for
more money from the federal
government for building residences.
"They should be built on
the same basis as academic
buildings, with reduced residence fees paying operating
costs only."
GRAD CLASS
GENERAL MEETING
TODAY-12:30 NOON
ANGUS 110
J
UBC OPEN SQUASH TOURNAMENT
MARCH 6-12
ENTER BY MARCH 3 AT AMS OFFICE
MEN $1.00
LADIES & NOVICES 50c
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL
(United)
11 tOO a.m. Morning Worship
"Confusion
Everywhere!"
ST. ANSELM'S (Anglican)
8:00, 9:30 & 11 a.m.
Holy Communion
Son of God —
"What Does It Mean?"
7:30 p.m. at University Hill United Church
"THE NEW MORALITY and MARRIAGE AND DIVORCE"
Dr. R. A, Wilson
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MU 2-1919 Thursday, March 2, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY.
Page 3
— powell hargrave photo
"SOME STUDY,  SOME  SLACK  off,  I   prefer a combination," mumbles Burton Bookwurm.
Even with the library's excellent facilities it's hard to concentrate on  studying as spring
approaches and young man's thoughts turn   to other things.
FREEDOM INEVITABLE'
Rhodesian predicts end'
By MARGARET LADBURY
The only solution to the problem In
Rhodesia is an "internal cataclysm," a leading African politician said Tuesday at UBC.
Dr. Herbert Chitepo, president of the
Zimbabwe African National Union, told 200
students that African control of the legislature by one man, one vote was inevitable.
Chitepo is the first negro lawyer in Rhodesia and one of the first to break the color
bar by being permitted to practice law in
Salisbury.
White Rhodesians are attempting to keep
power by the Unilateral Declaration of Independence and by suppressing African parties, Chitepo said.
Since 1960 there have been three such
parties each of which is now 'barred.
"There are 93 Africans sentenced to
death for such offenses as throwing a stone at
someone," said Chitepo.
"The penalties for opposition to the government have grown progressively stiffer."
When asked if it was true that some of
the native chiefs support Smith, Chitepo
said the chiefs are no longer leaders of the
tribes.
"Because the government now holds the
chiefs responsible for carrying out its policies the chiefs are alienated from the
people.
"In the 1920's the government decided
to separate the races by setting aside land
for the negroes and whites.
"The Land Apportionment Act of 1951
divided Rhodesia's 97 million acres almost
in half between 200,000 whites and 4 million Africans. The land of the Europeans
contained the cities and railroads while the
African areas held the mosquito which carries sleeping sickness.
"According to Rhodesian law a strike is
illegal so the 'riots' are quelled by the
army. In the trade unions preference is
given to the skilled workers who are white.
Thus the Africans have no real power to
improve their position.
"The Rhodesian government spends $100
pounds a year on each white student
through the ministry of native affairs,"
Chitepo said.
"Of the 17 schools preparing students
for university only two are open to Africans."
Chitepo was one of the first African
students to enter secondary school in 1939.
"Bad though the educational situation is,
it is still not a reason for denying Africans
the vote.
"The situation is still better in Rhodesia
today than it was in any other of the old
British African colonies at the time of their
independence.
Students plan
co-op housing
Togetherness for UBC and Simon Fraser
students could occur soon in the form of
joint co-ops in old Kitsilano and Shaughn-
essy houses.
Three visitors from the Burnaby academy will tell UBC about it at a housing
seminar at noon today.
They are Prof. Dave Berg, a philosopher
at SFA and driving force behind the academy's co-op housing effort; Rob Watt,
chairman of SFA coop housing and John
Olsen, a member of his board of directors.
SFA students have bought and turned
into co-ops several old houses in New Westminster. Now they want UBC student help
to do the same with old houses in Kits and
Shaughnessy.
Everyone is welcome to the meeting in
Bu. 202.
UofA referendum
plans CUS status
OTTAWA (CUP) — Canadian Union of Students president
Doug Ward has urged University of Alberta students to return
to CUS in a Friday referendum.
In an interview, Ward warned it would "be easier for
Alberta to stay out of CUS than to go back in" because membership in CUS will force new decision-making responsibilities
on U of A.
The CUS president said his organization will accept the
referendum result as an "internal" decision by Alberta, and
promised no CUS representative will campaign in Edmonton
this week without an invitation.
Meters questioned
The question today is whether the wording on UBC parking meters is illegal.
All UBC parking meter head plates designate the amount
of money that is needed to park legally.
But the amount is designated by< quarters, dimes, nickels,
and pennies. According to the Canadian Currency Act the
amounts should be designated toy 25, ten, five, and one-cent
pieces.
Thus, parking meters are "illegal" at UBC as well as
at Queens University where two law students are fighting
parking tickets  from the  unlawful  meters.
"If the lawyers do win their case, then we will comply
with any regulation which would bring about the required
changes," said Hugh Kelly, supervisor of the UBC patrol.
I
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..Year of Graduation.. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
MARCH 2, 1967
The think tank
You hear a lot of talk over cafeteria coffee these
days about what a miserable education we are getting.
Much of it is expletive-loaded drivel mouthed in faint
February hope that a miraculous revolution might
result before five impending essay deadlines roll around.
Some of it is couched in the belief that student action
in concert with professors, joint committees on curriculum, will do away with silly cou,rse requirements
doctrinal lectures and boredom. Very little of this
talk touches on the fundamental problems that plague
modern university education. It might if more of the
professors were sitting around in the cafeteria taking
part in the discussions.
McGill, like so maiiy Canadian institutions, represents a real enigma to the student activist. Obviously,
McGill is not laden with the kind of overt administrative
vices which regularly rouse the students at Berkeley to
assemble by the thousands in Sproul Plaza before Mario
Savio and his illegal microphones. Our administration
could hardly be labelled fascist. In many respects, then,
it is unfair to compare McGill with the large modem
university so prevalent in the United States. On the
other hand, McGill could not be described as a traditional
university, a genuine and free community of scholars,
where knowledge is closely linked with wisdom, contemplation and reflection. In the best tradition of the
Canadian tight-rope act, balancing between the pull of
big American society and the gentler tugs of our
European heritage, McGill as an academic institution
is hard to classify. More important, it is harder to criticize. The underlying rot is disguised by a thin veneer of
academic respectability. In actual fact, there is no agreement on the basic question of what a university is
supposed to do. Many students feel they are getting a
bad education. Few can explain why. Even fewer know
how to oppose something which is inscrutable. Activism
functions most happily where the demon plainly shows
its ugly head.
A few words on the nature of this demon are in
order. The crux of the matter is the gradual change
within the many departments of the modern university
in the meaning of knowledge. The scientific revolution
with its insistence on practicality and research has
struck at the very roots of traditional university
education. Knowledge and wisdom have been separated.
The latter has been left in the dust of progress.
Knowledge is now associated with more hip forms. It
must be "novel", "productive" and never "obsolete", it
must represent a "breakthrough". Professionalism is
rampant. Every discipline attempts to establish its usefulness by making a unique contribution to the growing
pile of accumulated knowledge. Teaching becomes a
drag. Students, except for graduates who assist the
"breakthroughs" and help with the teaching, become
superflous members of a shattered academic community.
This is the demon in full-snorting fury. Some
disciples are afflicted worse than others. But it is this
underlying condition which engenders the feeling of
alienation among the student population. It is this
condition which guarantees the student four years of
non-education as part of a non-community.
—from the McGill Daily
Maple Leaves
—from the Manitoban
"THE CANADIAN STUDENT is a member of society who is intensively engaged in the
pursuit of knowledge and truth."
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
I may speak sof My
builcarri) a big slick/
No speak Greek
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Your thoughtful readers
will quickly detect Mr. Dol-
sen's indifference to salient
and I would have thought inescapable disparities between
spoken and dead languages.
Let us hope he does not eventually join the spoken Latin
groups; they are even more a
waste of time than Mr. Dol-
sen's present arrangements.
Dead Latin and Greek are
far more difficult than spoken
Russian, in the sense that we
are deprived of naive experts.
The problems thence arising
are numerous; I am only sorry
that Mr. Dolsen finds them a
drag.
I also regret that deciphering texts must be so much a
part of literary studies in the
classics. As a daily exercise,
however, it does prevent optimistic teachers from giving
bright students credit for more
than they know.
H. G. EDINGER
classics
All for sloth
Editor, The Ubyssey:
What we need in Canada
and on this campus is a new
passivist movement. People
are altogether too active and
always bothering each other;
consequently we have wars
and other kinds of miseries.
The chief slogan of this
movement will be "slowly".
Our official symbol will be the
great tree sloth, which takes
an hour to move a foot, and
a day to eat a leaf. All day
long it hangs upside down
from a branch, sleeping peacefully and giving absolutely
no one any trouble whatsoever.
Our concern will consist of
programs such as "How to
improve parliament slightly"
or down to earth things such
as "the care and culture of
dandelions on campus lawns".
As soon as Canadians realize
that activists (whether pacifist
or otherwise) are a threat to
peace and quiet our movements will gather momentum.
Slowly, and without vigor.
JACK BOULOGNE
grad studies
Code or language?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Arthur Dolsen likes Greek
and Latin enough to ask that
they be taught as languages,
not as codes. But most of the
classics department, students
and staff, receive his request
as an insult and a threat. This
is ibecause, sadly enough, they
fit the image of the classics
scholar that Mr. Dolsen would
like to see changed.
If Greek and Latin were
taught as languages which
men have spoken, if Homer
and Horace were taught as
literature which men have enjoyed, then some of them
would no longer be competent
to teach.
But more important, these
people are in classics because
the languages are dead, and
do not give disquieting signs
of life while being dissected.
They will not have them resurrected.
RICHARD OWEN
Me-too  defended
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Your editorial criticizing
the political parties has many
good points but alas you are
prone to exaggerate.
Speaking   for   the  Liberal
club, we feel that we have
made some contribution to
university life which might
not be apparent to The Ubyssey.
The UBC Liberal club this
year prepared a brief on education for the B.C. provincial
Liberal caucus which formed
the basis for Liberal policy
towards higher education.
UBC Liberals, with university Liberals across Canada,
managed to get a resolution
accepting the principle of
universal accessibility passed
at the national Liberal convention in Ottawa. Several of
our members went to Victoria with the UBC delegation
in January. The club did participate with other clubs in
a debate on fundamental
policy which divides the parties.
On a much more contra-
tradictory note in your essay,
you bemoan the fact that
many Liberals, Tories, New
Democrats and Socreds as individuals supported Sullivan
(so did an awful lot of non-
politicos) and describe it as
me tooism yet you describe
the parties as not interested
in campus affairs. Surely you
can try to be more consistent.
As for your suggestion that
we form a UBC Chowder and
Marching society you might
have a good idea there but
we need an experienced leader. Do you know if John
Kelsey is available?
Liberal club President
BRIAN   FOGARTY
EDITOR: John Kelsey
City      Danny Stoffman
News _ Al Blrnte
Photo   Powell Hargrave
Page Friday  Claudia Cwinn
Sports  Sue Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Focus  Kris Emmott
Ass't News   Al Donald
Ass't City  Tom Morris
CUP  Bert Hill
The dialectic lamb, in quite
Marchy, flacked Val Thorn who
caroomed forcefully, while Dave
Cursons, debate - prone, watched
purbish. "Harangue," screeched
Morguer, "Come host, yon flock."
He feared rampage. The scurrilous
Lin Tse-hsu, crafty, purloined
other fleece. Writers? Who but
Wes Johnstone, David Hastings,
Margaret Ladbury, Lex Burton,
and open-housers Bo Hansen,
Kathi Harkness, and Mike Jessen.
Fotos by Kurt Hilger, Don
Kydd, Chris Blake and Al Harvey.
Aforementioned Jessen saw
sports so did Pio Uran. Board
meeting   Friday   12:30   p.m. Thursday, March 2,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Pago 5
ORIGINAL PROF
Logan retires in April
The only member of the original faculty
still teaching at UBC is retiring in April.
Eighty-year-old professor emeritus Harry
Logan meets his classic students for the last
time and will mark the end of his 52-year
association with UBC.
The teacher; author, editor, administrator and member of the board of governors
and senate has received
about every award UBC
can give including the
AMS's great trekker
award in 1960.
Logan's history goes
back to the days before
UBC was conceived. He
began at UBC's forerunner McGill University College in 1913.
When UBC's doors were
scheduled to open in 1915,
Logan   was   asked   by   a
committee of students to assist in drawing
up a constitution for the original AMS.
"The overriding concern of everyone
who worked on the document was to create
an atmosphere in which students were free
to run their own affairs," said Logan.
When classes started in the fall of 1915,
Logan left the students and went overseas
to war.
Not until 1920 did he return to Vancouver to teach Latin and Greek, which was
still housed at temporary quarters in Fair-
view makeshift huts in the shadow of the
Vancouver General Hospital.
"Nowadays people refer to UBC's early
buildings as the Fairview shacks but that
term came later during the Trek," he says.
LOGAN
"Everyone expected that our stay there
would be a short one, and when these expectations were not realized, the students
undertook to organize the Great Trek."
" The student protest was successful. Students and faculty moved into their new
quarters at Point Grey in 1925.
"Students have always been interested
in helping the university. Activities such as
the Trek and the Back Mac campaign are
part of that tradition."
Logan was first elected to the senate in
1930, was a member until 1947, and later
from 1955 until 1961. He was elected by the
senate to the board of governors in 1941 and
served on that body until 1946.
He was head of the classics department
from 1949 until 1953.
After his retirement from this post he
edited the UBC Alumni Chronicle and wrote
a 268-page history of the university called
Tuum Est.
He has continued to teach as special
lecturer, giving courses on Plato and the
Roman poet Virgil.
"I don't make a point of giving advice
to students, but when I'm asked, I tell them
only one thing. And that is, to find the kind
of work that they will enjoy always."
"There's ntohing new in that idea of
course. I learned it from the Greek philosopher Aristotle many years ago."
Logan will be honored again on March
6 in a dinner at the faculty club. Appropriately the affair will be presided over by
Malcolm McGregor, one of Logan's students
in the 193 0's and the man who succeeded
him as head of the classics department in
1953.
CYC recruiters here
Long hours, frustrating work, and little pay are the prospects offered by a company now interviewing on campus.
The organization is the Company of Young Canadians who
are recruiting students willing to build a better Canada.
CYC organizers Gary Taylor and Collin Thompson will
show films and speak about the CYC in Buchanan 106 today
at noon.
The CYC was organized in 1966 to help Canadian people to
work out their own problems.
Volunteers are carefully recruited and skills will be
matched to the jobs to be done.
There are no specific educational requirements. The primary requirement is an ability to work with other people.
More than 30 projects are now in operation, employing
66 volunteers. More training courses will be set up this year.
five
&
What does a renegade
cleric have in common with
a sensual moralist who
hates "erudite dwarfs, eunuchs,
and oracular donkeys" — with
an ex-varsity literary
mogul — with "a Monster from
Toronto" — with sex on the CNR?
We have the answers because
we've read A Church
Without God, Periods of
the Moon, Scratch One Dreamer,
Place D'Armes, and
Watcha Gonna Do Boy... Watcha
Gonna Be?
And so does your campus bookstore
for $2.50 each.
McClelland & stewart
The Canadian Publishers
SALE
RUSHANTS
CAMERAS
4538 W. 10th Ave.
STILL CAMERAS
Yashicaflex 2M Twin Lens
Used
Anscoflex 2Vi Reflex Used
Zeiss Nettar 2% F/4.5 Used
Mamiya—16 Auto  F/2.8
Sub—min Used
29.9S
9.50
19.95
39.95
5.95
Ansco Cadet 127 Used
PHONE FOR SALE SHEET
224-5858 224-9112
M6 VeSt4*/M
THIS   WEEK   ONLY
S   K   I
• CONTACT LENSES
AVAILABLE OHLYAT OUR OFFICES
Only Vent-Air invisible lenses are designed with four
air vents that permit better circu'ation of the eye's
natural moisture and air so necessary for proper wear.
NOW AN UNPRECEDENTED EXTRA-with every new
pair of Vent-Air contact lenses you will receive a spare
pair at no extra charge... tinted grey, blue, green, or
brown as desired.. '10%  Student Discount
Learn all the advantages of our unique "No-Risk"
wearing plan. Come in for your personal no-obligation
demonstration today...You may see without glasses
tomorrow! Remember, Vent-Air invisible lenses are
only available at our offices.
CHECK-UP • REPLACEMENT • DUPLICATION
Of All Types of Contact Lenses.
HOURS:
BIFOCALS
TOO!
No
Obligation!
UNO TODAY
FOR FKt
HUKTMTU
B00KUT
Lay-away plan
JMe
SUSSES
p.m. daily incl. Sat.; Monday to 8 p.m. t
Suite 616, Burrard Bldg.'""80*-*-™"\
1030 W. Georgia St., Vancouver, B.C. '
MU 3-7207
Pleat* send me your new Illustrated booklet
and the cost of Invisible lenses.
Mr.
Mrs.
MiM „   .,	
Address.
-lone-
Phone
City	
OFFICES TMOWNOUT ».$.«. MM CMHM
I
I
r
i
i
i
i
i
i
.j Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 2,  1967
Alumni get in to act
probe student gov't
Everyone is studying university government this year and the UBC Alumni Association is no exception.
The association is the third group at
UBC to study the student's role in the university.
The four-man alumni committee headed
by Vancouver lawyer Sholto Hebenton has
just completed the first phase of the project,
association president Ken Martin said Friday.
Martin said the association decided to
undertake the study because both the faculty and students at UBC have made proposals for changes in university government.
The other three committee members are
James Killeen, Hugh Legg and George
Morfitt. They are all UBC graduates from
the 1950's.
"We feel the picture isn't complete until
we have presented proposals ourselves," said
Martin.
"We like to think that we can be more
objective about this. We have less of a stake
in the matter than other groups."
He said the committee has completed its
preliminary work which consisted of studying the 1966 Duff-Berdahl report on university government in Canada and the reports
of the two UBC committees.
A UBC faculty association committee
chaired by mathematics professor B. N.
Moyls and the president's committee chaired by law professor C. B. Bourne released
reports last October.
Both committees recommended students
have the right to elect three representatives
to serve on the senate, the governing body
concerned with academic matters.
They also suggested students be represented on the board of governors by a non-
student rector.
AMS also made a formal appeal to the
senate on Feb. 13 for the right to elect five
members to that body. UBC president John
Macdonald said Feb. 19 he favors student
representation on the senate.
Martin said the alumni committee is
now interviewing UBC faculty, students,
alumni, administration officials, and businessmen interested in university affairs on
student representation in university government.
The report will be completed May 11
when it will be presented to the alumni for
approval.
Martin also said the association is establishing an alumni interview project, under
which various alumni will be available to
UBC students to provide them with detailed
information on the daily work in their profession.
PE tries tricycles
Physical education week concludes today
with the annual tricycle race.
The race will run out alongside a boat
race, with both presented by physical education enterprises week.
The foregoing contests of athletic prowess
shall commence at 12:40 p.m. in the main
library lily pond.
Any faculty found delinquent in producing required contestants shall be publicly
ridiculed and shall suffer humiliation, according to jock spokesman Ernie Yacub.
Come and PAINT-IN at the
OPEN HOUSE PAINT-IN
Saturday, Buchanan Quad
Bring a  Friend, All Materials  Provided
Sign Up, Brock 106 Toddy
Hyde Park at U.B.C?
COME AND AGITATE
For the Reform of Your Choice
OPEN HOUSE Soapboxing
In Front of Library,  Friday & Saturday
Speakers'   Stand   Provided
SALE
RUSHANTS
CAMERAS
4539 W. 10»h Ave.
USED  MOVIE CAMERAS
Keystone 8mm 8.50
Kodak 8mm 19.50
Sankyo 8T Turret 13mm F1.9 24.50
Bolex 16mm
w/F1.9 10mm Switar
F1.8 25mm Yvar 295.00
PHONE FOR SALE SHEET
224-5858
224-9112
Social Change Not Social Work
Company of Young Canadians
presents
Wjmxaa and (bfacuA&wn
THURSDAY, NOON
BU 104
This Diamond Ring Is Worth
All Of $1,000,000/
(To The Girl Who Wears It.)
And 10% discount to the yoong man who
gives it. Which explains why most students
consult Grassies on Seymour before buying important items like jewellery. Or anything else
for that matter. Because Grassies' 10%
Student Preferential Discount Policy covers all
their merchandise. An invaluable factor . . .
whatever   the  amount   you   wish   to  spend.
* $200: Retail Value/$180: To You.
566  SEYMOUR
685-2271
Officers In The Canadian Forces Enjoy Challenging Jobs
With Excitement, Travel and Responsibility, and
There May Be A Place For You Among Them
UNDER GRADS
May Qualify For Subsidized
University Training — Including:
• Tuition Fully Paid
• Book Allowance
• $180 M. Salary
12  Mo.   Yr.   While   Attending   University
• Month  Paid Holiday Annually
• Free Medical & Dental Care
• An Assured Future
UNIVERSITY GRADS
May Qualify For :
• Immediate Commissions
• Excellent Pay
• An Assured Future in a Unique and
Interesting Profession
• Early Pension Benifits At Top Rates
Phone or Visit The
Canadian Forces
Recruiting Centre
547 Seymour St.
Vancouver
684-7341 Thursday, March 2, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Extramurals vital
By IAN DONALD
Pres. Men's Athletic Assoc
Athletics are under fire.
The AMS president and treasurer elect have stated publicly that grants to athletics must be cut to provide for the
rising costs of clubs, undergraduate societies, and other student
activities. The Ubyssey editorial of Feb. 24 said with characteristic sympathy: "Extramurals are our most superfluous
activity."
What is being done is a set-off athletics against other
student activities. Because they are both vital to the university community, and because they are so inherently different,
they ought not to be compared to each other so that a "robbing
of Peter to give to Paul" situation results.
Financially, UBC students pay the lowest per capita fee
towards athletics in Canada, $5 compared with a national average of $15; and this supports the largest collegiate program
across the country. This fee has remained at the present
amount since 1958; the administration and alumni have been
filling in the many gaps over the years of increased athletic
activities and rising costs to keep athletics above water. AMS
supported activities, some of which did not exist when the fee
was instituted, have become more and more ambitious and
have made increasing claims on the AMS treasury. Athletics
has had to remain content for almost ten years with its inadequate $5.
What the present student leaders neglect to realize is that
athletics is one of the few rallying points where students can
congregate and be a part of a unified UBC spirit. UBC is a
computer campus of vast size, naturally the direction is against
unity; athletics can, as the new SUB probably will, provide an
opportunity for students to come out of their protective pockets
of interest and be a part of one institution. They also fail to
appreciate that athletics at this university has a considerable
tradition behind it, more highly developed and appreciated
when the campus was smaller, but nonetheless commanding
nationwide, and in some cases worldwide respect.
University athletics have implications which reach beyond
the campus. When UBC teams get into the newspapers and
travel to other provinces or countries, UBC is represented to
persons who otherwise would never hear of our school; not
merely from the sporting point of view, but also from the
broader angle of the university as a total institution. Athletics
provide a sense of pride to alumni and the local community
when they note for example that our basketball team is the
best in western Canada, or that the field hockey team practic-
aly makes up the tota of Canada's national team. The tradition
is impressive; the importance is vital.
Why should student financial support of athletics be a
political football? Last year, the AMS council saw that athletics
should be put on a stable year to year basis by protecting the
athletic fee from the vageries of yearly changing student leaders and hostile political pressure groups. The AMS executive
realized the inherent difference between athletics and competing interests, and put out a referendum in March, 1966 ask-
ig whether or not students wanted to pay that $5 directly into
the administration. The students voted a resounding 82 per
cent in favour of the proposal. The administration has not yet
taken over the fee and the present members of the AMS joint
executive have all expressed their desire to bite large pieces
out of the $5 before the transfer is implemented.
It is up to the student body as a voting public to direct
the council through the general meeting and subsequent
referendums that athletics is in a class of its own, that it deserves the support it is now receiving, and that student leadership must give due regard to extramural athletics as an essential element of campus life and the part it plays off the campus.
GYMNASTICS-FRLSAl-GYM
RUGBY-FRL 3:30-5TADHUH
LEROY ENGLISH
.   Calgary captain
Girls successful in
grass hockey play
Despite some unfortunate
mishaps, both women's field
hockey teams had a successful weekend of play on Vancouver Island.
Saturday afternoon the
JV's played to a scoreless tie
against Queen Margaret's
second eleven, and the Thunderettes defeated the first
eleven 3-2 in a very close
match.
Each team played two
games Sunday. The JV's won
their first game 3-0 but lost
to Norfolk House 'by the same
score in the afternoon. An
injury to one of the players
forced the varsity team to
play both matches with only
ten on the field. This meant
some switches in positioning
and style of play.
The team still easily defeated University of Victoria
5-1, led by Judy Males, scoring four goals.
However, they were not
quite able to keep up the
pace against the Oak Bay
Ladies who gave them their
first loss of the season, 2-1.
Captain Marg Dempsey
scored for the Thunderettes.
1916 SWINGERS . . . girls' grass hockey team
French Graduates
200 requests for secondary
school teachers received
from Ghana, Nigeria and
Sierra Leone.
Apply CUSO, Brock Ext. 165
or International House
BOBBY HULL-
Golden Boy
of Hockey
The story of Bobby Hull whose
awesome slapshot makes goalies
cringe . . . the man described
by coach Billy Reay as being
"almost too good to be true"
. . . the man who scored a record 54 goals last season and is
still burning up the NHL this
year. How did he get his start?
. . . What do teammates and
opponents think of him? . . .
What are his plans for the
future? Read it all in "BOBBY
HULL - Golden Boy of
Hockey" in March Reader's
Digest. Get it today!
High school hoopsters
The 11th annual B.C. High School Girls' Basketball
Tournament begins 8:30 a.m. Thursday and continues to the
finals 9 p.m. Saturday in the Memorial gym.
Thursday's schedule for the first round draw:
8:30 a.m.—Cranbrook vs New Westminster
9:40 a.m.—Nanaimo   vs  Abbotsford
10:50 a.m.—Courtenay vs Salmon Arm
12:00 p.m.—McBride  vs  M.E.I.
1:10 p.m.—Penticton vs Trail
2:20 p.m.—Tupper vs Skeena
Take advantage of this chance to watch top provincial
competition.
HOCffl-FRLSAl-ARBLA
BOOK STORE
ANNUAL SALE of
Discontinued Texts
Paperbacks
Stationery
Miscellaneous Items
BEGINS
Tuesday, March 7, 1967
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters.
/■S.N., Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, March 2, 1967
7WEEN CLASSES
Draft dodgers discussed
AAC-SCM
Doug Sanders, a lawyer,
discusses draft dodgers today, noon, Ang. 104.
HOUSING SEMINAR
Discussion of the principles
of co-operative housing, today, noon, Bu. 202.
CYC
Movies and discussion, today, noon, Bu. 106.
FINE ARTS
Prof. Ian McNairn discus-
'No gov't aid
for draftees/
Lester says
OTTAWA (CUP)—A $4,000
grant to the Student Union
for Peace Action has no connection with a SUPA pamphlet telling prospective American draft dodgers how to
beat the draft by moving to
Canada, prime minister Pearson said in the Commons.
The 1965 privy council
grant was used to pay for a
report by SUPA on its community activities, not to produce the 12-page booklet,
Pearson told opposition leader John Diefenbaker.
ses the meaning and purpose
of Nicola Pisano's pulpit in
the baptistry at Pisa, today,
noon, in the gallery.
GRAD CLASS
Meeting today, noon, Ang.
110.
GERMAN CLUB
Booth   building   today   in
the armory. Sign up to man
booth Friday and Saturday.
ATC
Discussion   of   the   legal
aspects of marriage, tonight,
7:30    p.m.,    ATC    students
center.
ARCHAEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting today, noon, archaeology lab.
SPORT CAR CLUB
Election    meeting   today,
noon, chem. 250.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Josh McDowell speaks on
prophetic schedule of events
at College Life in Ed. auditorium tonight, 9:01.
SUS SCIENCE LECTURES
Geneticist, Professor J. M.
Lerner, from Berkeley, discusses Genetics and Mankind's Concerns today, noon,
Hebb theatre.
PRE-MED
Microscope discussion noon,
today, histology lab, medical
block B.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Fund raising dance and
party,   Friday,   8  p.m.,  Rio
EYE-CATCHING EYE WEAR
W      _r 1MV1
Better vision can mean better marksl Start the new
year right with a visit to
you eye physician. Even if
your prescription is unchanged, a fashionable
new frame can do wonders
for the disposition.
GLASSES - CONTACT LENS
"A COMPLETE OPTICAL SERVICE"
SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT
Hall,   Joyce  and Kingsway.
Admission $1.
MUSSOC
All those involved in Secretary, Grand Old Ivy, Coffee
Break and Brotherhood report to auditorium, 2:45, Friday for rehearsal.
DESERET CLUB
Joe Hapi, New Zealand
Maori, speaks on Polynesian
Anthropology as related to
the Book of Mormon, Monday, noon, Bu. 216.
Nice
and easy
every
day
Diefenbaker     had    asked
whether the grant was used
to  assist publication of the
pamphlet   and   whether   the
SALE
government  was  aware  the
money  was  to be  used  for
"this unusual purpose".
RUSHANT'S
CAMERAS
4538 W. 10th Ave.
ESCURIAL
NEW  SLIDE  PROJECTORS
A   Savage  Farce
Mfg. List   Sals
by
Kodak Carousel 600     107.50 82.50
Ghelderode
Sawyer 550R Remote     137.95 84.50
Argus 543 Auto Remote 109.95 74.50
Frederic Wood Theatre
Argus 541 Auto Remote   94.95 64.50
Fri.   March   3,    12:30,   8:00
Sat., March 4, 2:00, 8:00
PHONE FOR SALE SHEET
NO CHARGE
224-5858            224-9112
On or off the slopes, you're totally
relaxed, totally confident... no
matter what time of the month it
happens to be.
Tampax tampons, worn internally, make this possible.
They free you from all the restraints of pins, pads and belts.
They free you from all the worries
and discomfort of odor,
chafing and irritation. And
everything, even the silken-smooth container-applicator, is completely disposable.
Tampax tampons are available
in 3 absorbency sizes: Regular,
Super and Junior wherever such
products are sold.
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE
CENTRE
SERVICE   -   PARTS
3627 W. Broadway
ACCESSORIES
731-7510
Fer Reasonable
Banquet Rata
Phone
FLAME
SUPPER CLUB
HE 4-5454
DEVELOPED Br A DOCTOR
NOW USED BV MILLIONS OF WOMEN
TAMPAX TAMPONS ARE MADE ONLY BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE,  ONTARIO.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost J- Found
11
MAN'S TIMEX WATCH WITH
black leather strap and metal
calendar lost near gym. Finder
phone   Jim   at   985-1804. ._
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
took my black "London" coat
from Brock please contact Walt
Esakin at  876-6188.  I have yours.
LOST       BROWN WALLET       IN
vicnity    of   War Memorial   Gym.
valuable     papers contact     John
224-3488.
PAIR OF LADY'S GLASSES
found. Claim at Publications Of-
fice,   Brock   Hall.
CAR KEYS IN  SEAL SKIN  CASE.
Finder   please   phone   738-6360.
Coming Dances
12A
YOU   WON'T   BELIEVE
your eyes and ears when you
know what's coming to campus
Friday, March 10th! Details tomorrow.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
THE CAMPUS SHOPPE (in the
Village) 6732 University Blvd.
228-8110 announces new store
hours. Tues. to Sat. 9 a.m. - 5:30
p.m., closing Mondays, commencing March 6th. Sale continues on
dresses, skirts, sweaters, etc. We
carry top brand names, "Dalkeith", "Panther Pants", "Shirt
Tales", "Shamrock", "Kayser",
etc.
ESCORTS UNLIMITED: OUR
unique service can provide a perfectly trained gentleman for any
and all social functions. Further
information,   1157   Steveston   Hwy.
GEM-ROCK CRAFTS — .121 WEST
Broadway, 731-1721. Stop here for
your gifts! Jade and other jewel-
ry,   $1   up.
GRAD CLASS GENERAL MEET-
ing Thursday, March 2. Angus
110,  12:30 p.m.
UBC OPEN SQUASH TOURNA-
ment, March 6-12; enter at AMS
Office   by March  3.
OPEN HOUSE PAINT-IN, MARCH
4. All materials supplied, interested? Bring a friend. Sign up today
in  Brock   106.
DON'T MISS EL CIRCULO'S
presentation of Le Cueva De Salamanca, March 3rd, 7:30 p.m.,
March 4th, 2:30, 7:30,Buchanan
106.
AN APOLOGY TO CLASSIFIED
Advertisers! Due to space limitations in tomorrow's Ubyssey
there will be no classified advertising section. Ads already accepted for that date will run
on Tuesday unless other instructions are recived by 11 a.m. Mon-
day.       	
SCIENTIFIC TRANSLATIONS
from Russian, German or French
B.Portier Dept. of Metallurgy
228-2676.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 50 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39A
If your life is to dull,
And  no  fun  atol,
A   haircut   will   probably right   it.
Then   go  out  prepared   to   fight   it.
CAMPUS   BARBER   SHOP
LT. B.A. GRANT: I'LL SHOW YOU
or anyone else Vancouver's "gay"
life    at   the    Castle.    H.   Podvin,
A.T.C.
TO SHELAG AVECLA FANTAS-
tic "Bod" & red hair. How does
it feel after 19. Good luck on the
twentieth. From the Bendlt gang
&   God.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY FAST FIN-
gers McSex. Hope you never get
arthritis.
LEATHERSMITHE MAKES CUS-
tom, entirely handmade, full-
grain, long-wearing, Aesthetic &
escetic, lovely-to-look-at, Sandals.
2057   W.   4th   Ave.,   736-6177.
YOUR MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS
theses, what - have - you, type
neatly and reliably at reasonable
cost.   244-4561.
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS, THESES
accurately typed elec. machine.
Phone   224-5046,   after   6   p.m.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—ESSAYS,
theses, regular rates. 41st Ave.,
Dunbar,   Marine area.   261-9027.	
TYPING DONE MY HOME, Experienced.   Phone   255-9483.
Typing
43
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8684   Granville   St.
70th   &  Granville  St. 263-4680
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
call   277-5640.
ESSAYS,   THESES   EXPERTLY
typed.   Phone   733-7819.	
EXPERIENCED TYPIST WILL
type essays, theses etc. at home.
581-8660.
FAST,      ACCURATE     TYPIST
Electric.    224-6129.
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS. THESES
accurateily typed on I.B.M. Selectric. Phone 325-0368 after 5:30
p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
81
ALL YOU VOLPTUOUS A-GO-GO
girls last chance auditions Friday.
Phone tonight 261-2467 after 6
p.m.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM 8th AVE-
nue near Crown, 8:30 and 6:30.
Call   Brian   and   Eileen,   224-7474.
Travel Opportunities
16
AUTOMOTIVE  ft MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1953 CHEV. SEDAN. CITY TESTED. Good condition, $100. AM 6-
0732.	
1962 SPRITE MARK II, $995.00.
261-5042.
FOR SALE — '64 MGB, EXCEL-
lent condition, low mileage, radio,
682-5786.
TR3  '62.   HARD AND  SOFT TOPS.
731-0161,   evenings.	
1956 M.G.A. GOOD CONDITION
runs well, custom radio. RE. 1-
7084.
MUST SELL 1967 MORRIS GOOD
cond. Phone Rick 684-6830, evenings.
1957 PLYMOUTH, 2 - TONE, 4 -
door, automatic, R. and H. good
running condition. Must sell. Can
be seen on campus. Ph. 876-6963,
btwn. 5:30-7:00 p.m. or see Danny
in   Radsoc  at   noon.
V.W. NEW TIRES & BATTERY,
radio, good upholst., mech. excel.,
$250.    CA.   4-0196.
1931 DESOTO 3 WINDOW COUPE
6 cylinder stock running condition,
phone   261-8656,   after   5   p.m,
CONVERTIBLE — 58 HILLMAN,
new clutch, tires, radio, good
transportation, 1150, phone Rob
AM.   6-8018.
Accessories
22
WILL PAY CASH FOR CAR
radios, tachs., accessories, etci
Phone Jim 988-4564 after 3:00
p.m.
Music
63
INSTRUCTOR WANTED IN POPU-
lar piano—two hrs. a week in my
home,   call   263-3466.	
BASS   FIDDLE —  GOOD   TONE —
needs   finish.   224-1631   —   Marve.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts. 736-6923.
EXPERT TUTORING IN MATH,
Science, Engineering. $3/hr. Minimum 5 lessons. 876-1869.
ENGLISH, HISTORY, FRENCH
tutoring by B.A., M.A., B.L.S.
No   contracts.     Phone   736-6923.
Instruction Wanted
•6
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE Tl
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen's Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE   6-0712.
Beer   Bottle  Driverln
at Rear of Store
WOOD SKIS IN GOOD SHAPE
with marker harness $35.00. Phone
261-7770.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
ONE SLEEPING ROOM FOR SEN-
ior male student. Private entce.
Shower. Light housekeeping facil-
ities,   $50  mth.   CA 8-8814.	
RENT ROOM OR SHARE APART -
ment, UBC vicinity, with teacher.
Phone   733-3983.
Room ft Board 62
ROOM AND BOARD FOR QUIET
male student. 4595 W. 6th. Phone
224-4866.
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Zeta Beta Tau house. Excellent food. Low rates ($65). Friendly atmosphere. Phone Jerry 224-
9660.
Furn. Houses and Apts. 83
WANTED—ONE GIRL TO SHARE
three bedroom flat. Fire place.
1742 Dunbar. Phone 731-1544. $40
month.

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