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The Ubyssey Sep 26, 1978

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Array Court battles
loom for AMS
By CHRIS BOCKING
The Alma Mater Society plans
to take the university to court
unless students get representation
on faculty tenure committees,
student law representative Dave van
Blarcom said Monday.
"Student politicians have been
shafted at every turn going through
normaJ channels, so now we're
trying the legal route."
But Erich Vogt, faculty and
student affairs vice-president said
he did. not believe students should
be on the tenure committee.
"I do not believe that students
are as well qualified as professors to
judge whether or not tenure should
be gratited to professors," he said.
"We value students' opinions
expressed by means of teacher
evaluations, but students don't
know enough about the scholarly
and research aspects of teaching."
The tenure committee decides
which   professors   are   granted
tenuer, a system in which a
professor cannot be fired except for
cases of gross misconduct.
"Only judges and senators have
the same sweetheart deal that
university professors have." van
Blarcom said.
Most of the academic problems
which plague students are related to
the tenure committee,  he added.
"We have a status quo faculty
here. Most of the members can be
classified as male and stodgy."
He said imaginative and innovative professors are often
denied tenure because they are
controversial.
"Our legal case is pretty good. It
is one of the more sound actions
proposed lately by student
politicians."
Van Blarcom said if the AMS
succeeds in its court case, his one
fear is that education minister Pat
McGeer will amend the Universities
See page 2: FACULTY
Foreign student
'flood' limited
By FRAN MACLEAN
Foreign students seeking
enrolment at UBC must face fierce
entry requirements regardless of
their competence, UBC registrar
Jack Parnall said Monday.
The number of foreign students
at UBC is well below the national
average because of the university's
unique admission policy, he said.
"No one can accuse us of
flooding UBC with foreign
students."
Parnall said the UBC admission
policy requires foreign students to
advance as far as possible in their
own education system before
seeking enrolment at UBC.
The number of foreign students
at UBC has never been "a
problem," he said.
"Even if they meet this
requirement we only take them if
they are good enough and if there is
room," he added.
"We expect them to be firmly
established as good students he
said. "We would never take a
foreign student that is only
marginally good whereas we might
take one from Burnaby."
Education minister Pat McGeer
has told the B.C. Students'
Federation the provincial government might impose a limit on the
number of foreign students attending post-secondary institutions
in B.C.. High unemployment
figures and pressure to hire
Canadians first for teaching
assistant positions were blamed for
the proposed foreign student
limitations.
Parnall said if an opening occurs
for a graduate student at UBC, the
best student is accepted regardless
of what country he or she is from.
As a general rule UBC does not
accept foreign students as undergraduates, he said, but at the
graduate level the university is
looking for brilliance and could not
possibly exclude foreign students as
candidates.
"It would be quite a restriction if
we couldn't hire foreigh students as
TAs," he said.
A foreign student may be very
competent and yet be unable to
come to UBC without the financial
security a teaching assistant
position would ensure, Parnall
said.
He added that B.C. students are
always accepted to the professional
faculties before  foreign  students.
"There is a greater demand for
local students in faculties such as
medicine, nursing and dentistry so
we woldn't take foreign students
without looking to our own first."
Parnall said McGeer would find
it very difficult to impose
limitations on the number of
foreign students coming to UBC.
McGeer could only restrict
foreign student enrolment at UBC
by implementing legislation similar
to Alberta's and Manitoba's, which
forces foreign students to pay
higher fees than Canadian students,
he said.
NDP education critic Dennis
Cocke said Monday it is important
to keep UBC open to foreign
students.
"Pat McGeer might have had a
difficult time getting his education
if the United States had that policy
(limitations on the number of
foreign students)," he said.
RCMP want student pics
ST. JOHN S (CUP) — The RCMP wants photos of all students at
Memorial University in Newfoundland.
In early September, the local detachment of the RCMP asked the
campus photography club to provide pictures of the approximately 5,000
Memorial students. According to an RCMP spokesperson, the force
wanted the photos to compare with a sketch of an armed robbery suspect.
The photo club has not complied with the request. The club does not
have photos of all Memorial students and is not sure about the legality of
releasing photos of individual students without their consent, a club
spokesman said.
Several Memorial student union representatives said they felt the RCMP
wanted the pictures for the possible identification of members of left wing
groups and drug users.
THE UBYSSEY
[Vol. LXI, No. 7 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1978
228-2301
— richard schreiner phofo
GRINNING GARDENERS UNEARTH clandestine corpse in annual physical plant treasure hunt. Gravediggers
gloated over priceless find clad in authentic period costume. Experts at nearby museum of anthropology surmised
well-preserved stiff circa 1895, would bring top price on next month's international museum market.
Grads need aces up sleeve
By STEVE HOWARD
Instead of being fussy about
the jobs they get, graduating
students must be prepared to face
the competitive job market, says
the manager of UBC's campus
placement office.
Not only is it important for
students to make a rational choice
of courses, but they should also
seek summer work that is career
related, says Ray Chew of the
Canada Employment Centre, which
opened in Brock Hall in May.
Planning ahead will help grads
avoid the dilemma of expecting to
land a job related to their studies
and of being unprepared to enter a
job market which has been tight for
four years, he says.
"Students look at me quizzically
when I say don't go for the big buck
in summer work, but you should
see the look of glee on employers'
faces when they find out a student
in a bachelor of commerce program
in accounting has spent three
summers doing bookkeeping."
Chew says a student may
rationally choose courses if he or
she consults history of employers
and looks at foreca sts for a particular field prepared by Canada
Employment and Immigration.
"Because of the current employment situation, not every BA in
psychology is going to do as well as
a Bachelor of Commerce in accounting, who is going to get at
least a few bites. He (the arts
student) can do not so badly if he
has some relevant experience, has
worked in the social services for a
couple of summers or has taken not
just the minimum (required)
courses, but has taken a few
commerce courses and can offer
something for a management
training program," Chew says.
"Although the general level of
educational requirements (for given
jobs) has increased, what is it that
employers look for above all? Is it
marks? No. Past experience is of
some importance. But the overwhelming decision-maker is attitude."
He says when employers choose
new staff they are thinking about
productivity, high staff turnover
and stability of the. employee.
And he says students should go
along with the appropriate rituals
when applying for jobs. In all parts
of a job search, in everything from
a proper covering letter and resume
to the interview, an applicant
should sense what is expected of
him and wear appropriate attire
even when going to an interview on
campus, he adds.
"Another thing which is important is communication skills,"
he says. "If you cannot get across
your ideas, whether in writing or
verbally, you will run into serious
problems."
"1 don't think students are
paying enough attention to getting
ready for careers. I promote the
idea of career education. It should
start in high school."
Chew has been involved in setting
up an experimental career
education program in Vancouver
high schools, in which information
about jobs is arranged by computer.
"Students should start thinking
about their interests at Grade
Eight," he says. "And they should
have more idea about what they
want by   grade 12."
The main thrust of the campus
employment centre is career-
related, Chew says, but the office
also tries to find summer, part-
time, casual and  Christmas jobs.
"Our placement could range
from (helping) someone who knew
what he or she wanted since age
three, who took all the right
courses to become an accountant,
to a person who doesn't know what
he wants, but liKes social services a
bit," says Chew.
While the placement officers
merely act as brokers for a student,
See page 8: JOB
AMS given gears
The engineering undergraduate
society will reveal a new constitutional proposal today which
would radically alter the current
Alma Mater Society constitution.
The Ubyssey learned from
reliable sources Monday that the
proposal recommends bringing
back at-large elections for AMS
executive officers.
The two student board of
governors representatives who
currently sit on the student
representative assembly will
continue to sit on the new council,
but the new proposal drastically
reduces representation of student
senators. The proposed amendments would allow only one senator
to represent all student senators on
a revamped student council.
The council will also be
drastically altered and representation will be cut in half. Instead of
basing representation on the basis
of population, all undergraduate
presidents of degree-granting
faculties will have a seat on council.
The current arrangement gives
more representatives to large
faculties such as arts and science.
Former AMS president BMce
Armstrong said Monday the new
proposal recommended s some
good changes, but said all student
organizations should be given an
opportunity to discuss possible
constitutional changes and make
suggestions.
The engineers collected 500
signatures on a petition to force a
referendum. Page 2
THE      U BYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26, 1978
'Faculty full of dead
• II •
From page 1
Act to preclude student participation.
"Basically, the administration is
very much pro-faculty. They look
out for faculty interests. As far as
the administration is concerned
students  are secondary citizens."
Publishing, faculty involvement
and teaching are the three main
concerns of the faculty, said Van
Blarcom.
He said only in theory is teaching
given an equal place with
publishing.
"The problem is that the
committee is composed only of
status   quo   professors.    Their
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priorities are faculty involvement
and publishing .Teaching is given a
much lower priority."
The faculty has been immensely
reluctant to allow their power to be
eroded, he said.
"Faculty are generally hired on a
two-year contract basis. After two
years they are re-evaluated. If they
have done a good job after two
two-year contracts, then they are
usually granted tenure."
At that point it becomes almost
impossible to get them off the
faculty, he said.
"We have a lot of dead wood in
the faculty now."
Professors who were granted
tenure 15 or 20 years ago are
currently making the tenure
decisions, he said.
"For example, psychology
professors will be judged by a
committee of psychology
professors."
The best way for students to get
involved at present is to let their
concerns be known to the administration, he said.
"I perceive this as such an important move. Student representation on the tenure committee is
really the king-pin in the whole
operation (in increasing student
participation)."
TRANSCENDENTAL MEDITATION
Special group meditation
and advanced lecture
for all meditators on Thurs.
Sept. 28, at 12:30 p.m.
in Henry Angus 210.
GIREERS
Public Service Canada
The class of  '79
This year, austerity measures have resulted in a marked decrease in
external recruitment for the Public Service of Canada.
Although our manpower requirements are lower than in previous
years, we will still be looking for a limited number of Canada's
finest graduating students.
For information and application forms, see your campus placement
office or your nearest Public Service Commission of Canada regional
staffing office. Your application must be postmarked no later than
October 11, 1978.
If you are interested in a career in any of the administrative areas,
you must write the General Examination, on Monday, October 16,
at 7 pm.
If you are applying to the Foreign Service, you must write the
Foreign Service Exam, on Saturday, October 14, at 9 am.
Check your campus placement office for the location of the exam
centre nearest you.
Competition 79-4000
I*
Public Service Commission
of Canada
Commission de la fonction publique
du Canada
HELP YOURSELF
FREE SELF-HELP WORKSHOPS
TO INCREASE YOUR SKILLS
WORKSHOP 1 — Effective Study Habits
Four one hour sessions on developing
more efficient methods of study.
WORKSHOP 2 — Personal Growth
A small group workshop to help define
personal goals, set plans to reach them and
to practice new behaviours with the support
of other interested persons.
These free programs are designed to help students develop skills. All workshops
commence the week of October 2. Sign up NOW since enrollment is limited.
THE   OFFICE   OF   STUDENT   SERVICES   PONDEROSA   ANNEX   (F)
Starts Thurs.
ROGER MOORE
JAMES BOND 007
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OMBUDSPERSON
The Selections Committee will be accepting applications for the position of AMS Ombudsperson.
Application forms can be obtained from the A.M.S.
Business Office SUB Rm. 266. Other information can
be obtained from the A.M.S. Student Offices in SUB
Rm. 236.
Pam Rosenger
Secretary/Treasurer
228-2050 SUB Room 250
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710 YATES MALL VICTORIA 383-2144 Tuesday, September 26, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
No hope for oppressed Uganda
By GLEN SCHAEFER
There is little hope for an end to
Idi Amin's oppressive rule of
Uganda, a former colonial official
said Monday.
University of Bristol professor
Kenneth Ingham told about 75
people in Buchanan that Amin has
a "second sense" about plots to
overthrow him.
"As a statesman Amin is stupid
and inept, but his judgement of
human nature is good," said
Ingham, a former British civil
servant in Uganda.
He said the Ugandan dictator's
position is reinforced by a large
oppressive army which tyranizes the
impoverished and disorganized
populace.
"Amin senses threats quickly."
Most people in Uganda subsist
on farming and live away from the
main roads to avoid being
harrassed by the army, said
Ingham.
He added that Amin ensures his
army's loyalty by giving the soldiers
the few consumer goods that get
into Uganda and "what little
foreign currency there is in the
country."
Uganda has virtually no domestic
industry except for subsistance
farming and coffee, but the coffee
crop is sold to buy arms and
equipment for the army, he said.
Some tribal groups were pleased
with Amin's decision to expel
Asians living in Uganda, said
Ingham.
He said the expulsion of the
Asians, who were mostly
tradesmen, artisans and merchants,
meant that "very few people were
left with the capital and expertise to
run commercial enterprises."
Uganda suffers from an acute
shortage of consumer goods.
The majority of Uganda's people
are poor and powerless because of
Amin's desire to keep his army in
riches, he said.
—geof wheelwright photo
REFUSE FOR RECYCLING doesn't include car, explains Dave Johnson, coordinator of off-campus housing,
who displays campus rag in attempt to humor intrepid photog. Environment enthusiast took waste to city recycling depot at foot of Cambie. Depot also takes newspaper, bottles and tin cans, but all other garbage goes to city
dump in Delta.
NORML pres predicts denim dope
GUELPH (CUP) — If the
National Organization for the
Reform of Marijuana Laws
(NORML) is correct, you may soon
be able to smoke that old pair of
jeans instead of throwing them out.
The industrial applications of
marijuana, including using hemp
fibres   to   produce   a   denim-like
material, will be among the topics
discussed at NORML's first
Canadian conference, being held at
the University of Guelph in
November.
"I am foreseeing the legalization
of marijuana within four or five
years," said Wolfgang Seibert,
president of NORML. "No one has
yet done a thorough study on what
Vote set on axed UVic pix
VICTORIA — If you think
Alma Mater Society funding
cutbacks at UBC are bad, stay
away from the University of
Victoria.
UVic's AMS is holding a
referendum in October to see if
students are willing to pay $1 to
have pictures put back on their
library/AMS cards.
The photos were dropped from
student cards in order to save
$6,000 for the AMS and the UVic
administration.
The lack of picture identification has caused several
problems for students. Campus
pub manager Brian Peterson says
that students must produce some
photo identification to get into the
pub and an athletics department
spokesman said photo identification must be shown in order
to use the university's recreation
facilities.
But UVic's library in in-
concerned with photo identification, according to librarian
Dean Halliwell.
"We haven't used the photo on
the card for years. We don't care
if you loan your card to someone
e&e, as long as you take
responsibility for the books
borrowed on it. As far as we're
concerned, it's immeasurable
cheaper sot to have the photo on
the card.*1 he said.
AMS president Dave Council
says the referendum is a response
to many compaints from UVic
students who say their library card
was their only form of photo
identification.
UVic, unlike UBC, issues new
cards to students each academic
year and does not renew cards
from previous years. j
society and governments will have
to be prepared for when this
happens."
NORML will bring in top
lawyers, medical advisors, and
experts in agriculture and
marketing to discuss the future of
cannibas sativa at the three-day
conference. Seibert said student
and faculty research groups from
other universities will also attend.
The University of Guelph was
chosen as the conference site
because of its agricultural research
college, he said. It is also a good
place for recruiting new members,
he added.
The Central Student Association,
which officially supports the
decriminalization of marijuana,
will co-sponsor the conference.
"We will be in full co-operation
with NORML to make all our
resources available," said Bryan
Bedford, CSA vice-president activities.
Conference delegates will make
recommendations for age group
use, commercial aspects of
marijuana marketing and advertising, and medical uses.
NORML hopes to put out an
album of marijuana-related songs
("The Green, Green Grass of
Home", "Jumping Jack Hash",
etc.) using campus radio station
equipment. Royalties from the
album would go towards subsidizing NORML's on-going
research.
But Ingham said a revolt by the
people is unlikely.
"They can't fight an army of
20,000 well equipped soldiers."
Any successful overthrow would
have to come from the army and
would most likely result in another
military dictatorship similar to
Amin's, he said.
Amin was commander-in-chief
of the army during the government
of president Milton Obote. Amin,
who was in charge of army
recruitment in the sixties, began
recruiting his soldiers primarily
from northwest Uganda, an area
which supported him. He was
strengthening his personal support
in the army at the expense of
Obote, said Ingham.
Obote's position was insecure to
begin with, said Ingham, because
he had failed to reconcile the tribal
groups in Uganda. So when Obote
went to the prime ministers'
conference in Singapore in 1971,
Amin capitalized on Uganda's
disunity and seized power, he said.
"This was possible because
Uganda was a divided coutry, split
over the nature of sovereignty."
The internal tensions that
facilitated Amin's rise to power
were a legacy of the British colonial
authorities, said Ingham.
Uganda's colonial system was
dominated    by    the    Buganda
INGHAM . . . speaks on Amin
kingdom. When Uganda first
gained independance in the fifties,
the government took steps to
eliminate Bugana's dominance.
The more powerful tribal groups
were happy with Obote's overthrow
because they saw Amin as a
"simple, amiable soldier" whom
they could manipulate as they
pleased, said Ingham.
By assassinating all influential
government and military officials
who supported Obote, Amin
quickly consolidated his power,
said Ingham.
"Amin seized power because he
likes it, and kept increasing his
power because he had nothing else
to do."
West's lure grips
East Germany
By JEFF RANKIN
East Germans are suffering from
a massive identity crisis, Ralph
Wushke of the Lutheran Campus
Centre said Monday.
Wushke, who recently returned
from travels in both East and West
Germany, said East Germans
generally hold Western society and
consumer goods in higher esteem
than their own.
"One of the most frustrating
things for a person living in the
German Democratic Republic (East
Germany) is that there is a constant
reminder that they are not in the
West," said Wushke.
He said this is a phenomenon
unique to eastern European
countries but especially prevalent in
East Germany because of its
proximity to Western culture.
Exposure to West German
television channels and com-,
munication between relatives in the
East and West increases the
demand for Western products, said
Wushke.
But the scarcity of these goods
and the government system used to
import them is a cause of resentment among the reople, he added.
"In East Germany they have
something called Intershops, which
sell Tide, Crest, all the good brand
names that speak of the quality of
the West," said Wushke. "But you
can only shop there with Western
currency."
He said this means only people in
high places or with western connections can buy these goods.
"The tension is great. There has
been serious vandalism in the shops
because of the resentment created
by this whole system."
East Germans tend to degrade
their own manufactured goods
because they desire scarce Western
products, he said.
Wushke said the East Germans
he visited had plenty to eat, but
were unhappy about restrictions
place on travel and other aspects of
life.
"The West seems better to
them," said Wushke. "I think
they'd trade the problems of the
East for the problems of the West."
Wushke also said Levis are
available in East Germany, but
added he did not know whether or
not Rolling Stones records were for
sale.
Feds admit
employment
has fallen
OTTAWA (CUP) — A recently-
released government survey has
confirmed what the unemployed
have suspected for some time —
there really are fewer jobs this year.
Results from Statistics Canada's
job vacancy survey for June, July,
and August show the average daily
number of jobs vacant during the
summer decreased 10 per cent from
the same period in 1977.
For every 1,000 job openings
during those months, five were
vacant, unchanged from the
precious three months.
The comparable rate a year
earlier was six jobs per thousand.
The highest vacancy rate was in
Alberta with eleven vacancies per
thousand. Newfoundland had the
lowest rate with two vacancies for
every 1,000 filled jobs.
In B.C. the rate was five per
thousand, unchanged from the
previous year.
The survey estimated the number
of vacancies in all jobs was 48,2000,
while the number of full-time jobs
vacant was 43,2000.
In August, the number of
unemployed was 941,000.
The survey results will not be
compiled in the future, because
government cutbacks will eliminate
the program by 1979.
The NDP and labor groups have
suggested the cut was made to avoid
government embarrassment
because of the large discrepancy
between the number of jobs
available and the number of
unemployed. Statistics Canada
representatives have denied the
charge. Pag* 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26, 1978
Quality tenure
faculty facade
Every university professor knows the
trauma and anxiety which comes once
in every academic's life when he or she
is. considered for tenure.
It is a nervous time for any candidate;
acceptance means a job for life barring
conviction for any gross misdemeanors;
and rejection means being busted in the
academic world.
Although receiving tenure is important to the professor concerned, it is
also a crucial decision for the university
and one which will have a profound effect on students.
Depending on the powers that be,
students may be stuck with a master
teacher award candidate or a turkey.
Either way students have a right to
have some input in the tenure-granting
procedure. Tuition fees help pay for the
faculty members' salaries, so students
should demand to have a say in who
they are hiring with their fees.
For many years at this university, student politicians have been fighting, at
various levels of intensity and effectiveness, to get some kind of student
control over tenure-granting decisions.
The current battle led by student
representative assembly member Dave
van Blarcom is the most recent
manifestation of a fight which has been
going on for more than ten years.
It is encouraging to see that the Alma
Mater Society intends to take a harder
line with the university and resort to
court action if faculties continue to stall
student input in tenure decisions.
Tenure candidates are judged on the
basis of their teaching ability, research
and published material. University administration officials have often paid lip
service in the past to the importance of
teaching ability, but this university has
been plagued in the last few years with a
number of tenure decisions which have
run counter to that principle.
Several years ago a commerce pro
fessor, John Evans, with a reputation as
an excellent teacher, was denied tenure
because he had not done enough
research. And later, a popular fine arts
professor, Brad Collins, was also denied
tenure.
Information revealed by The Ubyssey
then, showed that if teaching ability was
as important as claimed, these professors would have been given tenure.
Erich Vogt, administration vice-
president for faculty and student affairs,
claims students are not the best judges
of whether a professor should receive
tenure.
But if teaching ability is considered an
essential element of tenure decisions,
who but students are better equipped to
judge a professor's teaching qualifications? Nobody.
Currently, tenure decisions are usually
made by a standing committee of the
department or faculty concerned.
The committee is composed of senior
professors and their decision is ratified
by the department head and then the
faculty dean. The tenure appointments
are then rubber-stamped by the board of
governors.
At no point in the system are students
allowed input, except in the form of
teaching evaluations collected by some
faculties and departments.
In the interests of basing tenure decisions on reliable information, the university should encourage student participation.
The university and students suffer if
important decisions such as tenure are
made without the most complete information available.
Students offer a perspective in these
deliberations which cannot be acquired
by reading reams of faculty questionnaires.
For the university's sake, students
must be consulted when these decisions
are made.
>feS SIR... 0>l HUJ...COMICTEPF0K
PEFRAUP«slC( THE GOVERNMENT af
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Active reps rare
Despite the multitude of problems
Canadian students face, we are still
plagued by ineffectual student politicians.
There are too few politicians who
deserve their posts and too many more
who run for election merely to get an attractive item placed on a job resume.
As a result, The Ubyssey frequently
quotes certain politicians and not
others, as is pointed out in a letter today
by law student Dean Neumann.
A shortage of newspaper staffers is
not the reason for student board of
governors representative Paul Sandhu's
many appearances. Rather, it is the lack
of capable student politicians which has
caused this surplus of information from
a few sources.
The fact that Sandhu is often quoted
is not a sad statement about The
Ubyssey. Instead it is a statement of the
poor quality of student representatives
at UBC.
A further problem is that much of the
Alma Mater Society's political work is
done by a few individuals. When an
issue arises which needs comment by a
student politician then the one who is involved in that particular issue is quoted.
Nothing bothers The Ubyssey more
than quoting from one source. If people
like Neumann who seem to have opinions, however misguided, would get
off their butts and get involved in student politics the problem would not exist.
Letters
Non-drug users appreciate nuclear energy
It was appalling to read your
recent issue featuring a gleeful
endorsement of the Nuclear
Regulatory Commission's,
Schlesinger-inspired shutdown of
the 2000 megawatt Seabrook fission
reactor and the dumping of nearly
8000 workers. Fortunately a
mobilization by the U.S. Building
Trades   Unions,   the   National
Association for Advancement of
Colored People (NAACP), the
Democrats and Republicans
reversed the sabotage.
Seabrook construction is back to
work. The saboteurs who stopped it
had no beef with safety, they used
procedural schemes to stop
development.
It is disturbing that harassment
THE UBYSSEY
SEPTEMBER 26, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
A one a two a three . . . Tom Hawthorn was In awful form he was very rarely stable. Chris and Mike
bocking just wouldn't stop talking they could drink you under the table. Heather Conn could outperform Steve Howard in a stable. And Richard Schreiner was a beery swine who was just as sloshed as
Wheelwright. (Sorry, Geof, your name doesn't rhyme very well.) Yes, Peter Stockland himself is particularly missed. Bill Tieleman himself was permanently pissed. Fran Maclean pf her own free will on
half a pint of sherry was particularly ill. Jeff Rankin they say, could stick it away, half a pint of whiskey
every day. Verne McDonald, Verne McDoneld was a bugger for the bottle; Bob Kreiger was fond of his
dram. And Don Maclntyre was a drunken crier "I drink, therefore I am." There's nothing Glen
Schaefer couldn't teach about the rising of the wrist. Mary-Anne Sewald is a riot when she's pissed.
campaigns by Clamshell and related
drug-saturated mobs could be
applauded for a drive to create an
energy shortage (in the name of
clams) and drive 8000 working
people out of work.
Let's get it straight. Opponents
of nuclear energy parade under
phony anti-war, anti-nuclear arms,
anti-big business banners. They are
reactionary.
It is disinformation for these
opponents of progress to claim
(along lines of the insane Baruch
and Bertrand Russell doctrines)
that stopping peaceful use of
nuclear energy will aid the laudable
aim of nuclear weapons disarmament and world peace. Just the
opposite is true. To insure South
Africa, India and Israel do not use
weapons, we must launch the most
massive third world high-
technology development policies in
human history. The New World
Economic Order. Nuclear fission
and soon fusion will be required
both for energy and training of
skilled labor and scientific cadre.
To be honest, the advocates of
"appropriate technology," or
enforced backwardness "for our
brown-skinned brothers" are the
same "liberal imperialists"
(LIMPS) who sponsor the belief
structures of the anti-technology
environmentalists.
As the NAACP's energy committee members stressed this
summer when they denounced the
attacks on Seabrook, it was
sabotaged politically, not for
environmental reasons.
Human advance, and our
urgently needed ability to turn
around Israel's threat to blow up oil
wells with nuclear arms, depend on
advanced-technology global
development and that is what
defines the urgency of nuclear
fission and fusion technology.
To non-drug users, to workers
and serious students, that is perfectly clear.
Ira Liebowitz
We shall overcome
The recent Bakke case was
followed, for obvious reasons, with
keen interest by the UBC
philosophy department. It
presented an interesting dilemma
for modern jurisprudence. But
there is a less obvious reason why
the interest of the department was
so piqued. For years the UBC
philosophy department has
followed more or less consciously, a
policy even more iniquitous than
the Davis quota system was
eventually declared to be.
In our case there is a minority
group which is favored to a far
greater extent than that minority
against whick Bakke directed his
complaint. Yes, any member of this
UBC minority is guaranteed admission to graduate school and
assured comfortable passage
through the corridors of TA's and
fellowships.   Which   then   is  the
minority so affected? Well it is a
somewhat subjectively defined
group, but basically it consists of all
slender, ravishing, female WASPS.
One of the lesser known decisions
of the Bakke case was that society
has a duty to promote disadvantaged minorities through its
ranks even where such promotion
may result in discrimination against
other sectors of society.
Members of this minority, much
more so than other females, have
been systematically excluded from
the worlds of business, politics and
above all academia.
The UBC philosophy department
(perhaps not alone) has shown itself
sensitive   to    the    needs    and
aspirations   of   this   increasingly
vocal minority. I submit that it is
much to be applauded.
SueD'Nim
grad studies Tuesday, September 26, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Paul Sandhu only voice on UBC campus?
Are there no other students on
campus with an opinion other than
Paul Sandhu? Or more precisely,
does Paul Sandhu really have intelligent opinions  on  everything?
In the first three pages of the
Sept.    15   issue,   Paul   Sandhu's
comments appeared in no less than
three articles. This in itself is no big
deal, it is the quality of his comments where the concern lies.
Memorable quotes such as "the
cutback in service is disgusting",
(re: UBC bus service slashed) or
"even though the $1.6 million is not
a surplus, education minister Pat
McGeer might perceive it as a
surplus" (re: Admin "finds" extra
money), lack any semblance of
informative content.
I think that such "wind" is an
insult to the integrity of the general
student populace. While on the rare
occasion his contentions may be
correct, he offers us little consolation as to what he plans to do in
regards to an issue or more im-
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
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NORRES
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ALSO GARAGES.
BASEMENTS & YARDS
CLEAN-UPS
Science
Elections
call for
nominations for:
1. Department reps
to the Faculty of
Science.
2. Science senator
3. Science rep to SRA
4. SUS vice-president
5. SUS public
relations officer
6. Student   rep,   committee   to   select   a
new dean of
science • OPEN TO
GRADUATE STU-
ENTS ALSO
All positions open to any
student enrolled in the
Faculty of Science.
Nominations forms
available at SUS office-rm
216 Auditorium Annex.
Deadline for receiving
nominations - Friday
Sept. 29 at 4:00 p.m.
portantly, what he thinks is a better
idea.
Surely The Ubyssey is not that
understaffed that it has to solicit
Mr. Sandhu's comments in a near
exclusive manner. We do, by the
way, have two student board
members as well as several student
senators. It is almost certain that
one of them will have well-
researched comments to make on
any given issue.
We've put up with Moe Sihota
and his barbie for years and now his
faithful understudy Paul Sandhu is
littering the pages of The Ubyssey.
Your newspaper's reputation is and
has been rather sad, it would be
foolish to perpetuate it.
Now that Paul Sandhu has officially been elected as "head yap"
I cannot help but feel nauseated
when I think that yet another year
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of student publications will be as
informative as the Lower Slob-
bovian Dictionary.
Dean Neumann
law 1
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CANADIAN ARMED FORCES Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26, 1978
'Tween classes
TODAY
HILLEL HOUSE
Standing   committee   meeting,    noon,    Hillel
House.
CITR
General meeting, noon, SUB 233.
Fifties rock n' roll revival show, 3:30 p.m. to 6:30
p.m., 95.9 fm, 650 am on campus.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
BAHA'I CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 113.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
CREATIVE/CONTEMPORARY
DANCE WORKSHOP
Open workshop, 5:00-6:30 p.m., armoury 208.
MFA THESIS PRODUCTION
Auditions for Lenore Nevermore, noon and 3:30
p.m., Dorothy Somerset Studio.
WEDNESDAY
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 200.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
International food and cultural fair,  noon and
6:30 p.m., International House.
NEWMAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
AMNESTY UBC
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 212A.
UBC LIBERALS
Speaker lona Campagnolo, SUB 207.
MFA THESIS PRODUCTION
Auditions for Lenore Nevermore, noon and 3:30
p.m., Dorothy Somerset Studio.
INTERNATIONAL SISTERHOOD
OFTRUTCHKEYITES
Toothbrush   get-together,    midnight,   Trutch
House.
THURSDAY
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 113.
PHOTOSOC
General meeting, 7:30 to 11:30 p.m., SUB 212.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Intermediate level square dancing and ballroom
dancing, 8:00 p.m., beginners' square dance
lessons, 6:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
ISLAMIC YOUTH SOCIETY
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 111.
UBC YOUNG LIBERALS
General meeting with elections, noon, SUB 215.
UBC NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 213.
UBC PROGRESSIVE
CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Luncheon social gathering, noon. Pit.
HAMSOC
General meeting, noon. Brock Hall Annex, room
358.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 209.
LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
Movie and social, 7:30 p.m., SUB 205.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Dance and organizational meeting, noon, SUB
211.
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Lecture by Chinese missionary Geoffery Bull,
noon, Angus 104.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
VARSITY MEN'S TENNIS TEAM
General meeting,  noon,  War Memorial Gym,
room 213. Advanced players interested in tryouts are urged to attend.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' UNION
Organizational   meeting,   noon,   Grad   Centre
upstairs lounge.
SFfen
General meeting, noon, SUB 216.
AQUASOC
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 212.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Speaker  from   Vancouver  Volunteer   Bureau,
noon. Woodward 3.
FRIDAY
HANG-GLIDING CLUB
Orientation meeting, noon, SUB 215.
UBC
Graduation
Portraits
since 1969
Amoyrapb   ^lutiitm iCtfi.
3343 West Broadway
732-7446
Phone now for your Free sitting
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
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MECHANICS
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AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
PHOTOSOC
GENERAL MEETING
THIS THURSDAY
7:30 p.m. — SUB 212
All Members Please Attend
New Members Welcome
VOTE FRIDAY
On Friday September 29, 1978 polls will be open
from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. for the election of one Senator-
at-Large.
Polls will be located in the following buildings:
Sedgewick Library
Buchanan
S.U.B.
MacMillan
Woodward (IRC)
GET OUT AND VOTE
FOR YOUR CHOICE!!!
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
AT THE
ROYAL BANK
the helpful bank
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
Don Routley, Manager
Brenda Flack, Senior Loans Officer
Heather Betker, Loans Officer
10th at Sasamat — 228-1141
a .J.
JW
NOTESguwes
300 TITLES AVAILABLE
LARGEST SELECTION OF REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
BETTER BUY BOOKS!
4393 W. 10th Ave.     224-4144
DOUBLE & SINGLE
ROOMS AVAILABLE
for
WOMEN IN
TOTEM PARK &
PLACE VANIER
Please inquire in the
Housing Office Ponderosa or
Call 228-2811
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 tines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial t- 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Boom 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T 1W5
5 — Coming Events
International   House
Int'l Food * Cultural Fair — Wed.,
Sept. 27, e:30 p.m. Food and cultural
presentation from 10 different
countries. Dinner served at 6:30
p.m. Tickets In advance, $3.50 Phone
228-5021. Infl Horn* Is located between the Museum of Anthropology
and Graduate Centre.
70 - Services
JAMBS BOND In The Spy Who Loved
Me" starts this Thurs. at SUB Theatre. Only $1.00.
85 — Typing
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1612, 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
11 — For Sale — Private
1965 RAMBLER WAGON. Faculty own-
ed and well maintained since new.
Radio, mounted snows, roof rack, 6
cyl., 3 spd., 88,000 miles. Just passed
city test. New muffler and tail pipe.
Good condition, 15-20 m.p.g. $500 ooo.
266-4051. Arrange for viewing on
campus.
ON CAMPUS TYPIST. Fast, accurate.
Reasonable rates. Phone 733-3690 after
6:00 pjn.
TYPINO — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
1977     MOPED     MOBILETTE     DELUXE
with helmet. Excel,   condition.  Phone
after 5 p.m., 732-8103.
1J74 DATSUN PICK-UP with canopy.
Exc. cond. $2,500 o.b.o. Size 8 Trapper
ski boots, new cond., $60 o.b.o. 163
cm. skis, Saloman 202 bindings, $40
o.b.o.  224-3694.
30 - Jobs
THE   LAW   BOARD   REVIEW   CENTRE
is seeking a Regional Director to
assist in the operation of its LSAT
review course in the Vancouver area.
Applicants should have a background
in business, law or related area, and
be available on a part-time basis
October through January. To arrange
for a personal interview during the
first week of October, please write
the: LAW BOARD REVIEW CENTRE,
Suite 330—1152 Mainland Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6B 2T9.
EXPERIENCED SECRETARY will type
essays, term papers, etc. Can transcribe from a tape recorder. 60c per
page. Phone 732-1597.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, resumes, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy, 324-9414.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING on IBM Correcting typewriter by experienced
secretary. 224-1567.
90 - Wanted
URGENT: Readers needed for blind
student. Helps if reader has own
Cassette-Recorder but not compulsory.
Will pay $3.25 per hour. Contact: R.
Hogle,   224-1261,   2-A6   So.   Gage   Res.
Ill HELP  GREENPEACE   HELP I I I
Sellers urgently needed for the
Greenpeace "Go Anvwhere" lottery.
Make money! Save life! 2108 West 4th
Ave., Vancouver, V6K 1N6.  738-0321.
WANTED — Used Calculator. Prefer
programmable HP25 or similar. Phone
988-7394 evenings.
99 — Miscellaneous
UBC DANCE CLUB — Professional
lessons start week of Oct. 3. Payment
on or before this date. Beginners lessons and further information — weekdays, 12:30, SUB Ballroom.
DR. ED O'BRIEN
is pleased to announce
the opening of his practice
of Dentistry at
4433 W. 10th Avenue,
Phone 224-1520
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Tuesday, September 26, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 7
SPORTS
Super soccer Huskies beat UBC
By DON MacINTYRE
"Just bloody super," screamed
the ecstatic University of
Saskatchewan head soccer coach
Chris Gillott, after his Huskies
downed the UBC Thunderbirds 3-0
in Canada West University Athletic
Association action Friday at
Thunderbird Stadium.
The sled-dog drubbing of the
'Birds marked coach Gillott's first
ever win over the hometown side.
"I'm really proud of the boys, it's
their best effort in a long imte,"
offered Gillott.
Despite being out-played for
much of the first half Saskatchewan
opened the scoring at the 37-minute
mark. The goal, scored by forward
Roger Ng, came after teammate
Herb Maretzki stole the ball from a
UBC mid fielder and fed the ball up
to the breaking Ng who made no
mistake popping the ball in on the
short side.
The 'Birds had many opportunities to even the score in the
first half but were unable to put the
ball past the Husky goalkeeper. The
half ended with UBC on the short
end of a 1-0 score.
Grid 'Birds slide
in weekend trip
The UBC Thunderbirds' hopes
of attaining their second Western
Intercollegiate Football League
road victory of the season were
unceremoniously crushed 34-16 by
the University of Alberta Golden
Bears Saturday in Edmonton.
The superior size of Alberta's
offensive and defensive lines
proved to be too much for the
'Birds to handle. It was not that the
Thunderbirds played that poorly, it
was merely a case of the Golden
Bears playing that well.
Alberta halfback Sean Kehoe
scored two touchdowns, while
fullback Martin Pardell and split
end Lee McFadden added the other
majors. Place kicker Marco Cyncar
shipped on two field goals, two
converts and a pair of punt singles.
UBC scoring came on two first-
half touchdown tosses that saw
quarterback Dan Smith hit tight
end Chris Davies and wide receiver
Barry Muis.  Other 'Bird  scoring
came from the foot of Gary Metz,
who converted one touchdown and
added a field goal.
The Bears rolled up 506 yards of
total, offense and were led by
quarterback Dan McDermid who
was 14 for 21 and 201 yards while
halfback Sean Kehoe topped all
ground gainers with 111 yrds.
UBC's record stands at 2-2 good
for a share of second place with
Alberta now 2-1. In other Canada
West action the first place
University of Calgary Dinosaurs,
rated number two in the country,
dropped their first game of the
season 15-10 to the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies in
Saskatoon.
The Thunderbirds face. those
same Huskies Saturday at Thunderbird Stadium. In their last
meeting the 'Birds came away 48-7
winners, but the game is still a must
win for UBC if they hope to stay in
contention for a playoff birth.
One
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The UBC side went from bad to
worse in the second half, a half
characterized by sloppy play.
Bright spots would have to include
the play of Saskatchewan centre
forward Maretzki who set up his
team's first goal and scored the
second himself. His goal was the
result of a hard drive from the left
side of the box 20 minutes into the
second half.
Defensively the visitors played
extremely well, led by 32-year-old
defender Klass Post who constantly
thwarted UBC threats, allowing
them few opportunities inside the
18-yard box.
At the other end of the field, the
Huskies attacked well in the latter
stages. Their aggressive mid field
play led to the third and final tally
of the afternoon. The goal was
scored by Ian Pike, who split the
defense after being fed a beautiful
lead pass through the middle.
UBC head coach Joe Johnson
was obviously disappointed with his
team's effort, but was quick to add
that one game does not a season
make. "We had the early opportunities but didn't capitalize.
That's when I realized we were in
trouble. No matter what you do
you can't win if you don't score."
After playing the University of
Victoria to a 2-2 draw in Victoria
the night before, the team was
tired, but that is not an excuse.
Saskatchewan also had to go back-
to-back, because they travelled to
Victoria Saturday to take on the
Vikings.
The formation of the new leagut
this season makes the back-to-back
series necessary on road swings. But
now Western universities face each
other on a regular season basis, as
opposed to meeting in a Canada
West wind-up tournament.
Despite the loss Johnson still
feels his T-Birds, along with
Victoria, are the teams to beat in
the West this year.
When questioned about a
possible meeting with cross-town
Simon Fraser University the coach
replied that the two teams would
indeed meet sometime after
Christmas.
Johnson sees the two teams as
being close competitively, in spite
of Simon Fraser's success across the
line.
Coach Johnson sees his team as
much improved over last year,
claiming that their goal-scoring
potential is far superior, though
noting his team was kept off the
score sheet in Friday's contest.
Potential is the key word for the
'Birds this year. But with the experience of 13-year coach Johnson,
an ex-first division player with the
Glascow Rangers himself, the
Thunderbirds should be near the
top.
UBC next travels down south for
a scheduled seven-game road trip
beginning Oct. 30 in Denver and
ending with a tournament held at
Brigham Young University in Salt
Lake on Oct. 6-7. The coach is
hoping the trip will perk up his
team before they return to league
play Oct. 13 to take on the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs at
Thunderbird Stadium.
Jock Shorts
In First Division rugby action
played over the weekend it was the
UBC Thunderbirds over the
Vancouver Kats 36-6. But the
Vancouver Rowing Club, who last
week defeated the UBC side, kept
one step ahead by drubbing the
Trojans 22-0.
*        * *
First Division men's field hockey
saw the Thunderbirds down the
Falcons 3-1, while the junior varsity
women's side defeated Vancouver
'Lomas Two 2-0.
The real story in field hockey this
weekend    was    UBC's    varsity
women's team, who took first place
in a tournament played in Calgary.
* * *
In other Canadian college
football action over the weekend it
was perennial powerhouse Acadia
University over St. Mary's 34-13.
Last year's Canadian champions,
the Western Ontario University
Mustangs, were upset by the
University of Windsor 34-27.
In another Ontario meeting the
University of Toronto lost to Sir
Wilfred Laurier University 31-16.
T* .   EXHIBITION
'^^P • r^c CIMC   ADT  nDIMTC
OF FINE ART PRINTS
SPONSORED BY
AMS
Art Gallery
featuring the works of Chagall, Dali, Matisse,
Breughel, Cezanne, Van Gogh,
Homer, Klee, Monet, Magritte, Picasso, Miro,
Bosch, Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Wyeth ,
Gauguin, Rembrandt.   Group of Seven,  Blish
and others.
PRICES
. LARGE   PRINTS
$3.50ea3for$8.50
SMALL   PRINTS
$1.75 ^ 3F0R$4.5O
DME Sept. 18-29 (excl. wk..end)
TIME 9 qm- - 5 P m- SPECIAL FEATURE:
PLACE Art Gallery — Australian Art and
Union Bldg. MX. Escher
Over 1200 differenf prints Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 26, 1978
Job search demands high cards
From page 1
they may spend much more time
with another, he says.
An undecided student can receive
information about jobs, salaries,
possible locations and available
employment opportunities, he
adds.
"We're here to serve both of
these types. We're here for the
average graduate."
Chew says the establishment of
the office is a challenge, because the
staff has been expected to take over
a service which the university alone
provided for a number of years.
This is a time of high unemployment and there are more
graduating students than jobs to
fill, he adds.
Unitl this year the student services office carried out both
counselling and placement of
graduates and it still retains the
mandate for career counselling.
Aptitude and personality tests can
Gov't cut hurts Uof M
WINNIPEG (CUP) — Student
leaders, faculty and administrators
are criticizing Manitoba premier
Sterling Lyon for his announcement that the province
intends to continue its fiscal
restraint program.
In a recent speech delivered to the
Winnipeg Canadian club Lyon
warned that tight financial
situations will continue for post-
secondary education, health services and school divisions.
Last year Manitoba's universities
received the lowest percentage
budget increase of any universities
in Canada. Manitoba students
faced tuition increases as high as 20
per cent this year.
There have been  reductions  in
staff, courses, and supplies at all
three Manitoba universities.
John Finaly, U of M Faculty
Association president, said it was
not certain whether the province
can withstand such high restraints
on post-secondary education.
"Others have made the point that
quality in education is not a tap that
can be turned on and off at will.
The type of damage that is going to
be done will take years to repair,"
he said.
Students union president Steve
Ashton said the government appeared to have a "totally naive and
misinformed attitude towards
university."
He said he hoped student activities would convince the
government of the importance of
university funding.
be taken there, and students can
talk to psychologists to determine
which types of careers best suit
them.
But for employment information
and contact with employers
students now go to the employment
centre.
"We're here as a band-aid. But
we won't spoon-feed any students.
For that student who's willing to be
mobile, to conduct a thorough
search, not just at six places, he's
going to get a job.
"By next week there will be a full
list of who's coming to give interviews, and students can find out
about employment trends. We will
prepare pamphlets on preparing
resumes, conducting appropriate
job searches, and taking interviews."
Interviewing past and present
UBC graduates begins Oct. 30 and
continues with a Christmas break
until Mar. 30.
Of the 400 employers approached
this year, 80 have shown interest in
UBC grads, says Chew. A staff of
nine is preparing for the fall
recruitment and preparing a file
system of about 500 companies, to
explain the companies' operations
and help students apply directly to
them.
Chew says although his staff is
not as large as he would like, it has
already contacted  twice   as   many
mmELWSBMEm
'Pack up our troubles in your old kit bag.
companies as student services did
last year.
"One or two interviews won't get
a job," Chew says. "We're
promoting a rational way of getting
a job. We keep track of employers
that come (to campus) and students
can supplement that with their own
outside search."
The office allows students to
keep track of employers' needs. If a
company such as a chartered bank
decides not to register with Canada
Employment but hires from direct
applications,then the student can,
with that knowledge, send his
application directly  to  the bank.
Chew adds that most jobs are still
filled   through   personal   contacts.
He says this year's program is
intended to reach out to the
office about employers coming to
campus, and says they should
register with the office if they plan
to talk with employers.
The office can then tell employers what the grads have to
offer, he adds.
Students can also register for
part-time work during the winter
session.
The office has tried to get in
touch with undergraduate and
faculty employment information
representatives, because some
employers like to have pre-
interview briefings.
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JlbbLES m> WILL NOT LEAVE THE KING'S SlbE.
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AfTERMARDS,
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